Date   

Re: Visiting Poland #poland

Tilford Bartman <bartmant@...>
 

Hi,

Zamenhofa Street is still there. In fact one of the major hotels in
Bialystok the Braniki is at 25 Zamenhofa but it may be that the current
numbering system doesn't correspond well at all to what it was in 1941.
As you may know Zamenhofa is named for Ludwik Zamenhof the creator of
the artificial language Esparanto. As I remember his home is on the
corner of Biala Street. It's somewhat of a tourist site that you can
visit. This neighborhood was one of the old Jewish neighborhoods and
was probably best known for the presence of the rather impressive Choral
Synagogue. It was also sometimes called the Zabludowski synagogue. This
synagogue was built by Zamenhof's father I think in the mid 1800's, and
it was burned during the destruction of the Ghetto in 1943. Zamenhof
Street will be easy to find.

To find out specifically what happened to your family in Bialystok
during the Shoa may not be possible. I quickly looked for the name on
various things that I have but didn't find it. There where very many
ways and very many places in which Bialystoker Jews suffered and met
their fate during the Shoa. So there are many possibilities. There do
not appear to be very extensive lists or records that help us learn the
fate of specific Bialystoker Jews. Most of this is lost forever. Most
Jews >from Bialystok who ended up deported to death camps went to
Treblinka, Auschwitz, or Majdanek, in that order. There were also some
pretty extensive mass killings that were carried out locally in or near
the Ghetto >from June of 1941 to August of 1943. Many of the "Thursday"
victims came >from the area of Zamenhof street. This took place on
Thursday July 3rd 1943. Men >from the age about 16-60 were taken by the
Germans >from their homes and there was a "selection". Several hundred
were taken to the edge of town to Pietrasze field and killed there.
Unlike Warsaw for instance not as many died in Bialystok within the
ghetto of starvation and disease. I will keep a look out for the name
Walicki, and will email you if I find anything.

Tilford Bartman, www.zabludow.com


Batya Dashefsky wrote:


I will be visiting Poland in 9 months and am specifically trying to
find out what happened to my family who were living in Bialystok in
1941.

I have an address and I think a last name- Walicki, 27 Zamenhofa.
If anyone is familiar with the city and can point me in the right
direction I would appreciate it.

Thanks

Batya Dashefsky
Jerusalem

MODERATOR'S NOTE: While Discussion Group rules require that any
recommendation of guides, hotels, etc. must be sent privately,
other suggestions for research or travel to Bialystok may be
shared with the list.


BialyGen: Bialystok Region #Bialystok #Poland Re: Visiting Poland #poland

Tilford Bartman <bartmant@...>
 

Hi,

Zamenhofa Street is still there. In fact one of the major hotels in
Bialystok the Braniki is at 25 Zamenhofa but it may be that the current
numbering system doesn't correspond well at all to what it was in 1941.
As you may know Zamenhofa is named for Ludwik Zamenhof the creator of
the artificial language Esparanto. As I remember his home is on the
corner of Biala Street. It's somewhat of a tourist site that you can
visit. This neighborhood was one of the old Jewish neighborhoods and
was probably best known for the presence of the rather impressive Choral
Synagogue. It was also sometimes called the Zabludowski synagogue. This
synagogue was built by Zamenhof's father I think in the mid 1800's, and
it was burned during the destruction of the Ghetto in 1943. Zamenhof
Street will be easy to find.

To find out specifically what happened to your family in Bialystok
during the Shoa may not be possible. I quickly looked for the name on
various things that I have but didn't find it. There where very many
ways and very many places in which Bialystoker Jews suffered and met
their fate during the Shoa. So there are many possibilities. There do
not appear to be very extensive lists or records that help us learn the
fate of specific Bialystoker Jews. Most of this is lost forever. Most
Jews >from Bialystok who ended up deported to death camps went to
Treblinka, Auschwitz, or Majdanek, in that order. There were also some
pretty extensive mass killings that were carried out locally in or near
the Ghetto >from June of 1941 to August of 1943. Many of the "Thursday"
victims came >from the area of Zamenhof street. This took place on
Thursday July 3rd 1943. Men >from the age about 16-60 were taken by the
Germans >from their homes and there was a "selection". Several hundred
were taken to the edge of town to Pietrasze field and killed there.
Unlike Warsaw for instance not as many died in Bialystok within the
ghetto of starvation and disease. I will keep a look out for the name
Walicki, and will email you if I find anything.

Tilford Bartman, www.zabludow.com


Batya Dashefsky wrote:


I will be visiting Poland in 9 months and am specifically trying to
find out what happened to my family who were living in Bialystok in
1941.

I have an address and I think a last name- Walicki, 27 Zamenhofa.
If anyone is familiar with the city and can point me in the right
direction I would appreciate it.

Thanks

Batya Dashefsky
Jerusalem

MODERATOR'S NOTE: While Discussion Group rules require that any
recommendation of guides, hotels, etc. must be sent privately,
other suggestions for research or travel to Bialystok may be
shared with the list.


FREEDMAN #general

Norman Greenfeld
 

My wife's grandfather,Joseph FREEDMAN, died in 1924, came >from Polotosk. In
a copy of a holographic will, he referred to his brother, Hyman L. FREEDMAN
from Polotosk, a sister, Sophia AFFSENSKI and another brother, Max, of Holyoke
Massachusetts.. My wife's father never spoke of his family. Anything one may
have of either the town or the family would be most appreciated. You may
answer privately to ngreenf1@nycap.rr.com.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen FREEDMAN #general

Norman Greenfeld
 

My wife's grandfather,Joseph FREEDMAN, died in 1924, came >from Polotosk. In
a copy of a holographic will, he referred to his brother, Hyman L. FREEDMAN
from Polotosk, a sister, Sophia AFFSENSKI and another brother, Max, of Holyoke
Massachusetts.. My wife's father never spoke of his family. Anything one may
have of either the town or the family would be most appreciated. You may
answer privately to ngreenf1@nycap.rr.com.


Re. Rabbi Leiser LAZARUS (my relative?) #general

Fernando Lazarus <fernandolazarus@...>
 

Hello Genners:
The well know Rabbi Leiser LAZARUS, born 1822, in
Filehne, Posen (now Wielen) Prussia, had four
siblings: Bonna, married to the Philologist Dr.
Leopold Cohen, Arnold, Elie and Adolf all with the
surname of LAZARUS. According to Mr Herb Sollingen of
Uniondale, NY, member of JewishGen (2001) Arnold
LAZARUS married and have a daugther: Hanna (who
recently dies in NY, 2001)
My question is: it is possible that this Arnold
LAZARUS, is the Arnold I am looking after ?
My information says that Arnold LAZARUS, had two
siblings with Rosette ZOEGAL, one of them is my
grandfather: Ernest LAZARUS ZOEGAL born in Berlin
October 13, 1874.
My great grandmother : Rosette ZOEGAL, born on
November 22, 1850, place of birth: unknow, dies on
December 8, 1922, in Hamburg (?)
My Arnold was born: May 18, that all I have >from him.
Is possible that Arnold had siblings with two diferent
women, one of them is Rosette ZOEGAL.
The Rabbi Leiser Lazarus was the Director of the
Jewish Teological Seminay in Breslau, Silesia, Prussia
and he dies in 1879.
He had a brother by the name of Moritz LAZARUS,
1824-1903, a well know Philosopher and Social
Psychologist.
Leiser and Moritz father was: Aaron Levin LAZARUS.
I need help with this information.
Shalom

Fernando Enrique Lazarus
fernandolazarus@yahoo.com

MODERATOR NOTE: The writer is using the word "siblings" to mean
siblings in the next generation, not brothers and sisters of the person
mentioned.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re. Rabbi Leiser LAZARUS (my relative?) #general

Fernando Lazarus <fernandolazarus@...>
 

Hello Genners:
The well know Rabbi Leiser LAZARUS, born 1822, in
Filehne, Posen (now Wielen) Prussia, had four
siblings: Bonna, married to the Philologist Dr.
Leopold Cohen, Arnold, Elie and Adolf all with the
surname of LAZARUS. According to Mr Herb Sollingen of
Uniondale, NY, member of JewishGen (2001) Arnold
LAZARUS married and have a daugther: Hanna (who
recently dies in NY, 2001)
My question is: it is possible that this Arnold
LAZARUS, is the Arnold I am looking after ?
My information says that Arnold LAZARUS, had two
siblings with Rosette ZOEGAL, one of them is my
grandfather: Ernest LAZARUS ZOEGAL born in Berlin
October 13, 1874.
My great grandmother : Rosette ZOEGAL, born on
November 22, 1850, place of birth: unknow, dies on
December 8, 1922, in Hamburg (?)
My Arnold was born: May 18, that all I have >from him.
Is possible that Arnold had siblings with two diferent
women, one of them is Rosette ZOEGAL.
The Rabbi Leiser Lazarus was the Director of the
Jewish Teological Seminay in Breslau, Silesia, Prussia
and he dies in 1879.
He had a brother by the name of Moritz LAZARUS,
1824-1903, a well know Philosopher and Social
Psychologist.
Leiser and Moritz father was: Aaron Levin LAZARUS.
I need help with this information.
Shalom

Fernando Enrique Lazarus
fernandolazarus@yahoo.com

MODERATOR NOTE: The writer is using the word "siblings" to mean
siblings in the next generation, not brothers and sisters of the person
mentioned.


Re: Russian Phonetics #general

Stan Goodman <SPAM_FOILER@...>
 

On Fri, 3 Feb 2006 16:44:13 UTC, zen28027@zen.co.uk (Aubrey Jacobus)
opined:

It is classic genealogy trap -when is a slight spelling difference
significant and when is it mere coincidence -
with transliteration >from Cyrillic to Latin script often via Yiddish always
written without vowels an always present nightmare .
We have a case in point for years we suspected the Litvak families KLOSS and
KLASS were the same but had no proof. Very recently we were able to compare
two ship manifests one was a US 1905 immigrant Nachamia KLAS who fitted the
profile of Nick KLASS in Chicago perfectly now we find a US 1905 immigrant
Nechamia KLOSS who surely is Nick KLASS in Chicago , confirmed by the
destination address.
Can a Russian liguist comment on how such a confusion arose.
BTW KLOSS is a relatively common German name and KLASS is rare other than in
the USA.
Aubrey Jacobus
London
I do not style myself a linguist, but I can say the following:

1) In both Cyrillic and Latin handwriting, expecially some of the
execrable examples with which we have to deal, it is no great thing to
confuse a lower-case A with an O, or vice-versa. Judith's guess about
vowel pronunciation is equally likely. Take your pick.

2) As an aside: Contrary to what is written in the query above,
Yiddish, as an Indo-European language, is *never* written
without vowels, else its written form would be incomprehensible. It is
Hebrew, with other Afro-Asiatic languages, that is written without
vowels.

--
Stan Goodman, Qiryat Tiv'on, Israel

Searching:
NEACHOWICZ/NOACHOWICZ, NEJMAN/NAJMAN, SURALSKI: Lomza Gubernia
ISMACH: Lomza Gubernia, Galicia, and Ukraina
HERTANU, ABRAMOVICI, LAUER: Dorohoi District, Romania
GRISARU, VATARU: Iasi, Dorohoi, and Mileanca, Romania

See my interactive family tree (requires Java 1.1.6 or better). the
URL is: http://www.hashkedim.com

For reasons connected with anti-spam/junk security, the return address
is not valid. To communicate with me, please visit my website (see the
URL above -- no Java required for this purpose) and fill in the email
form there.

MODERATOR NOTE: This discussion, which started with the practical
question of the identity of families in Lithuania and America with
similarly spelled names, has moved well into the realm of technical
points of linguistics. Please continue the technical linguistic discussions
privately. Messages with direct genealogical content will be considered
for posting.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Russian Phonetics #general

Stan Goodman <SPAM_FOILER@...>
 

On Fri, 3 Feb 2006 16:44:13 UTC, zen28027@zen.co.uk (Aubrey Jacobus)
opined:

It is classic genealogy trap -when is a slight spelling difference
significant and when is it mere coincidence -
with transliteration >from Cyrillic to Latin script often via Yiddish always
written without vowels an always present nightmare .
We have a case in point for years we suspected the Litvak families KLOSS and
KLASS were the same but had no proof. Very recently we were able to compare
two ship manifests one was a US 1905 immigrant Nachamia KLAS who fitted the
profile of Nick KLASS in Chicago perfectly now we find a US 1905 immigrant
Nechamia KLOSS who surely is Nick KLASS in Chicago , confirmed by the
destination address.
Can a Russian liguist comment on how such a confusion arose.
BTW KLOSS is a relatively common German name and KLASS is rare other than in
the USA.
Aubrey Jacobus
London
I do not style myself a linguist, but I can say the following:

1) In both Cyrillic and Latin handwriting, expecially some of the
execrable examples with which we have to deal, it is no great thing to
confuse a lower-case A with an O, or vice-versa. Judith's guess about
vowel pronunciation is equally likely. Take your pick.

2) As an aside: Contrary to what is written in the query above,
Yiddish, as an Indo-European language, is *never* written
without vowels, else its written form would be incomprehensible. It is
Hebrew, with other Afro-Asiatic languages, that is written without
vowels.

--
Stan Goodman, Qiryat Tiv'on, Israel

Searching:
NEACHOWICZ/NOACHOWICZ, NEJMAN/NAJMAN, SURALSKI: Lomza Gubernia
ISMACH: Lomza Gubernia, Galicia, and Ukraina
HERTANU, ABRAMOVICI, LAUER: Dorohoi District, Romania
GRISARU, VATARU: Iasi, Dorohoi, and Mileanca, Romania

See my interactive family tree (requires Java 1.1.6 or better). the
URL is: http://www.hashkedim.com

For reasons connected with anti-spam/junk security, the return address
is not valid. To communicate with me, please visit my website (see the
URL above -- no Java required for this purpose) and fill in the email
form there.

MODERATOR NOTE: This discussion, which started with the practical
question of the identity of families in Lithuania and America with
similarly spelled names, has moved well into the realm of technical
points of linguistics. Please continue the technical linguistic discussions
privately. Messages with direct genealogical content will be considered
for posting.


Re: Looking for German translation help - Lichtenstein family tree #general

Celia Male <celiamale@...>
 

I simply have to comment on the genealogical
significance of Reuben Gross's document which appeared
in two Viewmate sections on different dates:
VM7375-7378 [archive] - VM7455- 7459 [current].

It is one of the most detailed family sagas I have
seen - apparently written in 1926. It discusses the
spread of a Moravian family called LICHTENSTEIN from
Leipnik [Moravia] to Bohemia, Slovakia, Austria,
Hungary, Russia, Turkey to USA & Brazil. Many places
{and family names} are mentioned including Pressburg,
Ung. Ostra, Tyrnau, Budapest, Raab, Vienna, Chicago,
and New York.

The man who wrote it must have verbalised a tree in
front of him. Unless one has the whole document and
enters the data systematically onto a family tree it
is hard to follow.

Even if you do not speak German you may find a link as
I suspect there must be many links with Siggers all
over the world. There are links to so many names and I
have picked out just a few:

WEICHSELBAUM living in Vienna >from Galicia
FUCHS Leopold; a cantor >from Pressburg [Hungary/Slovakia]
KATZ Minka >from Prerau, Moravia - daughter of a rabbi
with many rabbinic forefathers.
ROSENWASSER Emil - Budapest;
BING Josef Plesivec;
SLECHTA Bedrich - Ung. Ostra [Moravia]
HERZ Fanni >from Trencin.

This is a prize document and a classic for anyone
studying Moravian and Bohemian genealogy and the
subsequent spread of these families throughout the
Habsburg Empire and later throughout the world, before
the holocaust.

The saga starts with VM7375: {Wieland} Bernard
LICHTENSTEIN who wandered to Krivoklat in Bohemia from
Leipnik in Moravia in the year 1809, where he built a
house in 1811. I suspect he was born ca 1785-1790. He
died in 1874. Leipnik was first settled by Jews in
1454. His first marriage was to LOWENSTEIN from
Podhradi [Frauenberg] in Bohemia.

The whole scanned document up to the final page [7458]
deals with descendants [four sons] of Bernard's first
marriage - on the last page we start with the
descendants of his second marriage [three sons and
three daughters]. Unfortunately there are not dates,
but once this tree is computerised one should be able
to make informed guesses. The first batch of children
were probably born 1812-1819 - followed soon after by
the second batch. Bernard's third marriage was
childless.

Just use this single Viewmate link and substitute the
different numbers sequentially to see all the pages:

http://data.jewishgen.org/viewmate/ALL/viewmateview.asp?key=7375

continue with: 7376-7377-7378-7455-7456-7457-7458

Thank you Reuben for bringing such exciting genealogy
to the General Discussion Group. It will be of great
interest to many Austria-Czech and Slovakian-Hungarian
Siggers: http://www.jewishgen.org/austriaczech/
http://www.jewishgen.org/Hungary/

We always knew that a large percentage of Hungarian
Jews were descended >from Bohemian and Moravian Jews
and here is a document which shows us the links which
are usually missing.

Celia Male [U.K.]


Lithuanian groshes (coins) #general

Lee Nydell <lnydell@...>
 

I have seen a reference that in the year of 1626, the Jewish Community
sent 1460 Lithuanian groshes (coins) to the government.

Can anyone tell me if this was a little or a lot of money in 1626?

Lee Nydell Irvine, California, United States lnydell@yahoo.com
Researching - NADEL, NUDEL, NIEDLE >from Russia, Belarus and Poland


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen re: Looking for German translation help - Lichtenstein family tree #general

Celia Male <celiamale@...>
 

I simply have to comment on the genealogical
significance of Reuben Gross's document which appeared
in two Viewmate sections on different dates:
VM7375-7378 [archive] - VM7455- 7459 [current].

It is one of the most detailed family sagas I have
seen - apparently written in 1926. It discusses the
spread of a Moravian family called LICHTENSTEIN from
Leipnik [Moravia] to Bohemia, Slovakia, Austria,
Hungary, Russia, Turkey to USA & Brazil. Many places
{and family names} are mentioned including Pressburg,
Ung. Ostra, Tyrnau, Budapest, Raab, Vienna, Chicago,
and New York.

The man who wrote it must have verbalised a tree in
front of him. Unless one has the whole document and
enters the data systematically onto a family tree it
is hard to follow.

Even if you do not speak German you may find a link as
I suspect there must be many links with Siggers all
over the world. There are links to so many names and I
have picked out just a few:

WEICHSELBAUM living in Vienna >from Galicia
FUCHS Leopold; a cantor >from Pressburg [Hungary/Slovakia]
KATZ Minka >from Prerau, Moravia - daughter of a rabbi
with many rabbinic forefathers.
ROSENWASSER Emil - Budapest;
BING Josef Plesivec;
SLECHTA Bedrich - Ung. Ostra [Moravia]
HERZ Fanni >from Trencin.

This is a prize document and a classic for anyone
studying Moravian and Bohemian genealogy and the
subsequent spread of these families throughout the
Habsburg Empire and later throughout the world, before
the holocaust.

The saga starts with VM7375: {Wieland} Bernard
LICHTENSTEIN who wandered to Krivoklat in Bohemia from
Leipnik in Moravia in the year 1809, where he built a
house in 1811. I suspect he was born ca 1785-1790. He
died in 1874. Leipnik was first settled by Jews in
1454. His first marriage was to LOWENSTEIN from
Podhradi [Frauenberg] in Bohemia.

The whole scanned document up to the final page [7458]
deals with descendants [four sons] of Bernard's first
marriage - on the last page we start with the
descendants of his second marriage [three sons and
three daughters]. Unfortunately there are not dates,
but once this tree is computerised one should be able
to make informed guesses. The first batch of children
were probably born 1812-1819 - followed soon after by
the second batch. Bernard's third marriage was
childless.

Just use this single Viewmate link and substitute the
different numbers sequentially to see all the pages:

http://data.jewishgen.org/viewmate/ALL/viewmateview.asp?key=7375

continue with: 7376-7377-7378-7455-7456-7457-7458

Thank you Reuben for bringing such exciting genealogy
to the General Discussion Group. It will be of great
interest to many Austria-Czech and Slovakian-Hungarian
Siggers: http://www.jewishgen.org/austriaczech/
http://www.jewishgen.org/Hungary/

We always knew that a large percentage of Hungarian
Jews were descended >from Bohemian and Moravian Jews
and here is a document which shows us the links which
are usually missing.

Celia Male [U.K.]


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Lithuanian groshes (coins) #general

Lee Nydell <lnydell@...>
 

I have seen a reference that in the year of 1626, the Jewish Community
sent 1460 Lithuanian groshes (coins) to the government.

Can anyone tell me if this was a little or a lot of money in 1626?

Lee Nydell Irvine, California, United States lnydell@yahoo.com
Researching - NADEL, NUDEL, NIEDLE >from Russia, Belarus and Poland


Olishabka Chernigov Region #general

Milton Friedman <miltonf@...>
 

My grandfather Robert Kruger was >from the town of Olishabka, Chernigov
Region of what is now the Ukraine I cannot find the town on a map. It may
also be a phonetic spell of the town. I am trying to locate the place.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Olishabka Chernigov Region #general

Milton Friedman <miltonf@...>
 

My grandfather Robert Kruger was >from the town of Olishabka, Chernigov
Region of what is now the Ukraine I cannot find the town on a map. It may
also be a phonetic spell of the town. I am trying to locate the place.


Re: Russian Phonetics #general

Jules Levin
 

At 07:38 AM 2/3/2006, you wrote:

It is classic genealogy trap -when is a slight spelling difference
significant and when is it mere coincidence -
with transliteration >from Cyrillic to Latin script often via Yiddish always
written without vowels an always present nightmare .
We have a case in point for years we suspected the Litvak families KLOSS and
KLASS were the same but had no proof. Very recently we were able to compare
two ship manifests one was a US 1905 immigrant Nachamia KLAS who fitted the
profile of Nick KLASS in Chicago perfectly now we find a US 1905 immigrant
Nechamia KLOSS who surely is Nick KLASS in Chicago , confirmed by the
destination address.
Can a Russian liguist comment on how such a confusion arose.
BTW KLOSS is a relatively common German name and KLASS is rare other than in
the USA.
I don't quite see how Cyrillic vs. Latin plays a
role here, since curiously enough,
the Cyrillic letters for A and O are in fact A
and O. Thus "Moscow" in Russian letters
is MOCKBA, pronounced [in NGR dialect]
'moskva'. (In standard Russian unstressed
'o' becomes 'a'.) As for the phonetics involved,
note that the 'a' involved is pronounced
'ah' as in 'father', and the 'o' involved is
pronounced 'aw', as in 'dawn' [*not* 'o' as in 'dope'!]. If you speak an
American dialect that doesn't make a distinction
between Don and dawn, you won't get this.
As for the confusion, I can't think of a reason
based on Eastern European phonetics. If both names are
attested in EEurope, they must be considered
different names. If, not, perhaps we
should look at local factors in the US. Could
the spelling be changed >from 'o' to 'a' under the influence
of the English word 'class'? I hate to resort to
the theory of ignorant immigration officials, but could the
pronunciation of Kloss as 'klaws' have been
misapprehended as 'klahs' and then written with 'a'?
Other ideas?
Jules Levin
Professor of Russian and Linguistics, Emeritus
UCLA, UCR


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Russian Phonetics #general

Jules Levin
 

At 07:38 AM 2/3/2006, you wrote:

It is classic genealogy trap -when is a slight spelling difference
significant and when is it mere coincidence -
with transliteration >from Cyrillic to Latin script often via Yiddish always
written without vowels an always present nightmare .
We have a case in point for years we suspected the Litvak families KLOSS and
KLASS were the same but had no proof. Very recently we were able to compare
two ship manifests one was a US 1905 immigrant Nachamia KLAS who fitted the
profile of Nick KLASS in Chicago perfectly now we find a US 1905 immigrant
Nechamia KLOSS who surely is Nick KLASS in Chicago , confirmed by the
destination address.
Can a Russian liguist comment on how such a confusion arose.
BTW KLOSS is a relatively common German name and KLASS is rare other than in
the USA.
I don't quite see how Cyrillic vs. Latin plays a
role here, since curiously enough,
the Cyrillic letters for A and O are in fact A
and O. Thus "Moscow" in Russian letters
is MOCKBA, pronounced [in NGR dialect]
'moskva'. (In standard Russian unstressed
'o' becomes 'a'.) As for the phonetics involved,
note that the 'a' involved is pronounced
'ah' as in 'father', and the 'o' involved is
pronounced 'aw', as in 'dawn' [*not* 'o' as in 'dope'!]. If you speak an
American dialect that doesn't make a distinction
between Don and dawn, you won't get this.
As for the confusion, I can't think of a reason
based on Eastern European phonetics. If both names are
attested in EEurope, they must be considered
different names. If, not, perhaps we
should look at local factors in the US. Could
the spelling be changed >from 'o' to 'a' under the influence
of the English word 'class'? I hate to resort to
the theory of ignorant immigration officials, but could the
pronunciation of Kloss as 'klaws' have been
misapprehended as 'klahs' and then written with 'a'?
Other ideas?
Jules Levin
Professor of Russian and Linguistics, Emeritus
UCLA, UCR


Re: FindUSA pulls library access - clarification #general

Yehudh bn Shlmo
 

--- Renee Steinig <rsteinig@suffolk.lib.ny.us> wrote:

Unfortunately, news came today >from Godfrey's
director, Richard E. Black, that FindUSA's parent
company has "made a business decision to discontinue
the FindUSA database service to libraries effective
immediately."
I just want to clarify this. When ReferenceUSA said
that they discontinued the product, they did not mean
just library access. The FindUSA online product was
completely removed >from the marketplace, even to
businesses.

Yehudah ben Shlomo
U.S.A


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: FindUSA pulls library access - clarification #general

Yehudh bn Shlmo
 

--- Renee Steinig <rsteinig@suffolk.lib.ny.us> wrote:

Unfortunately, news came today >from Godfrey's
director, Richard E. Black, that FindUSA's parent
company has "made a business decision to discontinue
the FindUSA database service to libraries effective
immediately."
I just want to clarify this. When ReferenceUSA said
that they discontinued the product, they did not mean
just library access. The FindUSA online product was
completely removed >from the marketplace, even to
businesses.

Yehudah ben Shlomo
U.S.A


mtDNA: Whom to test? #dna

Pam Weston <pweston@...>
 

Would there be any difference in the test results if I tested my
mother, myself, my daughter, or my granddaughter? Would the mtDNA
all be exactly the same?

Pam Weston
Chicago/Rincon, PR.


DNA Research #DNA mtDNA: Whom to test? #dna

Pam Weston <pweston@...>
 

Would there be any difference in the test results if I tested my
mother, myself, my daughter, or my granddaughter? Would the mtDNA
all be exactly the same?

Pam Weston
Chicago/Rincon, PR.