Date   

Pipik? #general

krippens <krippens@...>
 

Hello everyone,

Something triggered a childhood memory of the word pipik. I vaguely
remember jokes about Moishe Pipik, as in 'who do you think you are,
Moishe Pipik?'

I can't find the word in any Yiddish resource I have. Can anyone tell me
what 'pipik' means? Or where it came from, or what the joke about it is?

Much thanks
Karen Jo Rippens


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Pipik? #general

krippens <krippens@...>
 

Hello everyone,

Something triggered a childhood memory of the word pipik. I vaguely
remember jokes about Moishe Pipik, as in 'who do you think you are,
Moishe Pipik?'

I can't find the word in any Yiddish resource I have. Can anyone tell me
what 'pipik' means? Or where it came from, or what the joke about it is?

Much thanks
Karen Jo Rippens


Re: Leivik - a Hebrew name? #general

MBernet@...
 

In a message dated 1/20/2006 6:55:45 A.M. Eastern Standard Time,
tulse04-news@yahoo.co.uk writes:

According to a Lubavitch website www.lchaimweekly.org/lchaim/5753/279.htm
the father of the former Lubavitcher Rebbe whose name was Levi was
affectionately known as "Leivik", so this is an affectionate name for Levi,
which is a Hebrew name. Levi was one of the sons of Jacob in Genesis.

==Indeed, Leivik could well be a Yiddish diminutive for someone named Levi
in Hebrew. However, we were told "His English name is Leo. I believe his
Yiddish name may have been Leibl." Both these names are associated with the
Hebrew name Yehuda; neither is connected with Levi.

Michael Bernet, New York


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Leivik - a Hebrew name? #general

MBernet@...
 

In a message dated 1/20/2006 6:55:45 A.M. Eastern Standard Time,
tulse04-news@yahoo.co.uk writes:

According to a Lubavitch website www.lchaimweekly.org/lchaim/5753/279.htm
the father of the former Lubavitcher Rebbe whose name was Levi was
affectionately known as "Leivik", so this is an affectionate name for Levi,
which is a Hebrew name. Levi was one of the sons of Jacob in Genesis.

==Indeed, Leivik could well be a Yiddish diminutive for someone named Levi
in Hebrew. However, we were told "His English name is Leo. I believe his
Yiddish name may have been Leibl." Both these names are associated with the
Hebrew name Yehuda; neither is connected with Levi.

Michael Bernet, New York


Re: naturalization information #general

russ <russ@...>
 

I have had very different results >from the USCIS (Formerly the INS). I
have requested documents for many relatives and received in quite a
reasonable amount of time an initial response and then a packet with the
documents requested.

Perhaps it is the specific address used. I use:

National Records Center
Attn: FOIA Officer
PO BOX 648010
Lee's Summit, MO
64064-8010


R. Byer
Researching:
BYER/BAYER/BAER (Zeimiai, Lithuania -> Vilijampole, Lith -> NYC, USA
->Bangor, Maine)
COSTRELL/KOSTRELL/KASTREL (Kurenets, Belarus -> NYC, US -> Detroit, Mich)


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: naturalization information #general

russ <russ@...>
 

I have had very different results >from the USCIS (Formerly the INS). I
have requested documents for many relatives and received in quite a
reasonable amount of time an initial response and then a packet with the
documents requested.

Perhaps it is the specific address used. I use:

National Records Center
Attn: FOIA Officer
PO BOX 648010
Lee's Summit, MO
64064-8010


R. Byer
Researching:
BYER/BAYER/BAER (Zeimiai, Lithuania -> Vilijampole, Lith -> NYC, USA
->Bangor, Maine)
COSTRELL/KOSTRELL/KASTREL (Kurenets, Belarus -> NYC, US -> Detroit, Mich)


Re: Pipik? #general

HPOLLINS@...
 

In a message dated 21/01/2006 19:50:24 GMT Standard Time,
SPAM_FOILER@hashkedim.com writes:
No, "pupik" does not mean "bellybutton" (aka "navel" ); it means
"gizzard", an organ found in poultry and other birds.
In Uriel Weinstein's Modern English-Yiddish Dictionary he has the same word
for gizzard and for navel, namely pupik: peh-vav-peh-yud-kof.


Harold Pollins
Oxford


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Pipik? #general

HPOLLINS@...
 

In a message dated 21/01/2006 19:50:24 GMT Standard Time,
SPAM_FOILER@hashkedim.com writes:
No, "pupik" does not mean "bellybutton" (aka "navel" ); it means
"gizzard", an organ found in poultry and other birds.
In Uriel Weinstein's Modern English-Yiddish Dictionary he has the same word
for gizzard and for navel, namely pupik: peh-vav-peh-yud-kof.


Harold Pollins
Oxford


Town called Mepil(in Lithuania) #general

Dr. Trevor Waner
 

from a letter I had translated >from Yiddish >from 1934, I encountered the
town or Shetel called Mepil in Lithuania. I have looked in the Shetel
Seeker and I have found a town called Mauliai. The reference is to a member
of SHEIN family visiting his grandfather, Rabbi Shlomo Yaakov Shein just
after the High holidays. Does anyone know of this town and can give me some
reference to it.

Shavoa tov,

Trevor Waner
Rehovot, Israel
(Formally Springs, South Africa)


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Town called Mepil(in Lithuania) #general

Dr. Trevor Waner
 

from a letter I had translated >from Yiddish >from 1934, I encountered the
town or Shetel called Mepil in Lithuania. I have looked in the Shetel
Seeker and I have found a town called Mauliai. The reference is to a member
of SHEIN family visiting his grandfather, Rabbi Shlomo Yaakov Shein just
after the High holidays. Does anyone know of this town and can give me some
reference to it.

Shavoa tov,

Trevor Waner
Rehovot, Israel
(Formally Springs, South Africa)


JCR: 1891 Census - is there a street index? #unitedkingdom

jeremy frankel
 

Dear Jonathan,

Yes, there are street indexes for most of the censuses carried out in
England. I don't know where you would find them in England, but I
know that my local Mormon library has them all on microfiche for a
number of census years.

They list the relevant numbers plus a cross-reference to the Mormon
microfilms of the respective censuses.

I will be there later on and will try to look it up for you.

Jeremy G Frankel
Berkeley, California, USA

At 12:00 AM -0600 1/19/06, JCR-UK SIG digest wrote:
Subject: 1891 Census - is there a street index?
From: JGrodz@aol.com
Date: Wed, 18 Jan 2006 04:25:36 -0500
X-Message-Number: 3

I have recently found old leases and conveyances of our family's
first bakery shop at 31 Fieldgate Street London E. which show that
the premises which I had always known as 29 31 and 33 were
originally called 9 10 and 11 and by 1897 had been renumbered.

I now wish to find the census entries for 1891. I have a
subscription to Ancestry.com, but other than knowing that the
address is in Whitechapel - St Mary, do not know where to start
looking . How do I find out on what page of the census Fieldgate
street records appear?


Jonathan Grodzinski - 4th generation London Master Baker


JCR-UK SIG #UnitedKingdom JCR: 1891 Census - is there a street index? #unitedkingdom

jeremy frankel
 

Dear Jonathan,

Yes, there are street indexes for most of the censuses carried out in
England. I don't know where you would find them in England, but I
know that my local Mormon library has them all on microfiche for a
number of census years.

They list the relevant numbers plus a cross-reference to the Mormon
microfilms of the respective censuses.

I will be there later on and will try to look it up for you.

Jeremy G Frankel
Berkeley, California, USA

At 12:00 AM -0600 1/19/06, JCR-UK SIG digest wrote:
Subject: 1891 Census - is there a street index?
From: JGrodz@aol.com
Date: Wed, 18 Jan 2006 04:25:36 -0500
X-Message-Number: 3

I have recently found old leases and conveyances of our family's
first bakery shop at 31 Fieldgate Street London E. which show that
the premises which I had always known as 29 31 and 33 were
originally called 9 10 and 11 and by 1897 had been renumbered.

I now wish to find the census entries for 1891. I have a
subscription to Ancestry.com, but other than knowing that the
address is in Whitechapel - St Mary, do not know where to start
looking . How do I find out on what page of the census Fieldgate
street records appear?


Jonathan Grodzinski - 4th generation London Master Baker


Vasilkov,Ukraine. #general

Elmer Friedman <elmerf@...>
 

Can someone please advise me in which province or gubernia the town of Vasilkov,
Ukraine, is located and how contact can be made to discover a grave site in one
of the cemeteries there? Thank you.
Dr. Elmer Friedman
elmerf@iopener.net

MODERATOR NOTE: You should consider to explore the resources avilable on the
Ukraine-SIG and to post your message to the Ukraine-SIG discussion group.
You can find more on the Ukraine-SIG home page, at:
http://www.jewishgen.org/ukraine/


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Vasilkov,Ukraine. #general

Elmer Friedman <elmerf@...>
 

Can someone please advise me in which province or gubernia the town of Vasilkov,
Ukraine, is located and how contact can be made to discover a grave site in one
of the cemeteries there? Thank you.
Dr. Elmer Friedman
elmerf@iopener.net

MODERATOR NOTE: You should consider to explore the resources avilable on the
Ukraine-SIG and to post your message to the Ukraine-SIG discussion group.
You can find more on the Ukraine-SIG home page, at:
http://www.jewishgen.org/ukraine/


Seeking Death Date And Obit On Aaron Friedman-NY-Brooklyn #general

sacredsisters3@aol.com <sacredsisters3@...>
 

Hello to all

I seek help in finding any information on this ancestor of mine. I am
seeking to find the death date for Aaron FRIEDMAN and possibly an obit.
I believe he died after 1966, because he is in photos of my uncles
barmitzvah and that was in 1966. He and his wife Rose(faikes)Friedman
lived in Brooklyn since the 1930's as far as I am aware. They did have
a business they operated for several years, but I am not sure if it was
a restaurant or store that sold all types of products. Quite possibly
it was a hat store or furniture store.

As far as I am aware they only had one child named Esther, who may
possibly still be living in new york, but I do not know her married
name. I believe the wife Rose(my great-aunt) died in 2000 in a home. I
believe he came >from Poland. I am not sure of his birth year but I
believe he was only one or two years younger then his wife rose and she
was born in 1903.

Sarah Greenberg
sacredsisters3@aol.com


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Seeking Death Date And Obit On Aaron Friedman-NY-Brooklyn #general

sacredsisters3@aol.com <sacredsisters3@...>
 

Hello to all

I seek help in finding any information on this ancestor of mine. I am
seeking to find the death date for Aaron FRIEDMAN and possibly an obit.
I believe he died after 1966, because he is in photos of my uncles
barmitzvah and that was in 1966. He and his wife Rose(faikes)Friedman
lived in Brooklyn since the 1930's as far as I am aware. They did have
a business they operated for several years, but I am not sure if it was
a restaurant or store that sold all types of products. Quite possibly
it was a hat store or furniture store.

As far as I am aware they only had one child named Esther, who may
possibly still be living in new york, but I do not know her married
name. I believe the wife Rose(my great-aunt) died in 2000 in a home. I
believe he came >from Poland. I am not sure of his birth year but I
believe he was only one or two years younger then his wife rose and she
was born in 1903.

Sarah Greenberg
sacredsisters3@aol.com


Re: Jewish death notices in the early 20th century #general

Lisa Lepore <llepore@...>
 

In the January 19,2006 JewishGen Digest, Pat Weinthal of Boston, MA
wrote:

<<There appears to be a mis-understanding about the purpose of
published death notices. In the U.S., this is a legal requirement
as claims on property, inheritance, and debt will need to be resolved.>>
From: < AGloger@aol.com >
I am puzzled by this statement as I have *never* heard of or been informed
that publication of a death was "a legal requirement" in the United States. Is
this a requirement in Massachusetts or throughout the US? I would be most
appreciative if Pat Weinthat could clarify this.

My personal experience has been that paid death notices did not become
common-place and published in daily and weekly newspapers until the early to
mid-1930s. My grandfather died in 1929 and an uncle died in 1930, and there
as no paid death notice or obituary in either the daily newspapers or the Jewish
weeklys. Ditto for my greatgrandmother who died in 1913.

Adelle Weintraub Gloger
Cleveland, Ohio
There seems to be confusion with the terminology here - I think the oiginal
message >from Pat is referring to the legal notices section of the paper. This
is where notices are posted concerning probate hearings or other legal matters
where the parties are required by law to notify anyone who might have an interest
in the case, and would want to be heard by the court. The law requires a public
notice to be sure all interested parties who may be unknown to the lawyers/
courts will have an opportunity to participate.

The rest of us who were confused by her message are referring to the obituaries/
death listings/death announcements that appear in all newspapers. They might
range >from a name and date of death to a long bio naming all the family members
and life accomplishments of the deceased. They can be paid or free, depending
on the newspapers' policies.
There is no legal requirement to place these kinds of notices. Most people place a
notice or an obituary to notify the public so that friends and family may
attend the services, and to memorialize the deceased person in some way.

In the old days, and in some parts of the US today, deaths are considered news,
and are listed by the paper for free. Today, many city newspapers across the
country have started to charge large sums to place the longer style obituaries,
so I think we will see less of them.

No one should overlook trying to find an obituary or notice of death in any of the
newspapers in the area where the person lived.

Lisa


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Jewish death notices in the early 20th century #general

Lisa Lepore <llepore@...>
 

In the January 19,2006 JewishGen Digest, Pat Weinthal of Boston, MA
wrote:

<<There appears to be a mis-understanding about the purpose of
published death notices. In the U.S., this is a legal requirement
as claims on property, inheritance, and debt will need to be resolved.>>
From: < AGloger@aol.com >
I am puzzled by this statement as I have *never* heard of or been informed
that publication of a death was "a legal requirement" in the United States. Is
this a requirement in Massachusetts or throughout the US? I would be most
appreciative if Pat Weinthat could clarify this.

My personal experience has been that paid death notices did not become
common-place and published in daily and weekly newspapers until the early to
mid-1930s. My grandfather died in 1929 and an uncle died in 1930, and there
as no paid death notice or obituary in either the daily newspapers or the Jewish
weeklys. Ditto for my greatgrandmother who died in 1913.

Adelle Weintraub Gloger
Cleveland, Ohio
There seems to be confusion with the terminology here - I think the oiginal
message >from Pat is referring to the legal notices section of the paper. This
is where notices are posted concerning probate hearings or other legal matters
where the parties are required by law to notify anyone who might have an interest
in the case, and would want to be heard by the court. The law requires a public
notice to be sure all interested parties who may be unknown to the lawyers/
courts will have an opportunity to participate.

The rest of us who were confused by her message are referring to the obituaries/
death listings/death announcements that appear in all newspapers. They might
range >from a name and date of death to a long bio naming all the family members
and life accomplishments of the deceased. They can be paid or free, depending
on the newspapers' policies.
There is no legal requirement to place these kinds of notices. Most people place a
notice or an obituary to notify the public so that friends and family may
attend the services, and to memorialize the deceased person in some way.

In the old days, and in some parts of the US today, deaths are considered news,
and are listed by the paper for free. Today, many city newspapers across the
country have started to charge large sums to place the longer style obituaries,
so I think we will see less of them.

No one should overlook trying to find an obituary or notice of death in any of the
newspapers in the area where the person lived.

Lisa


Re: Jewish death notices in the early 20th century #general

Hilary Henkin <hilary@...>
 

In regards to newspapers publishing death notices, I would add to
Anita's response that the Los Angeles Times publishes only a very few
death notices of any sort; certainly not all that would die in that
great region each day. Sadly for genealogists, they see no benefit
to listing the daily deaths.

On the other hand, I live in Atlanta, Georgia, and the Atlanta
Journal-Constitution publicly announces that it strives to list
everyone who has just died, and that a simple death notice costs
nothing. It promotes this as a community service. One can, of
course, purchase a larger listing and add details, photos, etc.

I also checked the Atlanta Business Chronicle, and it apparently
lists no notices related to deaths, probate, etc.

So, if there's a "legal requirement", it's not federal, and not in
California or Georgia . . .

Hilary Henkin
Atlanta, Georgia

At 08:31 PM 1/20/2006, you wrote:
There appears to be a mis-understanding about the purpose of
published death notices. In the U.S., this is a legal requirement
as claims on property, inheritance, and debt will need to be resolved.

Local law determines in which newspapers the names of the deceased
must appear.

This response has caught my attention because I was not aware of
this requirement. Do legal entanglements have to exist prior to the
death or is this just a matter of course. I ask because I never
published nor seen published announcements of my parents, uncles,
aunts, grandparents, etc. deaths. Am I misunderstanding this?

Thanks.

Regards,
Anita Citron


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen RE: Jewish death notices in the early 20th century #general

Hilary Henkin <hilary@...>
 

In regards to newspapers publishing death notices, I would add to
Anita's response that the Los Angeles Times publishes only a very few
death notices of any sort; certainly not all that would die in that
great region each day. Sadly for genealogists, they see no benefit
to listing the daily deaths.

On the other hand, I live in Atlanta, Georgia, and the Atlanta
Journal-Constitution publicly announces that it strives to list
everyone who has just died, and that a simple death notice costs
nothing. It promotes this as a community service. One can, of
course, purchase a larger listing and add details, photos, etc.

I also checked the Atlanta Business Chronicle, and it apparently
lists no notices related to deaths, probate, etc.

So, if there's a "legal requirement", it's not federal, and not in
California or Georgia . . .

Hilary Henkin
Atlanta, Georgia

At 08:31 PM 1/20/2006, you wrote:
There appears to be a mis-understanding about the purpose of
published death notices. In the U.S., this is a legal requirement
as claims on property, inheritance, and debt will need to be resolved.

Local law determines in which newspapers the names of the deceased
must appear.

This response has caught my attention because I was not aware of
this requirement. Do legal entanglements have to exist prior to the
death or is this just a matter of course. I ask because I never
published nor seen published announcements of my parents, uncles,
aunts, grandparents, etc. deaths. Am I misunderstanding this?

Thanks.

Regards,
Anita Citron