Date   

Translation help #romania

Sandra Burne <sburne@...>
 

I was wondering if some could possibly help me with the translation
into English of the following Romanian text found on photos of memorial
stones
belonging to some relatives (location unknown):

1.Aci se odihneste scumpul si deuitaiul nostru sot si tata. Vois Miselest
la
14 mai 1945. Lacrimile noastre nu vor seca niciodata

2. In urma uhui accident

Many thanks
Sandra Burne
The Netherlands


Romania SIG #Romania Translation help #romania

Sandra Burne <sburne@...>
 

I was wondering if some could possibly help me with the translation
into English of the following Romanian text found on photos of memorial
stones
belonging to some relatives (location unknown):

1.Aci se odihneste scumpul si deuitaiul nostru sot si tata. Vois Miselest
la
14 mai 1945. Lacrimile noastre nu vor seca niciodata

2. In urma uhui accident

Many thanks
Sandra Burne
The Netherlands


Re: Bavaria is a B I G place [but not as big as it once was] #germany

Roger Lustig <trovato@...>
 

Our MODERATOR wrote:

MODERATOR NOTE: Parts of the present day Land of Baden Wuertemberg were once
part of the Kingdom of Bavaria. Your ancestors may have called "Bavaria" their
native land but Baden Wuerttemberg is located far to the west of
the present day state of Bavaria (Land Bayern). For a simple map of Germany
illustrating this fact write to gersig@aol.com with "send map of German states"
as your subject line. MOD1 =========>
Actually, not much of today's Baden-Wuerttemberg was Bavarian--and
"Baden-Wuerttemberg is far to the west of Bavaria" isn't quite accurate
either, since the two Laender are adjacent. Bavaria's large holding in
the west was the Palatinate, or Pfalz in German, which is now the
southern part of the Land of Rheinland-Pfalz.

To be sure, Wuerttemberg and Bavaria are light-years apart in *attitude*...

Roger Lustig Princeton, NJ <trovato@verizon.net>

MODERATOR NOTE: Thanks to Roger for this important correction. Our website
contains links to a number of Historic maps of Germany. Check the map that best
matches your ancestor's date of emmigration at:
http://www.jewishgen.org/GerSIG/resources.htm#maps


German SIG #Germany Re: Bavaria is a B I G place [but not as big as it once was] #germany

Roger Lustig <trovato@...>
 

Our MODERATOR wrote:

MODERATOR NOTE: Parts of the present day Land of Baden Wuertemberg were once
part of the Kingdom of Bavaria. Your ancestors may have called "Bavaria" their
native land but Baden Wuerttemberg is located far to the west of
the present day state of Bavaria (Land Bayern). For a simple map of Germany
illustrating this fact write to gersig@aol.com with "send map of German states"
as your subject line. MOD1 =========>
Actually, not much of today's Baden-Wuerttemberg was Bavarian--and
"Baden-Wuerttemberg is far to the west of Bavaria" isn't quite accurate
either, since the two Laender are adjacent. Bavaria's large holding in
the west was the Palatinate, or Pfalz in German, which is now the
southern part of the Land of Rheinland-Pfalz.

To be sure, Wuerttemberg and Bavaria are light-years apart in *attitude*...

Roger Lustig Princeton, NJ <trovato@verizon.net>

MODERATOR NOTE: Thanks to Roger for this important correction. Our website
contains links to a number of Historic maps of Germany. Check the map that best
matches your ancestor's date of emmigration at:
http://www.jewishgen.org/GerSIG/resources.htm#maps


Re: Name of a shtetl SE of Lodz, Poland #general

Alexander Sharon
 

"Lee Nydell" < lnydell@gmail.com > wrote

Looking for the correct spelling of a Shtetl that is thought to be SE
of Lodz, Poland, that might be spelled something like "Tommechef".

Can anyone suggest what the correct spelling might be.

Hi

It's Tomaszow Mazowiecki.
--
Regards,

Alexander Sharon
JGFF editor


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Name of a shtetl SE of Lodz, Poland #general

Alexander Sharon
 

"Lee Nydell" < lnydell@gmail.com > wrote

Looking for the correct spelling of a Shtetl that is thought to be SE
of Lodz, Poland, that might be spelled something like "Tommechef".

Can anyone suggest what the correct spelling might be.

Hi

It's Tomaszow Mazowiecki.
--
Regards,

Alexander Sharon
JGFF editor


To new subscribers and a reminder to all subscribers #scandinavia

Elsebeth Paikin
 

Dear Scandinavia-Genners,

Although I sent this reminder in January, I take the liberty
of sending it again, as there are a number of new subscribers
to this mailing list.

A particular welcome to the many new subscribers.
I hope that you will find help and the information you want.
Likewise I hope that other subscribers to this list will
learn something >from you. And most of all: I hope that you
will find relatives or someone who is researching the same
names and/or places that you are, so that you can exchange
information and perhaps work together.

However, in order to get the most out of your subscription
it is *absolutely necessary* that you write to the discussion
group and introduce yourself and your research to the other
subscribers. If you do not write to the list, you cannot
expect to get any help or information, because this list is
not as some of the other JewishGen mailing lists where there
are many messages each day (so you can just read and learn).

The Scandinavia SIG mailing list does not have many messages
each week, so you have to take active part and present yourself.

Some have replied that they don't know how or what to write!

I therefore give you an example below (which of course can be
much longer, should you so desire). Pleaes NOTE that the more
common the surname the more important it is to write as much
as you know about your ancestor! If you write that you want
"information about COHN in Denmark" I guarantee that nobody
will answer you. If you write that you want "information
about Aron Salomon COHN (1845-1906) in Copenhagen" then you
will give other Scandinavia-Genners a reasonable possibility
of finding information for you - and you can rely on getting
some replies!

* ******************************
* Example (the names are fictitious):
* --------
* Subject: INTRO - researching SAMSON and COHN
*
* I am new to this list and hope that this group will help to
* bring some light or new ideas in researching my family history...
*
* I do not know much about my ancestors, among them are:
*
* Simon Aron SAMSON was born in 1810 in Copenhagen,
* son of Aron SAMSON and Sara COHN/COHEN, and he died
* in 1856 in Copenhagen.
*
* I would be thankful for any suggestions how to find
* more information.
*
* Thanking you in anticipation
*
* Best regards,
*
* "signnature, town, country"
* ******************************

All my best wishes for good results

Elsebeth Paikin, President
Jewish Genealogical Society of Denmark:
http://www.jewishgen.org/jgs-denmark/
&
SIG Coordinator and webmaster:
JewishGen's Scandinavia SIG
http://www.jewishgen.org/scandinavia/
mailto:elsebeth@paikin.dk


Scandinavia SIG #Scandinavia To new subscribers and a reminder to all subscribers #scandinavia

Elsebeth Paikin
 

Dear Scandinavia-Genners,

Although I sent this reminder in January, I take the liberty
of sending it again, as there are a number of new subscribers
to this mailing list.

A particular welcome to the many new subscribers.
I hope that you will find help and the information you want.
Likewise I hope that other subscribers to this list will
learn something >from you. And most of all: I hope that you
will find relatives or someone who is researching the same
names and/or places that you are, so that you can exchange
information and perhaps work together.

However, in order to get the most out of your subscription
it is *absolutely necessary* that you write to the discussion
group and introduce yourself and your research to the other
subscribers. If you do not write to the list, you cannot
expect to get any help or information, because this list is
not as some of the other JewishGen mailing lists where there
are many messages each day (so you can just read and learn).

The Scandinavia SIG mailing list does not have many messages
each week, so you have to take active part and present yourself.

Some have replied that they don't know how or what to write!

I therefore give you an example below (which of course can be
much longer, should you so desire). Pleaes NOTE that the more
common the surname the more important it is to write as much
as you know about your ancestor! If you write that you want
"information about COHN in Denmark" I guarantee that nobody
will answer you. If you write that you want "information
about Aron Salomon COHN (1845-1906) in Copenhagen" then you
will give other Scandinavia-Genners a reasonable possibility
of finding information for you - and you can rely on getting
some replies!

* ******************************
* Example (the names are fictitious):
* --------
* Subject: INTRO - researching SAMSON and COHN
*
* I am new to this list and hope that this group will help to
* bring some light or new ideas in researching my family history...
*
* I do not know much about my ancestors, among them are:
*
* Simon Aron SAMSON was born in 1810 in Copenhagen,
* son of Aron SAMSON and Sara COHN/COHEN, and he died
* in 1856 in Copenhagen.
*
* I would be thankful for any suggestions how to find
* more information.
*
* Thanking you in anticipation
*
* Best regards,
*
* "signnature, town, country"
* ******************************

All my best wishes for good results

Elsebeth Paikin, President
Jewish Genealogical Society of Denmark:
http://www.jewishgen.org/jgs-denmark/
&
SIG Coordinator and webmaster:
JewishGen's Scandinavia SIG
http://www.jewishgen.org/scandinavia/
mailto:elsebeth@paikin.dk


Schedule for IAJGS Conference 2006 #danzig #gdansk #germany #poland

Elsebeth Paikin
 

The preliminary schedule for the IAJGS Conference being held at
the New York Marriott Marquis >from Sunday, August 13th to Friday,
August 18th is now on-line and can be accessed at the Conference
website www.jgsny2006.org using the =93Conference Program=94 link on
the left side of the home page. It is an exciting program of
lectures and computer workshops.

The schedule continues to evolve as we attempt to meet the needs
of our lecturers. You may wonder why certain lecturers who you
are sure will be making presentations are not on the list of
speakers. Only those speakers who have submitted their signed
Speaker=92s Agreement are included in the list of speakers.
There are many more lectures to come. When you click on the
lecture title on the Lectures pages, the lecture abstract will
open up in a separate pop-up on your screen. When you click on
the speaker=92s name, the speaker=92s biography will appear. In many
cases you will be able to see a photograph of the speaker.
It is possible to search for lectures by topic using the pull down
menu under =93Session Topic.=94

You may want to change your browser settings to allow pop-ups for
this site. This page is continuously evolving and new speakers are
being added daily, so check back often.

Subscribe to the Conference Mailing List at JewishGen.
Please note that you must be a registered JewishGen user in order
to subscribe.

We have speakers coming >from many countries, including Australia,
the Czech Republic, France, Germany, Great Britain, Hungary, Israel,
Italy, Lithuania, Poland, Ukraine, the US and Uzbekistan. There will
be a comprehensive set of hands-on computer labs teaching everything
from genealogical applications of Excel and PowerPoint to accessing
JewishGen databases. We will have a large number of lectures on
Sephardic genealogy, a series of lectures focusing on Russian genealogy
to assist the large Russian =E9migr=E9 population in New York, panels on
cemetery restoration in our shtetlekh, genealogy education, genetics
and genealogy and travel for the genealogist and many lectures from
archivists for New York City repositories and repositories in the nations
from which our ancestors emigrated. Dr. Neville Lamdan, the Director of the
new International Institute for Jewish Genealogy in Jerusalem will speak.

We have an ambitious program scheduled and we believe this will be the most
international conference so far. We look forward to seeing you there.

Seating in each of the computer labs is limited to 25 people and they are
filling up. We urge you to register NOW for the Conference at
http://www.jgsny2006.org/registration.cfm

Gloria Berkenstat Freund
2006 IAJGS Conference Program Committee Chair


Danzig/Gedansk SIG #Danzig #Gdansk #Germany #Poland Schedule for IAJGS Conference 2006 #danzig #gdansk #germany #poland

Elsebeth Paikin
 

The preliminary schedule for the IAJGS Conference being held at
the New York Marriott Marquis >from Sunday, August 13th to Friday,
August 18th is now on-line and can be accessed at the Conference
website www.jgsny2006.org using the =93Conference Program=94 link on
the left side of the home page. It is an exciting program of
lectures and computer workshops.

The schedule continues to evolve as we attempt to meet the needs
of our lecturers. You may wonder why certain lecturers who you
are sure will be making presentations are not on the list of
speakers. Only those speakers who have submitted their signed
Speaker=92s Agreement are included in the list of speakers.
There are many more lectures to come. When you click on the
lecture title on the Lectures pages, the lecture abstract will
open up in a separate pop-up on your screen. When you click on
the speaker=92s name, the speaker=92s biography will appear. In many
cases you will be able to see a photograph of the speaker.
It is possible to search for lectures by topic using the pull down
menu under =93Session Topic.=94

You may want to change your browser settings to allow pop-ups for
this site. This page is continuously evolving and new speakers are
being added daily, so check back often.

Subscribe to the Conference Mailing List at JewishGen.
Please note that you must be a registered JewishGen user in order
to subscribe.

We have speakers coming >from many countries, including Australia,
the Czech Republic, France, Germany, Great Britain, Hungary, Israel,
Italy, Lithuania, Poland, Ukraine, the US and Uzbekistan. There will
be a comprehensive set of hands-on computer labs teaching everything
from genealogical applications of Excel and PowerPoint to accessing
JewishGen databases. We will have a large number of lectures on
Sephardic genealogy, a series of lectures focusing on Russian genealogy
to assist the large Russian =E9migr=E9 population in New York, panels on
cemetery restoration in our shtetlekh, genealogy education, genetics
and genealogy and travel for the genealogist and many lectures from
archivists for New York City repositories and repositories in the nations
from which our ancestors emigrated. Dr. Neville Lamdan, the Director of the
new International Institute for Jewish Genealogy in Jerusalem will speak.

We have an ambitious program scheduled and we believe this will be the most
international conference so far. We look forward to seeing you there.

Seating in each of the computer labs is limited to 25 people and they are
filling up. We urge you to register NOW for the Conference at
http://www.jgsny2006.org/registration.cfm

Gloria Berkenstat Freund
2006 IAJGS Conference Program Committee Chair


Schedule for IAJGS Conference in New York 2006 #scandinavia

Elsebeth Paikin
 

26th Annual IAJGS International Conference on Jewish Genealogy
New York City August 13-18, 2006
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

The preliminary schedule for the IAJGS Conference being held at
the New York Marriott Marquis >from Sunday, August 13th to Friday,
August 18th is now on-line and can be accessed at the Conference
website www.jgsny2006.org using the =93Conference Program=94 link on
the left side of the home page. It is an exciting program of
lectures and computer workshops.

The schedule continues to evolve as we attempt to meet the needs
of our lecturers. You may wonder why certain lecturers who you
are sure will be making presentations are not on the list of
speakers. Only those speakers who have submitted their signed
Speaker=92s Agreement are included in the list of speakers.
There are many more lectures to come. When you click on the
lecture title on the Lectures pages, the lecture abstract will
open up in a separate pop-up on your screen. When you click on
the speaker=92s name, the speaker=92s biography will appear. In many
cases you will be able to see a photograph of the speaker.
It is possible to search for lectures by topic using the pull down
menu under =93Session Topic.=94

You may want to change your browser settings to allow pop-ups for
this site. This page is continuously evolving and new speakers are
being added daily, so check back often.

Subscribe to the Conference Mailing List at JewishGen.
Please note that you must be a registered JewishGen user in order
to subscribe.

We have speakers coming >from many countries, including Australia,
the Czech Republic, France, Germany, Great Britain, Hungary, Israel,
Italy, Lithuania, Poland, Ukraine, the US and Uzbekistan. There will
be a comprehensive set of hands-on computer labs teaching everything
from genealogical applications of Excel and PowerPoint to accessing
JewishGen databases. We will have a large number of lectures on
Sephardic genealogy, a series of lectures focusing on Russian genealogy
to assist the large Russian =E9migr=E9 population in New York, panels on
cemetery restoration in our shtetlekh, genealogy education, genetics
and genealogy and travel for the genealogist and many lectures from
archivists for New York City repositories and repositories in the nations
from which our ancestors emigrated. Dr. Neville Lamdan, the Director of the
new International Institute for Jewish Genealogy in Jerusalem will speak.

We have an ambitious program scheduled and we believe this will be the most
international conference so far. We look forward to seeing you there.

Seating in each of the computer labs is limited to 25 people and they are
filling up. We urge you to register NOW for the Conference at
http://www.jgsny2006.org/registration.cfm

Gloria Berkenstat Freund
2006 IAJGS Conference Program Committee Chair


Scandinavia SIG #Scandinavia Schedule for IAJGS Conference in New York 2006 #scandinavia

Elsebeth Paikin
 

26th Annual IAJGS International Conference on Jewish Genealogy
New York City August 13-18, 2006
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

The preliminary schedule for the IAJGS Conference being held at
the New York Marriott Marquis >from Sunday, August 13th to Friday,
August 18th is now on-line and can be accessed at the Conference
website www.jgsny2006.org using the =93Conference Program=94 link on
the left side of the home page. It is an exciting program of
lectures and computer workshops.

The schedule continues to evolve as we attempt to meet the needs
of our lecturers. You may wonder why certain lecturers who you
are sure will be making presentations are not on the list of
speakers. Only those speakers who have submitted their signed
Speaker=92s Agreement are included in the list of speakers.
There are many more lectures to come. When you click on the
lecture title on the Lectures pages, the lecture abstract will
open up in a separate pop-up on your screen. When you click on
the speaker=92s name, the speaker=92s biography will appear. In many
cases you will be able to see a photograph of the speaker.
It is possible to search for lectures by topic using the pull down
menu under =93Session Topic.=94

You may want to change your browser settings to allow pop-ups for
this site. This page is continuously evolving and new speakers are
being added daily, so check back often.

Subscribe to the Conference Mailing List at JewishGen.
Please note that you must be a registered JewishGen user in order
to subscribe.

We have speakers coming >from many countries, including Australia,
the Czech Republic, France, Germany, Great Britain, Hungary, Israel,
Italy, Lithuania, Poland, Ukraine, the US and Uzbekistan. There will
be a comprehensive set of hands-on computer labs teaching everything
from genealogical applications of Excel and PowerPoint to accessing
JewishGen databases. We will have a large number of lectures on
Sephardic genealogy, a series of lectures focusing on Russian genealogy
to assist the large Russian =E9migr=E9 population in New York, panels on
cemetery restoration in our shtetlekh, genealogy education, genetics
and genealogy and travel for the genealogist and many lectures from
archivists for New York City repositories and repositories in the nations
from which our ancestors emigrated. Dr. Neville Lamdan, the Director of the
new International Institute for Jewish Genealogy in Jerusalem will speak.

We have an ambitious program scheduled and we believe this will be the most
international conference so far. We look forward to seeing you there.

Seating in each of the computer labs is limited to 25 people and they are
filling up. We urge you to register NOW for the Conference at
http://www.jgsny2006.org/registration.cfm

Gloria Berkenstat Freund
2006 IAJGS Conference Program Committee Chair


Re: Inheritance vs. Testing #dna

lfarber@...
 

On 2006.02.28, Danielle James <daniandw@chariot.net.au> wrote:

Can someone please explain if a female can trace female DNA from
both father and mother lineage? I have been told that females can
only trace through their mother's line.

As my mother was non-Jewish and my father Jewish (both parents) what
would my situation be if I wished a DNA tracing. Would it show any
of the "Jewish" DNA?
Danielle,

In general, our DNA is a mixture of "genes" >from our mother and our
father. It is difficult to separate out their individual contributions
to our genetic make-up.

There are two exceptions. The male inherits a Y-chromosome >from his
father. This is unique and provides a direct way to trace a male line.
The other exception is the mitochondria. All cells have large numbers
of mitochondria which contain their own DNA, called mtDNA. When an
ovum is fertilized, the sperm cell's mitochondria are lost and only
the maternal mitochondria are passed on. This provides a direct way
to trace a female line.

In your situation, you got half of your DNA >from your father -- but
none that can be directly traced in the way you want. You would have
to rely upon analysis of relatives on your father's side. His siblings
would have the same mtDNA as your father did and his brothers would
also share his Y-chromosomal DNA. Your next potential source would be
first cousins. Those related through your father's sisters would share
his mtDNA and your male first cousins related through your father's
brothers would share his Y-chromosomal DNA.

You can trace through more distant cousins if you can trace a direct
male descent or a direct female descent.

There really isn't any "Jewish" DNA, but there are certain inherited
patterns that are more common among Jews and some that are rare or
unknown in Jewish populations, Analysis of your father's family (your
uncles, aunts and/or cousins) might provide the information your are
interested in obtaining.

I hope this answers your questions.

Len Farber
Oak Park, IL


DNA Research #DNA Re: Inheritance vs. Testing #dna

lfarber@...
 

On 2006.02.28, Danielle James <daniandw@chariot.net.au> wrote:

Can someone please explain if a female can trace female DNA from
both father and mother lineage? I have been told that females can
only trace through their mother's line.

As my mother was non-Jewish and my father Jewish (both parents) what
would my situation be if I wished a DNA tracing. Would it show any
of the "Jewish" DNA?
Danielle,

In general, our DNA is a mixture of "genes" >from our mother and our
father. It is difficult to separate out their individual contributions
to our genetic make-up.

There are two exceptions. The male inherits a Y-chromosome >from his
father. This is unique and provides a direct way to trace a male line.
The other exception is the mitochondria. All cells have large numbers
of mitochondria which contain their own DNA, called mtDNA. When an
ovum is fertilized, the sperm cell's mitochondria are lost and only
the maternal mitochondria are passed on. This provides a direct way
to trace a female line.

In your situation, you got half of your DNA >from your father -- but
none that can be directly traced in the way you want. You would have
to rely upon analysis of relatives on your father's side. His siblings
would have the same mtDNA as your father did and his brothers would
also share his Y-chromosomal DNA. Your next potential source would be
first cousins. Those related through your father's sisters would share
his mtDNA and your male first cousins related through your father's
brothers would share his Y-chromosomal DNA.

You can trace through more distant cousins if you can trace a direct
male descent or a direct female descent.

There really isn't any "Jewish" DNA, but there are certain inherited
patterns that are more common among Jews and some that are rare or
unknown in Jewish populations, Analysis of your father's family (your
uncles, aunts and/or cousins) might provide the information your are
interested in obtaining.

I hope this answers your questions.

Len Farber
Oak Park, IL


Re: Family Surname Mysteries #general

Suzanne Silk Klein <shoshana32@...>
 

Linda Shefler wrote:
How could he legally change his name before
becoming a citizen?
I think that formalities were much less formal then. I know that my
father changed his name in the 1920's long before he became a citizen.


Suzanne Silk Klein


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Family Surname Mysteries #general

Suzanne Silk Klein <shoshana32@...>
 

Linda Shefler wrote:
How could he legally change his name before
becoming a citizen?
I think that formalities were much less formal then. I know that my
father changed his name in the 1920's long before he became a citizen.


Suzanne Silk Klein


Re: What Gurburnia is Shpola in? #ukraine

Naomi Fatouros
 

On Mar 1, 2006, at 3:24 PM, danielle freedman wrote:

Hi can someone please advise me what Gurburnia Shpola is in please?
I have located my ELMAN family >from Shpola shetl Berdichev & would
like to know which region this is in the Ukraine and if so what
information is avaliable for research purposes.

Thanks,

DANIELLE HAMPSON
ELMAN (UKRAINE) Uman, Talnoye, Odessa
Ms. Hampson can find some of the informatiuon she seeks about Shpola at:

http://www.nytimes.com/2006/02/26/nyregion/thecity/26gall.html?
pagewanted=2

According to:

http://www.movinghere.org.uk/galleries/roots/jewish/country/ukraine3.htm

Jewish records for Shpola were microilmed by the LDS in Cherkasy in
1996-97.

For more information bout Shpola Ms. Hampson should look at the
Columbia LIppincott Gazetteer, and Miriam Weiner's "Jewish Roots in
Ukraine and Moldova. "' The Gazetteer should be available in most US
libraries and Weiner's books in any good Universitiy library.

Naomi Fatouros (nee FELDMAN)
Bloomington, Indiana
NFatouros@aol.com
BELKOWSKY,BIELKOWSKY, BILKOWSKI, Odessa,St. Petersburg,Berdichev,
Kiev;ROTHSTEIN, Kremenchug;FRASCH,Kiev;LIBERMAN,Moscow;FELDMAN, Pinsk;
SCHUTZ, RETTIG, WAHL, Shcherets;LEVY, WEIL, Mulhouse; SAS/
SASS,Podwolochisk;
RAPOPORT, Tarnopol, Podwolochisk, Radomysl?; BEHAM, Salok, Kharkov;
WOLPIANSKY, Ostryna.


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine Re: What Gurburnia is Shpola in? #ukraine

Naomi Fatouros
 

On Mar 1, 2006, at 3:24 PM, danielle freedman wrote:

Hi can someone please advise me what Gurburnia Shpola is in please?
I have located my ELMAN family >from Shpola shetl Berdichev & would
like to know which region this is in the Ukraine and if so what
information is avaliable for research purposes.

Thanks,

DANIELLE HAMPSON
ELMAN (UKRAINE) Uman, Talnoye, Odessa
Ms. Hampson can find some of the informatiuon she seeks about Shpola at:

http://www.nytimes.com/2006/02/26/nyregion/thecity/26gall.html?
pagewanted=2

According to:

http://www.movinghere.org.uk/galleries/roots/jewish/country/ukraine3.htm

Jewish records for Shpola were microilmed by the LDS in Cherkasy in
1996-97.

For more information bout Shpola Ms. Hampson should look at the
Columbia LIppincott Gazetteer, and Miriam Weiner's "Jewish Roots in
Ukraine and Moldova. "' The Gazetteer should be available in most US
libraries and Weiner's books in any good Universitiy library.

Naomi Fatouros (nee FELDMAN)
Bloomington, Indiana
NFatouros@aol.com
BELKOWSKY,BIELKOWSKY, BILKOWSKI, Odessa,St. Petersburg,Berdichev,
Kiev;ROTHSTEIN, Kremenchug;FRASCH,Kiev;LIBERMAN,Moscow;FELDMAN, Pinsk;
SCHUTZ, RETTIG, WAHL, Shcherets;LEVY, WEIL, Mulhouse; SAS/
SASS,Podwolochisk;
RAPOPORT, Tarnopol, Podwolochisk, Radomysl?; BEHAM, Salok, Kharkov;
WOLPIANSKY, Ostryna.


Re: seeking Roman JAKOBOWITZ and general 20th c. queries #germany #poland #danzig #gdansk

Logan J. Kleinwaks
 

Moshe Yaakobi asked how to find information about his uncle Roman
JAKOBOWITZ, a barber, and his family, who were living in Danzig
before and around 1932. First, a response to this specific query,
and then a general reply about sources concerning Jews who lived
in Danzig in the 20th century other than vital records.

Searching for "Jakobowitz" in location "Danzig" in the Shoah Victims'
Database at http://www.yadvashem.org returns a few hits.

Since you know the occupation of your uncle, it is easy to look for him
in Danzig business directories. If you find him, you will learn a year
when he lived in Danzig and at what street address. Near the end of the
Resources webpage on our SIG website http://www.jewishgen.org/danzig,
you can find links to sources of online Danzig business directories.
The latest computer-searchable directory is >from 1930, and the earliest
non-computer-searchable directory is >from 1938. I checked the 1930
directory for you, but did not find any JAKOBOWITZes (or similar) in
the "hairdressers" section ("Fryzjerzy" in Polish), nor any JAKOBOWITZes
(or similar) of any occupation in Danzig. (You can, however, find many
JAKOBOWICZes elsewhere in Poland in the directory.)

Since you state a specific day, Jan. 25 1932, when your uncle was last
heard from, it seems plausible that you have a letter >from him, which
might contain his street address. If so, you might want to search the
computer-searchable directories by his street address. This could
reveal the names of other people living at the same address at different
times, who (or, more likely, whose descendants) might know something
additional about your uncle. It is impractical to manually search these
business directories by street address, since they are not indexed by
street address, but the computer search at http://www.kalter.org/search
should yield results in a minute or less (to search by street address,
use the "Regular" search option there and include Polish characters).

You might also be lucky and actually find your uncle when searching by
street address, even though you cannot find him when searching by his
name, because the search engine is not 100% accurate and might have made
a mistake interpreting his name.

General comments follow.

Separate >from these business directories, and much more importantly,
an enormous amount of documentation survives for the Danzig Jewish
Community during the 20th century, including the 1930s, as part of the
Archives of the Jewish Community of Danzig at the Central Archives for
the History of the Jewish People (CAHJP) in Jerusalem. CAHJP has
prepared an online inventory of this material, to which you can find a
link in the Resources section of our SIG website. This inventory is
written in German, so, if you are not fluent, you might want to use an
online free computer translation service (many major search engines
offer such a service). If you have not explored this inventory, I
strongly advise you to do so.

There are many items in this inventory that could help you in such a
search, besides vital records. For example, you might check the
community membership lists, the annual records of allocation of the
synagogues' seats, and income tax lists. If you are researching people
involved in the administration of the community, you might want to
examine the many items dealing with synagogue finances, election of
officials, hiring of rabbis, etc. If you are researching students,
there are class lists for various religious schools. During the 20th
century, there were many Jewish organizations in Danzig, and records of
some of these (some including membership lists) are also present in this
collection. If you are researching a prominent member of the community,
you might even find him mentioned individually in the inventory. This
is just a small part of the material available >from the 20th century
(and there is also material dating back to the early 18th century).

Currently, to utilize this material, you will have to visit CAHJP in
Jerusalem. If you might be able to visit and examine the Danzig
collection, please contact me privately before doing so. The SIG is
looking for volunteers to examine these documents, and any amount of
time volunteered will be helpful.

Best regards,

Logan Kleinwaks
Coordinator, JewishGen Danzig/Gdansk SIG
kleinwaks@alumni.princeton.edu
near Washington, D.C.


Danzig/Gedansk SIG #Danzig #Gdansk #Germany #Poland Re: seeking Roman JAKOBOWITZ and general 20th c. queries #danzig #gdansk #germany #poland

Logan J. Kleinwaks
 

Moshe Yaakobi asked how to find information about his uncle Roman
JAKOBOWITZ, a barber, and his family, who were living in Danzig
before and around 1932. First, a response to this specific query,
and then a general reply about sources concerning Jews who lived
in Danzig in the 20th century other than vital records.

Searching for "Jakobowitz" in location "Danzig" in the Shoah Victims'
Database at http://www.yadvashem.org returns a few hits.

Since you know the occupation of your uncle, it is easy to look for him
in Danzig business directories. If you find him, you will learn a year
when he lived in Danzig and at what street address. Near the end of the
Resources webpage on our SIG website http://www.jewishgen.org/danzig,
you can find links to sources of online Danzig business directories.
The latest computer-searchable directory is >from 1930, and the earliest
non-computer-searchable directory is >from 1938. I checked the 1930
directory for you, but did not find any JAKOBOWITZes (or similar) in
the "hairdressers" section ("Fryzjerzy" in Polish), nor any JAKOBOWITZes
(or similar) of any occupation in Danzig. (You can, however, find many
JAKOBOWICZes elsewhere in Poland in the directory.)

Since you state a specific day, Jan. 25 1932, when your uncle was last
heard from, it seems plausible that you have a letter >from him, which
might contain his street address. If so, you might want to search the
computer-searchable directories by his street address. This could
reveal the names of other people living at the same address at different
times, who (or, more likely, whose descendants) might know something
additional about your uncle. It is impractical to manually search these
business directories by street address, since they are not indexed by
street address, but the computer search at http://www.kalter.org/search
should yield results in a minute or less (to search by street address,
use the "Regular" search option there and include Polish characters).

You might also be lucky and actually find your uncle when searching by
street address, even though you cannot find him when searching by his
name, because the search engine is not 100% accurate and might have made
a mistake interpreting his name.

General comments follow.

Separate >from these business directories, and much more importantly,
an enormous amount of documentation survives for the Danzig Jewish
Community during the 20th century, including the 1930s, as part of the
Archives of the Jewish Community of Danzig at the Central Archives for
the History of the Jewish People (CAHJP) in Jerusalem. CAHJP has
prepared an online inventory of this material, to which you can find a
link in the Resources section of our SIG website. This inventory is
written in German, so, if you are not fluent, you might want to use an
online free computer translation service (many major search engines
offer such a service). If you have not explored this inventory, I
strongly advise you to do so.

There are many items in this inventory that could help you in such a
search, besides vital records. For example, you might check the
community membership lists, the annual records of allocation of the
synagogues' seats, and income tax lists. If you are researching people
involved in the administration of the community, you might want to
examine the many items dealing with synagogue finances, election of
officials, hiring of rabbis, etc. If you are researching students,
there are class lists for various religious schools. During the 20th
century, there were many Jewish organizations in Danzig, and records of
some of these (some including membership lists) are also present in this
collection. If you are researching a prominent member of the community,
you might even find him mentioned individually in the inventory. This
is just a small part of the material available >from the 20th century
(and there is also material dating back to the early 18th century).

Currently, to utilize this material, you will have to visit CAHJP in
Jerusalem. If you might be able to visit and examine the Danzig
collection, please contact me privately before doing so. The SIG is
looking for volunteers to examine these documents, and any amount of
time volunteered will be helpful.

Best regards,

Logan Kleinwaks
Coordinator, JewishGen Danzig/Gdansk SIG
kleinwaks@alumni.princeton.edu
near Washington, D.C.