Date   

Ship Alley, London #unitedkingdom

robert fraser <robertandginafraser@...>
 

Dear Friends -

I wonder if anyone can point me to a website that shows pre-WW2 roads in
London, or point me to any related information. The reason is that I will be
briefly in London in April, and am curious to find if Ship Alley still
exists. I'm pretty sure that it has been redeveloped, but it did still exist
in the 1950's. It was a narrow alley somewhere in the East End, can't recall
where, and my Parents stayed there briefly with a Mrs Mazin on arrival from
Vienna in mid-1939.

As my hotel is near Liverpool Street, on the fringes of the East End. I
thought that I might try to find it.

Thank you for any pointers.

Robert Fraser
Dianella, Western Australia
robertandginafraser@iinet.net.au
Searching:
NOWAK - Moravia, Austria/Vienna - >
EISINGER - Moravia - >
FINKELSTEIN - Galicia, Poland
NAGEL - Austria
KRAUTERBLUTH - ? Galicia


JCR-UK SIG #UnitedKingdom Ship Alley, London #unitedkingdom

robert fraser <robertandginafraser@...>
 

Dear Friends -

I wonder if anyone can point me to a website that shows pre-WW2 roads in
London, or point me to any related information. The reason is that I will be
briefly in London in April, and am curious to find if Ship Alley still
exists. I'm pretty sure that it has been redeveloped, but it did still exist
in the 1950's. It was a narrow alley somewhere in the East End, can't recall
where, and my Parents stayed there briefly with a Mrs Mazin on arrival from
Vienna in mid-1939.

As my hotel is near Liverpool Street, on the fringes of the East End. I
thought that I might try to find it.

Thank you for any pointers.

Robert Fraser
Dianella, Western Australia
robertandginafraser@iinet.net.au
Searching:
NOWAK - Moravia, Austria/Vienna - >
EISINGER - Moravia - >
FINKELSTEIN - Galicia, Poland
NAGEL - Austria
KRAUTERBLUTH - ? Galicia


Searching for families of Rabbis Tanicki and Czarne, Ukraine #general

Lisa
 

Dear Group,

I am searching for the families of the following rabbis who were married to
two of the many daughters of Rabbi Yitzhak Avraham HAISSINSKY (GAISINSKY) of
Stavishche (Stavisht), Ukraine (1857-1942). The sons-in-law of Rabbi
Gaisinsky were most likely born between the years 1875-1890. Here is the
information >from 1912 that I have on them:

The first son-in-law was Rabbi Zelig TANICKI, son of Rabbi Aryeh, the kosher
butcher in Bogoslav, a respected merchant in Kharkov.

The second son-in-law was Rabbi Dov Ber CZARNE, Rabbi of Monasterzyce, son
of Rabbi Shlomo Fishel, who himself was also once the Rabbi of Monasterzyce.

I am trying to assist a few members of the families of the wives of these
two rabbis who were sisters to each other. We do not know the first names of
the wives.

There is a slight possiblity that one of these families may have immigrated
to England but we have no confirmation of this. It's possible that they
remained in Russia or may have immigrated to another country in later years.

Any leads would be appreciated!
Many thanks,
Lisa Brahin Weinblatt
New Jersey, USA
Redball62@aol.com


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Searching for families of Rabbis Tanicki and Czarne, Ukraine #general

Lisa
 

Dear Group,

I am searching for the families of the following rabbis who were married to
two of the many daughters of Rabbi Yitzhak Avraham HAISSINSKY (GAISINSKY) of
Stavishche (Stavisht), Ukraine (1857-1942). The sons-in-law of Rabbi
Gaisinsky were most likely born between the years 1875-1890. Here is the
information >from 1912 that I have on them:

The first son-in-law was Rabbi Zelig TANICKI, son of Rabbi Aryeh, the kosher
butcher in Bogoslav, a respected merchant in Kharkov.

The second son-in-law was Rabbi Dov Ber CZARNE, Rabbi of Monasterzyce, son
of Rabbi Shlomo Fishel, who himself was also once the Rabbi of Monasterzyce.

I am trying to assist a few members of the families of the wives of these
two rabbis who were sisters to each other. We do not know the first names of
the wives.

There is a slight possiblity that one of these families may have immigrated
to England but we have no confirmation of this. It's possible that they
remained in Russia or may have immigrated to another country in later years.

Any leads would be appreciated!
Many thanks,
Lisa Brahin Weinblatt
New Jersey, USA
Redball62@aol.com


FW: Ship Alley, London #unitedkingdom

Martyn Woolf <martyn@...>
 

Dear All

Subject: RE: [jcr-uk] Ship Alley, London

A 1913 Ordnance Survey map shows Ship Alley leading North >from St. George
Street into Wellclose Square. The length of the alley appears to be no more
than about 70 yards with about 20 buildings in total. It was probably
destroyed during the blitz and certainly is not there now.

Regards
Martyn Woolf


FINBERG #unitedkingdom

Miriam Margolyes <75342.3217@...>
 

I had hoped this Isaac FINBERG would be 'mine'. He isn't: but here's a
precis
of the Naturalization file, in case it belongs to someone else.

Precis of Isaac Finberg

9/7/1904
Born Poland - Goodleva 14 August 1858
FATHER =3D Lewis Finberg
MOTHER =3D Sarah Finberg
Resides 14 Poplar Grove, West Kensington, London
Age 46 Years
OCCUPATION - Master Tailor - 12 Connaught Street, London
RESIDES: 6 Kilburn Park Road Oct 1896 - Sept 1899
12 Connaught Street, Edgeware Road, Sept.1899 to present date

5 Children:

Sarah Finberg 23 years
Mathilda Finberg 21 years
Leah Finberg 20 years
Rebecca Finberg 17 years
Myer Finberg 15 years

REFEREE
David Johnson - Baker
Herbert Edward - Shoemaker
Ebenesa Barratt - Chemical Cleaner
Thomas Woodley
John Fletcher Woolen Merchant

REPORT form Criminal Investigation dept. New Scotland Yard 28/7/1904

Re Bankruptcy Court and Creditors

Date 27/3/1897
Owed =A35,51.00. 16.4 =

Assets of =A314.5.3
Discharge suspended for 3 years

1 Creditor Mr Platt of 77 St Martin's Lane described the bankruptcy as a
regrettable affair bought about by the high-handed and harsh action of th=
e
Landlady, Mrs.Edilstone, who was more desirous to ruin Mr. Finberg than
obtain her money=85

Headed Paper =

"I FINBERG & CO., Practical Tailors, Livery and Gentlemen's Outfitters"
12 Connaught Street, Hyde Park W And 12a Lower Porchester Street

Note. Finberg's patent reversible Coat

Letter explaining bankruptcy dated 13 July 1904
Went Bankrupt in 27 March 1897 - he had been in the country since 1872 a=
nd
started in business in 1876 or 77. Took the lease of a house and shop on =
18
Upper George Street, Bryanston Sq. where he carried out his business - th=
en
a shop became available next door (same owner as his) and his
brother-in-law (in Tobacco and Cigars) and he and his brother-in-law
decided to open it as a cigar shop=85=85=85. (could be missing something =
here as
it doesn't follow on well=85=85=85=85=85=85=85=85.. & private house at 14=
Poplar Grove,
Kensington
He then lists some well know people such as the Right Hon. Earl de Grey,
Fredrick Milner, Sir Edwards Sassoon. He encloses his discharge certifica=
te

Best: Miriam Margolyes
Santa Monica

searching: FINBURGH, FRANKEL (Sunderland)


Was there a port in Odessa circa 1921? #general

Lisa
 

Dear Group,

I am trying to help a friend validate a story that she heard >from her family
members. Does anyone know if there was a port in Odessa, Russia where one
could take a ship to England circa 1921? If so, are there any online sources
for these ships? Are there any online sources for passengers who arrived in
England during this time period?

Many thanks,
Lisa Brahin Weinblatt
New Jersey, USA
E-mail: Redball62@aol.com


JCR-UK SIG #UnitedKingdom FW: Ship Alley, London #unitedkingdom

Martyn Woolf <martyn@...>
 

Dear All

Subject: RE: [jcr-uk] Ship Alley, London

A 1913 Ordnance Survey map shows Ship Alley leading North >from St. George
Street into Wellclose Square. The length of the alley appears to be no more
than about 70 yards with about 20 buildings in total. It was probably
destroyed during the blitz and certainly is not there now.

Regards
Martyn Woolf


JCR-UK SIG #UnitedKingdom FINBERG #unitedkingdom

Miriam Margolyes <75342.3217@...>
 

I had hoped this Isaac FINBERG would be 'mine'. He isn't: but here's a
precis
of the Naturalization file, in case it belongs to someone else.

Precis of Isaac Finberg

9/7/1904
Born Poland - Goodleva 14 August 1858
FATHER =3D Lewis Finberg
MOTHER =3D Sarah Finberg
Resides 14 Poplar Grove, West Kensington, London
Age 46 Years
OCCUPATION - Master Tailor - 12 Connaught Street, London
RESIDES: 6 Kilburn Park Road Oct 1896 - Sept 1899
12 Connaught Street, Edgeware Road, Sept.1899 to present date

5 Children:

Sarah Finberg 23 years
Mathilda Finberg 21 years
Leah Finberg 20 years
Rebecca Finberg 17 years
Myer Finberg 15 years

REFEREE
David Johnson - Baker
Herbert Edward - Shoemaker
Ebenesa Barratt - Chemical Cleaner
Thomas Woodley
John Fletcher Woolen Merchant

REPORT form Criminal Investigation dept. New Scotland Yard 28/7/1904

Re Bankruptcy Court and Creditors

Date 27/3/1897
Owed =A35,51.00. 16.4 =

Assets of =A314.5.3
Discharge suspended for 3 years

1 Creditor Mr Platt of 77 St Martin's Lane described the bankruptcy as a
regrettable affair bought about by the high-handed and harsh action of th=
e
Landlady, Mrs.Edilstone, who was more desirous to ruin Mr. Finberg than
obtain her money=85

Headed Paper =

"I FINBERG & CO., Practical Tailors, Livery and Gentlemen's Outfitters"
12 Connaught Street, Hyde Park W And 12a Lower Porchester Street

Note. Finberg's patent reversible Coat

Letter explaining bankruptcy dated 13 July 1904
Went Bankrupt in 27 March 1897 - he had been in the country since 1872 a=
nd
started in business in 1876 or 77. Took the lease of a house and shop on =
18
Upper George Street, Bryanston Sq. where he carried out his business - th=
en
a shop became available next door (same owner as his) and his
brother-in-law (in Tobacco and Cigars) and he and his brother-in-law
decided to open it as a cigar shop=85=85=85. (could be missing something =
here as
it doesn't follow on well=85=85=85=85=85=85=85=85.. & private house at 14=
Poplar Grove,
Kensington
He then lists some well know people such as the Right Hon. Earl de Grey,
Fredrick Milner, Sir Edwards Sassoon. He encloses his discharge certifica=
te

Best: Miriam Margolyes
Santa Monica

searching: FINBURGH, FRANKEL (Sunderland)


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Was there a port in Odessa circa 1921? #general

Lisa
 

Dear Group,

I am trying to help a friend validate a story that she heard >from her family
members. Does anyone know if there was a port in Odessa, Russia where one
could take a ship to England circa 1921? If so, are there any online sources
for these ships? Are there any online sources for passengers who arrived in
England during this time period?

Many thanks,
Lisa Brahin Weinblatt
New Jersey, USA
E-mail: Redball62@aol.com


The Grandfather of David HALBERSTAM #general

Abuwasta Abuwasta
 

Dear Genners,
For a research concerning the Hasidic rabbis
Halberstam, I would appreciate info about the name and
origin of the grandfather of the American journalist
and author David HALBERSTAM(b.1934). His father Dr.
Charles (d. 1950) was born in the USA to immigrants
from what is now Poland.
Plewase respond privately.
Jacob Rosen
Jerusalem


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen The Grandfather of David HALBERSTAM #general

Abuwasta Abuwasta
 

Dear Genners,
For a research concerning the Hasidic rabbis
Halberstam, I would appreciate info about the name and
origin of the grandfather of the American journalist
and author David HALBERSTAM(b.1934). His father Dr.
Charles (d. 1950) was born in the USA to immigrants
from what is now Poland.
Plewase respond privately.
Jacob Rosen
Jerusalem


Re: Leivik - a Hebrew Name? Update #general

Judith Romney Wegner
 

The answers I received >from people ran the gamut:
The Hebrew name is either Aryeh, Judah, Lev, or Levi.
Leivik is either a diminutive of the Hebrew "Levi" or the Yiddish
"Leib" or "Lev."
Now, the decision as to what name to use has to be made.
Rochelle Gershenow

Dear Rochelle:

If I may offer a suggestion regarding the stone:

First off, you can forget Levi altogether (that was a bumsteer based
on an error) and stick with the other three names. Your father
almost certainly received two of the following at his circumcision
ceremony: Aryeh, Judah, Lev.
Since double-barrelled names are the norm for Eastern European Jewry,
you could pick any two of them, as follows:

(1) Yehudah-Aryeh (the traditional original all-Hebrew version)
(2) Juda-Leib (a very common Hebrew-Yiddish combination among East
European Jews).
(3) Aryeh-Leib (the Hebrew and Yiddish words for "Lion" -- another
common combination)

My husband's father was known as Leo in Vienna, but Polish birth
documents called him Lew (pronounced Lev). So we were virtually
certain that my husband's father -- who had been born into a
Yiddish-speaking family -- must have been named Juda-Leib at his
bris. In naming our firstborn for him, we selected Yehudah Aryeh
because we preferred the pure Hebrew original version. But since you
know that your dad was known as "Leibl" and/or "Leivik", you might
wish to preserve that by choosing either Aryeh-Lev or Yehudah Lev
as the Hebrew name on his stone.

Best wishes,

Judith Romney Wegner


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Leivik - a Hebrew Name? Update #general

Judith Romney Wegner
 

The answers I received >from people ran the gamut:
The Hebrew name is either Aryeh, Judah, Lev, or Levi.
Leivik is either a diminutive of the Hebrew "Levi" or the Yiddish
"Leib" or "Lev."
Now, the decision as to what name to use has to be made.
Rochelle Gershenow

Dear Rochelle:

If I may offer a suggestion regarding the stone:

First off, you can forget Levi altogether (that was a bumsteer based
on an error) and stick with the other three names. Your father
almost certainly received two of the following at his circumcision
ceremony: Aryeh, Judah, Lev.
Since double-barrelled names are the norm for Eastern European Jewry,
you could pick any two of them, as follows:

(1) Yehudah-Aryeh (the traditional original all-Hebrew version)
(2) Juda-Leib (a very common Hebrew-Yiddish combination among East
European Jews).
(3) Aryeh-Leib (the Hebrew and Yiddish words for "Lion" -- another
common combination)

My husband's father was known as Leo in Vienna, but Polish birth
documents called him Lew (pronounced Lev). So we were virtually
certain that my husband's father -- who had been born into a
Yiddish-speaking family -- must have been named Juda-Leib at his
bris. In naming our firstborn for him, we selected Yehudah Aryeh
because we preferred the pure Hebrew original version. But since you
know that your dad was known as "Leibl" and/or "Leivik", you might
wish to preserve that by choosing either Aryeh-Lev or Yehudah Lev
as the Hebrew name on his stone.

Best wishes,

Judith Romney Wegner


Re: Leivik - a Hebrew Name? Update #general

MBernet@...
 

In a message dated 1/24/2006 11:34:40 A.M. Eastern Standard Time,
rpgersh@comcast.net writes:
Thank you to the many Genners who responded to me privately or on the list
about my inquiry about whether Leivik is a Hebrew name. My father listed
Leivik as his Hebrew name on paperwork for a burial society. I need to know
what Hebrew name to put on his tombstone this coming year. So,I wanted to
determine what was the correct Hebrew name as I didn't think Leivik was
Hebrew. >from somewhere deep down in my memory I remembered my father
telling me that he was called Leibl boychik.

The answers I received >from people ran the gamut:
The Hebrew name is either Aryeh, Judah, Lev, or Levi.
Leivik is either a diminutive of the Hebrew "Levi" or the Yiddish "Leib" or
"Lev."
Well, I did get an answer to my original question, i.e., Leivik is not a
Hebrew name. Now, the decision as to what name to use has to be made.

==>from the information you gave, he used names such as Leo, Leib and Leibl.
All these refer to a name meaning Lion, which would be Aryeh in Hebrew and
that name suggests the more ancient underlying Hebrew name, Yehuda.

==>from the names you say were used, Levi would be a highly unlikable source
for his names.

==I think you would do better to use a name, or a form of the name that was
the name that was used by friends and family, and that would clearly identify
him. There is no indication that he was known as Yehuda. The use of a kinnuy,
such as Leib or Leibl, is as acceptable in many communities (including ultra
religious one) as is a pure Hebrew or Biblical name.

My suggestion is to use the names Leib (lamed-yod-yod-bet) or Leibl
(lamed-yod-yod-bet-lamed). And bear in mind, that he chose to use he form Leivik
on paperwork for a burial society. I'd take this as a compelling vote >from the
chairman.

Michael Bernet, New York


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Leivik - a Hebrew Name? Update #general

MBernet@...
 

In a message dated 1/24/2006 11:34:40 A.M. Eastern Standard Time,
rpgersh@comcast.net writes:
Thank you to the many Genners who responded to me privately or on the list
about my inquiry about whether Leivik is a Hebrew name. My father listed
Leivik as his Hebrew name on paperwork for a burial society. I need to know
what Hebrew name to put on his tombstone this coming year. So,I wanted to
determine what was the correct Hebrew name as I didn't think Leivik was
Hebrew. >from somewhere deep down in my memory I remembered my father
telling me that he was called Leibl boychik.

The answers I received >from people ran the gamut:
The Hebrew name is either Aryeh, Judah, Lev, or Levi.
Leivik is either a diminutive of the Hebrew "Levi" or the Yiddish "Leib" or
"Lev."
Well, I did get an answer to my original question, i.e., Leivik is not a
Hebrew name. Now, the decision as to what name to use has to be made.

==>from the information you gave, he used names such as Leo, Leib and Leibl.
All these refer to a name meaning Lion, which would be Aryeh in Hebrew and
that name suggests the more ancient underlying Hebrew name, Yehuda.

==>from the names you say were used, Levi would be a highly unlikable source
for his names.

==I think you would do better to use a name, or a form of the name that was
the name that was used by friends and family, and that would clearly identify
him. There is no indication that he was known as Yehuda. The use of a kinnuy,
such as Leib or Leibl, is as acceptable in many communities (including ultra
religious one) as is a pure Hebrew or Biblical name.

My suggestion is to use the names Leib (lamed-yod-yod-bet) or Leibl
(lamed-yod-yod-bet-lamed). And bear in mind, that he chose to use he form Leivik
on paperwork for a burial society. I'd take this as a compelling vote >from the
chairman.

Michael Bernet, New York


Re: Saying Where You Are #general

Mike Posnick
 

You're not alone. First of all, the JewishGen rules call for
messages to be signed with their sender's name and location. But
even if they did not, I also find, as you do, that the sender's
location affects my response. Indeed, I never respond to e-mail
inquiries or listings in the Jewish Genealogy Family Finder (JGFF)
where the sender's/lister's name and location are not shown. If
nothing else, saying where one is located is a matter of common courtesy.

Mike Posnick
Minneapolis, Minnesota
mpoz@earthlink.net

In her JewishGen message of 1/24/2006, Shirley Collier
<shirley.collier@btinternet.com> wrote:

Am I alone in, when reading an email, I look to see where the email
is coming from? Not just the name but also the place? I find it does sometimes
help to know where the writer is situated and what facilities might be open
to them.
It is no good telling someone of the resource centres to visit in London or
America when they might be in opposite sides of the world. I often read the
signatures and think, yes, but where are you? Or am I just being nosey?


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Saying Where You Are #general

Mike Posnick
 

You're not alone. First of all, the JewishGen rules call for
messages to be signed with their sender's name and location. But
even if they did not, I also find, as you do, that the sender's
location affects my response. Indeed, I never respond to e-mail
inquiries or listings in the Jewish Genealogy Family Finder (JGFF)
where the sender's/lister's name and location are not shown. If
nothing else, saying where one is located is a matter of common courtesy.

Mike Posnick
Minneapolis, Minnesota
mpoz@earthlink.net

In her JewishGen message of 1/24/2006, Shirley Collier
<shirley.collier@btinternet.com> wrote:

Am I alone in, when reading an email, I look to see where the email
is coming from? Not just the name but also the place? I find it does sometimes
help to know where the writer is situated and what facilities might be open
to them.
It is no good telling someone of the resource centres to visit in London or
America when they might be in opposite sides of the world. I often read the
signatures and think, yes, but where are you? Or am I just being nosey?


Has anyone had this experience? #general

Sara Lynns
 

Fitting pieces of the puzzle together (father's family)

My father died when I was quite young; my mother told me little about his early
life. Some years later (as an adult), I began my family "Lerner" research. I
discovered my father had a sister, then later, I found he had a brother.
According to my mother, my father and his sister were not on speaking terms.

I ordered my father's military records; found a notation with his sister listed
as next of kin with an address. Of course, that was late 1930's.

My mother received VA pension >from my father. Asked me for the military records
I had. Of course, I gave them to her.

I received the military records back, except for one thing: the page listing my
aunt (my father's sister) as next of kin with mailing address as of late 1930's.

Didn't discover the missing page until some time later.

Jacqueline Lerner-Aderman


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Has anyone had this experience? #general

Sara Lynns
 

Fitting pieces of the puzzle together (father's family)

My father died when I was quite young; my mother told me little about his early
life. Some years later (as an adult), I began my family "Lerner" research. I
discovered my father had a sister, then later, I found he had a brother.
According to my mother, my father and his sister were not on speaking terms.

I ordered my father's military records; found a notation with his sister listed
as next of kin with an address. Of course, that was late 1930's.

My mother received VA pension >from my father. Asked me for the military records
I had. Of course, I gave them to her.

I received the military records back, except for one thing: the page listing my
aunt (my father's sister) as next of kin with mailing address as of late 1930's.

Didn't discover the missing page until some time later.

Jacqueline Lerner-Aderman