Date   

Re: foto studios/website #germany

Christopher Massur <cmassur@...>
 

Martin.Conitzer@t-online.de (Martin Conitzer) provided a SITE CITE to:
http://db.genealogy.net/fotostudios
The website (in German )gives details about historic photographic studios in
Germany. ============>

The list is a growing effort it seems. Already quite a lot of German towns
and photographers or studios can be found. You can see details of their
logos and sometimes also an actual picture. This info helps identifying the
style and / or timeframe [of old photographs]. I saw that also some photographers
in Swiss towns are mentioned. I put it right a way on my favorites list, because
with the help of more contributors this can grow out to be a major data-base.

Even though the information is in German, it does not matter, because the main
thing is to locate the names of photographers or the town they worked in.

Christopher Massur, Curaçao, NA <cmassur@hotmail.com>


German SIG #Germany re: foto studios/website #germany

Christopher Massur <cmassur@...>
 

Martin.Conitzer@t-online.de (Martin Conitzer) provided a SITE CITE to:
http://db.genealogy.net/fotostudios
The website (in German )gives details about historic photographic studios in
Germany. ============>

The list is a growing effort it seems. Already quite a lot of German towns
and photographers or studios can be found. You can see details of their
logos and sometimes also an actual picture. This info helps identifying the
style and / or timeframe [of old photographs]. I saw that also some photographers
in Swiss towns are mentioned. I put it right a way on my favorites list, because
with the help of more contributors this can grow out to be a major data-base.

Even though the information is in German, it does not matter, because the main
thing is to locate the names of photographers or the town they worked in.

Christopher Massur, Curaçao, NA <cmassur@hotmail.com>


German-Jewish genealogy programs at the IAJGS Conference in August #germany

Renee Steinig <rsteinig@...>
 

Have you registered yet to attend the Jewish Genealogy Conference in New
York, August 13 to 18? If not, what are you waiting for? The "early bird"
deadline is May 15 (www.jgsny2006.org/registration.cfm).

On behalf of the Conference committee, I would like to point out some of the
lectures that are of special interest to those with German-Jewish roots:

James Bauer (Session #103)
Meet the "Cesters" -- Making Friends and Researching Family
in Three Small German Towns: Ernsbach, Nagelsberg and Furfeld

Karen Franklin (Session #116)
Embalmers on the Range: Tracking the Winter Family

Karen Franklin (Session #404)
The Leo Baeck Institute

Simone Eick (Session #242)
Research Work at the German Emigration Center, Bremerhaven, Germany

Roger Lustig (Session #352)
Vital Records in Prussian Poland: Getting the Whole Picture

Fritz Neubauer (Session #310)
Genealogical Information in Memorial Books >from Germany

For descriptions of these and and almost 200 more programs that will be
offered at the Conference, see www.jgsny2006.org/sessions.cfm .

To register for the Conference go to www.jgsny2006.org/registration.cfm
You can sign up for the GerSIG lunch (Monday, Aug. 14) on the registration
form.

To subscribe to the NY2006 Conference mailing list, follow the links at
www.jgsny2006.org/list_serve_directions.cfm .

Hope to see you at the New York Marriott Marquis in August!

Renee Stern Steinig Dix Hills, New York, USA renee@jgsny2006.org


German SIG #Germany German-Jewish genealogy programs at the IAJGS Conference in August #germany

Renee Steinig <rsteinig@...>
 

Have you registered yet to attend the Jewish Genealogy Conference in New
York, August 13 to 18? If not, what are you waiting for? The "early bird"
deadline is May 15 (www.jgsny2006.org/registration.cfm).

On behalf of the Conference committee, I would like to point out some of the
lectures that are of special interest to those with German-Jewish roots:

James Bauer (Session #103)
Meet the "Cesters" -- Making Friends and Researching Family
in Three Small German Towns: Ernsbach, Nagelsberg and Furfeld

Karen Franklin (Session #116)
Embalmers on the Range: Tracking the Winter Family

Karen Franklin (Session #404)
The Leo Baeck Institute

Simone Eick (Session #242)
Research Work at the German Emigration Center, Bremerhaven, Germany

Roger Lustig (Session #352)
Vital Records in Prussian Poland: Getting the Whole Picture

Fritz Neubauer (Session #310)
Genealogical Information in Memorial Books >from Germany

For descriptions of these and and almost 200 more programs that will be
offered at the Conference, see www.jgsny2006.org/sessions.cfm .

To register for the Conference go to www.jgsny2006.org/registration.cfm
You can sign up for the GerSIG lunch (Monday, Aug. 14) on the registration
form.

To subscribe to the NY2006 Conference mailing list, follow the links at
www.jgsny2006.org/list_serve_directions.cfm .

Hope to see you at the New York Marriott Marquis in August!

Renee Stern Steinig Dix Hills, New York, USA renee@jgsny2006.org


Mt. Hebron Cemetery, Flushing, Queens NY #general

Shelly Crane
 

Hello to all,

Is there anyone willing to go to Mt. Hebron Cemetery in Flushing, Queens NY,
to take pictures of some headstones?

The address of the cemetery is:
130-04 Horace Harding Expressway
Flushing, NY 11367

I would go myself, but live well over 1000 miles away!

Please email me privately for a list of names and grave locations.

Thank you!

Shelly Crane
USA
Names I am researching:
Ukraine: BERMAN, BLAS, BLEKHMAN, CHOLODENKO, DICKTER, FELDMAN, FISCHLER,
GITERMAN, GLASS, KVACHINSKIJ, KWAIT, LEFELMAN, LIPOVETSKY, MEZHERITZKY,
OSCHERANKO, PETROVSKI, SELDMAN, SHAPIRA, SHIFFMAN, TAMOUR, TITKOV, WEXLER,
ZEISLER Streshin, Mogilev (gub), Belarus: GUTIN


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Mt. Hebron Cemetery, Flushing, Queens NY #general

Shelly Crane
 

Hello to all,

Is there anyone willing to go to Mt. Hebron Cemetery in Flushing, Queens NY,
to take pictures of some headstones?

The address of the cemetery is:
130-04 Horace Harding Expressway
Flushing, NY 11367

I would go myself, but live well over 1000 miles away!

Please email me privately for a list of names and grave locations.

Thank you!

Shelly Crane
USA
Names I am researching:
Ukraine: BERMAN, BLAS, BLEKHMAN, CHOLODENKO, DICKTER, FELDMAN, FISCHLER,
GITERMAN, GLASS, KVACHINSKIJ, KWAIT, LEFELMAN, LIPOVETSKY, MEZHERITZKY,
OSCHERANKO, PETROVSKI, SELDMAN, SHAPIRA, SHIFFMAN, TAMOUR, TITKOV, WEXLER,
ZEISLER Streshin, Mogilev (gub), Belarus: GUTIN


Re: Jewish Tradition an First Names #general

Sally Bruckheimer <sallybru@...>
 

It depends on the Jews' ancestry. Sephardi and western European Ashkenazi
*do* name their kids after the grandparents, living or dead: first
son(daughter) named after the father's father (mother), second son(daughter)
named after the mother's father (mother). Two brothers would name their
first sons Geoffrey if their father was Geoffrey (or similar sounding
Yiddish/Hebrew name)-even if he was living.

Eastern European Ashkenazi don't name kids after living people. Two
Geoffrey's might be named after a recently deceased older Geoffrey (or
similar sounding Yiddish/Hebrew name).

Sally Bruckheimer
Bridgewater, NJ

"I've always understood that it was Jewish tradition not to name children
after living relatives. Someone just mentioned to me that this isn't the
case for particularly orthodox families."


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Jewish Tradition an First Names #general

Sally Bruckheimer <sallybru@...>
 

It depends on the Jews' ancestry. Sephardi and western European Ashkenazi
*do* name their kids after the grandparents, living or dead: first
son(daughter) named after the father's father (mother), second son(daughter)
named after the mother's father (mother). Two brothers would name their
first sons Geoffrey if their father was Geoffrey (or similar sounding
Yiddish/Hebrew name)-even if he was living.

Eastern European Ashkenazi don't name kids after living people. Two
Geoffrey's might be named after a recently deceased older Geoffrey (or
similar sounding Yiddish/Hebrew name).

Sally Bruckheimer
Bridgewater, NJ

"I've always understood that it was Jewish tradition not to name children
after living relatives. Someone just mentioned to me that this isn't the
case for particularly orthodox families."


Re: Jewish Tradition an First Names #general

Ben Forman <ben.forman@...>
 

Hi Genners

yesterday I wrote:

Until this week I thought that the Sephardi tradition was to name for
the grandparents in a certain order, whether they were living or dead,
but I read in the latest issue of a magazine dealing with Jewish
culture that after 1492 the Sephardic Jews of Morocco had different
naming traditions depending on whether they descended >from Berber/
mountain villages or >from the Spanish mainland. I will get more detail
on this when I get home tonight.
.........................

to expand on this the article (approximately)

New arrivals in Morocco after the expulsion of 1492 were known as
Megorashim (the banished), the native Jews were Toshavim. The two
communities separated themselves for 450 years, and until recently the
most Megorashim communities spoke HakMtia a mixture of Spanish,
Hebrew and an Arabic Dialect......

...amongst the Toshavim a boy is always named after the grandfather even
if he is still alive, where asamongst the Megorashim a child is never
named after a living relative.
.........................
If the moderator will allow me to mention the name of the magazine, which
I previously found out about through this list, more info can be found at
http://www.jewishrenaissance.org.uk/index2.htm
I have no financial interest in this magazine.

Shabbat shalom
Ben Forman
Manchester UK

searching: BERNSTEIN/WEINER: Ylakai, CAHN/WOLF: Koeln; FURMAN: Kaluszyn;
GEVER: Daugavpils; SAWADY: Zavadi,Posen; STILLMAN: Pilica/Czestechowa


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen RE: Jewish Tradition an First Names #general

Ben Forman <ben.forman@...>
 

Hi Genners

yesterday I wrote:

Until this week I thought that the Sephardi tradition was to name for
the grandparents in a certain order, whether they were living or dead,
but I read in the latest issue of a magazine dealing with Jewish
culture that after 1492 the Sephardic Jews of Morocco had different
naming traditions depending on whether they descended >from Berber/
mountain villages or >from the Spanish mainland. I will get more detail
on this when I get home tonight.
.........................

to expand on this the article (approximately)

New arrivals in Morocco after the expulsion of 1492 were known as
Megorashim (the banished), the native Jews were Toshavim. The two
communities separated themselves for 450 years, and until recently the
most Megorashim communities spoke HakMtia a mixture of Spanish,
Hebrew and an Arabic Dialect......

...amongst the Toshavim a boy is always named after the grandfather even
if he is still alive, where asamongst the Megorashim a child is never
named after a living relative.
.........................
If the moderator will allow me to mention the name of the magazine, which
I previously found out about through this list, more info can be found at
http://www.jewishrenaissance.org.uk/index2.htm
I have no financial interest in this magazine.

Shabbat shalom
Ben Forman
Manchester UK

searching: BERNSTEIN/WEINER: Ylakai, CAHN/WOLF: Koeln; FURMAN: Kaluszyn;
GEVER: Daugavpils; SAWADY: Zavadi,Posen; STILLMAN: Pilica/Czestechowa


Finding an original Jewish family name #general

david nathan <d.nathan1@...>
 

Hi Genners,

Nick Rich asked:

<<What is my best hope of trying to find out their original surname? Is it
possible to find passenger lists? They were Jews and came into the UK with
their parents when they were children sometime around 1870.>>

I would also be interested in this subject for my wife and I have been
struggling to find my wife's ancestors who, we believe, came >from Grodno,
Belarus. They came to the UK around 1902 with a baby in arms, the first of
their subsequent seven children, of whom my father-in-law was the youngest,
born 1917. His father could not speak any English and was taught on the boat
to tell the immigration officers that he was "a freed man >from Russia".
Legend has it that the officer responded:"Welcome to England Mr Freedman".

Thereafter there was no discussion in the family about their origins. The
mantra was "New country, new name, new life." All very admirable, but where
does that leave us today?

I have been fortunate to discover that my grandmother-in-law's maiden name
was Betsy Steingart and that, 15 years after coming to England, her husband
was still unable to write his name in English! We have a photograph, taken
in Grodno (>from the photographer's name and address on the back) which we
suspect could be the parents of one of the couple. We date this, >from their
mode of dress as around 1899-1902 and it could be a keepsake >from their
parents.

Anyone have any suggestions of a route through this brick wall?

David Nathan, London, England, researching FREEDMAN and STEINGART, from
Grodno.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Finding an original Jewish family name #general

david nathan <d.nathan1@...>
 

Hi Genners,

Nick Rich asked:

<<What is my best hope of trying to find out their original surname? Is it
possible to find passenger lists? They were Jews and came into the UK with
their parents when they were children sometime around 1870.>>

I would also be interested in this subject for my wife and I have been
struggling to find my wife's ancestors who, we believe, came >from Grodno,
Belarus. They came to the UK around 1902 with a baby in arms, the first of
their subsequent seven children, of whom my father-in-law was the youngest,
born 1917. His father could not speak any English and was taught on the boat
to tell the immigration officers that he was "a freed man >from Russia".
Legend has it that the officer responded:"Welcome to England Mr Freedman".

Thereafter there was no discussion in the family about their origins. The
mantra was "New country, new name, new life." All very admirable, but where
does that leave us today?

I have been fortunate to discover that my grandmother-in-law's maiden name
was Betsy Steingart and that, 15 years after coming to England, her husband
was still unable to write his name in English! We have a photograph, taken
in Grodno (>from the photographer's name and address on the back) which we
suspect could be the parents of one of the couple. We date this, >from their
mode of dress as around 1899-1902 and it could be a keepsake >from their
parents.

Anyone have any suggestions of a route through this brick wall?

David Nathan, London, England, researching FREEDMAN and STEINGART, from
Grodno.


Re: Russian village converting to Judaism - several sources 77 #general

Schelly Talalay Dardashti
 

Dear Genners,

Sorry for the length of this message, but there are some really fascinating
sources out there on Russians converting to Judaism, along with some name lists.
This is not an exhaustive list, but those who are interested can follow links to
links to links!

Google turns up a March 22, 2005 story >from JTA on the Subbotniks-Subbotniki-
Subbotnicki of the remote Russian town of Vysoki. They are descended from
peasants who converted to Judaism abut 200 years ago. In fact, in May 2005,
Israel brought 20 of these families to Bet Shemesh in Israel.

Interesting article on
http://www.jewishencyclopedia.com/view.jsp?artid=1146&letter=S

Geographical localities include: up until 1820, Voronej, Orel, Moscow, Tula and
Saratof, and later deported those who openly identified to Caucasus,
Transcaucasia, and Irkutsk, Tobolsk, Yeniseisk in Siberia. Alexander I gave them
more freedom, but during his reign Russian clergy killed (in Moghilef/Mohilev,
now Belarus), 100 Subbotniki and their spiritual leaders.

For a list of 80 Subbotniks buried in the Home of Peace Cemetery on Whittier
Blvd in Los Angeles, California, go to
http://www.molokane.org/subbotniki/America/cemetery/index.html

These are the names (23 variations on 15 names):
Aldacushion Andrews (= Androff) Androff Androw Bagdanov Bagdanoff Bogdanoff
Druginin Hall (= Holovachoff) Moiseve Moisser (= Moiseve) Patapoff Pivaroff
Pivavaroff Pivovorof Plujnkoff Pluss (= Plujnkoff) Potopoff Povovarof Slivkoff
Urenn Urkov Uroff

http://www.molokane.org/subbotniki/index.html is an extensive resource of many
articles organized geographically, including the Jews in Armenia and "the
People of the Sabbath" who were relocated there in 1730s >from Tambov, Saratov
and Voronezh to build their own town of Yelenovka, now Sevan, on Lake Sevan.

A Belarus connection: Kosachevka, Rodion and Kostyukovka, Yekaterina: villages
once in Belarus,Mogilovskaya Oblast, Klimovicheskiye Rayon. Now in Russia,
Smolenskaya oblast Roslavl Rayon, and a website of an israeli descendant of one
of these families (AGEYEV)

http://www.molokane.org/subbotniki/America/Kramer.html for a discussion of
Subbotnik community in Los Angeles, burials and rabbis who ministered to the
community. Mentions a 1913 newspaper article describing a community of "30
families of Caucasian Jews" regarded as something of a "lost tribe." Subbotniki
of Boyle Heights. Mentions also journalist Albert Parry visited some in the
1920s, who reported they used accents and inflections of the Central Russian
moujik (peasant).

Some family names: PIVOVAROFF, POTAPOFF, YURIN, YURKOFF. In cemetery, burials
for GREGORIEF, KONNOFF, BAGDANOV, UROV AND PIVOVAROFF noted also by the
journalist. The community said that they came >from Transcaucasia, but their
ancestors were >from Tamboff [Tambov] and Voronezh provinces, and that they had
been exiled because the ancestors refused to eat bacon, worship icons or accept
Greek Orthodox priests.

Also in the Azerbaijan village of Privolnoe, there are two communities of
converts, one called Gerim (ger=convert) and also a community of Subbotniks. This
I believe was written about in either Midstream or Commentary.

I also seem to remember >from a corner of my memory a photographic essay of this
community (could it have been National Geographic?). There is also a story about
70 Molokan families converting to Judaism in Saratov before 1925.

www.shavei.org, which is involved in saving remote Jewish communities as well
as "lost" communities, has the JTA story.

www.kulanu.org/russia/subbotnicki.html
"A Crash Course on the Subbotniki" Article by Anne Herschman in Kulanu,
Volume 9, Number 3, Autumn 2002, page 13. (PDF)

For information on Subbotniks in Israel, see also:
http://www.jafi.org.il/education/noar/live98/groups/sites/dubrovin.htm

The Dubrovin family, to Eretz Israel in 1903, were originally Russian nobility
Christians living near Azerbaijan border with Iran, on the shores of Volga
river. Observed Shabbat, as Subbotniks, and officially converted to Judaism.
The parents, Yoav and Rachel (conversion names) joined the Petah Tikva settlers,
and were joined in 1905, by 13 more family members. Calledindustrious,
courageous, strong, highly esteemed by neighbors; moved to Beit Gan near
Yavniel, working as coachmen between Haifa and the Galilee settlements. In 1907,
bought 650 dunams near Yesud haMa'alah and built farm, but were struck by
malaria (3 sons and a son-in-law died). Father Yoav died on their farm age
104. Last family member was Yitzhak who gave the farm to the Jewish National
Fund, which, in 1986, restored and opened it to the public in 1986.

You will also see references to Molokans (milkmen), named because they ate dairy
on fast days when this was forbidden by church, according to various articles.

There's lots more out there :-)

With best wishes,

Schelly Talalay Dardashti
Tel Aviv


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Russian village converting to Judaism - several sources 77 #general

Schelly Talalay Dardashti
 

Dear Genners,

Sorry for the length of this message, but there are some really fascinating
sources out there on Russians converting to Judaism, along with some name lists.
This is not an exhaustive list, but those who are interested can follow links to
links to links!

Google turns up a March 22, 2005 story >from JTA on the Subbotniks-Subbotniki-
Subbotnicki of the remote Russian town of Vysoki. They are descended from
peasants who converted to Judaism abut 200 years ago. In fact, in May 2005,
Israel brought 20 of these families to Bet Shemesh in Israel.

Interesting article on
http://www.jewishencyclopedia.com/view.jsp?artid=1146&letter=S

Geographical localities include: up until 1820, Voronej, Orel, Moscow, Tula and
Saratof, and later deported those who openly identified to Caucasus,
Transcaucasia, and Irkutsk, Tobolsk, Yeniseisk in Siberia. Alexander I gave them
more freedom, but during his reign Russian clergy killed (in Moghilef/Mohilev,
now Belarus), 100 Subbotniki and their spiritual leaders.

For a list of 80 Subbotniks buried in the Home of Peace Cemetery on Whittier
Blvd in Los Angeles, California, go to
http://www.molokane.org/subbotniki/America/cemetery/index.html

These are the names (23 variations on 15 names):
Aldacushion Andrews (= Androff) Androff Androw Bagdanov Bagdanoff Bogdanoff
Druginin Hall (= Holovachoff) Moiseve Moisser (= Moiseve) Patapoff Pivaroff
Pivavaroff Pivovorof Plujnkoff Pluss (= Plujnkoff) Potopoff Povovarof Slivkoff
Urenn Urkov Uroff

http://www.molokane.org/subbotniki/index.html is an extensive resource of many
articles organized geographically, including the Jews in Armenia and "the
People of the Sabbath" who were relocated there in 1730s >from Tambov, Saratov
and Voronezh to build their own town of Yelenovka, now Sevan, on Lake Sevan.

A Belarus connection: Kosachevka, Rodion and Kostyukovka, Yekaterina: villages
once in Belarus,Mogilovskaya Oblast, Klimovicheskiye Rayon. Now in Russia,
Smolenskaya oblast Roslavl Rayon, and a website of an israeli descendant of one
of these families (AGEYEV)

http://www.molokane.org/subbotniki/America/Kramer.html for a discussion of
Subbotnik community in Los Angeles, burials and rabbis who ministered to the
community. Mentions a 1913 newspaper article describing a community of "30
families of Caucasian Jews" regarded as something of a "lost tribe." Subbotniki
of Boyle Heights. Mentions also journalist Albert Parry visited some in the
1920s, who reported they used accents and inflections of the Central Russian
moujik (peasant).

Some family names: PIVOVAROFF, POTAPOFF, YURIN, YURKOFF. In cemetery, burials
for GREGORIEF, KONNOFF, BAGDANOV, UROV AND PIVOVAROFF noted also by the
journalist. The community said that they came >from Transcaucasia, but their
ancestors were >from Tamboff [Tambov] and Voronezh provinces, and that they had
been exiled because the ancestors refused to eat bacon, worship icons or accept
Greek Orthodox priests.

Also in the Azerbaijan village of Privolnoe, there are two communities of
converts, one called Gerim (ger=convert) and also a community of Subbotniks. This
I believe was written about in either Midstream or Commentary.

I also seem to remember >from a corner of my memory a photographic essay of this
community (could it have been National Geographic?). There is also a story about
70 Molokan families converting to Judaism in Saratov before 1925.

www.shavei.org, which is involved in saving remote Jewish communities as well
as "lost" communities, has the JTA story.

www.kulanu.org/russia/subbotnicki.html
"A Crash Course on the Subbotniki" Article by Anne Herschman in Kulanu,
Volume 9, Number 3, Autumn 2002, page 13. (PDF)

For information on Subbotniks in Israel, see also:
http://www.jafi.org.il/education/noar/live98/groups/sites/dubrovin.htm

The Dubrovin family, to Eretz Israel in 1903, were originally Russian nobility
Christians living near Azerbaijan border with Iran, on the shores of Volga
river. Observed Shabbat, as Subbotniks, and officially converted to Judaism.
The parents, Yoav and Rachel (conversion names) joined the Petah Tikva settlers,
and were joined in 1905, by 13 more family members. Calledindustrious,
courageous, strong, highly esteemed by neighbors; moved to Beit Gan near
Yavniel, working as coachmen between Haifa and the Galilee settlements. In 1907,
bought 650 dunams near Yesud haMa'alah and built farm, but were struck by
malaria (3 sons and a son-in-law died). Father Yoav died on their farm age
104. Last family member was Yitzhak who gave the farm to the Jewish National
Fund, which, in 1986, restored and opened it to the public in 1986.

You will also see references to Molokans (milkmen), named because they ate dairy
on fast days when this was forbidden by church, according to various articles.

There's lots more out there :-)

With best wishes,

Schelly Talalay Dardashti
Tel Aviv


Looking for descendants of FINBERG and PORTNOY , Rhode Island #general

ester de-paz <edepazster@...>
 

We have recently found the graves of the Americans descendants of Shabtai
FINBERG the Rabbi of Michalishuk. In the Lincoln Park Cemetery,Warwick, in the
family lot, there are six graves:

Joseph FINBERG 5 Aug 1871 19 Aug 1945 Attleboro Ma
Jessie KALTER, his wife 10 Aug 1890 6 Mar 1942
Harry FINBERG 30 Mar 1885 17 Jul 1941 Providence RI
Sonya FINBERG, his wife 5 Dec 1890 2 Sep 1964
Edward FINBERG 28 Apr 1920 26 Jun 1969
Leanora (FINBERG) PORTNOY 2 Aug 1913 18 Apr 1971
There are still two empty graves in this lot.
I am looking for information about all the above especially the descendants of
Harry's children Edward and Leanora.
Any help would be appreciated.

Ester De Paz
Herzliya, Israel.

searching:
FINBERG,SUTZKEVER,RUBIN,MAGIDS,BEKENSHTEIN, Smorgon,Michalishuk


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Looking for descendants of FINBERG and PORTNOY , Rhode Island #general

ester de-paz <edepazster@...>
 

We have recently found the graves of the Americans descendants of Shabtai
FINBERG the Rabbi of Michalishuk. In the Lincoln Park Cemetery,Warwick, in the
family lot, there are six graves:

Joseph FINBERG 5 Aug 1871 19 Aug 1945 Attleboro Ma
Jessie KALTER, his wife 10 Aug 1890 6 Mar 1942
Harry FINBERG 30 Mar 1885 17 Jul 1941 Providence RI
Sonya FINBERG, his wife 5 Dec 1890 2 Sep 1964
Edward FINBERG 28 Apr 1920 26 Jun 1969
Leanora (FINBERG) PORTNOY 2 Aug 1913 18 Apr 1971
There are still two empty graves in this lot.
I am looking for information about all the above especially the descendants of
Harry's children Edward and Leanora.
Any help would be appreciated.

Ester De Paz
Herzliya, Israel.

searching:
FINBERG,SUTZKEVER,RUBIN,MAGIDS,BEKENSHTEIN, Smorgon,Michalishuk


JGS - Hamilton (Ontario, Canada) & Area - Wed, April 26 Meeting #courland #latvia

Ina Levitt-Yanover
 

Offered by
Jewish Genealogical Society- Hamilton & Area
Wednesday, April 26, 2006
7:30 PM to 10:00 PM
Location: Temple Anshe Sholom
215 Cline Avenue North, Hamilton, ON

Every week, people around the world suddenly discover their Jewish roots.
Peter Jassem's lecture will reveal the reasons for the involuntary loss of
Jewish identity after the war and provide examples of reconnecting to Jewish
roots, and the psychological and practical consequences thereof. Examples,
including Peter's own experiences, will illustrate the methods used to trace
one's Jewish roots and how their discovery evolved. Peter's presentation
will also encompass ways of searching for lost relatives, whether Holocaust
survivors or their descendants living under an assumed or imposed false identity.

Raised as a Christian, Peter Jassem suspected that his roots were Jewish for
some time and was able to confirm this in 1995. During the following 18
months he located 1500 names of Jewish ancestors or relatives. He became an
active board member of the JGS of Canada (Toronto) and is now on the board
of JRI-Poland, Gesher Galicia and the Canadian Foundation for Polish
Studies. Since 2002 he has served as president of the Polish-Jewish Heritage
Foundation of Canada. He has written articles for genealogical newsletters,
lectured on genealogy and participated in various projects. He was the
program chair of the 22nd IAJGS International Conference on Jewish
Genealogy, Toronto, 2002.

Please join us for this presentation Discovering Jewish Roots of People
raised as Non-Jews. Admission for non - members is $5 which will be applied
when joining in the same membership year.

Ina Levitt-Yanover
Hamilton, ON, Canada
inaly3@gmail.com
www.jgsh.org newsletter@jgsh.org

Researching:
LEVITT- Seda, Lithuania to South Africa to Paterson, New Jersey to
Hamilton, Ontario; ZICK - Libau, Latvia to South Africa
ADNO/ADLER - Riga, Latvia to South Africa & Brooklyn, New York to
Hamilton, Ontario; GRINKER - Paterson, New Jersey
SZNIFER/SHNIFER/GOLDHAR - Staszow, Poland to Toronto, Ontario & Sao
Paulo, Brazil to Hamilton, Ontario
GOLDMAN/ISMOCHOVITZ - Lomza, Poland to London (Spitalfields), England
to Hamilton, Ontario to Buffalo, New York to Hamilton
EISENSTADT/AYZENSTADT - Bobruisk, Russia to Toronto, Ontario to
Hamilton, Ontario
YANOVER - Nasielsk, Poland to Hamilton, Ontario & Chicago,
Illinois;GROSS - Kielce, Poland to Toronto & London to Hamilton,Ontario


Courland SIG #Courland #Latvia JGS - Hamilton (Ontario, Canada) & Area - Wed, April 26 Meeting #courland #latvia

Ina Levitt-Yanover
 

Offered by
Jewish Genealogical Society- Hamilton & Area
Wednesday, April 26, 2006
7:30 PM to 10:00 PM
Location: Temple Anshe Sholom
215 Cline Avenue North, Hamilton, ON

Every week, people around the world suddenly discover their Jewish roots.
Peter Jassem's lecture will reveal the reasons for the involuntary loss of
Jewish identity after the war and provide examples of reconnecting to Jewish
roots, and the psychological and practical consequences thereof. Examples,
including Peter's own experiences, will illustrate the methods used to trace
one's Jewish roots and how their discovery evolved. Peter's presentation
will also encompass ways of searching for lost relatives, whether Holocaust
survivors or their descendants living under an assumed or imposed false identity.

Raised as a Christian, Peter Jassem suspected that his roots were Jewish for
some time and was able to confirm this in 1995. During the following 18
months he located 1500 names of Jewish ancestors or relatives. He became an
active board member of the JGS of Canada (Toronto) and is now on the board
of JRI-Poland, Gesher Galicia and the Canadian Foundation for Polish
Studies. Since 2002 he has served as president of the Polish-Jewish Heritage
Foundation of Canada. He has written articles for genealogical newsletters,
lectured on genealogy and participated in various projects. He was the
program chair of the 22nd IAJGS International Conference on Jewish
Genealogy, Toronto, 2002.

Please join us for this presentation Discovering Jewish Roots of People
raised as Non-Jews. Admission for non - members is $5 which will be applied
when joining in the same membership year.

Ina Levitt-Yanover
Hamilton, ON, Canada
inaly3@gmail.com
www.jgsh.org newsletter@jgsh.org

Researching:
LEVITT- Seda, Lithuania to South Africa to Paterson, New Jersey to
Hamilton, Ontario; ZICK - Libau, Latvia to South Africa
ADNO/ADLER - Riga, Latvia to South Africa & Brooklyn, New York to
Hamilton, Ontario; GRINKER - Paterson, New Jersey
SZNIFER/SHNIFER/GOLDHAR - Staszow, Poland to Toronto, Ontario & Sao
Paulo, Brazil to Hamilton, Ontario
GOLDMAN/ISMOCHOVITZ - Lomza, Poland to London (Spitalfields), England
to Hamilton, Ontario to Buffalo, New York to Hamilton
EISENSTADT/AYZENSTADT - Bobruisk, Russia to Toronto, Ontario to
Hamilton, Ontario
YANOVER - Nasielsk, Poland to Hamilton, Ontario & Chicago,
Illinois;GROSS - Kielce, Poland to Toronto & London to Hamilton,Ontario


JGS - Hamilton (Ontario, Canada) & Area - Wed, April 26 Meeting #southafrica

Ina Levitt-Yanover
 

Offered by
Jewish Genealogical Society- Hamilton & Area
Wednesday, April 26, 2006
7:30 PM to 10:00 PM
Location: Temple Anshe Sholom
215 Cline Avenue North, Hamilton, ON

Every week, people around the world suddenly discover their Jewish roots.
Peter Jassem's lecture will reveal the reasons for the involuntary loss of
Jewish identity after the war and provide examples of reconnecting to Jewish
roots, and the psychological and practical consequences thereof. Examples,
including Peter's own experiences, will illustrate the methods used to trace
one's Jewish roots and how their discovery evolved. Peter's presentation
will also encompass ways of searching for lost relatives, whether Holocaust
survivors or their descendants living under an assumed or imposed false identity.

Raised as a Christian, Peter Jassem suspected that his roots were Jewish for
some time and was able to confirm this in 1995. During the following 18
months he located 1500 names of Jewish ancestors or relatives. He became an
active board member of the JGS of Canada (Toronto) and is now on the board
of JRI-Poland, Gesher Galicia and the Canadian Foundation for Polish
Studies. Since 2002 he has served as president of the Polish-Jewish Heritage
Foundation of Canada. He has written articles for genealogical newsletters,
lectured on genealogy and participated in various projects. He was the
program chair of the 22nd IAJGS International Conference on Jewish
Genealogy, Toronto, 2002.

Please join us for this presentation Discovering Jewish Roots of People
raised as Non-Jews. Admission for non - members is $5 which will be applied
when joining in the same membership year.

Ina Levitt-Yanover
Hamilton, ON, Canada
inaly3@gmail.com
www.jgsh.org newsletter@jgsh.org

Researching:
LEVITT- Seda, Lithuania to South Africa to Paterson, New Jersey to
Hamilton, Ontario; ZICK - Libau, Latvia to South Africa
ADNO/ADLER - Riga, Latvia to South Africa & Brooklyn, New York to
Hamilton, Ontario; GRINKER - Paterson, New Jersey
SZNIFER/SHNIFER/GOLDHAR - Staszow, Poland to Toronto, Ontario & Sao
Paulo, Brazil to Hamilton, Ontario
GOLDMAN/ISMOCHOVITZ - Lomza, Poland to London (Spitalfields), England
to Hamilton, Ontario to Buffalo, New York to Hamilton
EISENSTADT/AYZENSTADT - Bobruisk, Russia to Toronto, Ontario to
Hamilton, Ontario
YANOVER - Nasielsk, Poland to Hamilton, Ontario & Chicago,
Illinois;GROSS - Kielce, Poland to Toronto & London to Hamilton,Ontario


Hauschner Family Tree #southafrica

Helen McCaig <helenmccaig@...>
 

I am researching the Hauschner Family Tree and seek information >from any
descendants of Hermann Hauschner who emigrated to South Africa and who
might be able to help me with additional information.

My great grandparents Jacob and Friederike Hauschner (ms Schwarz) lived in
Birnbaum and Bresslau (early - mid 1800's). I have ascertained that they had
four sons Markus, Hermann (grandfather of Hermann who emigrated to South
Africa), Gustav amd Isaac (my grandfather). Their ages range >from 1837-1851
and I feel sure there must have been other children.

If anyone has information in their family tree of any other siblings and
would like to share this with me, I would be extremely grateful.

Regards

Helen P McCaig