Date   

LATKES & PONCHIKES #poland

fbussgang@...
 

We always had Ponchikes for Khanuka. <
Paczki (with a tail on the "a" and pronounced ponchki) are Polish
doughnuts -- round, no hole, a little jam in the middle and sugar on top.

Fay Bussgang
Lexington, MA

MODERATOR'S NOTE: The description of Ponichkes and Paczki sounds similar
to "sufganiyot", the fried jelly doughnuts that are very popular in Israel
to celebrate Chanukah.


JRI Poland #Poland LATKES & PONCHIKES #poland

fbussgang@...
 

We always had Ponchikes for Khanuka. <
Paczki (with a tail on the "a" and pronounced ponchki) are Polish
doughnuts -- round, no hole, a little jam in the middle and sugar on top.

Fay Bussgang
Lexington, MA

MODERATOR'S NOTE: The description of Ponichkes and Paczki sounds similar
to "sufganiyot", the fried jelly doughnuts that are very popular in Israel
to celebrate Chanukah.


Duntowicz #poland

malcolm katz <malkikatz9361@...>
 

Hello everyone

I am researching DUNTOWICZ and variations from
MLAWA,Also ALEKSANDROWICZ and variations >from the same
town.

Many thanks
Malcolm Katz

MODERATOR'S NOTE: If you have any family information, please
respond privately.




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JRI Poland #Poland Duntowicz #poland

malcolm katz <malkikatz9361@...>
 

Hello everyone

I am researching DUNTOWICZ and variations from
MLAWA,Also ALEKSANDROWICZ and variations >from the same
town.

Many thanks
Malcolm Katz

MODERATOR'S NOTE: If you have any family information, please
respond privately.




___________________________________________________________
To help you stay safe and secure online, we've developed the all new Yahoo! Security Centre. http://uk.security.yahoo.com


Coats, colours and hunting - re GRUNRUCK, GRUNROCK & GRUNHUT #poland

Celia Male <celiamale@...>
 

Norma Schaffer writes: "I have been trying for a long
time to obtain information on the surname GRUNRUCK OR
GRUENRUCK. I am not sure about the spelling of this
surname which was my paternal grandmother's maiden
name. I was given information a long time ago about
the meaning of this surname. German for "green
jacket" I did not know that this was a term used for a
"hunter". This part of the meaning was given to me by
a German neighbor of mine. My grandmother's name was
Riwcze Grunruck."

There is no more famous association of the colour
*green* with the concept of the *hunter* than in
Schubert's Song Cycle; Die Schone Mullerin - see:
http://www3.sympatico.ca/matthew.zadow/mullerin_translation.html.

The Miller tries to attract his love by dressing all
in green, as she loves the hunt; his rival in love is
a hunter.

There is also the colour "Hunting Green":
http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/uk/2274269.stm

and the traditional German children's song:
Grun, ja grun sind alle meine Kleider. Grun, ja grun
ist alles was ich hab. Darum lieb ich alles was so
grun ist; weil mein Schatz ein Jager ist.

All my clothes are green; yes green is all I have;
that is why I love green so much, because my love is a
hunter.

cf Die Schone Mullerin.

But back to GRUNRUCK - I too have searched many
databases inc. Austrian and Bohemian-Moravian sites
for GRUNRUCK and variants and have drawn a blank. The
German would be GRUNROCK [green jacket] and there are
three GRUNROCK and five GREENCOAT in the 1930 and 1850
Federal censuses respectively. The 1850 US families
appeared to originate >from England, yet mysteriously,
there are no GREEENCOAT in the UK censuses. The three
GRUNROCK appear out of the blue [or should I say "out
of the green wood"] in the 1930 US census. I cannot
access it, to find out more.

Whether the very common Jewish surname GRUNHUT has any
relationship to hunting I do not know. Robin Hood
always wore a green hat - and there is controversy
about the origin of this - freedom - hunting - his
possible Saxon ancestry?

Be that as it may, there are about 900 tragic GRUNHUT
Holocaust victims on Yad Vashem and not one GRUNROCK.
On the Austrian Holocaust database we can find
KURZROCK, KLEINROCK and SCHWARZMANTEL. Thinking
laterally, I found more JAGER [hunter] Holocaust
vicims than GRUNHUT.

We can speculate why the colour "green" stopped at the
hat. GRUNROCK sounds just as suitable a Jewish name to
me as GRUNHUT.

SCHWARZMANTEL is a name I would naturally associate
with orthodox Jews, but that also appears to be rare.
If you look up "all record types" and "all countries"
on a famous genealogical site you will find only two
[deaths] and believe it or not, I knew both of them:

Fanny SCHWARZMANTEL Oct 1989 21 Apr 1905 Leeds West
Yorkshire
Hans SCHWARZMANTEL Aug 1989 5 Sep 1901 Leeds West
Yorkshire

They were Jewish and >from Vienna; Hans was the best
friend of my Viennese uncle Dr Francis Hess, a
physician in Rochester, NY.

But look up WEISSMANTEL and there you have a veritable
bonanza.
Are they Jewish? I would not know, but I do know now
that there is some mystery about coats, colours and
Jewish family names.

Happy Holidays to everyone.

Celia Male [U.K.]


"comiser" #ukraine

Tamar Dothan <dothan-t@...>
 

Does anyone know what profession was "comiser" in Ukraine in 1920?

Thanks,

Tamar Dothan
Jerusalem


JRI Poland #Poland Coats, colours and hunting - re GRUNRUCK, GRUNROCK & GRUNHUT #poland

Celia Male <celiamale@...>
 

Norma Schaffer writes: "I have been trying for a long
time to obtain information on the surname GRUNRUCK OR
GRUENRUCK. I am not sure about the spelling of this
surname which was my paternal grandmother's maiden
name. I was given information a long time ago about
the meaning of this surname. German for "green
jacket" I did not know that this was a term used for a
"hunter". This part of the meaning was given to me by
a German neighbor of mine. My grandmother's name was
Riwcze Grunruck."

There is no more famous association of the colour
*green* with the concept of the *hunter* than in
Schubert's Song Cycle; Die Schone Mullerin - see:
http://www3.sympatico.ca/matthew.zadow/mullerin_translation.html.

The Miller tries to attract his love by dressing all
in green, as she loves the hunt; his rival in love is
a hunter.

There is also the colour "Hunting Green":
http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/uk/2274269.stm

and the traditional German children's song:
Grun, ja grun sind alle meine Kleider. Grun, ja grun
ist alles was ich hab. Darum lieb ich alles was so
grun ist; weil mein Schatz ein Jager ist.

All my clothes are green; yes green is all I have;
that is why I love green so much, because my love is a
hunter.

cf Die Schone Mullerin.

But back to GRUNRUCK - I too have searched many
databases inc. Austrian and Bohemian-Moravian sites
for GRUNRUCK and variants and have drawn a blank. The
German would be GRUNROCK [green jacket] and there are
three GRUNROCK and five GREENCOAT in the 1930 and 1850
Federal censuses respectively. The 1850 US families
appeared to originate >from England, yet mysteriously,
there are no GREEENCOAT in the UK censuses. The three
GRUNROCK appear out of the blue [or should I say "out
of the green wood"] in the 1930 US census. I cannot
access it, to find out more.

Whether the very common Jewish surname GRUNHUT has any
relationship to hunting I do not know. Robin Hood
always wore a green hat - and there is controversy
about the origin of this - freedom - hunting - his
possible Saxon ancestry?

Be that as it may, there are about 900 tragic GRUNHUT
Holocaust victims on Yad Vashem and not one GRUNROCK.
On the Austrian Holocaust database we can find
KURZROCK, KLEINROCK and SCHWARZMANTEL. Thinking
laterally, I found more JAGER [hunter] Holocaust
vicims than GRUNHUT.

We can speculate why the colour "green" stopped at the
hat. GRUNROCK sounds just as suitable a Jewish name to
me as GRUNHUT.

SCHWARZMANTEL is a name I would naturally associate
with orthodox Jews, but that also appears to be rare.
If you look up "all record types" and "all countries"
on a famous genealogical site you will find only two
[deaths] and believe it or not, I knew both of them:

Fanny SCHWARZMANTEL Oct 1989 21 Apr 1905 Leeds West
Yorkshire
Hans SCHWARZMANTEL Aug 1989 5 Sep 1901 Leeds West
Yorkshire

They were Jewish and >from Vienna; Hans was the best
friend of my Viennese uncle Dr Francis Hess, a
physician in Rochester, NY.

But look up WEISSMANTEL and there you have a veritable
bonanza.
Are they Jewish? I would not know, but I do know now
that there is some mystery about coats, colours and
Jewish family names.

Happy Holidays to everyone.

Celia Male [U.K.]


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine "comiser" #ukraine

Tamar Dothan <dothan-t@...>
 

Does anyone know what profession was "comiser" in Ukraine in 1920?

Thanks,

Tamar Dothan
Jerusalem


Jewish records in Catholic parishes #hungary

alex p miller <alex.miller@...>
 

Hello Friends,

I am still hoping to find Jewish records in Catholic parishes.

My area of research and knowledge is limited to Zemplen-Szabolcs-Bihar
area. I know that in the villages of this region the Catholics are a
small minority perhaps 15% of the population and the Catholic church is a
small one on a side street, while the 'Reformatus' on is the main thing
in the village situated in a center location. Most of the smaller
villages do not have records in the LDS catalog.

Where could the early records be? Were the catholic parishes grouped into
a larger regional one? Were there no catholic parishes in the smaller
villages and they came into existence at a later day when people started
moving around?

Based on my limited knowledge of the Hungarian history the Catholic-
Reform tug of war was a reflection of the Hungarian struggle for
independence >from Austria, Austria being the Catholic force. This battle
was most acute in the early 1700, at the time of the kuruc wars led by
count Rakoczy and the above counties were called the Rakoczy lands.
Therefore I am surmising that in this area the Reforms predominate. Any
advice?

Best Regards,

Alex Miller, Chester CO. PA
alex.miller@ juno.com


Hungary SIG #Hungary Jewish records in Catholic parishes #hungary

alex p miller <alex.miller@...>
 

Hello Friends,

I am still hoping to find Jewish records in Catholic parishes.

My area of research and knowledge is limited to Zemplen-Szabolcs-Bihar
area. I know that in the villages of this region the Catholics are a
small minority perhaps 15% of the population and the Catholic church is a
small one on a side street, while the 'Reformatus' on is the main thing
in the village situated in a center location. Most of the smaller
villages do not have records in the LDS catalog.

Where could the early records be? Were the catholic parishes grouped into
a larger regional one? Were there no catholic parishes in the smaller
villages and they came into existence at a later day when people started
moving around?

Based on my limited knowledge of the Hungarian history the Catholic-
Reform tug of war was a reflection of the Hungarian struggle for
independence >from Austria, Austria being the Catholic force. This battle
was most acute in the early 1700, at the time of the kuruc wars led by
count Rakoczy and the above counties were called the Rakoczy lands.
Therefore I am surmising that in this area the Reforms predominate. Any
advice?

Best Regards,

Alex Miller, Chester CO. PA
alex.miller@ juno.com


Re: Hungarian Latkes #hungary

rwollheim@juno.com
 

This is what my grandmother called "cherugah" except that you slit the
center and pulled one
end through before frying - it looks like a bow tie!
Latkes were never sweet - I eat mine with salt!
Rhonda Wollheim
Buffalo Grove, IL 60089
rwollheim@...

On Thu, 15 Dec 2005 19:19:23 -0500 "Daniela" <daniela@...>
writes:

Could this be a recipe for what you were talking about?I hope
everybody has
happy Chanukah!

http://www.buissink.com/en/?selectie=recepten&id=90601&titel=fanky


daniela


----- Original Message -----
From: <SGerendasy@...>
To: "H-SIG" <h-sig@...>
Sent: Wednesday, December 14, 2005 11:34 AM
Subject: Re: [h-sig] Hungarian Latkes


That's the way my mother made them too. She was >from
Ermihalyfalva. No
sugar and no sour cream. Certainly not if it was served with
meat. But
there's
another pressing question. For Hannuka she made jelly doughnuts
that
make
my mouth water thinking about them 60 years later. I think they
were
called
fank. In keeping with the proper research objectives, does
anyone have a
recipe for fank in the style of Ermihalyfalva?
Stan Gerendasy


Novaky Camp-Slovakia #hungary

Gabriela Svatos
 

A well known auction site is selling photos >from the Novaky Labour Camp in
Slovakia. The dealer appears to be in Israel. No connection...just passing
along the info.


Gabi
Gabriela Svatos
Richmond Hill, Ontario
E-mail: gsvatos@...
Business E-mail: bookstore@...
Business URL: www.abe.com/home/GSVATOS


Re: Hungarian Latkes #hungary

Stephen Schmideg <stephen@...>
 

I was born in western Hungary and I don't recall anyone eating latkes at
anytime of the year. I have a library of Hungarian Jewish and
non-Jewish cookbooks and nothing similar appears. Langos contains some
boiled potatoes, but it's a very distant cousin of latkes. I didn't
become aware of latkes until I moved to Australia and mixed with
Eastern European Jews and once I married a girl >from Poland it became a
part of my Hannuka menu. I sprinkled it with salt and my Polish in-laws
with sugar.

Stephen Schmideg
Melbourne, Australia


How about Cake Meal Pancake Latkes? #poland

sangreenb@...
 

Hello: My grandmother came >from Sniatzyn a bike ride >from Czernowitz,
Austria (now the Ukraine). Every Pesach she made latkes out of cake meal
(she used the cake meal instead of matzo meal). They came out like small
latke sized pancakes very light and golden in color.
She served them sprinkled with sugar on them. As a child I always looked
forward to her cake meal pancakes - as do my daughters, and now my
grandaughters.

My mother-in-law came >from Pukovitzi near Minsk (White Russia). She
told me they ate their potato latkes plain as they were too poor to have
sour cream.

I have enjoyed the Latke discussion - so interesting how different
localities fixed their latkes.

Genealogy research sometimes gets a bit heavy and serious and it's nice to
read about a lighter topic.

Happy Hanukkah to all.

Sandra Greenberg
Denver, CO USA
_sangreenb@... (mailto:sangreenb@...)

GREENBERG/BEN DAVID - Bivolari, near Iasi, Romania
HERMAN - Sniatzyn/Kolomea near Chernovitz, Austria
NEUBERGER - Botosani/Saveni, Romania
CHAET/CHAIT - Pukovitzi, near Minsk
LESZNIK - Golub Dobrzyn, Poland


Re: My 2 Cents on sugar in cooking #poland

hennynow
 

May I correct Judith Scarani's assumption that "...sugar was a wealthy man's
pleasure. It certainly didn't grow in Galicia--or any other part of
Poland." Sugar is derived >from beets, as well as sugar cane. So, it was a
common foodstuff in Europe.

Henriette Moëd Roth
Los Angeles, California
hennynow@...


Hungary SIG #Hungary Re: Hungarian Latkes #hungary

rwollheim@juno.com
 

This is what my grandmother called "cherugah" except that you slit the
center and pulled one
end through before frying - it looks like a bow tie!
Latkes were never sweet - I eat mine with salt!
Rhonda Wollheim
Buffalo Grove, IL 60089
rwollheim@...

On Thu, 15 Dec 2005 19:19:23 -0500 "Daniela" <daniela@...>
writes:

Could this be a recipe for what you were talking about?I hope
everybody has
happy Chanukah!

http://www.buissink.com/en/?selectie=recepten&id=90601&titel=fanky


daniela


----- Original Message -----
From: <SGerendasy@...>
To: "H-SIG" <h-sig@...>
Sent: Wednesday, December 14, 2005 11:34 AM
Subject: Re: [h-sig] Hungarian Latkes


That's the way my mother made them too. She was >from
Ermihalyfalva. No
sugar and no sour cream. Certainly not if it was served with
meat. But
there's
another pressing question. For Hannuka she made jelly doughnuts
that
make
my mouth water thinking about them 60 years later. I think they
were
called
fank. In keeping with the proper research objectives, does
anyone have a
recipe for fank in the style of Ermihalyfalva?
Stan Gerendasy


Hungary SIG #Hungary Novaky Camp-Slovakia #hungary

Gabriela Svatos
 

A well known auction site is selling photos >from the Novaky Labour Camp in
Slovakia. The dealer appears to be in Israel. No connection...just passing
along the info.


Gabi
Gabriela Svatos
Richmond Hill, Ontario
E-mail: gsvatos@...
Business E-mail: bookstore@...
Business URL: www.abe.com/home/GSVATOS


Hungary SIG #Hungary Re: Hungarian Latkes #hungary

Stephen Schmideg <stephen@...>
 

I was born in western Hungary and I don't recall anyone eating latkes at
anytime of the year. I have a library of Hungarian Jewish and
non-Jewish cookbooks and nothing similar appears. Langos contains some
boiled potatoes, but it's a very distant cousin of latkes. I didn't
become aware of latkes until I moved to Australia and mixed with
Eastern European Jews and once I married a girl >from Poland it became a
part of my Hannuka menu. I sprinkled it with salt and my Polish in-laws
with sugar.

Stephen Schmideg
Melbourne, Australia


JRI Poland #Poland How about Cake Meal Pancake Latkes? #poland

sangreenb@...
 

Hello: My grandmother came >from Sniatzyn a bike ride >from Czernowitz,
Austria (now the Ukraine). Every Pesach she made latkes out of cake meal
(she used the cake meal instead of matzo meal). They came out like small
latke sized pancakes very light and golden in color.
She served them sprinkled with sugar on them. As a child I always looked
forward to her cake meal pancakes - as do my daughters, and now my
grandaughters.

My mother-in-law came >from Pukovitzi near Minsk (White Russia). She
told me they ate their potato latkes plain as they were too poor to have
sour cream.

I have enjoyed the Latke discussion - so interesting how different
localities fixed their latkes.

Genealogy research sometimes gets a bit heavy and serious and it's nice to
read about a lighter topic.

Happy Hanukkah to all.

Sandra Greenberg
Denver, CO USA
_sangreenb@... (mailto:sangreenb@...)

GREENBERG/BEN DAVID - Bivolari, near Iasi, Romania
HERMAN - Sniatzyn/Kolomea near Chernovitz, Austria
NEUBERGER - Botosani/Saveni, Romania
CHAET/CHAIT - Pukovitzi, near Minsk
LESZNIK - Golub Dobrzyn, Poland


JRI Poland #Poland Re: My 2 Cents on sugar in cooking #poland

hennynow
 

May I correct Judith Scarani's assumption that "...sugar was a wealthy man's
pleasure. It certainly didn't grow in Galicia--or any other part of
Poland." Sugar is derived >from beets, as well as sugar cane. So, it was a
common foodstuff in Europe.

Henriette Moëd Roth
Los Angeles, California
hennynow@...