Date   

Zasliai and Zeimiai Lithuania Web Pages #general

Jose Gutstein
 

I have created web pages for two towns in Lithuania:

- Zasliai (Zosle), located about half-way between Kaunas and Vilnius:

http://www.gutstein.net/zasliai/zasliai-home.htm

- Zeimiai (Zheim), a very tiny village NE of Kaunas, only 7 miles NNW of
Jonava, 7 miles S of Seta, 12 miles SE of Kedainiai:

http://www.gutstein.net/zeimiai/zeimiai-home.htm

Thank you,

Jose Gutstein
Radzilow web page: http://www.radzilow.com
Szczuczyn web page: http://www.szczuczyn.com
Wizna web page: http://www.wizna.com
Zasliai web page: http://www.gutstein.net/zasliai/zasliai-home.htm


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Zasliai and Zeimiai Lithuania Web Pages #general

Jose Gutstein
 

I have created web pages for two towns in Lithuania:

- Zasliai (Zosle), located about half-way between Kaunas and Vilnius:

http://www.gutstein.net/zasliai/zasliai-home.htm

- Zeimiai (Zheim), a very tiny village NE of Kaunas, only 7 miles NNW of
Jonava, 7 miles S of Seta, 12 miles SE of Kedainiai:

http://www.gutstein.net/zeimiai/zeimiai-home.htm

Thank you,

Jose Gutstein
Radzilow web page: http://www.radzilow.com
Szczuczyn web page: http://www.szczuczyn.com
Wizna web page: http://www.wizna.com
Zasliai web page: http://www.gutstein.net/zasliai/zasliai-home.htm


Re: LDS Family History Centres in England #general

Jerry Goldbloom <j.goldbloom@...>
 

There are at least two LDS Family History Centres in England and probably many
more. I have used the local one at High Wycombe, Bucks. and they were most
helpful. I believe there is another centre in S. Kensington, London.

Regards

Jeremy Goldbloom, Chorleywood, UK

1) There are no Family History Centers in Israel or England (and
probably other places). So, recommending that someone rent a FHC
microfilm, or go to their local FHC to do ancestry.com research, is
useless advice for them.
MODERATOR NOTE:
http://www.familysearch.org/Eng/Library/FHC/FHC_Results.asp?FHCCountry=England
lists all 76 centers in England


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: LDS Family History Centres in England #general

Jerry Goldbloom <j.goldbloom@...>
 

There are at least two LDS Family History Centres in England and probably many
more. I have used the local one at High Wycombe, Bucks. and they were most
helpful. I believe there is another centre in S. Kensington, London.

Regards

Jeremy Goldbloom, Chorleywood, UK

1) There are no Family History Centers in Israel or England (and
probably other places). So, recommending that someone rent a FHC
microfilm, or go to their local FHC to do ancestry.com research, is
useless advice for them.
MODERATOR NOTE:
http://www.familysearch.org/Eng/Library/FHC/FHC_Results.asp?FHCCountry=England
lists all 76 centers in England


Orgeyev (Orhei), Moldova Yizkor Book #romania

Terry Lasky <talasky@...>
 

I am happy to announce that an additional 13 chapters (42 pages) of the
Orhei (Orgeyev), Moldova Yizkor book have now been translated and put on
Jewishgen. This includes Chapters 8-14, 19 and 129-133.

It will only take about $350 more (plus what I have already collected
and contributed) to finish the entire book. This is the last time that
I will be asking for donations. Please make a donation at
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/v_projectslist.asp?project_cat=23
and be sure to mark it for the Orhei, Moldova Yizkor book. No more
work will be done on the book until I have collected enough money.
Please be generous this final time so that we can have a completed
Yizkor book. Please email me privately to let me know the amount of
your donation so that I will know if I have collected enough to complete
the book (talasky@comcast.net).

Thank You

Terry Lasky
Colorado, USA


Romania SIG #Romania Orgeyev (Orhei), Moldova Yizkor Book #romania

Terry Lasky <talasky@...>
 

I am happy to announce that an additional 13 chapters (42 pages) of the
Orhei (Orgeyev), Moldova Yizkor book have now been translated and put on
Jewishgen. This includes Chapters 8-14, 19 and 129-133.

It will only take about $350 more (plus what I have already collected
and contributed) to finish the entire book. This is the last time that
I will be asking for donations. Please make a donation at
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/v_projectslist.asp?project_cat=23
and be sure to mark it for the Orhei, Moldova Yizkor book. No more
work will be done on the book until I have collected enough money.
Please be generous this final time so that we can have a completed
Yizkor book. Please email me privately to let me know the amount of
your donation so that I will know if I have collected enough to complete
the book (talasky@comcast.net).

Thank You

Terry Lasky
Colorado, USA


World War I expulsion from Siauliai #lithuania

Howard Margol
 

Several messages have appeared on the Digest about the expulsion of Jews
from Lithuania during World War I - mainly 1915. The majority of those
Jews returned to the newly independent country of Lithuania after 1918.
Upon their return, they had to apply for an internal passport in order to
become a citizen.
Their application had to be filed within 30 days in order to avoid paying
heavy fines. The date of their application gives an exact date of their
return within a 30 day period so it is an important benchmark.

With their application is a photograph taken at the time. In most cases,
the photograph still exists along with other documents contained in their
individual file. These documents usually give information about where
they lived between the time of their expulsion and when they returned -
all very valuable >from a genealogical research point of view.

Go on the internet to the following site and you will find interesting
and instructive information about the internal passports. Do a search
and you may find your ancestors.

http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Lithuania/InternalPassports.htm

Howard Margol
Atlanta, Georgia
homargol@aol.com
www.pusalotas.org


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania World War I expulsion from Siauliai #lithuania

Howard Margol
 

Several messages have appeared on the Digest about the expulsion of Jews
from Lithuania during World War I - mainly 1915. The majority of those
Jews returned to the newly independent country of Lithuania after 1918.
Upon their return, they had to apply for an internal passport in order to
become a citizen.
Their application had to be filed within 30 days in order to avoid paying
heavy fines. The date of their application gives an exact date of their
return within a 30 day period so it is an important benchmark.

With their application is a photograph taken at the time. In most cases,
the photograph still exists along with other documents contained in their
individual file. These documents usually give information about where
they lived between the time of their expulsion and when they returned -
all very valuable >from a genealogical research point of view.

Go on the internet to the following site and you will find interesting
and instructive information about the internal passports. Do a search
and you may find your ancestors.

http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Lithuania/InternalPassports.htm

Howard Margol
Atlanta, Georgia
homargol@aol.com
www.pusalotas.org


Gruzin-Feitelberg Connection + email for Howard Baker #lithuania

Marj Green <marjgreen@...>
 

I am searching for information on Malke FEITELBERG born 1901 in
Goldingen (Kukliga), Latvia who married Aaron David GRUZIN born 1903 in
Kreitzburg (Krustpils), Latvia. They were married in 1930 in Riga,
Latvia, where Aaron David was a hatter.

Malke's parents were Abram Leib FEITELBERG and BELLA SHLACHTER. Aaron
David was the son of Gershen GRUZIN.

If you have any information on these families, please let me know.

In 2003 I received some material on the FEITELBERG-GRUZIN connection
from Howard Baker, a Litvak SIG member, but no longer have a correct =
email address for him. If anyone knows Howard's email or if Howard sees
this SIG message, please get in touch with me privately at
marjgreen@mindspring.com.

Thanks,

Marj

Marj Gruzen Green, Los Altos, CA
Researching GRUZIN-GRUZEN-GRUSIN-GRUSON >from Glazmanka (Gostini),
Kreitzburg (Krustpils), and Riga, Latvia


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania Gruzin-Feitelberg Connection + email for Howard Baker #lithuania

Marj Green <marjgreen@...>
 

I am searching for information on Malke FEITELBERG born 1901 in
Goldingen (Kukliga), Latvia who married Aaron David GRUZIN born 1903 in
Kreitzburg (Krustpils), Latvia. They were married in 1930 in Riga,
Latvia, where Aaron David was a hatter.

Malke's parents were Abram Leib FEITELBERG and BELLA SHLACHTER. Aaron
David was the son of Gershen GRUZIN.

If you have any information on these families, please let me know.

In 2003 I received some material on the FEITELBERG-GRUZIN connection
from Howard Baker, a Litvak SIG member, but no longer have a correct =
email address for him. If anyone knows Howard's email or if Howard sees
this SIG message, please get in touch with me privately at
marjgreen@mindspring.com.

Thanks,

Marj

Marj Gruzen Green, Los Altos, CA
Researching GRUZIN-GRUZEN-GRUSIN-GRUSON >from Glazmanka (Gostini),
Kreitzburg (Krustpils), and Riga, Latvia


Re: Thanks (Solomon-Zalman) #lithuania

Prof. G. L. Esterson <jerry@...>
 

Nathalie RIED of Paris posted as follows:

"Shalom to all and many thanks for your interesting answers : the
overwhelming consensus is that Zalman and Shlomo are two versions of the
same name, but I wanted to check this out specially because I have seen
Zalman being one of the possible variants for Meshulam in the Given
Names Database....which is quite possible too, but apparantly less
frequent!"


I do not have access to the original posting, so I am not aware of exactly
what questions were asked. But I will address the "consensus" that "Zalman
and Shlomo are two versions of the same name."

This statement is not correct. Shlomo is a Hebrew given name, originally
used in the Bible for King David's son. The *Yiddish given name* Zalman
comes >from a different language, Yiddish, and is not the same thing as the
Hebrew name Shlomo, although there is a linkage between these two names.

Yiddish was the new language created by Jews beginning about 1000 years
ago, and defined by them as "Mama Lashon" -- "Mother language". It was
always a warm, family language used in the home, between friends, and in
the Jewish community, different >from the Hebrew language which was created
much earlier, about 4,000 years ago. Hebrew was and is the language of
Jewish law, prayer, writing of contracts, and other formal usages by Jews,
and has always been called "Lashon Kodesh" -- "the holy language". Two
different languages, belonging to one people, one "loved" by them, the
other treated with great respect and honor.

Some male Jews in Lithuania were given the Yiddish name Zalman for use
within the family and with other Jews. These same Jews were also given a
Hebrew name, because Jewish custom states that a Jewish man's *legal*
Jewish name consists at least of a Hebrew name, perhaps secondarily also a
Yiddish and/or secular name. Among Jews, it became customary to prefer
certain Yiddish names if one was given at his Brit Mila a certain legal
Hebrew name -- some Yiddish names seemed to "go" with certain Hebrew names.

The Hebrew names Avraham, Efrayim, Elyaqim, Meshulam, Shlomo, Shmarya,
Shneyur, and Yekusieyl were found by expert Lithuanian rabbis using
statistical studies of names, to be the ones for which the Yiddish name
Zalman was a "favorite". Therefor, authorized by their respected positions
as the writers of Jewish law for how Jewish names were to be defined and
written in Gitin (Jewish divorce contracts) and other contracts, and to be
called to an aliya in shul, they defined the Yiddish name Zalman to be a
kinui (Jewish legal alias) of the above Hebrew names. Accordingly, in a
Get, a man having one of these Hebrew names and also the name Zalman must
be identified in the Get as (say) Shlomo haMechune Zalman, and he would be
called to the Tora in an aliya as Shlomo Zalman ben Ploni (Ploni being the
Legal Jewish given name of his father). The Hebrew word "haMechune" means
"known as" and is one of two such legal terms used to identify the Legal
Jewish Name of a male Jew -- the other legal term is "demitkari".

So, we see that these two names Shlomo and Zalman are not the "same name",
but rather are linked names which together define a Jewish man's Legal
Jewish Name -- one that he usually carries with him during his whole
lifetime, and uses for the important Jewish events and contracts in his
lifetime.

Jewish women were not called to the Tora, and therefor had no need for a
legal Jewish name. So, it was quite common for women to be given only a
Hebrew name, only a Yiddish name, or only a secular name (e.g., Augusta, a
German secular name used in Lithuania).

These Hebrew and Yiddish names can be seen by visiting the JewishGen Given
Names Data Base for Lithuania at:

< http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/GivenNames/ >

and searching for the name "Zalman" (without the quotation marks).

Shabbat shalom,

Professor G. L. Esterson, Ra'anana, Israel


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania Re: Thanks (Solomon-Zalman) #lithuania

Prof. G. L. Esterson <jerry@...>
 

Nathalie RIED of Paris posted as follows:

"Shalom to all and many thanks for your interesting answers : the
overwhelming consensus is that Zalman and Shlomo are two versions of the
same name, but I wanted to check this out specially because I have seen
Zalman being one of the possible variants for Meshulam in the Given
Names Database....which is quite possible too, but apparantly less
frequent!"


I do not have access to the original posting, so I am not aware of exactly
what questions were asked. But I will address the "consensus" that "Zalman
and Shlomo are two versions of the same name."

This statement is not correct. Shlomo is a Hebrew given name, originally
used in the Bible for King David's son. The *Yiddish given name* Zalman
comes >from a different language, Yiddish, and is not the same thing as the
Hebrew name Shlomo, although there is a linkage between these two names.

Yiddish was the new language created by Jews beginning about 1000 years
ago, and defined by them as "Mama Lashon" -- "Mother language". It was
always a warm, family language used in the home, between friends, and in
the Jewish community, different >from the Hebrew language which was created
much earlier, about 4,000 years ago. Hebrew was and is the language of
Jewish law, prayer, writing of contracts, and other formal usages by Jews,
and has always been called "Lashon Kodesh" -- "the holy language". Two
different languages, belonging to one people, one "loved" by them, the
other treated with great respect and honor.

Some male Jews in Lithuania were given the Yiddish name Zalman for use
within the family and with other Jews. These same Jews were also given a
Hebrew name, because Jewish custom states that a Jewish man's *legal*
Jewish name consists at least of a Hebrew name, perhaps secondarily also a
Yiddish and/or secular name. Among Jews, it became customary to prefer
certain Yiddish names if one was given at his Brit Mila a certain legal
Hebrew name -- some Yiddish names seemed to "go" with certain Hebrew names.

The Hebrew names Avraham, Efrayim, Elyaqim, Meshulam, Shlomo, Shmarya,
Shneyur, and Yekusieyl were found by expert Lithuanian rabbis using
statistical studies of names, to be the ones for which the Yiddish name
Zalman was a "favorite". Therefor, authorized by their respected positions
as the writers of Jewish law for how Jewish names were to be defined and
written in Gitin (Jewish divorce contracts) and other contracts, and to be
called to an aliya in shul, they defined the Yiddish name Zalman to be a
kinui (Jewish legal alias) of the above Hebrew names. Accordingly, in a
Get, a man having one of these Hebrew names and also the name Zalman must
be identified in the Get as (say) Shlomo haMechune Zalman, and he would be
called to the Tora in an aliya as Shlomo Zalman ben Ploni (Ploni being the
Legal Jewish given name of his father). The Hebrew word "haMechune" means
"known as" and is one of two such legal terms used to identify the Legal
Jewish Name of a male Jew -- the other legal term is "demitkari".

So, we see that these two names Shlomo and Zalman are not the "same name",
but rather are linked names which together define a Jewish man's Legal
Jewish Name -- one that he usually carries with him during his whole
lifetime, and uses for the important Jewish events and contracts in his
lifetime.

Jewish women were not called to the Tora, and therefor had no need for a
legal Jewish name. So, it was quite common for women to be given only a
Hebrew name, only a Yiddish name, or only a secular name (e.g., Augusta, a
German secular name used in Lithuania).

These Hebrew and Yiddish names can be seen by visiting the JewishGen Given
Names Data Base for Lithuania at:

< http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/GivenNames/ >

and searching for the name "Zalman" (without the quotation marks).

Shabbat shalom,

Professor G. L. Esterson, Ra'anana, Israel


Jews of Lithuania in 1915 #lithuania

Anatoly Chayesh <chayesh@...>
 

Dear Litvaks

Whoever is interested in destiny of Jews of Lithuania in 1915, I
recommend my two publications " On the Front Line in Lithuania, 1915"
(Parts I and II) in the LitvakSIG Jnline Journal. Although my publication,
"Explusion of Jews >from Lithuania" in the Online Journal was recently cited
in the Digest, this second publication has not been mentioned in the Digest
in regard to this subject.

Russian Calendar in 1915 lagged behind >from European on 13 days.

Anatolij Chayesh


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania Jews of Lithuania in 1915 #lithuania

Anatoly Chayesh <chayesh@...>
 

Dear Litvaks

Whoever is interested in destiny of Jews of Lithuania in 1915, I
recommend my two publications " On the Front Line in Lithuania, 1915"
(Parts I and II) in the LitvakSIG Jnline Journal. Although my publication,
"Explusion of Jews >from Lithuania" in the Online Journal was recently cited
in the Digest, this second publication has not been mentioned in the Digest
in regard to this subject.

Russian Calendar in 1915 lagged behind >from European on 13 days.

Anatolij Chayesh


Help with 1911 census Montreal entry #general

joyweave
 

I think I've found my grandmother in the 1911 census in Montreal. The entry for
her relationship looks like "cogem" or "cojem". Several others in the h/h are
listed as "Cousin" or "Cousine." This doesn't look like those.

Can someone whose French is better than mine translate this?

Joy Weaver
East Islip, NY USA


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Help with 1911 census Montreal entry #general

joyweave
 

I think I've found my grandmother in the 1911 census in Montreal. The entry for
her relationship looks like "cogem" or "cojem". Several others in the h/h are
listed as "Cousin" or "Cousine." This doesn't look like those.

Can someone whose French is better than mine translate this?

Joy Weaver
East Islip, NY USA


Re: NYC marriage license puzzle #general

joyweave
 

Shelly, was the officiant the second time a rabbi? What I'm thinking is
that there was a Civil wedding and then a religious one.

Sometimes, even today, clergy will require that a couple obtain a new
marriage license when they tell him/ her they are already married.
There's a special name for this type of license, but I can't recall what
it is just now. It's a way of assuring that the marriage really is
legal as well as religious.

Joy Weaver,
Islip, NY

Question 2:

Does anyone have any ideas as to why the information given is *exactly* the
same 2 years later? If they were married civilly 2 years earlier, wouldn't
the residences be the same?

I also thought that if you were married at City Hall, you didn't need another
marriage license if you were later married in a religious ceremony. Any ideas
on this?

They were both Jewish, so I don't think the 2nd marriage license is the result
of a conversion.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: NYC marriage license puzzle #general

joyweave
 

Shelly, was the officiant the second time a rabbi? What I'm thinking is
that there was a Civil wedding and then a religious one.

Sometimes, even today, clergy will require that a couple obtain a new
marriage license when they tell him/ her they are already married.
There's a special name for this type of license, but I can't recall what
it is just now. It's a way of assuring that the marriage really is
legal as well as religious.

Joy Weaver,
Islip, NY

Question 2:

Does anyone have any ideas as to why the information given is *exactly* the
same 2 years later? If they were married civilly 2 years earlier, wouldn't
the residences be the same?

I also thought that if you were married at City Hall, you didn't need another
marriage license if you were later married in a religious ceremony. Any ideas
on this?

They were both Jewish, so I don't think the 2nd marriage license is the result
of a conversion.


IGI corrections, name removal - new address #general

bik <kooshb9341@...>
 

We were informed today of a new address for submission to LDS of requests for
name removal >from the Mormon International Genealogical Index (IGI).

Some who have discovered their relative's names in the IGI and reported
the inappropriate submission, have had the names removed. Full details
at http://www.jewishgen.org/InfoFiles/ldsagree.html

Bernard Kouchel


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen IGI corrections, name removal - new address #general

bik <kooshb9341@...>
 

We were informed today of a new address for submission to LDS of requests for
name removal >from the Mormon International Genealogical Index (IGI).

Some who have discovered their relative's names in the IGI and reported
the inappropriate submission, have had the names removed. Full details
at http://www.jewishgen.org/InfoFiles/ldsagree.html

Bernard Kouchel