Date   

COHNREICH shop, Haifa #general

Nick <tulse04-news@...>
 

I was recently told by my father that when my parents were in Haifa 25+
years ago they saw a shop with the name COHNREICH (presumably in Roman
characters).

This is my greatgrandmother's maiden name.

Does the shop still exist?

Does anyone know anything about the people who owned this shop?

Can anyone put me in touch with the owners or maybe descendants of the
owners?

Thank you for any information.


--
Nick Landau
London, UK

COHNREICH (Anklam, Germany Krajenka, Poland) ATLAS (Wielkie Oczy (near
Lvov/Lemberg), Poland) WEITZMAN (Cracow), WECHSLER(Schwabach, Germany)
KOHN/WEISSKOPF (Wallerstein and Kleinerdlingen,Germany) LANDAU (only adopted
on leaving Belarus or later)/FREDKIN (?) (Gomel, Mogilev, Chernigov,
Belarus)


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen COHNREICH shop, Haifa #general

Nick <tulse04-news@...>
 

I was recently told by my father that when my parents were in Haifa 25+
years ago they saw a shop with the name COHNREICH (presumably in Roman
characters).

This is my greatgrandmother's maiden name.

Does the shop still exist?

Does anyone know anything about the people who owned this shop?

Can anyone put me in touch with the owners or maybe descendants of the
owners?

Thank you for any information.


--
Nick Landau
London, UK

COHNREICH (Anklam, Germany Krajenka, Poland) ATLAS (Wielkie Oczy (near
Lvov/Lemberg), Poland) WEITZMAN (Cracow), WECHSLER(Schwabach, Germany)
KOHN/WEISSKOPF (Wallerstein and Kleinerdlingen,Germany) LANDAU (only adopted
on leaving Belarus or later)/FREDKIN (?) (Gomel, Mogilev, Chernigov,
Belarus)


Re: Russian Phonetics #general

Nick <tulse04-news@...>
 

I would refer you to the resource on JewishGen
http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/GivenNames/problems.htm

"Problems Researching Jewish Names"

It concludes that the most accurate source for a name is the Get or bill of
Jewish divorce, because of the consequences of getting it wrong.

I hope that these didn't have to be issued too frequently, and therefore
that this would somewhat be lessened as a research tool. Correspondingly I
would have thought that the Ketuba which presumably preceded it is the one
to look for.

In an Orthodox synagogue in the UK, the only way of getting married is
production of one's parent's Ketuba or the certification >from another
religious authority that one was also married in their synagogue.


--
Nick Landau
London, UK

COHNREICH (Anklam, Germany Krajenka, Poland) ATLAS (Wielkie Oczy (near
Lvov/Lemberg), Poland) WEITZMAN (Cracow), WECHSLER(Schwabach, Germany)
KOHN/WEISSKOPF (Wallerstein and Kleinerdlingen,Germany) LANDAU (only adopted
on leaving Belarus or later)/FREDKIN (?) (Gomel, Mogilev, Chernigov,
Belarus)


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Russian Phonetics #general

Nick <tulse04-news@...>
 

I would refer you to the resource on JewishGen
http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/GivenNames/problems.htm

"Problems Researching Jewish Names"

It concludes that the most accurate source for a name is the Get or bill of
Jewish divorce, because of the consequences of getting it wrong.

I hope that these didn't have to be issued too frequently, and therefore
that this would somewhat be lessened as a research tool. Correspondingly I
would have thought that the Ketuba which presumably preceded it is the one
to look for.

In an Orthodox synagogue in the UK, the only way of getting married is
production of one's parent's Ketuba or the certification >from another
religious authority that one was also married in their synagogue.


--
Nick Landau
London, UK

COHNREICH (Anklam, Germany Krajenka, Poland) ATLAS (Wielkie Oczy (near
Lvov/Lemberg), Poland) WEITZMAN (Cracow), WECHSLER(Schwabach, Germany)
KOHN/WEISSKOPF (Wallerstein and Kleinerdlingen,Germany) LANDAU (only adopted
on leaving Belarus or later)/FREDKIN (?) (Gomel, Mogilev, Chernigov,
Belarus)


Re: Question about Euro currency & German writing of numbers #general

Simon Tardell
 

Judith27@aol.com wrote:

feeling that the comma between the 15 and 00 is really more of a period.
Sooo, what I would like to know is (a) is this a German or European convention
to use a period instead of a comma to demarcate what I think of as the
decimal point between dollars and pennies and (b) is this 15,00 just 15 Euros
or 1500 Euros??
It is the other way around: It is an international convention to use a
comma on the line as the decimal sign (ISO 31-0:1992, section 3.3.2).
English speakers are the odd lot here by using a period. Thus it is
fifteen euros and zero cents.

Thanking you in advance for your expert help!
You are welcome!

Simon Tardell,
Stockholm, Sweden.

--
Simon Tardell, simon@tardell.se


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Question about Euro currency & German writing of numbers #general

Simon Tardell
 

Judith27@aol.com wrote:

feeling that the comma between the 15 and 00 is really more of a period.
Sooo, what I would like to know is (a) is this a German or European convention
to use a period instead of a comma to demarcate what I think of as the
decimal point between dollars and pennies and (b) is this 15,00 just 15 Euros
or 1500 Euros??
It is the other way around: It is an international convention to use a
comma on the line as the decimal sign (ISO 31-0:1992, section 3.3.2).
English speakers are the odd lot here by using a period. Thus it is
fifteen euros and zero cents.

Thanking you in advance for your expert help!
You are welcome!

Simon Tardell,
Stockholm, Sweden.

--
Simon Tardell, simon@tardell.se


Re: Question about Euro currency & German writing of numbers #general

Nick <tulse04-news@...>
 

from my schooldays in Germany 15,00 is 15 decimal point 00. The full-stop is
used to represent thousands, eg 15.000. Therefore as the full-stop is just a
marker, it would be ignored as in your expereince.

So a) 15,00 Euros is 15 Euros. 15,95 Euros is 15 decimal point 95 Euros.
(b) 15.000 is certainly 15000 Euros

See this webpage >from Exeter Univ regarding this
http://www.exeter.ac.uk/german/abinitio/chap4-7.html . Clearly the writer is
not a mathematician because they refer to the thousands marker in Germany as
a "decimal point" (ie point).

--
Nick Landau
London, UK

COHNREICH (Anklam, Germany Krajenka, Poland) ATLAS (Wielkie Oczy (near
Lvov/Lemberg), Poland) WEITZMAN (Cracow), WECHSLER(Schwabach, Germany)
KOHN/WEISSKOPF (Wallerstein and Kleinerdlingen,Germany) LANDAU (only adopted
on leaving Belarus or later)/FREDKIN (?) (Gomel, Mogilev, Chernigov,
Belarus)


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Question about Euro currency & German writing of numbers #general

Nick <tulse04-news@...>
 

from my schooldays in Germany 15,00 is 15 decimal point 00. The full-stop is
used to represent thousands, eg 15.000. Therefore as the full-stop is just a
marker, it would be ignored as in your expereince.

So a) 15,00 Euros is 15 Euros. 15,95 Euros is 15 decimal point 95 Euros.
(b) 15.000 is certainly 15000 Euros

See this webpage >from Exeter Univ regarding this
http://www.exeter.ac.uk/german/abinitio/chap4-7.html . Clearly the writer is
not a mathematician because they refer to the thousands marker in Germany as
a "decimal point" (ie point).

--
Nick Landau
London, UK

COHNREICH (Anklam, Germany Krajenka, Poland) ATLAS (Wielkie Oczy (near
Lvov/Lemberg), Poland) WEITZMAN (Cracow), WECHSLER(Schwabach, Germany)
KOHN/WEISSKOPF (Wallerstein and Kleinerdlingen,Germany) LANDAU (only adopted
on leaving Belarus or later)/FREDKIN (?) (Gomel, Mogilev, Chernigov,
Belarus)


Re: Question about Euro currency & German writing of numbers #general

Evertjan. <exjxw.hannivoort@...>
 

Sooo, what I
would like to know is (a) is this a German or European convention to
use a period instead of a comma to demarcate what I think of as the
decimal point between dollars and pennies and (b) is this 15,00 just
15 Euros or 1500 Euros??
It is just the opposite.

Using the decimal "point", insted of a comma,
is an Anglo-American convention.

--
Evertjan Hannivoort.
The Netherlands.
(Please change the x'es to dots in my emailaddress)


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Question about Euro currency & German writing of numbers #general

Evertjan. <exjxw.hannivoort@...>
 

Sooo, what I
would like to know is (a) is this a German or European convention to
use a period instead of a comma to demarcate what I think of as the
decimal point between dollars and pennies and (b) is this 15,00 just
15 Euros or 1500 Euros??
It is just the opposite.

Using the decimal "point", insted of a comma,
is an Anglo-American convention.

--
Evertjan Hannivoort.
The Netherlands.
(Please change the x'es to dots in my emailaddress)


Re: Question about Euro currency & German writing of numbers #general

Alexander Sharon
 

Judi Langer-Surnamer Caplan wrote

Sooo, what I would like to know is (a) is this a German or European
convention to use a period instead of a comma to demarcate what I
think of as the decimal point between dollars and pennies and
(b) is this 15,00 just 15 Euros or 1500 Euros??
And I thought that only the engineers and scientists are dealing with such
"problems" :-)
Indeed, dot is used to separate thousands, and comma represents the decimal
'point'.
In addition, monetary units are displayed at the end of the amount, thus:
15,00$ is actually $15.00.

Alexander Sharon
Calgary, AB


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Question about Euro currency & German writing of numbers #general

Alexander Sharon
 

Judi Langer-Surnamer Caplan wrote

Sooo, what I would like to know is (a) is this a German or European
convention to use a period instead of a comma to demarcate what I
think of as the decimal point between dollars and pennies and
(b) is this 15,00 just 15 Euros or 1500 Euros??
And I thought that only the engineers and scientists are dealing with such
"problems" :-)
Indeed, dot is used to separate thousands, and comma represents the decimal
'point'.
In addition, monetary units are displayed at the end of the amount, thus:
15,00$ is actually $15.00.

Alexander Sharon
Calgary, AB


Re: Faigenblat #ukraine

Jeanne Gold <jg@...>
 

Hi, Ruth,

Have you thought to use the online phone directories? One place that
makes it a little easier is:
http://www.TheUltimates.com/white/

Jeanne Gold
Albany, OR, USA


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine Re: Faigenblat #ukraine

Jeanne Gold <jg@...>
 

Hi, Ruth,

Have you thought to use the online phone directories? One place that
makes it a little easier is:
http://www.TheUltimates.com/white/

Jeanne Gold
Albany, OR, USA


Re: Motis and Mordechai #general

MBernet@...
 

In a message dated 2/5/2006 10:36:39 P.M. Eastern Standard Time,
bzs@actcom.co.il writes:

I live in Israel, where 99 out of 100 guys who were officially named
Mordechai, go by Moti. In gross generalization, about the only chance you
have of meeting someone who answers "Mordechai" to the question "What's your
name?" is to wander in Haredi neighborhoods. This applies, by the way, to
non-Ashkenazim too.

==I live in the USA where 999 out of 1000 guys who were officially named
Michael, are commonly known as Mike. I insist on being called Michael.

==I have not done any scientific research but my observations suggest that
90 of those 99 Israeli Motis are actually name Motke by friends and family.
Beider gives over 100 variants on the Mordechai name; Motis is not one of them.
Most of my Haredi acquaintances are known by the Yiddish form of their
Hebrew names; the Mordechais are Motkes, Mottel etc. . . .

==One common name derivation >from Mordechai is Marcus/Markus, >from which we
get Mark, Marc, Marks, Marx, Max

Michael Bernet, New York


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Motis and Mordechai #general

MBernet@...
 

In a message dated 2/5/2006 10:36:39 P.M. Eastern Standard Time,
bzs@actcom.co.il writes:

I live in Israel, where 99 out of 100 guys who were officially named
Mordechai, go by Moti. In gross generalization, about the only chance you
have of meeting someone who answers "Mordechai" to the question "What's your
name?" is to wander in Haredi neighborhoods. This applies, by the way, to
non-Ashkenazim too.

==I live in the USA where 999 out of 1000 guys who were officially named
Michael, are commonly known as Mike. I insist on being called Michael.

==I have not done any scientific research but my observations suggest that
90 of those 99 Israeli Motis are actually name Motke by friends and family.
Beider gives over 100 variants on the Mordechai name; Motis is not one of them.
Most of my Haredi acquaintances are known by the Yiddish form of their
Hebrew names; the Mordechais are Motkes, Mottel etc. . . .

==One common name derivation >from Mordechai is Marcus/Markus, >from which we
get Mark, Marc, Marks, Marx, Max

Michael Bernet, New York


Re: Motis-Mendl/Emanuel #general

Judith Romney Wegner
 

Benzy wrote:

I live in Israel, where ...... about the only chance you
have of meeting someone who answers "Mordechai" to the question "What's your
name?" is to wander in Haredi neighborhoods. This applies, by the way, to
non-Ashkenazim too.
That surprises me -- because the name Mordechai used to be very
common also among non-Haredim. It occurs in the families of both of
my parents. It was much used in my maternal Dutch-Jewish Ashkenazi
family, where it went back to an 18th-century ancestor described only
as "Mordechai mi-Amsterdam" in the record of his son's marriage at
the Great Synagogue in London in 1793. That was my gg gf. Both he and
his grandson, my gf, were named Mark Marks -- both having the
Hebrew name Mordechai -- and of course the surname Marks likewise
stemmed ultimately >from that name.

On the other side, my paternal g gf (>from Poland) was also a
Mordechai -- as I learned >from my zayde's gravestone in London. So
my son Mark (Mordechai) was named after a whole bunch of non-Haredi
ancestors.

Judith Romney Wegner


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Motis-Mendl/Emanuel #general

Judith Romney Wegner
 

Benzy wrote:

I live in Israel, where ...... about the only chance you
have of meeting someone who answers "Mordechai" to the question "What's your
name?" is to wander in Haredi neighborhoods. This applies, by the way, to
non-Ashkenazim too.
That surprises me -- because the name Mordechai used to be very
common also among non-Haredim. It occurs in the families of both of
my parents. It was much used in my maternal Dutch-Jewish Ashkenazi
family, where it went back to an 18th-century ancestor described only
as "Mordechai mi-Amsterdam" in the record of his son's marriage at
the Great Synagogue in London in 1793. That was my gg gf. Both he and
his grandson, my gf, were named Mark Marks -- both having the
Hebrew name Mordechai -- and of course the surname Marks likewise
stemmed ultimately >from that name.

On the other side, my paternal g gf (>from Poland) was also a
Mordechai -- as I learned >from my zayde's gravestone in London. So
my son Mark (Mordechai) was named after a whole bunch of non-Haredi
ancestors.

Judith Romney Wegner


Re: Motis-Mendl/Emanuel #general

Alexander Sharon
 

"Steve Orlen" wrote

I have two questions to ask: 1) My 3xgreat-grandfather was >from Boguslav
in the Ukraine. I was told his name was "Motis-Mendl" (WOLINSKY). The
name "Mendl" I know, of course, but what could "Motis" refer to, or be a
misspelling of? 2) On his son's marriage certificate (London, 1897) his
name is given as "Emanuel." Are there any connections among these names?
Motis or Matis is probably Yiddish version of Matias (Matthias, Matheus)
from Hebrew Mattityahu.
No connection to Emanuel, he could select any name he wanted to or liked to,
to be known in his new country.

BTW Russian version of Matias is Matvey, many Russian Jews have selected
this name during the assimilation trend, and in Poland name Mateusz was
adopted in the similar circumstances.

Alexander Sharon
Calgary, AB


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Motis-Mendl/Emanuel #general

Alexander Sharon
 

"Steve Orlen" wrote

I have two questions to ask: 1) My 3xgreat-grandfather was >from Boguslav
in the Ukraine. I was told his name was "Motis-Mendl" (WOLINSKY). The
name "Mendl" I know, of course, but what could "Motis" refer to, or be a
misspelling of? 2) On his son's marriage certificate (London, 1897) his
name is given as "Emanuel." Are there any connections among these names?
Motis or Matis is probably Yiddish version of Matias (Matthias, Matheus)
from Hebrew Mattityahu.
No connection to Emanuel, he could select any name he wanted to or liked to,
to be known in his new country.

BTW Russian version of Matias is Matvey, many Russian Jews have selected
this name during the assimilation trend, and in Poland name Mateusz was
adopted in the similar circumstances.

Alexander Sharon
Calgary, AB