Date   

Re: Russian Phonetics #general

Nick <tulse04-news@...>
 

"Fritz Neubauer" <fritz.neubauer@uni-bielefeld.de> wrote

I don't think, it needs a Russian linguist to explain how an ou-sound can
turn into an a-sound, because it has nothing to do with Russian
pronujnciation, rather an English/American linguist is needed: just
compare how the word "dollar" is pronounced in Britain and in America! It
was originally derived >from the German currency "Taler", but the Americans
thought, when hearing "Taler", it would have to be spelled "dollar". In
the same way, KLOSS pronounced by an American would be given an a-sound
which then could be confused as an A in writing, too.
Anglo-Jewish pronunciation in an Ashkenazi synagogue of the same Hebrew
vowel sounds has changed over the years. The way that my father, I and my
nephews learnt to say the Hebrew word "Boruch" are markedly different.

The first vowel my father rhymes with boat. (after Chief Rabbi Joseph Hertz)
I rhyme it with not. My nephews rhyme with but. (Ivrit style)

A gentleman >from Poland in my synagogue pronounce it to rhyme with boy.

--
Nick Landau
London, UK

COHNREICH (Anklam, Germany Krajenka, Poland) ATLAS (Wielkie Oczy (near
Lvov/Lemberg), Poland) WEITZMAN (Cracow), WECHSLER(Schwabach, Germany)
KOHN/WEISSKOPF (Wallerstein and Kleinerdlingen,Germany) LANDAU (only adopted
on leaving Belarus or later)/FREDKIN (?) (Gomel, Mogilev, Chernigov,
Belarus)


Re: Russian Phonetics #general

Nick <tulse04-news@...>
 

I have recently started singing in a synagogue choir. The Hebrew is
transliterated into English characters. The letter "e" is used to represent
two different Hebrew vowels (Segol and Schwa).

There is the addition of a French accent and/or phonetic symbol to indicate
the difference - no doubt most of the choristers are not familiar with
these. The choirmaster often has to remind us of this - even for those who
read Hebrew, music is written left to right whereas Hebrew is written the
other way around.

If anyone has ever learnt another language solely >from a phrasebook they
might have had a similar problem.

--
Nick Landau
London, UK

COHNREICH (Anklam, Germany Krajenka, Poland) ATLAS (Wielkie Oczy (near
Lvov/Lemberg), Poland) WEITZMAN (Cracow), WECHSLER(Schwabach, Germany)
KOHN/WEISSKOPF (Wallerstein and Kleinerdlingen,Germany) LANDAU (only adopted
on leaving Belarus or later)/FREDKIN (?) (Gomel, Mogilev, Chernigov,
Belarus)


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Russian Phonetics #general

Nick <tulse04-news@...>
 

"Fritz Neubauer" <fritz.neubauer@uni-bielefeld.de> wrote

I don't think, it needs a Russian linguist to explain how an ou-sound can
turn into an a-sound, because it has nothing to do with Russian
pronujnciation, rather an English/American linguist is needed: just
compare how the word "dollar" is pronounced in Britain and in America! It
was originally derived >from the German currency "Taler", but the Americans
thought, when hearing "Taler", it would have to be spelled "dollar". In
the same way, KLOSS pronounced by an American would be given an a-sound
which then could be confused as an A in writing, too.
Anglo-Jewish pronunciation in an Ashkenazi synagogue of the same Hebrew
vowel sounds has changed over the years. The way that my father, I and my
nephews learnt to say the Hebrew word "Boruch" are markedly different.

The first vowel my father rhymes with boat. (after Chief Rabbi Joseph Hertz)
I rhyme it with not. My nephews rhyme with but. (Ivrit style)

A gentleman >from Poland in my synagogue pronounce it to rhyme with boy.

--
Nick Landau
London, UK

COHNREICH (Anklam, Germany Krajenka, Poland) ATLAS (Wielkie Oczy (near
Lvov/Lemberg), Poland) WEITZMAN (Cracow), WECHSLER(Schwabach, Germany)
KOHN/WEISSKOPF (Wallerstein and Kleinerdlingen,Germany) LANDAU (only adopted
on leaving Belarus or later)/FREDKIN (?) (Gomel, Mogilev, Chernigov,
Belarus)


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Russian Phonetics #general

Nick <tulse04-news@...>
 

I have recently started singing in a synagogue choir. The Hebrew is
transliterated into English characters. The letter "e" is used to represent
two different Hebrew vowels (Segol and Schwa).

There is the addition of a French accent and/or phonetic symbol to indicate
the difference - no doubt most of the choristers are not familiar with
these. The choirmaster often has to remind us of this - even for those who
read Hebrew, music is written left to right whereas Hebrew is written the
other way around.

If anyone has ever learnt another language solely >from a phrasebook they
might have had a similar problem.

--
Nick Landau
London, UK

COHNREICH (Anklam, Germany Krajenka, Poland) ATLAS (Wielkie Oczy (near
Lvov/Lemberg), Poland) WEITZMAN (Cracow), WECHSLER(Schwabach, Germany)
KOHN/WEISSKOPF (Wallerstein and Kleinerdlingen,Germany) LANDAU (only adopted
on leaving Belarus or later)/FREDKIN (?) (Gomel, Mogilev, Chernigov,
Belarus)


Re: FindUSA pulls library access - clarification #general

Nick <tulse04-news@...>
 

See this editorial in the Eastman's Online Genealogy Newsletter.

http://blog.eogn.com/eastmans_online_genealogy/2006/02/findusa_shuts_d.html#more

It lists other companies providing similar services.

Mr Eastman wonders whether other companies might pull out of the market
through the same privacy concerns - which according to him was the reason
that FindUSA has been withdrawn.

--
Nick Landau
London, UK

COHNREICH (Anklam, Germany Krajenka, Poland) ATLAS (Wielkie Oczy (near
Lvov/Lemberg), Poland) WEITZMAN (Cracow), WECHSLER(Schwabach, Germany)
KOHN/WEISSKOPF (Wallerstein and Kleinerdlingen,Germany) LANDAU (only adopted
on leaving Belarus or later)/FREDKIN (?) (Gomel, Mogilev, Chernigov,
Belarus)


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: FindUSA pulls library access - clarification #general

Nick <tulse04-news@...>
 

See this editorial in the Eastman's Online Genealogy Newsletter.

http://blog.eogn.com/eastmans_online_genealogy/2006/02/findusa_shuts_d.html#more

It lists other companies providing similar services.

Mr Eastman wonders whether other companies might pull out of the market
through the same privacy concerns - which according to him was the reason
that FindUSA has been withdrawn.

--
Nick Landau
London, UK

COHNREICH (Anklam, Germany Krajenka, Poland) ATLAS (Wielkie Oczy (near
Lvov/Lemberg), Poland) WEITZMAN (Cracow), WECHSLER(Schwabach, Germany)
KOHN/WEISSKOPF (Wallerstein and Kleinerdlingen,Germany) LANDAU (only adopted
on leaving Belarus or later)/FREDKIN (?) (Gomel, Mogilev, Chernigov,
Belarus)


Re: Need look-up at Surrogate's Court--Bronx, NY #general

Nick <tulse04-news@...>
 

"Deborah Dworski" <ddworski@erols.com> wrote in message
news:003d01c62941$f3979b10$9f382c42@Debbie...

Hi All,
If anyone is headed to the Surrogate's Court in Bronx, New York, I'd be
grateful for a quick look-up. The Court's address is 851 Grand Concourse.
I have name of deceased individual and specific date of death which should
provide efficient access to the file, according to a clerk at the Court.
I'm simply looking for names of living descendants which are hopefully
included in the person's Will or other estate documents. I am not
interested in any financial aspects of the estate.
I was wondering what the Surrogate's Court is. In the UK the equivalent is
called the Court of Probate.

--
Nick Landau
London, UK

COHNREICH (Anklam, Germany Krajenka, Poland) ATLAS (Wielkie Oczy (near
Lvov/Lemberg), Poland) WEITZMAN (Cracow), WECHSLER(Schwabach, Germany)
KOHN/WEISSKOPF (Wallerstein and Kleinerdlingen,Germany) LANDAU (only adopted
on leaving Belarus or later)/FREDKIN (?) (Gomel, Mogilev, Chernigov,
Belarus)


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Need look-up at Surrogate's Court--Bronx, NY #general

Nick <tulse04-news@...>
 

"Deborah Dworski" <ddworski@erols.com> wrote in message
news:003d01c62941$f3979b10$9f382c42@Debbie...

Hi All,
If anyone is headed to the Surrogate's Court in Bronx, New York, I'd be
grateful for a quick look-up. The Court's address is 851 Grand Concourse.
I have name of deceased individual and specific date of death which should
provide efficient access to the file, according to a clerk at the Court.
I'm simply looking for names of living descendants which are hopefully
included in the person's Will or other estate documents. I am not
interested in any financial aspects of the estate.
I was wondering what the Surrogate's Court is. In the UK the equivalent is
called the Court of Probate.

--
Nick Landau
London, UK

COHNREICH (Anklam, Germany Krajenka, Poland) ATLAS (Wielkie Oczy (near
Lvov/Lemberg), Poland) WEITZMAN (Cracow), WECHSLER(Schwabach, Germany)
KOHN/WEISSKOPF (Wallerstein and Kleinerdlingen,Germany) LANDAU (only adopted
on leaving Belarus or later)/FREDKIN (?) (Gomel, Mogilev, Chernigov,
Belarus)


Polish Passport from 1921 #general

Aliza <alizam@...>
 

Dear Genners,
A few weeks ago a cousin of mine, presented me with my great grandfathers
Polish Passport, issued in 1921.
It is extremely fragile.
I would like to photocopy it or scan it to a computor but I'm afraid that
the pages will tear. Can anyone give me any advice as to how to copy/scan,
as well as how to preserve it.
Once this can be done, I will post it for translation.
Thank you all,
Aliza Maor
Rishon Le Zion
Israel


Re: Motis-Mendl/Emanuel #general

Nick <tulse04-news@...>
 

"Steve Orlen" <sorlen@email.arizona.edu> wrote in message > Dear Cousins,

I have two questions to ask: 1) My 3xgreat-grandfather was >from Boguslav
in the Ukraine. I was told his name was "Motis-Mendl" (WOLINSKY). The
name "Mendl" I know, of course, but what could "Motis" refer to, or be a
misspelling of? 2) On his son's marriage certificate (London, 1897) his
name is given as "Emanuel." Are there any connections among these names?
Regarding (2) English-born brother-in-law of my aunt was known by us and his
brothers as Mendel - by his wife and their family as Manny (ie Emanuel). His
father though came >from Russia at the age of about 25.

I imagine that Mendel would have been my connection's "Yiddish" name and
apparently childhood name, and Emanuel his secular name, and probably the
name that appears on his birth certificate.

On the other hand, I am known as Nicholas by my family and Nick by my
friends >from school and onwards - so degree of formality can work the other
way - certainly in England. Indeed I am occasionally brought up short in a
shop when I hear a mother saying to her child "Nicholas!!".

--
Nick Landau
London, UK

COHNREICH (Anklam, Germany Krajenka, Poland) ATLAS (Wielkie Oczy (near
Lvov/Lemberg), Poland) WEITZMAN (Cracow), WECHSLER(Schwabach, Germany)
KOHN/WEISSKOPF (Wallerstein and Kleinerdlingen,Germany) LANDAU (only adopted
on leaving Belarus or later)/FREDKIN (?) (Gomel, Mogilev, Chernigov,
Belarus)


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Polish Passport from 1921 #general

Aliza <alizam@...>
 

Dear Genners,
A few weeks ago a cousin of mine, presented me with my great grandfathers
Polish Passport, issued in 1921.
It is extremely fragile.
I would like to photocopy it or scan it to a computor but I'm afraid that
the pages will tear. Can anyone give me any advice as to how to copy/scan,
as well as how to preserve it.
Once this can be done, I will post it for translation.
Thank you all,
Aliza Maor
Rishon Le Zion
Israel


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Motis-Mendl/Emanuel #general

Nick <tulse04-news@...>
 

"Steve Orlen" <sorlen@email.arizona.edu> wrote in message > Dear Cousins,

I have two questions to ask: 1) My 3xgreat-grandfather was >from Boguslav
in the Ukraine. I was told his name was "Motis-Mendl" (WOLINSKY). The
name "Mendl" I know, of course, but what could "Motis" refer to, or be a
misspelling of? 2) On his son's marriage certificate (London, 1897) his
name is given as "Emanuel." Are there any connections among these names?
Regarding (2) English-born brother-in-law of my aunt was known by us and his
brothers as Mendel - by his wife and their family as Manny (ie Emanuel). His
father though came >from Russia at the age of about 25.

I imagine that Mendel would have been my connection's "Yiddish" name and
apparently childhood name, and Emanuel his secular name, and probably the
name that appears on his birth certificate.

On the other hand, I am known as Nicholas by my family and Nick by my
friends >from school and onwards - so degree of formality can work the other
way - certainly in England. Indeed I am occasionally brought up short in a
shop when I hear a mother saying to her child "Nicholas!!".

--
Nick Landau
London, UK

COHNREICH (Anklam, Germany Krajenka, Poland) ATLAS (Wielkie Oczy (near
Lvov/Lemberg), Poland) WEITZMAN (Cracow), WECHSLER(Schwabach, Germany)
KOHN/WEISSKOPF (Wallerstein and Kleinerdlingen,Germany) LANDAU (only adopted
on leaving Belarus or later)/FREDKIN (?) (Gomel, Mogilev, Chernigov,
Belarus)


Re: Russian o or Russian a #general

Jules Levin
 

At 12:38 PM 2/4/2006, you wrote:

Whether a name is KLASS or KLOSS may depend on the
scribe in both Russian and English, so always investigate both
spellings if your surname contains an a or an o. Russian metrical
records are written in script; they are not printed. The difference
between the script a and the script o should depend on where the
continuation line exits the circle. But scribes did not make these
careful distinctions. In a year's Tsarist-era metrical records
written by the same scribe, unless you already know the word,
you will be unable to distinguish the o >from the a in 25% of the cases.
This is particularly true at the end of the word. So if looking for
SHAPIRO, be sure to check SHAPIRA.
I agree with Mr Lazerow that this could be an explanation if the
difference originated in reading handwriting. In Russian school
normative handwriting the script 'a' and 'o' are clearly differentiated,
but to recognize this difference in individual writers and in the flow
of script on the page can be a real challenge. I'd like to think that I
could score better than 75%, but I might need to stare at the page of
writing for an hour or two before taking up the challenge.
That pace is not even good enough for government work, as they say.
Jules Levin


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Russian o or Russian a #general

Jules Levin
 

At 12:38 PM 2/4/2006, you wrote:

Whether a name is KLASS or KLOSS may depend on the
scribe in both Russian and English, so always investigate both
spellings if your surname contains an a or an o. Russian metrical
records are written in script; they are not printed. The difference
between the script a and the script o should depend on where the
continuation line exits the circle. But scribes did not make these
careful distinctions. In a year's Tsarist-era metrical records
written by the same scribe, unless you already know the word,
you will be unable to distinguish the o >from the a in 25% of the cases.
This is particularly true at the end of the word. So if looking for
SHAPIRO, be sure to check SHAPIRA.
I agree with Mr Lazerow that this could be an explanation if the
difference originated in reading handwriting. In Russian school
normative handwriting the script 'a' and 'o' are clearly differentiated,
but to recognize this difference in individual writers and in the flow
of script on the page can be a real challenge. I'd like to think that I
could score better than 75%, but I might need to stare at the page of
writing for an hour or two before taking up the challenge.
That pace is not even good enough for government work, as they say.
Jules Levin


Re: Motis-Mendl/Emanuel #general

MBernet@...
 

In a message dated 2/4/2006 4:50:19 P.M. Eastern Standard Time,
sorlen@email.arizona.edu writes:

1) My 3xgreat-grandfather was >from Boguslav in
the Ukraine. I was told his name was "Motis-Mendl" (WOLINSKY). The name
"Mendl" I know, of course, but what could "Motis" refer to, or be a
misspelling of?

2) On his son's marriage certificate (London, 1897) his
name is given as "Emanuel." Are there any connections among these names?

==Let's start with a king of Israel named Menahem. Menahem means "console"
and the name is given frequently to an infant named shortly after a death in
he family, or to someone born close to the Ninth of Av, the focus of mourning
for the destruction by the Romans of the Temple, Jerusalem and the Jewish
state in 70 CE.

==In some parts of Germany, the diminutive was formed by adding "chen" to
the end of a name.This led to a popular assumption that Menachem was a
diminutive for an imaginary name Man or Men. Diminutives in other part of Germany
included "le," "lein," "el," "del" . . .

==Accordingly, "smart" folk "corrected Menachem according to the local
diminutive and we et a hole range of Jewish names including Mendel, Mantel, Manes,
Mannish. Today it is common for many Jews to have the double barreled name
Menachem-Mendel.

==Beider declares the names Mote and Motus as derived >from Mordechai, and
that Matis is a contraction of the Hebrew name Mattityahu (rendered Matthew in
the English transliteration). It is possible that Motis was given that name
under the wrong assumption that the name was an alternative form of Manes (or
a misreading?). [for what it's worth, Mattityahu is the hero of Chanuka,
Mordechai the hero of Purim]

==Many Jews have a Biblical or Hebrew name as shem kadosh, used in the
synagogue, on marriage contracts, tombstones etc., and a "civil" name for use in
dealing with civic authorities, in business etc. >from around 1800, Emanuel was
a civil name frequently associated with Mendel. Emanuel is Hebrew, it's in
Isaiah, but it's not really a Jewish name but, oddly it's a Christian name
based on a misreading of the Hebrew text ("God is with us"). In the course of
the 19th century, Emanuel became a name popular among Jews, and as Jews took
on that name, non-Jews started avoiding it. Accordingly, by the end of the
century, Jews also tended to avoid the name and replaced it with Emil.

==Complicated? Whoever said Jewish names was an easy issue?

Michael Bernet, New York


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Motis-Mendl/Emanuel #general

MBernet@...
 

In a message dated 2/4/2006 4:50:19 P.M. Eastern Standard Time,
sorlen@email.arizona.edu writes:

1) My 3xgreat-grandfather was >from Boguslav in
the Ukraine. I was told his name was "Motis-Mendl" (WOLINSKY). The name
"Mendl" I know, of course, but what could "Motis" refer to, or be a
misspelling of?

2) On his son's marriage certificate (London, 1897) his
name is given as "Emanuel." Are there any connections among these names?

==Let's start with a king of Israel named Menahem. Menahem means "console"
and the name is given frequently to an infant named shortly after a death in
he family, or to someone born close to the Ninth of Av, the focus of mourning
for the destruction by the Romans of the Temple, Jerusalem and the Jewish
state in 70 CE.

==In some parts of Germany, the diminutive was formed by adding "chen" to
the end of a name.This led to a popular assumption that Menachem was a
diminutive for an imaginary name Man or Men. Diminutives in other part of Germany
included "le," "lein," "el," "del" . . .

==Accordingly, "smart" folk "corrected Menachem according to the local
diminutive and we et a hole range of Jewish names including Mendel, Mantel, Manes,
Mannish. Today it is common for many Jews to have the double barreled name
Menachem-Mendel.

==Beider declares the names Mote and Motus as derived >from Mordechai, and
that Matis is a contraction of the Hebrew name Mattityahu (rendered Matthew in
the English transliteration). It is possible that Motis was given that name
under the wrong assumption that the name was an alternative form of Manes (or
a misreading?). [for what it's worth, Mattityahu is the hero of Chanuka,
Mordechai the hero of Purim]

==Many Jews have a Biblical or Hebrew name as shem kadosh, used in the
synagogue, on marriage contracts, tombstones etc., and a "civil" name for use in
dealing with civic authorities, in business etc. >from around 1800, Emanuel was
a civil name frequently associated with Mendel. Emanuel is Hebrew, it's in
Isaiah, but it's not really a Jewish name but, oddly it's a Christian name
based on a misreading of the Hebrew text ("God is with us"). In the course of
the 19th century, Emanuel became a name popular among Jews, and as Jews took
on that name, non-Jews started avoiding it. Accordingly, by the end of the
century, Jews also tended to avoid the name and replaced it with Emil.

==Complicated? Whoever said Jewish names was an easy issue?

Michael Bernet, New York


A Tarnopol Survivor's Story and Gift #galicia

Mark Halpern
 

In today's News & Observer, a newspaper covering the
Raleigh/Durham/Chapel Hill area of North Carolina, is the interesting
story of Holocaust survivor, Sonja van der Horst, born Chaya Eichenbaum
Teichholz in Tarnopol in 1923 to Naftali Teichholz and Chawa Eichenbaum.
The story can be found online at
http://www.newsobserver.com/105/story/396739.html.

Sonja survived the war as a slave laborer. She has collected reparation
payments >from the German government since the 1960s and she has never
spent any of this money. She and her family recently donated more than
$650,000 to the University of North Carolina in Chapel Hill to establish
a professorship in the Jewish Studies program. Sonja/Chaya's gift to UNC
is a fitting memorial in that her slave wages will pay to further
Jewish education for many students for many years to come.

More about Sonja/Chaya, including her testimony to the Spielberg Shoah
Foundation, can be found at http://www.sonjavanderhorst.org/.

Mark Halpern
West Chester, PA


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia A Tarnopol Survivor's Story and Gift #galicia

Mark Halpern
 

In today's News & Observer, a newspaper covering the
Raleigh/Durham/Chapel Hill area of North Carolina, is the interesting
story of Holocaust survivor, Sonja van der Horst, born Chaya Eichenbaum
Teichholz in Tarnopol in 1923 to Naftali Teichholz and Chawa Eichenbaum.
The story can be found online at
http://www.newsobserver.com/105/story/396739.html.

Sonja survived the war as a slave laborer. She has collected reparation
payments >from the German government since the 1960s and she has never
spent any of this money. She and her family recently donated more than
$650,000 to the University of North Carolina in Chapel Hill to establish
a professorship in the Jewish Studies program. Sonja/Chaya's gift to UNC
is a fitting memorial in that her slave wages will pay to further
Jewish education for many students for many years to come.

More about Sonja/Chaya, including her testimony to the Spielberg Shoah
Foundation, can be found at http://www.sonjavanderhorst.org/.

Mark Halpern
West Chester, PA


researching a family Reck-Ascher native of Stanislawow-Galicia #galicia

Jacqueline Pollak <jacqueline.pollak@...>
 

I am researching the descendants of a family Reck-Ascher which came >from
Stanislawow (today Ivano-Frankovsk).
Leizer Ber (Louis) arrives a first time in Ellis Island in 1805. Her wife
Golde, daugher of Osias Ascher, arrives in Ellis Island in 1913 with 8
children : Malke, Luisa, Genia, Marie, Osias, Annie, Heramn and Joseph.
Leizer Ber Louis Reck and golde Ascher die in 1944-45 in New-York.
I would be very grateful for any information concerning this family.

Jacqueline Pollak
Brussels

MODERATOR NOTE: One of JewishGen's most heavily visited sites is the
JewishGen Family Finder (JGFF) and family connections are being made more
and more frequently. If you have not already done so, please log
onto www.jewishgen.org/jgff and using the ENTER/MODIFY procedure enter
and register all the surnames of interest to your family research.
As you learn about more names and places of origin, they can always be added,
but only **you** can keep your own listings up to date.



ASCHER-TREITLER-POLLAK Stanislawow East-Galicia
RECK Stanislawow
Searching


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia researching a family Reck-Ascher native of Stanislawow-Galicia #galicia

Jacqueline Pollak <jacqueline.pollak@...>
 

I am researching the descendants of a family Reck-Ascher which came >from
Stanislawow (today Ivano-Frankovsk).
Leizer Ber (Louis) arrives a first time in Ellis Island in 1805. Her wife
Golde, daugher of Osias Ascher, arrives in Ellis Island in 1913 with 8
children : Malke, Luisa, Genia, Marie, Osias, Annie, Heramn and Joseph.
Leizer Ber Louis Reck and golde Ascher die in 1944-45 in New-York.
I would be very grateful for any information concerning this family.

Jacqueline Pollak
Brussels

MODERATOR NOTE: One of JewishGen's most heavily visited sites is the
JewishGen Family Finder (JGFF) and family connections are being made more
and more frequently. If you have not already done so, please log
onto www.jewishgen.org/jgff and using the ENTER/MODIFY procedure enter
and register all the surnames of interest to your family research.
As you learn about more names and places of origin, they can always be added,
but only **you** can keep your own listings up to date.



ASCHER-TREITLER-POLLAK Stanislawow East-Galicia
RECK Stanislawow
Searching