Date   

Re: Vital records indexed on Avotaynu fiche of Slovakian records #hungary

Gabriela Svatos
 

Dear Warren,

Most of the Zilina vital records are in the Bytca archive in Slovakia.
Microfilms of these records can be ordered through the Mormons. Depending
on which era you are researching, you may be interested in a yizkor type
book written on the jewish community of this city:

Title: The Rise and Decline of the Jewish Community of Zilina
Author: Haim Gordon
Published: Privately 2003,Jerusalem

I have an address/telephone number of the Israeli distributor (which is
printed inside the booklet), but am not sure if there are any copies left.

The jewish cemetery is beautifully preserved and has a caretaker who lives
in a house within the walled encircled grounds. At the entrance of the
cemetery there is a building, on the inside walls of which are engraved the
names of the holocaust victims of the town. There is a schematic of the
graves posted behind glass as you enter leave the entrance building and
enter the actual cemetery. The groundskeeper also has a name index for the
graves which helps to quickly identify family plots.

My grandmother (Prof. Magda Preiss) is a survivor >from Zilina, and published
a book in 2005 about her wartime experiences. If you read Czech, I can
forward you the details of the memoir.


Good luck with your research,
Gabi


Gabriela Svatos
Richmond Hill, Ontario
E-mail: gsvatos@hotmail.com
Business E-mail: bookstore@agawa.com
Business URL: www.abe.com/home/GSVATOS

From: "Warren D. Fishbaugh" <WFISH@usadatanet.net>
Reply-To: "H-SIG" <h-sig@lyris.jewishgen.org>
To: "H-SIG" <h-sig@lyris.jewishgen.org>
Subject: [h-sig] Vital records indexed on Avotaynu fiche of Slovakian
records
Date: Fri, 27 Jan 2006 09:46:10 -0500

Dear H-Sig: Can someone explain to me how to access the Jewish Vital
Records indexed on the Avotaynu fiche of Slovakian records, please? The
index seems to describe records >from Zilina, but is only an index. Was
there an article in 'Avotaynu' or where is the actual source of the
records? Thanks for the help.
Warren Dell Fishbaugh
Walworth, New York


Hungary SIG #Hungary RE: Vital records indexed on Avotaynu fiche of Slovakian records #hungary

Gabriela Svatos
 

Dear Warren,

Most of the Zilina vital records are in the Bytca archive in Slovakia.
Microfilms of these records can be ordered through the Mormons. Depending
on which era you are researching, you may be interested in a yizkor type
book written on the jewish community of this city:

Title: The Rise and Decline of the Jewish Community of Zilina
Author: Haim Gordon
Published: Privately 2003,Jerusalem

I have an address/telephone number of the Israeli distributor (which is
printed inside the booklet), but am not sure if there are any copies left.

The jewish cemetery is beautifully preserved and has a caretaker who lives
in a house within the walled encircled grounds. At the entrance of the
cemetery there is a building, on the inside walls of which are engraved the
names of the holocaust victims of the town. There is a schematic of the
graves posted behind glass as you enter leave the entrance building and
enter the actual cemetery. The groundskeeper also has a name index for the
graves which helps to quickly identify family plots.

My grandmother (Prof. Magda Preiss) is a survivor >from Zilina, and published
a book in 2005 about her wartime experiences. If you read Czech, I can
forward you the details of the memoir.


Good luck with your research,
Gabi


Gabriela Svatos
Richmond Hill, Ontario
E-mail: gsvatos@hotmail.com
Business E-mail: bookstore@agawa.com
Business URL: www.abe.com/home/GSVATOS

From: "Warren D. Fishbaugh" <WFISH@usadatanet.net>
Reply-To: "H-SIG" <h-sig@lyris.jewishgen.org>
To: "H-SIG" <h-sig@lyris.jewishgen.org>
Subject: [h-sig] Vital records indexed on Avotaynu fiche of Slovakian
records
Date: Fri, 27 Jan 2006 09:46:10 -0500

Dear H-Sig: Can someone explain to me how to access the Jewish Vital
Records indexed on the Avotaynu fiche of Slovakian records, please? The
index seems to describe records >from Zilina, but is only an index. Was
there an article in 'Avotaynu' or where is the actual source of the
records? Thanks for the help.
Warren Dell Fishbaugh
Walworth, New York


Jews in Habsburg Armed Forces 1788-1918 #hungary

Joan and Sam Kraus <jnskraus@...>
 

One of the Appendices in the subject book, which I obtained on
Interlibrary loan, gives the numbers of Jewish officers in the various
branches of the services , for several periods. After seeing the
limited number in the Cavalry for one period, I was emboldened to
furnish the information to a professional genealogist. He found the
records for my grandfather in the military archives in Budapest.

Samuel Kraus

Rancho Palos Verdes, California

Moderator: Please provide title (in Hungarian and/or German), publisher, date of publication, and ISBN for others who might be interested in this publication.


Hungary SIG #Hungary Jews in Habsburg Armed Forces 1788-1918 #hungary

Joan and Sam Kraus <jnskraus@...>
 

One of the Appendices in the subject book, which I obtained on
Interlibrary loan, gives the numbers of Jewish officers in the various
branches of the services , for several periods. After seeing the
limited number in the Cavalry for one period, I was emboldened to
furnish the information to a professional genealogist. He found the
records for my grandfather in the military archives in Budapest.

Samuel Kraus

Rancho Palos Verdes, California

Moderator: Please provide title (in Hungarian and/or German), publisher, date of publication, and ISBN for others who might be interested in this publication.


Jewish records in Catholic Parishes #hungary

alex p miller <alex.miller@...>
 

I want to report that in the three films I checked, there were no Jewish
records(Kiraly Helmec, Sarospatak, SA Ujhely)

Alex

I was encouraged by one post where it was stated that the Jewish records
were on the bottom of the pages. I am planning on getting a few films
from the Hegyalja area in Zemplen....SNIP
Best Regards,

Alex Miller, Chester CO. PA
alex.miller@ juno.com


Cluj, Romania chapter in Pinkas HaKehillot #hungary

Joyce Field
 

We are interested in having the chapter in the Pinkas HaKehillot,
Romania, volume 2 on Cluj translated. The chapter starts on page 243
of volume 2. You would have to have access to the volume. If you
can translate this chapter >from Hebrew to English, please contact me
privately.

The translation would be added to the Yizkor Book translations >from
Pinkas HaKehillot Romania. The index page for all translations is at
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/translations.html. The tables of
contents for the Romania volumes can be found at
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/pinkas_romania/pinkas_romania1.html
and
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/pinkas_romania/pinkas_romania2.html.

Cluj is known in Hungarian as Kolozsvar and in German as Klausenburg.

Joyce Field
JewishGen VP, Data Acquisition
jfield@jewishgen.org


Hungary SIG #Hungary Jewish records in Catholic Parishes #hungary

alex p miller <alex.miller@...>
 

I want to report that in the three films I checked, there were no Jewish
records(Kiraly Helmec, Sarospatak, SA Ujhely)

Alex

I was encouraged by one post where it was stated that the Jewish records
were on the bottom of the pages. I am planning on getting a few films
from the Hegyalja area in Zemplen....SNIP
Best Regards,

Alex Miller, Chester CO. PA
alex.miller@ juno.com


Hungary SIG #Hungary Cluj, Romania chapter in Pinkas HaKehillot #hungary

Joyce Field
 

We are interested in having the chapter in the Pinkas HaKehillot,
Romania, volume 2 on Cluj translated. The chapter starts on page 243
of volume 2. You would have to have access to the volume. If you
can translate this chapter >from Hebrew to English, please contact me
privately.

The translation would be added to the Yizkor Book translations >from
Pinkas HaKehillot Romania. The index page for all translations is at
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/translations.html. The tables of
contents for the Romania volumes can be found at
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/pinkas_romania/pinkas_romania1.html
and
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/pinkas_romania/pinkas_romania2.html.

Cluj is known in Hungarian as Kolozsvar and in German as Klausenburg.

Joyce Field
JewishGen VP, Data Acquisition
jfield@jewishgen.org


Chicago high school yearbooks #general

Mjn519@...
 

I wonder if anyone has access to Chicago area high school yearbooks
(1939-1946) and can do a lookup for me?

Looking for twin brothers with the last name COOPER. They were born
sometime between 1925-27 so I assume their high school days might be between the
years 1939-1946. Don't have their first names which is what I am looking for.

If you find the COOPER twin boys, I'm willing to pay for copying, etc.

Thank you for all your help!

Marie Lubman
Chino Hills, CA

Researching: GREENSTONE, GUTERMAN, AUGUST, ZACHER, FISCHER,
SOLOMON-Russia/Poland and New York; COOPER-New York/Chicago


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Chicago high school yearbooks #general

Mjn519@...
 

I wonder if anyone has access to Chicago area high school yearbooks
(1939-1946) and can do a lookup for me?

Looking for twin brothers with the last name COOPER. They were born
sometime between 1925-27 so I assume their high school days might be between the
years 1939-1946. Don't have their first names which is what I am looking for.

If you find the COOPER twin boys, I'm willing to pay for copying, etc.

Thank you for all your help!

Marie Lubman
Chino Hills, CA

Researching: GREENSTONE, GUTERMAN, AUGUST, ZACHER, FISCHER,
SOLOMON-Russia/Poland and New York; COOPER-New York/Chicago


Gruzin-Feitelberg Connection + email for Howard Baker #latvia

Marj Green <marjgreen@...>
 

I am searching for information on Malke FEITELBERG born 1901 in Goldingen
(Kukliga), Latvia who married Aaron David GRUZIN born 1903 in Kreitzburg
(Krustpils), Latvia. They were married in 1930 in Riga, Latvia, where Aaron
David was a hatter.

Malke's parents were Abram Leib FEITELBERG and BELLA SHLACHTER. Aaron David
was the son of Gershen GRUZIN.

If you have any information on these families, please let me know.

In 2003 I received some material on the FEITELBERG-GRUZIN connection >from
Howard Baker, a Litvak SIG member, but no longer have a correct email
address for him. If anyone knows Howard's email or if Howard sees this SIG
message, please get in touch with me privately at marjgreen@mindspring.com.

Thanks,

Marj

Marj Gruzen Green, Los Altos, CA
Researching GRUZIN-GRUZEN-GRUSIN-GRUSON >from Glazmanka (Gostini), Kreitzburg
(Krustpils), and Riga, Latvia


Latvia SIG #Latvia Gruzin-Feitelberg Connection + email for Howard Baker #latvia

Marj Green <marjgreen@...>
 

I am searching for information on Malke FEITELBERG born 1901 in Goldingen
(Kukliga), Latvia who married Aaron David GRUZIN born 1903 in Kreitzburg
(Krustpils), Latvia. They were married in 1930 in Riga, Latvia, where Aaron
David was a hatter.

Malke's parents were Abram Leib FEITELBERG and BELLA SHLACHTER. Aaron David
was the son of Gershen GRUZIN.

If you have any information on these families, please let me know.

In 2003 I received some material on the FEITELBERG-GRUZIN connection >from
Howard Baker, a Litvak SIG member, but no longer have a correct email
address for him. If anyone knows Howard's email or if Howard sees this SIG
message, please get in touch with me privately at marjgreen@mindspring.com.

Thanks,

Marj

Marj Gruzen Green, Los Altos, CA
Researching GRUZIN-GRUZEN-GRUSIN-GRUSON >from Glazmanka (Gostini), Kreitzburg
(Krustpils), and Riga, Latvia


Re: Birobidzhan #general

Dr.Josef ASH
 

It should be very interesting discussion!

The Flushing library of the Queens Library will present: Birobidzhan:
Stalin's Forgotten Zion Branch.
Created by Stalin in 1928 as a region of former USSR,
It was created in 1934

it was a center of Yiddish language and culture.
It never was any center of Jewish life and culture. In the best years there
were not more then 10% of Jews in the district population, that is, about 10
thousand Jews. I have met several Jews who made alia >from Birobidzhan - they
don't speak Yiddish. Yes, there was the newspaper "Birobidzhner Stern", they
had some kind of Jewish life, but it was far >from being "the center" of.

Nikolai Borodulin, teacher at Birobidzhan Teachers College, will discuss
Jewish life there.
It would be interesting to hear Mr. Borodulin.

Shavua tov! (Have a good week!),
Dr.Josef Ash


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Birobidzhan #general

Dr.Josef ASH
 

It should be very interesting discussion!

The Flushing library of the Queens Library will present: Birobidzhan:
Stalin's Forgotten Zion Branch.
Created by Stalin in 1928 as a region of former USSR,
It was created in 1934

it was a center of Yiddish language and culture.
It never was any center of Jewish life and culture. In the best years there
were not more then 10% of Jews in the district population, that is, about 10
thousand Jews. I have met several Jews who made alia >from Birobidzhan - they
don't speak Yiddish. Yes, there was the newspaper "Birobidzhner Stern", they
had some kind of Jewish life, but it was far >from being "the center" of.

Nikolai Borodulin, teacher at Birobidzhan Teachers College, will discuss
Jewish life there.
It would be interesting to hear Mr. Borodulin.

Shavua tov! (Have a good week!),
Dr.Josef Ash


Bounced email: BERNARD MILCH and HARRIS WELGER #general

Jean Rosenbaum <mervinr@...>
 

Email to the following Podhajce researchers has bounced:

Bernard Milch
Harris Welger

Corrected addresses would be appreciated.

Jean Rosenbaum
Baytown, TX


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Bounced email: BERNARD MILCH and HARRIS WELGER #general

Jean Rosenbaum <mervinr@...>
 

Email to the following Podhajce researchers has bounced:

Bernard Milch
Harris Welger

Corrected addresses would be appreciated.

Jean Rosenbaum
Baytown, TX


Cluj, Romania chapter in Pinkas HaKehillot #general

Joyce Field
 

We are interested in having the chapter in the Pinkas HaKehillot,
Romania, volume 2 on Cluj translated. The chapter starts on page 243
of volume 2. You would have to have access to the volume. If you
can translate this chapter >from Hebrew to English, please contact me
privately.

The translation would be added to the Yizkor Book translations >from
Pinkas HaKehillot Romania. The index page for all translations is at
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/translations.html. The tables of
contents for the Romania volumes can be found at
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/pinkas_romania/pinkas_romania1.html
and
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/pinkas_romania/pinkas_romania2.html.

Cluj is known in Hungarian as Kolozsvar and in German as Klausenburg.

Joyce Field
JewishGen VP, Data Acquisition
jfield@jewishgen.org


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Cluj, Romania chapter in Pinkas HaKehillot #general

Joyce Field
 

We are interested in having the chapter in the Pinkas HaKehillot,
Romania, volume 2 on Cluj translated. The chapter starts on page 243
of volume 2. You would have to have access to the volume. If you
can translate this chapter >from Hebrew to English, please contact me
privately.

The translation would be added to the Yizkor Book translations >from
Pinkas HaKehillot Romania. The index page for all translations is at
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/translations.html. The tables of
contents for the Romania volumes can be found at
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/pinkas_romania/pinkas_romania1.html
and
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/pinkas_romania/pinkas_romania2.html.

Cluj is known in Hungarian as Kolozsvar and in German as Klausenburg.

Joyce Field
JewishGen VP, Data Acquisition
jfield@jewishgen.org


New Free UK-Research Database #general

Pamela Weisberger <pweisberger@...>
 

For those of you researching ancestors who lived in the United Kingdom,
Ancestry.com, a fee-based service, is currently offering *free* access to a
new (beta) database of the actual images of the birth, marriage and death
indexes--I repeat *indexes*, not certificates!-- for England and Wales >from
1837 - 1983.

http://www.ancestry.com/search/rectype/vital/freebmd/bmd.aspx

The civil registration system for births, marriages and deaths was
introduced in England and Wales in 1837. Registration was undertaken by
civil registrars who reported to the Registrar General at the General
Register Office (GRO) in London, now part of the Office for National
Statistics (ONS).

Getting access to the information on one of these certificates can be done
two ways:

One can use the partially completed FreeBMD search engine at:

http://www.freebmd.org.uk/

This is ongoing project to transcribe the Civil Registration index of
births, marriages and deaths for England and Wales, and to provide free
Internet access to the transcribed records, especially useful for names
before 1900. If you locate the record you want, there is a link to a credit
card order form (approximately $12 per record) and orders are filled in
about two weeks. (The actual record will, of course, provide more complete
details of the event than the index provides.)

Remember this is not yet a complete index yet--work is ongoing--so if you
don't find a record you believe should be there, searching the national
birth, marriage and death indexes, that have been created by the GRO--should
be your next step. The indexes for the three events are each divided into
quarterly volumes, with the names for each quarter listed alphabetically.
Once an entry in one of the indexes is found, you are then able to use that
information to order of copy. The other information that can be obtained
from the index includes:
Year
Record type (Quarter (March, June, September, and December)
District (each county in England and Wales was divided up into registration
districts)
Volume
Page number
Note: Names were entered into the volume of the quarter in which
notification of the event was received, not necessarily the quarter in which
the event actually occurred.

Keep in mind that when you search on a surname, you will not receive a "hit"
for that particular name--as you would searching the Free BMD database--but
will only get the pages in an alphabetical page image that "may" contain the
name you are searching for. If the search name falls alphabetically between
the first name and the last name on a page, that page is returned as a
possible match. You may then view an image of the page to see if the name
you are searching for is on that page.

You must search by indicating year and quarter, so it can be slow-going, but
if you know the approximate date an event occurred you might be pleasantly
surprised. (Remember to search in the months after an event as it might
have been registered late.)

Previously, these indices, on microfiche, were only available (in the US) in
Family History Centers or libraries, but never before online to my
knowledge, so this is very useful, convenient, and *free* resource--no
subscription required--for genealogists.

Pamela Weisberger
Santa Monica, CA
pweisberger@hotmail.com


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen New Free UK-Research Database #general

Pamela Weisberger <pweisberger@...>
 

For those of you researching ancestors who lived in the United Kingdom,
Ancestry.com, a fee-based service, is currently offering *free* access to a
new (beta) database of the actual images of the birth, marriage and death
indexes--I repeat *indexes*, not certificates!-- for England and Wales >from
1837 - 1983.

http://www.ancestry.com/search/rectype/vital/freebmd/bmd.aspx

The civil registration system for births, marriages and deaths was
introduced in England and Wales in 1837. Registration was undertaken by
civil registrars who reported to the Registrar General at the General
Register Office (GRO) in London, now part of the Office for National
Statistics (ONS).

Getting access to the information on one of these certificates can be done
two ways:

One can use the partially completed FreeBMD search engine at:

http://www.freebmd.org.uk/

This is ongoing project to transcribe the Civil Registration index of
births, marriages and deaths for England and Wales, and to provide free
Internet access to the transcribed records, especially useful for names
before 1900. If you locate the record you want, there is a link to a credit
card order form (approximately $12 per record) and orders are filled in
about two weeks. (The actual record will, of course, provide more complete
details of the event than the index provides.)

Remember this is not yet a complete index yet--work is ongoing--so if you
don't find a record you believe should be there, searching the national
birth, marriage and death indexes, that have been created by the GRO--should
be your next step. The indexes for the three events are each divided into
quarterly volumes, with the names for each quarter listed alphabetically.
Once an entry in one of the indexes is found, you are then able to use that
information to order of copy. The other information that can be obtained
from the index includes:
Year
Record type (Quarter (March, June, September, and December)
District (each county in England and Wales was divided up into registration
districts)
Volume
Page number
Note: Names were entered into the volume of the quarter in which
notification of the event was received, not necessarily the quarter in which
the event actually occurred.

Keep in mind that when you search on a surname, you will not receive a "hit"
for that particular name--as you would searching the Free BMD database--but
will only get the pages in an alphabetical page image that "may" contain the
name you are searching for. If the search name falls alphabetically between
the first name and the last name on a page, that page is returned as a
possible match. You may then view an image of the page to see if the name
you are searching for is on that page.

You must search by indicating year and quarter, so it can be slow-going, but
if you know the approximate date an event occurred you might be pleasantly
surprised. (Remember to search in the months after an event as it might
have been registered late.)

Previously, these indices, on microfiche, were only available (in the US) in
Family History Centers or libraries, but never before online to my
knowledge, so this is very useful, convenient, and *free* resource--no
subscription required--for genealogists.

Pamela Weisberger
Santa Monica, CA
pweisberger@hotmail.com