Date   

February 5 meeting of JGS Conejo Valley and Ventura County #general

jan meisels allen <janmallen@...>
 

The JGS of the Conejo Valley and Ventura County [California] (JGSCV) will
meet on Sunday, February 5, 2006 >from 2:00 -4:00 p.m.

Attend our meeting and learn about "windows of our past" the archives of the
Ventura County Museum - Our program is the "Jewish Treasures of the Ventura
County Museum".

Charles Johnson, Librarian and Associate Director of the Ventura County
Museum will discuss the archives and resources of the Ventura County Museum
related to the pioneer Jews of Ventura County, including where the pioneer
Jews are buried, the A. Levy Collection, and other collections of interest.
Learn how to research your Ventura County pioneer ancestors starting from
1873 >from biographical resources! Mr. Johnson will present historical
research, depicting time and place--providing "windows of our past".

The meeting is scheduled for January 8 2006 >from 2:00-4:00 pm at Temple
Adat Elohim in the Social Hall. The meeting is co-sponsored with Temple
Adat Elohim .

Location: Temple Adat Elohim, Social Hall
2420 E. Hillcrest Drive, Thousand Oaks

Directions:

from the east: 101 Freeway going west/north to Hampshire Blvd. Turn left
to East Thousand Oaks Blvd, turn right (north) on Skyline Drive,
turn left on E. Hillcrest drive go 0.3 miles - Temple is on the left.

from the west:
Take 101 Freeway going east/south - exit Rancho Road in Thousand Oaks, go
left or north (across Thousand Oaks Blvd) to E. Hillcrest Drive
turn right on E. Hillcrest go about 1.3 miles (just east of Conejo School
Road) Temple is on the right.

There are approximately 75 parking spots within the complex. There is no
parking on Hillcrest Drive. You may park in the complex or on any of the
side streets.

There is no fee to attend the program, and anyone interested in Jewish
genealogy is welcome to attend.

For more information on the JGSCV or about the program, please contact Jan
Meisels Allen at jan@JGSCV.org

Jan Meisels Allen
President, JGSCV
Agoura Hills, CA


JGS Broward January Meeting #general

kasakaplan@...
 

Sunday, January 29th at 2:00 PM
Soref Jewish Community Center
6501 West Sunrise Blvd.
(65th Avenue between University Drive and the Florida Turnpike)
Plantation, Florida

Our speaker will be Ron Arons who will speak about Bugsy Siegel and Meyer
Lansky - the Men Behind the famous Flamingo Hotel and their amazing lives. The
talk will not only provide a terrific story, but also focus on how and where
one can find non-traditional documents. Of special interest Mayer Lansky,
born Maier Suchowljansky, a Jew >from Grudno, once lived in Miami Beach and
later helped put Las Vegas on the map.

Admission is free, all are welcome and refreshments will be served. For
additional information or inquiries, please check our website at
www.JGSBroward.org or www.Sorefjcc.org.

Elaine L. Kaplan
Program Chairman


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen February 5 meeting of JGS Conejo Valley and Ventura County #general

jan meisels allen <janmallen@...>
 

The JGS of the Conejo Valley and Ventura County [California] (JGSCV) will
meet on Sunday, February 5, 2006 >from 2:00 -4:00 p.m.

Attend our meeting and learn about "windows of our past" the archives of the
Ventura County Museum - Our program is the "Jewish Treasures of the Ventura
County Museum".

Charles Johnson, Librarian and Associate Director of the Ventura County
Museum will discuss the archives and resources of the Ventura County Museum
related to the pioneer Jews of Ventura County, including where the pioneer
Jews are buried, the A. Levy Collection, and other collections of interest.
Learn how to research your Ventura County pioneer ancestors starting from
1873 >from biographical resources! Mr. Johnson will present historical
research, depicting time and place--providing "windows of our past".

The meeting is scheduled for January 8 2006 >from 2:00-4:00 pm at Temple
Adat Elohim in the Social Hall. The meeting is co-sponsored with Temple
Adat Elohim .

Location: Temple Adat Elohim, Social Hall
2420 E. Hillcrest Drive, Thousand Oaks

Directions:

from the east: 101 Freeway going west/north to Hampshire Blvd. Turn left
to East Thousand Oaks Blvd, turn right (north) on Skyline Drive,
turn left on E. Hillcrest drive go 0.3 miles - Temple is on the left.

from the west:
Take 101 Freeway going east/south - exit Rancho Road in Thousand Oaks, go
left or north (across Thousand Oaks Blvd) to E. Hillcrest Drive
turn right on E. Hillcrest go about 1.3 miles (just east of Conejo School
Road) Temple is on the right.

There are approximately 75 parking spots within the complex. There is no
parking on Hillcrest Drive. You may park in the complex or on any of the
side streets.

There is no fee to attend the program, and anyone interested in Jewish
genealogy is welcome to attend.

For more information on the JGSCV or about the program, please contact Jan
Meisels Allen at jan@JGSCV.org

Jan Meisels Allen
President, JGSCV
Agoura Hills, CA


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen JGS Broward January Meeting #general

kasakaplan@...
 

Sunday, January 29th at 2:00 PM
Soref Jewish Community Center
6501 West Sunrise Blvd.
(65th Avenue between University Drive and the Florida Turnpike)
Plantation, Florida

Our speaker will be Ron Arons who will speak about Bugsy Siegel and Meyer
Lansky - the Men Behind the famous Flamingo Hotel and their amazing lives. The
talk will not only provide a terrific story, but also focus on how and where
one can find non-traditional documents. Of special interest Mayer Lansky,
born Maier Suchowljansky, a Jew >from Grudno, once lived in Miami Beach and
later helped put Las Vegas on the map.

Admission is free, all are welcome and refreshments will be served. For
additional information or inquiries, please check our website at
www.JGSBroward.org or www.Sorefjcc.org.

Elaine L. Kaplan
Program Chairman


JCR: Cornwall Road in London 1918 #unitedkingdom

jeremy frankel
 

Dear Jonathan,

In looking at a modern A-Z for London, I see that there are a total
of ten Cornwall Roads; four of them have London postal district
appellations: N4, N15, N18, SE1, while six are in the London suburbs:
Croydon, Esher, Harrow, Pinner, Sutton and Twickenham. If Jonathan is
fairly sure that the business was in London, then we can probably
disregard the suburb locations

I then looked at my pre-war (WW2) A-Z, I see that there are five
Cornwall Roads with postal district appellations: E2, N4, N15, SE1,
and W11.

E2 - a very short street in Bethnal Green/Mile End area. It ran
westwards off Braintree Street (still there today). It was renamed
Cornwall AVENUE in 1938.

N4 - this too is a short "one block long" street running east-west
between Lancaster Road and Oakfield Road in Finsbury Park. It is just
to the west of the park. It is still there today.

N15 - one mile NE of the N4 location. It runs north-south >from St.
Ann's Road to Green Road in the North Harringay area. It is still
there today

N18 - getting closer to the "'burbs." A "very" short street running
north-south >from Angel Road (A 406) to Fairfield Road. It is so small
that most maps don't name it, but it is the second one >from the right
going east >from Fore Street as one walks down Fairfield. Still there
today.

SE1 - this runs roughly north-south >from Upper Ground to The Cut in
Lambeth. This too is still there today.

So, Jonathan, which one? By the way, there is a Grodzinski's bakery
at the bottom of my road, Edgwarebury Lane, Edgware where my mother
gets her challah every week.

Jeremy G Frankel
ex-Edgware, Middlesex, England
Berkeley, California, USA

At 12:00 AM -0600 1/19/06, JCR-UK SIG digest wrote:
Subject: Cornwall Road in London 1918
From: JGrodz@aol.com
Date: Wed, 18 Jan 2006 04:14:43 -0500

I have just found my grandfather Abie GRODZINSKI statement of
affairs drawn up after his death in 1918. Abie was aged 32 at the
time and was running the family bakery business in Fieldgate Street
in London's East End.

In the statement there is reference to rates and rent ....... also
to "107 Cornwall Road" (without any indication of where this was in
London). My late uncle told me that the family had had a shop in
West London at approximately that time.

I have looked at current Cornwall Roads, but before I start
investigating them, I would like to know whether there were others
in London in 1918. I have found an index of changed street names
but it is alphabetical according to current and not old names.

So can anyone help me find my grandfather's Cornwall Road? I think
that No. 107 would have been a baker's shop and may have had some
Jewish population nearby.


JCR-UK SIG #UnitedKingdom JCR: Cornwall Road in London 1918 #unitedkingdom

jeremy frankel
 

Dear Jonathan,

In looking at a modern A-Z for London, I see that there are a total
of ten Cornwall Roads; four of them have London postal district
appellations: N4, N15, N18, SE1, while six are in the London suburbs:
Croydon, Esher, Harrow, Pinner, Sutton and Twickenham. If Jonathan is
fairly sure that the business was in London, then we can probably
disregard the suburb locations

I then looked at my pre-war (WW2) A-Z, I see that there are five
Cornwall Roads with postal district appellations: E2, N4, N15, SE1,
and W11.

E2 - a very short street in Bethnal Green/Mile End area. It ran
westwards off Braintree Street (still there today). It was renamed
Cornwall AVENUE in 1938.

N4 - this too is a short "one block long" street running east-west
between Lancaster Road and Oakfield Road in Finsbury Park. It is just
to the west of the park. It is still there today.

N15 - one mile NE of the N4 location. It runs north-south >from St.
Ann's Road to Green Road in the North Harringay area. It is still
there today

N18 - getting closer to the "'burbs." A "very" short street running
north-south >from Angel Road (A 406) to Fairfield Road. It is so small
that most maps don't name it, but it is the second one >from the right
going east >from Fore Street as one walks down Fairfield. Still there
today.

SE1 - this runs roughly north-south >from Upper Ground to The Cut in
Lambeth. This too is still there today.

So, Jonathan, which one? By the way, there is a Grodzinski's bakery
at the bottom of my road, Edgwarebury Lane, Edgware where my mother
gets her challah every week.

Jeremy G Frankel
ex-Edgware, Middlesex, England
Berkeley, California, USA

At 12:00 AM -0600 1/19/06, JCR-UK SIG digest wrote:
Subject: Cornwall Road in London 1918
From: JGrodz@aol.com
Date: Wed, 18 Jan 2006 04:14:43 -0500

I have just found my grandfather Abie GRODZINSKI statement of
affairs drawn up after his death in 1918. Abie was aged 32 at the
time and was running the family bakery business in Fieldgate Street
in London's East End.

In the statement there is reference to rates and rent ....... also
to "107 Cornwall Road" (without any indication of where this was in
London). My late uncle told me that the family had had a shop in
West London at approximately that time.

I have looked at current Cornwall Roads, but before I start
investigating them, I would like to know whether there were others
in London in 1918. I have found an index of changed street names
but it is alphabetical according to current and not old names.

So can anyone help me find my grandfather's Cornwall Road? I think
that No. 107 would have been a baker's shop and may have had some
Jewish population nearby.


Re: JCR: 1891 Census - is there a street index? #unitedkingdom

BP Bergman <bergville@...>
 

Jonathan,

Am I right in thinking you are in London? If so, go to the Family Records
Centre in Myddelton Street (between Sadlers Wells Theatre and Mount Pleasant
Post Office) and on the first floor you can consult the census on microfilm
and, where available, online. They have the complete set of indexes which
will allow you to locate the correct page for a particular street very
quickly. The staff are very helpful and will show you how to use the
indexes if you have never used them before.

Beverly Bergman
Camberley UK


<Yes, there are street indexes for most of the censuses carried out in
England. I don't know where you would find them in England>

<How do I find out on what page of the census Fieldgate
street records appear?>


JCR-UK SIG #UnitedKingdom Re: JCR: 1891 Census - is there a street index? #unitedkingdom

BP Bergman <bergville@...>
 

Jonathan,

Am I right in thinking you are in London? If so, go to the Family Records
Centre in Myddelton Street (between Sadlers Wells Theatre and Mount Pleasant
Post Office) and on the first floor you can consult the census on microfilm
and, where available, online. They have the complete set of indexes which
will allow you to locate the correct page for a particular street very
quickly. The staff are very helpful and will show you how to use the
indexes if you have never used them before.

Beverly Bergman
Camberley UK


<Yes, there are street indexes for most of the censuses carried out in
England. I don't know where you would find them in England>

<How do I find out on what page of the census Fieldgate
street records appear?>


WAPNER and ZUCKERMAN #ukraine

Levindedham@...
 

I am looking for information on Alexander (Sender) WAPNER. His first wife
was Minnie SILVERMAN. They had 9 children. After he died Sender married
Thuba/Tuba. Isreal WAPNER was killed in russia before 1909 prompting the
family to move to America. They places I have heard fo them living Kamenitz,
Jampole, and Romania. Any connections out there??


I also have Harry and Rosa ZUCKERMAN born in Podolia. I have their son
Morris born 2 Jul 1886 in Odessa. Can anyone help???

Thanks, Sarah Levin
Dedham, ME


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine WAPNER and ZUCKERMAN #ukraine

Levindedham@...
 

I am looking for information on Alexander (Sender) WAPNER. His first wife
was Minnie SILVERMAN. They had 9 children. After he died Sender married
Thuba/Tuba. Isreal WAPNER was killed in russia before 1909 prompting the
family to move to America. They places I have heard fo them living Kamenitz,
Jampole, and Romania. Any connections out there??


I also have Harry and Rosa ZUCKERMAN born in Podolia. I have their son
Morris born 2 Jul 1886 in Odessa. Can anyone help???

Thanks, Sarah Levin
Dedham, ME


Romocsahaza #hungary

Patricia J Weisshaus <patjw28@...>
 

Several years ago someone told me to try Romocsahaza instead of the village
I was attempting to find. This person said they had relatives there. I
would like to know if it is possible to get marriage or birth records for
this village through LDS.

You may reply offline if you so desire.

Pat


Hungary SIG #Hungary Romocsahaza #hungary

Patricia J Weisshaus <patjw28@...>
 

Several years ago someone told me to try Romocsahaza instead of the village
I was attempting to find. This person said they had relatives there. I
would like to know if it is possible to get marriage or birth records for
this village through LDS.

You may reply offline if you so desire.

Pat


Re: BLAS/BLASS Family from Bardejov,Slovakia #hungary

d pfalzer <d_pfalzer@...>
 

Hi there,

It is satisfying to see you posting one of my surnames
-BLAS, even if it is quite far away >from the area
where my Jewish ancestors came from.

For the record my ggf's second wife was Fanika Blas.
They married around 1920, and lived in Murska Sobota,
Slovenia (the long time residence of my ggf). Fanika
was born around 1900 (family stories say that she was
around the same age as my gf) probably in the
Slovenia/Croatia area. She seems to have some
connection to Varazdin, Croatia, as she moved there
after my ggf died.

I don't know if you will find any of this useful to
you (it is certainly a long shot), but I thought I
would share it -- just in case.

Happy searching,

Denise

--- Abuwasta Abuwasta <abuwasta@yahoo.com> wrote:

Dear H-Siggers and Genners
I recently discovered at The Auschwitz Museum
website
a certain
Hermann KOENIGSBUCH(1912-1942) who was born in
Michalovce. KOENIGSBUCH is a unique surname, all
it's
bearers hail >from Brzesko,Poland. My mother's maiden
name was KOENIGSBUCH.
I saw at Michalovce's Yizkor book reference to
KOENIGSBUCH.
About a month ago I learned that at the Michalovce
cemetery there is a grave of Chaya ,daughter of
Isser
and the wife of Joseph KOENIGSBUCH. She died in
1934.
3 days ago I found at Yad VaSHEM Pages of Testimony
that Hermann KOENIGSBUCH's parents were Joseph K.
and
Helene BLAS.
Joseph is probably the brother of my
grandfather,Ascher K.
I have no idea where this BLAS family hails from.
There is no mention of them at the Michalovce Yizkor
book so I assue that she was >from somewhere else.
But I browsed today through the Bardejov Yizkor book
because my late father in law,David Apotheker was
born
there.By sheer chance I saw there a the name of a
certain Israel Isser BLAS(p. 89).I checked quickly
at
Yad Vashem and found 1 PoT for Adela
BLASS >from Bardejov.
I just wonder whether any one on the list with
Bardejov roots can enlighten me about this family?
Jacob Rosen
Jerusalem


Hungary SIG #Hungary Re: BLAS/BLASS Family from Bardejov,Slovakia #hungary

d pfalzer <d_pfalzer@...>
 

Hi there,

It is satisfying to see you posting one of my surnames
-BLAS, even if it is quite far away >from the area
where my Jewish ancestors came from.

For the record my ggf's second wife was Fanika Blas.
They married around 1920, and lived in Murska Sobota,
Slovenia (the long time residence of my ggf). Fanika
was born around 1900 (family stories say that she was
around the same age as my gf) probably in the
Slovenia/Croatia area. She seems to have some
connection to Varazdin, Croatia, as she moved there
after my ggf died.

I don't know if you will find any of this useful to
you (it is certainly a long shot), but I thought I
would share it -- just in case.

Happy searching,

Denise

--- Abuwasta Abuwasta <abuwasta@yahoo.com> wrote:

Dear H-Siggers and Genners
I recently discovered at The Auschwitz Museum
website
a certain
Hermann KOENIGSBUCH(1912-1942) who was born in
Michalovce. KOENIGSBUCH is a unique surname, all
it's
bearers hail >from Brzesko,Poland. My mother's maiden
name was KOENIGSBUCH.
I saw at Michalovce's Yizkor book reference to
KOENIGSBUCH.
About a month ago I learned that at the Michalovce
cemetery there is a grave of Chaya ,daughter of
Isser
and the wife of Joseph KOENIGSBUCH. She died in
1934.
3 days ago I found at Yad VaSHEM Pages of Testimony
that Hermann KOENIGSBUCH's parents were Joseph K.
and
Helene BLAS.
Joseph is probably the brother of my
grandfather,Ascher K.
I have no idea where this BLAS family hails from.
There is no mention of them at the Michalovce Yizkor
book so I assue that she was >from somewhere else.
But I browsed today through the Bardejov Yizkor book
because my late father in law,David Apotheker was
born
there.By sheer chance I saw there a the name of a
certain Israel Isser BLAS(p. 89).I checked quickly
at
Yad Vashem and found 1 PoT for Adela
BLASS >from Bardejov.
I just wonder whether any one on the list with
Bardejov roots can enlighten me about this family?
Jacob Rosen
Jerusalem


Re: Yad vaShem-Auschwitz Victims-Additional Data #galicia

Gábor Hirsch <g_hirsch@...>
 

The Auschwitz Museum published the death books in 3 volumes, as you can see a
short information on the HomePage of the Auschwitz Museum under
Publications:

“Death books >from Auschwitz
Vol.I. Reports; Vol.II Index of Names A – L; Vol.III Index of Names M - Z

This documentation is based on the original records kept by the SS
authorities of the Auschwitz-Birkenau concentration and death camps. They
contain entries for the death dates of Auschwitz prisoners in the period
from July 27, 1941 to December 31, 1943. Most of these names of prisoners
who died in Auschwitz, documentated by the SS administration, have not been
published anywhere before and remain a historical source of unique
importance...“

In this period, the majority of the victims were not Jewish, the Death book
of Auschwitz as well as other documentations of Auschwitz speak of
a “Polish” period >from 1940 to mid-1942, when the majority of deportees and
victims were Poles
and
a “Jewish” period mid-1942 to 1945, when Jews represented the majority of
the deportees and victims.

The tattooed numbers were for all prisoners identical untill 13. Mai 1944,
72 Jewish men >from the camp Blechhammer got the numbers A-1 to A-72, on 16.
Mai 14 Jewish women >from Sosnowitz got the numbers A-1 to A-14. The first
numbers of the Jewish B-Serie for men were distributed to a transport from
Bionki (district Radom) on 31. Juli 1944. The highest A-Serie number for
Jewish men is A-20000 >from B-Serie B-14897 and for Jewish women existed only
A-Serie and the highest number was A-29354. On a gravestone >from the time of
the death marches is between others a B number recorded which is higher than
the mentioned it is B-15717 and the grave is in Ksiazenice. Was the number
unreadable, or an A lokked like a B, I don’t know.

Best regards
Gabor Hirsch


--- Ursprüngliche Nachricht ---
Von: "Katz, Itzik" <Itzik.Katz@KLA-Tencor.com>
An: "H-SIG" <h-sig@lyris.jewishgen.org>
Betreff: RE: [h-sig] Yad vaShem-Auschwitz Victims-Additional Data
Datum: Wed, 18 Jan 2006 09:35:15 +0200

The Auschwitz records mentioned by Jacob only contain names of inmates
up to and including 1943. Since the deportations >from Hungary started in
1944 it is very unlikely for members of the H-SIG looking for their
Hungarian relatives to find any relevant information in there. I tried
looking for my relatives in that database and failed.

Isaac Katz
Israel


-----Original Message-----
From: Abuwasta Abuwasta [mailto:abuwasta@yahoo.com]
Sent: Tuesday, January 17, 2006 2:44 PM
To: H-SIG
Subject: [h-sig] Yad vaShem-Auschwitz Victims-Additional Data

Dear Genners and Siggers,
As you probably know the Auschwitz Museum website has
an alphabetical list of 69,000 victims who were
executed there,including non Jews.I just discovered
that Yad vaShem has posted the same list on the PoT
section but with additional data:
the names of the victim's parents.


Jacob Rosen
Jerusalem


Hungary SIG #Hungary RE: Yad vaShem-Auschwitz Victims-Additional Data #hungary

Gábor Hirsch <g_hirsch@...>
 

The Auschwitz Museum published the death books in 3 volumes, as you can see a
short information on the HomePage of the Auschwitz Museum under
Publications:

“Death books >from Auschwitz
Vol.I. Reports; Vol.II Index of Names A – L; Vol.III Index of Names M - Z

This documentation is based on the original records kept by the SS
authorities of the Auschwitz-Birkenau concentration and death camps. They
contain entries for the death dates of Auschwitz prisoners in the period
from July 27, 1941 to December 31, 1943. Most of these names of prisoners
who died in Auschwitz, documentated by the SS administration, have not been
published anywhere before and remain a historical source of unique
importance...“

In this period, the majority of the victims were not Jewish, the Death book
of Auschwitz as well as other documentations of Auschwitz speak of
a “Polish” period >from 1940 to mid-1942, when the majority of deportees and
victims were Poles
and
a “Jewish” period mid-1942 to 1945, when Jews represented the majority of
the deportees and victims.

The tattooed numbers were for all prisoners identical untill 13. Mai 1944,
72 Jewish men >from the camp Blechhammer got the numbers A-1 to A-72, on 16.
Mai 14 Jewish women >from Sosnowitz got the numbers A-1 to A-14. The first
numbers of the Jewish B-Serie for men were distributed to a transport from
Bionki (district Radom) on 31. Juli 1944. The highest A-Serie number for
Jewish men is A-20000 >from B-Serie B-14897 and for Jewish women existed only
A-Serie and the highest number was A-29354. On a gravestone >from the time of
the death marches is between others a B number recorded which is higher than
the mentioned it is B-15717 and the grave is in Ksiazenice. Was the number
unreadable, or an A lokked like a B, I don’t know.

Best regards
Gabor Hirsch


--- Ursprüngliche Nachricht ---
Von: "Katz, Itzik" <Itzik.Katz@KLA-Tencor.com>
An: "H-SIG" <h-sig@lyris.jewishgen.org>
Betreff: RE: [h-sig] Yad vaShem-Auschwitz Victims-Additional Data
Datum: Wed, 18 Jan 2006 09:35:15 +0200

The Auschwitz records mentioned by Jacob only contain names of inmates
up to and including 1943. Since the deportations >from Hungary started in
1944 it is very unlikely for members of the H-SIG looking for their
Hungarian relatives to find any relevant information in there. I tried
looking for my relatives in that database and failed.

Isaac Katz
Israel


-----Original Message-----
From: Abuwasta Abuwasta [mailto:abuwasta@yahoo.com]
Sent: Tuesday, January 17, 2006 2:44 PM
To: H-SIG
Subject: [h-sig] Yad vaShem-Auschwitz Victims-Additional Data

Dear Genners and Siggers,
As you probably know the Auschwitz Museum website has
an alphabetical list of 69,000 victims who were
executed there,including non Jews.I just discovered
that Yad vaShem has posted the same list on the PoT
section but with additional data:
the names of the victim's parents.


Jacob Rosen
Jerusalem


Hungarian Census and Tax List Records 1795-1850 #hungary

Eric M. Bloch
 

H-SIG has some exciting news to announce!


We are about to undertake a huge transcription project involving
Hungarian census and tax list records >from the period 1795-1850. Most of
these “Conscriptio Judaerum” lists provided data for calculating the
notorious “Tolerance Tax” that was levied against the Jewish communities
throughout Hungary. Beginning in 1747, during the reign of Empress Maria
Theresa (1740-1780), the Jews were heavily taxed for the privilege of
remaining in the empire, and were threatened with expulsion if they did
not pay.

The Magyar Országos Levéltár (Hungarian National Archives) has granted
permission to JewishGen to create a searchable database of names
appearing in these censuses and tax lists that will become part of the
All-Hungary database. So far we have obtained two microfilms with
“other” censuses and tax lists for the counties of Arva, Lipto,
Maramaros, Moson, Nograd, Saros, Szepes, and Zemplen. Hungarian SIG
copied the microfilm images onto a CD-ROM to facilitate transcription.
Records >from many other counties are also in the possession of the
Magyar Országos Levéltár, and we will attempt to obtain them as well.
The records are arranged by counties and sometimes by regions within the
county.

Although the digitized images will NOT be accessible to genealogists,
copies can be obtained directly >from the Hungarian National Archives. It
appears that the census and tax lists are available for approximately 65
counties and 48 varosoks (cities). The first counties to be included in
the project are Lipto, Maramaros, Moson, Nograd, Saros, and Szepes. We
want to thank Adam Smith for his generosity in purchasing these first
microfilms and making them available to H-SIG for creation of the
digital images.

If anyone else has already purchased a microfilm >from the Hungarian
National Archives and is willing to let H-SIG have digital images made
for transcription, we would be most appreciative. The microfilm would be
returned to the donor, of course.

In order to get started, we need volunteers willing to transcribe
records and/or validate the transcriptions. The beauty of this project
is that the work can be done in the comfort of your own home with your
own computer - no shlepping to the LDS library to read microfilms.
Because this is a long term project, we are not working against any
deadline and are not requiring any specific time commitment >from
volunteers. The only requirements are an ability to work with
photographic images on your computer and to use Microsoft Excel
spreadsheets, as well as dedication, perseverance, patience, and some
talent in reading names written in 18th and 19th century script.
Although the documents are in Latin, no knowledge of the Latin language
is necessary. The names on most of the documents are quite legible.

If you are interested in volunteering, please contact our coordinator
for the project, Eric M. Bloch (mailto:bloch@wi.rr.com).

Thanks,

Carol J. Robinson, Alameda, CA

Eric M. Bloch, Milwaukee, WI


Re: Blas / Blass family #hungary

Sandor Bacskai <bacskaisanyi@...>
 

Dear Jacob,

Sorry, I can't enlighten you about the Blasz family of Bardejov. But
I heared already about the following ones:
- Moshe Yehoshua Blasz, the soychet of Eger, he was born in
Berettyoujfalu
- Ede/Eliyahu Blasz of Debrecen, he was a member of the leadership of
Hung. Orth. Communities
- Shmuel Blasz the cantor of Mariapocs, Szabolcs County
- Jeno Blasz of Fehergyarmat, Szatmar County. He's the author of the
memorial book of Fehergyarmat (Bnei Brak, 1965)

and others.

Unfortunately I don't have information at this moment, if they were
connected to Bardejov.

Regards,

Sandor Bacskai
Budapest, Hungary

--------------
Original message

Subject: Yad Vashem-Auschwitz Museum-Additional Data
From: Abuwasta Abuwasta <abuwasta@yahoo.com>
Date: Thu, 19 Jan 2006 13:05:34 -0800 (PST)
X-Message-Number: 5

I have no idea where this BLAS family hails from.
There is no mention of them at the Michalovce Yizkor
book so I assue that she was >from somewhere else.
But I browsed today through the Bardejov Yizkor book
because my late father in law,David Apotheker was born
there.By sheer chance I saw there a the name of a
certain Israel Isser BLAS(p. 89).I checked quickly at
Yad Vashem and found 1 PoT for Adela
BLASS >from Bardejov.
I just wonder whether any one on the list with
Bardejov roots can enlighten me about this family?
Jacob Rosen
Jerusalem


Hungary SIG #Hungary Hungarian Census and Tax List Records 1795-1850 #hungary

Eric M. Bloch
 

H-SIG has some exciting news to announce!


We are about to undertake a huge transcription project involving
Hungarian census and tax list records >from the period 1795-1850. Most of
these “Conscriptio Judaerum” lists provided data for calculating the
notorious “Tolerance Tax” that was levied against the Jewish communities
throughout Hungary. Beginning in 1747, during the reign of Empress Maria
Theresa (1740-1780), the Jews were heavily taxed for the privilege of
remaining in the empire, and were threatened with expulsion if they did
not pay.

The Magyar Országos Levéltár (Hungarian National Archives) has granted
permission to JewishGen to create a searchable database of names
appearing in these censuses and tax lists that will become part of the
All-Hungary database. So far we have obtained two microfilms with
“other” censuses and tax lists for the counties of Arva, Lipto,
Maramaros, Moson, Nograd, Saros, Szepes, and Zemplen. Hungarian SIG
copied the microfilm images onto a CD-ROM to facilitate transcription.
Records >from many other counties are also in the possession of the
Magyar Országos Levéltár, and we will attempt to obtain them as well.
The records are arranged by counties and sometimes by regions within the
county.

Although the digitized images will NOT be accessible to genealogists,
copies can be obtained directly >from the Hungarian National Archives. It
appears that the census and tax lists are available for approximately 65
counties and 48 varosoks (cities). The first counties to be included in
the project are Lipto, Maramaros, Moson, Nograd, Saros, and Szepes. We
want to thank Adam Smith for his generosity in purchasing these first
microfilms and making them available to H-SIG for creation of the
digital images.

If anyone else has already purchased a microfilm >from the Hungarian
National Archives and is willing to let H-SIG have digital images made
for transcription, we would be most appreciative. The microfilm would be
returned to the donor, of course.

In order to get started, we need volunteers willing to transcribe
records and/or validate the transcriptions. The beauty of this project
is that the work can be done in the comfort of your own home with your
own computer - no shlepping to the LDS library to read microfilms.
Because this is a long term project, we are not working against any
deadline and are not requiring any specific time commitment >from
volunteers. The only requirements are an ability to work with
photographic images on your computer and to use Microsoft Excel
spreadsheets, as well as dedication, perseverance, patience, and some
talent in reading names written in 18th and 19th century script.
Although the documents are in Latin, no knowledge of the Latin language
is necessary. The names on most of the documents are quite legible.

If you are interested in volunteering, please contact our coordinator
for the project, Eric M. Bloch (mailto:bloch@wi.rr.com).

Thanks,

Carol J. Robinson, Alameda, CA

Eric M. Bloch, Milwaukee, WI


Hungary SIG #Hungary Re: Blas / Blass family #hungary

Sandor Bacskai <bacskaisanyi@...>
 

Dear Jacob,

Sorry, I can't enlighten you about the Blasz family of Bardejov. But
I heared already about the following ones:
- Moshe Yehoshua Blasz, the soychet of Eger, he was born in
Berettyoujfalu
- Ede/Eliyahu Blasz of Debrecen, he was a member of the leadership of
Hung. Orth. Communities
- Shmuel Blasz the cantor of Mariapocs, Szabolcs County
- Jeno Blasz of Fehergyarmat, Szatmar County. He's the author of the
memorial book of Fehergyarmat (Bnei Brak, 1965)

and others.

Unfortunately I don't have information at this moment, if they were
connected to Bardejov.

Regards,

Sandor Bacskai
Budapest, Hungary

--------------
Original message

Subject: Yad Vashem-Auschwitz Museum-Additional Data
From: Abuwasta Abuwasta <abuwasta@yahoo.com>
Date: Thu, 19 Jan 2006 13:05:34 -0800 (PST)
X-Message-Number: 5

I have no idea where this BLAS family hails from.
There is no mention of them at the Michalovce Yizkor
book so I assue that she was >from somewhere else.
But I browsed today through the Bardejov Yizkor book
because my late father in law,David Apotheker was born
there.By sheer chance I saw there a the name of a
certain Israel Isser BLAS(p. 89).I checked quickly at
Yad Vashem and found 1 PoT for Adela
BLASS >from Bardejov.
I just wonder whether any one on the list with
Bardejov roots can enlighten me about this family?
Jacob Rosen
Jerusalem