Date   

Hechaver. #lithuania

pocahontas <chayakat@...>
 

dear litvaksig members,

the title "hechaver" was -and is used not only on tombstones but also in
calling people up to the Torah.It is a title of respect to leaders or
respected elders---but especially used for scholars,learned members of
the community-TALMIDEY CHACHOMIM.It is more common in congregations
whose origin was in Germany-and in Anglo-Saxon congregations folowing
their custom-minhag.Among our Litvak and Russian and Poylisher ancestors
the term REB(i stress-not rav or rov or rabbi which refer to musmochim -
people with semicha-rabbinical ordination)was used.

In the Gemorreh-talmud and Mishne the term is mentioned dozens of times-
and thousands of years ago already signified a scholar or associate of
scholars.In Jastrows Talmudic Dictionary there are a number of such
references-in addition to our common modern meaning of "friend"or member
of a kibbutz or club or party or organisation (Unless stated as being a
chaver os unlikely to appear on a grave with such a meaning.)

To back up all i have written ,i refer anyone to the very large entry
in the Jewish Encyclopaedia under the entry""HAVER".

sincerely,Rabbi Menachem Mendal Katz.Israel.


Rabbi Pinhas from Korets #rabbinic

alex ki
 

Dear colleagues,

I am looking for the genealogical tree of Rabbi Pinkhas >from Korets.
Can anybody help me to find any sources for this searching? Please
respond to me private e-mail - alex.ks.ki@gmail.com

Thanks
Alex Kopelberg


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania Hechaver. #lithuania

pocahontas <chayakat@...>
 

dear litvaksig members,

the title "hechaver" was -and is used not only on tombstones but also in
calling people up to the Torah.It is a title of respect to leaders or
respected elders---but especially used for scholars,learned members of
the community-TALMIDEY CHACHOMIM.It is more common in congregations
whose origin was in Germany-and in Anglo-Saxon congregations folowing
their custom-minhag.Among our Litvak and Russian and Poylisher ancestors
the term REB(i stress-not rav or rov or rabbi which refer to musmochim -
people with semicha-rabbinical ordination)was used.

In the Gemorreh-talmud and Mishne the term is mentioned dozens of times-
and thousands of years ago already signified a scholar or associate of
scholars.In Jastrows Talmudic Dictionary there are a number of such
references-in addition to our common modern meaning of "friend"or member
of a kibbutz or club or party or organisation (Unless stated as being a
chaver os unlikely to appear on a grave with such a meaning.)

To back up all i have written ,i refer anyone to the very large entry
in the Jewish Encyclopaedia under the entry""HAVER".

sincerely,Rabbi Menachem Mendal Katz.Israel.


Rabbinic Genealogy SIG #Rabbinic Rabbi Pinhas from Korets #rabbinic

alex ki
 

Dear colleagues,

I am looking for the genealogical tree of Rabbi Pinkhas >from Korets.
Can anybody help me to find any sources for this searching? Please
respond to me private e-mail - alex.ks.ki@gmail.com

Thanks
Alex Kopelberg


Re: HeChaver #lithuania

The Berkleys <berkley@...>
 

In Germany the title "HeChaver" (meaning "the friend" or "the member") was a
title of honor bestowed on stalwards of the community as a sign of
recogniton for services rendered.

Jonny Berkley
Israel


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania Re: HeChaver #lithuania

The Berkleys <berkley@...>
 

In Germany the title "HeChaver" (meaning "the friend" or "the member") was a
title of honor bestowed on stalwards of the community as a sign of
recogniton for services rendered.

Jonny Berkley
Israel


Re: World War I expulsion from Siauliai #lithuania

Assaf Urieli <assaf@...>
 

Hello all,

Thanks for all of the answers and all of the encouragement in this endeavor.
Since asking the question, I have also managed to contact quite a few
cousins on both of my parents' sides, and I'm getting swamped over with
all kinds of details - it seems I'm not the first one in the family to
wonder about our history! For those who wrote me personally, please
excuse me if I haven't answered yet - I'll try to get to it soon!

I've also done some more research of my own regarding this period.
First, a couple of fascinating articles to read on the Internet:
Anatoly Chayesh's articles "On the Front Line in Lithuania, 1915"
(translated by Gordon McDaniel):
http://www.jewishgen.org/Litvak/HTML/OnlineJournals/1915fline.htm
http://www.jewishgen.org/Litvak/HTML/OnlineJournals/On%20the%20Front%20Line%20in%20Lithuania%20in%201915%20Narratives%20of%20Jewish%20Eyewitnesses%20Part%202.htm

A translation of a chapter (>from Yiddish I believe) specifically
regarding this period for Litvaks (written by Louis Stein, translated by
Judie Goldstein):
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/lita/Lit0089.html

from one of my mother's cousins, I learned that his father's family was
deported to Vitebsk (as was Meyer Kron, cited on Eilat Gordon Levitan's
site), not all the way to Eastern Ukraine, so that there seem to be
exceptions to the rule . My cousin has a 40-page document written by his
grandfather specifically about the deportation, which he will send me soon.

My current understanding is that the expulsion was not performed in a
very organised manner: rather, the local police would give the Jewish
community very short notice to leave their houses and go east, saying
anybody found after 24 hours would be hung. The people left any way they
could - some by train (directly to Eastern Ukraine?), some by horse or
wagon, some by foot.

Those who survived reached larger centers further east - here they
somehow got "travel certificates" to travel by rail directly to Eastern
Ukraine (under despicable conditions). I'm not sure how this part of the
deporation was enforced. But some stayed in these larger centers (e.g.
Vilna). I don't know why most of the populace did travel further east -
presumably they were forced to, but I don't know how or by whom -
perhaps only under threat of punishment if they were found there.

If anybody has information to correct the above, please let me know.

As mentioned by Howard Margol, regarding people's return to "free"
Lithuania, usually in 1920, they had to apply for internal passports, so
that documentary evidence can probably be found for most people
regarding their return. I'll try this route soon...

In the third link above, I found some interesting information
specifically regarding Shavl, which corroborates the statement by my
grandmother that they were separated >from her father for a few years:
The Jews of Shavl were given eight hours [to leave].... In Shavl a
couple of days before the expulsion all the young and healthy Jewish men
were taken to forced labor, to dig trenches several versts outside the
city. While the expulsion was going on the officials intentionally did
not let the Jewish forced laborers know about the evil decree. When the
Jewish forced laborers returned to the city, they could not find their
loved ones. Therefore, a number of Jewish Shavl families were separated
for many years.

Regarding the management of the expulsion, and the fact that some Jews
remained in Vilna (including possibly my grandmother's family):
The exiled Lithuanian Jews who were required, according to the order of
the 5th May 1915, to be sent to places in Poltava, Yekaterinoslav and
Tavritchesk Provinces were not able to travel by train, before the
authorities gave out a travel certificate. This type of document was
known in Russia >from prior times. These travel certificates were given
out to political exiles or criminals and served as their only
identification document until they reached the appointed place of
banishment. The majority of exiles were banished this way. Some of the
Jews, who did not want to wander so far >from their hometowns, chose the
more difficult and dangerous road to wander by wagon and on foot until
they reached a Jewish settlement. People left for Vilna and the
surrounding towns to wait until the Germans arrived so they could go
back to their home shtetl.

I'll write more when I find more information that could interest
everybody. I'd be interested to know if anybody has other details or
other sources of information regarding the expulsion.

Best regards,
Assaf Urieli
Toulouse, France


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania Re: World War I expulsion from Siauliai #lithuania

Assaf Urieli <assaf@...>
 

Hello all,

Thanks for all of the answers and all of the encouragement in this endeavor.
Since asking the question, I have also managed to contact quite a few
cousins on both of my parents' sides, and I'm getting swamped over with
all kinds of details - it seems I'm not the first one in the family to
wonder about our history! For those who wrote me personally, please
excuse me if I haven't answered yet - I'll try to get to it soon!

I've also done some more research of my own regarding this period.
First, a couple of fascinating articles to read on the Internet:
Anatoly Chayesh's articles "On the Front Line in Lithuania, 1915"
(translated by Gordon McDaniel):
http://www.jewishgen.org/Litvak/HTML/OnlineJournals/1915fline.htm
http://www.jewishgen.org/Litvak/HTML/OnlineJournals/On%20the%20Front%20Line%20in%20Lithuania%20in%201915%20Narratives%20of%20Jewish%20Eyewitnesses%20Part%202.htm

A translation of a chapter (>from Yiddish I believe) specifically
regarding this period for Litvaks (written by Louis Stein, translated by
Judie Goldstein):
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/lita/Lit0089.html

from one of my mother's cousins, I learned that his father's family was
deported to Vitebsk (as was Meyer Kron, cited on Eilat Gordon Levitan's
site), not all the way to Eastern Ukraine, so that there seem to be
exceptions to the rule . My cousin has a 40-page document written by his
grandfather specifically about the deportation, which he will send me soon.

My current understanding is that the expulsion was not performed in a
very organised manner: rather, the local police would give the Jewish
community very short notice to leave their houses and go east, saying
anybody found after 24 hours would be hung. The people left any way they
could - some by train (directly to Eastern Ukraine?), some by horse or
wagon, some by foot.

Those who survived reached larger centers further east - here they
somehow got "travel certificates" to travel by rail directly to Eastern
Ukraine (under despicable conditions). I'm not sure how this part of the
deporation was enforced. But some stayed in these larger centers (e.g.
Vilna). I don't know why most of the populace did travel further east -
presumably they were forced to, but I don't know how or by whom -
perhaps only under threat of punishment if they were found there.

If anybody has information to correct the above, please let me know.

As mentioned by Howard Margol, regarding people's return to "free"
Lithuania, usually in 1920, they had to apply for internal passports, so
that documentary evidence can probably be found for most people
regarding their return. I'll try this route soon...

In the third link above, I found some interesting information
specifically regarding Shavl, which corroborates the statement by my
grandmother that they were separated >from her father for a few years:
The Jews of Shavl were given eight hours [to leave].... In Shavl a
couple of days before the expulsion all the young and healthy Jewish men
were taken to forced labor, to dig trenches several versts outside the
city. While the expulsion was going on the officials intentionally did
not let the Jewish forced laborers know about the evil decree. When the
Jewish forced laborers returned to the city, they could not find their
loved ones. Therefore, a number of Jewish Shavl families were separated
for many years.

Regarding the management of the expulsion, and the fact that some Jews
remained in Vilna (including possibly my grandmother's family):
The exiled Lithuanian Jews who were required, according to the order of
the 5th May 1915, to be sent to places in Poltava, Yekaterinoslav and
Tavritchesk Provinces were not able to travel by train, before the
authorities gave out a travel certificate. This type of document was
known in Russia >from prior times. These travel certificates were given
out to political exiles or criminals and served as their only
identification document until they reached the appointed place of
banishment. The majority of exiles were banished this way. Some of the
Jews, who did not want to wander so far >from their hometowns, chose the
more difficult and dangerous road to wander by wagon and on foot until
they reached a Jewish settlement. People left for Vilna and the
surrounding towns to wait until the Germans arrived so they could go
back to their home shtetl.

I'll write more when I find more information that could interest
everybody. I'd be interested to know if anybody has other details or
other sources of information regarding the expulsion.

Best regards,
Assaf Urieli
Toulouse, France


Contact information for Sam Kagan #lithuania

Joel Ratner
 

Would researcher Sam Kagan please contact me privately regarding the
Vital Records Indexing (VRI) Project?

Joel Ratner


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania Contact information for Sam Kagan #lithuania

Joel Ratner
 

Would researcher Sam Kagan please contact me privately regarding the
Vital Records Indexing (VRI) Project?

Joel Ratner


Re: Lithuanian Vital Records Database is now LIVE #general

Ben Forman <ben.forman@...>
 

I pretty sure I've just found the birth record of my GGGM, SHAINA
VEINER she was born in Panevezys / Kupiskis in 1878. But I would like to
check a couple of things

1. It gives an exact date in 1878 for her date of birth which would mean
that her daughter, my great granmother was born when she was 17. My GGM
had an older sister Nechama and it would seem unlikely that they would
both be born by the time their mother was 17.Do you think this is
possible?

2.It lists the name of the father/grandfather as Vulf Mordkhel, Falk, I
have not come across the name Falk before, is it a diminutive of
something. It lists the mother/grandfather as Esther Malka is this Ester
whose mother was Malka, and no name for the father or maiden name .

Thanks for the help, I'll keep my fingers crossed and do some more
checking tonight (GMT)

Ben

Ben Forman
manchester UK
ben.forman@btconnect.com

searching: FURMAN: Kaluszyn; CAHN: Koeln; BERNSTEIN: Ylakai, STILLMAN:
Pilica/Czestechowa; SAWADY: Zavadi/Posen; GEVER: Daugavpils


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania RE: Lithuanian Vital Records Database is now LIVE #lithuania

Ben Forman <ben.forman@...>
 

I pretty sure I've just found the birth record of my GGGM, SHAINA
VEINER she was born in Panevezys / Kupiskis in 1878. But I would like to
check a couple of things

1. It gives an exact date in 1878 for her date of birth which would mean
that her daughter, my great granmother was born when she was 17. My GGM
had an older sister Nechama and it would seem unlikely that they would
both be born by the time their mother was 17.Do you think this is
possible?

2.It lists the name of the father/grandfather as Vulf Mordkhel, Falk, I
have not come across the name Falk before, is it a diminutive of
something. It lists the mother/grandfather as Esther Malka is this Ester
whose mother was Malka, and no name for the father or maiden name .

Thanks for the help, I'll keep my fingers crossed and do some more
checking tonight (GMT)

Ben

Ben Forman
manchester UK
ben.forman@btconnect.com

searching: FURMAN: Kaluszyn; CAHN: Koeln; BERNSTEIN: Ylakai, STILLMAN:
Pilica/Czestechowa; SAWADY: Zavadi/Posen; GEVER: Daugavpils


Lithuania Vital Records Database is now LIVE #lithuania

Howard Margol
 

We are proud to announce that the database of Lithuanian
vital records is now LIVE on JewishGen... over 9,000
birth, marriage, divorce and death records.

These can be searched via the JewishGen Lithuania
Database at http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Lithuania

The introductory material for this database is at
http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Lithuania/VitalRecs.htm

Howard Margol
homargol@aol.com

Aaron Roetenberg
aaronr@suscom.net

MODERATOR'S NOTE: The majority of Lithuanian vital records are being
translated as part of LitvakSIG's Vital Records Indexing (VRI) project.
If you are interested in getting your town's records translated, contact
Joel Ratner of the LitvakSIG VRI Project at < joelrat1@hotmail.com >


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania Lithuania Vital Records Database is now LIVE #lithuania

Howard Margol
 

We are proud to announce that the database of Lithuanian
vital records is now LIVE on JewishGen... over 9,000
birth, marriage, divorce and death records.

These can be searched via the JewishGen Lithuania
Database at http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Lithuania

The introductory material for this database is at
http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Lithuania/VitalRecs.htm

Howard Margol
homargol@aol.com

Aaron Roetenberg
aaronr@suscom.net

MODERATOR'S NOTE: The majority of Lithuanian vital records are being
translated as part of LitvakSIG's Vital Records Indexing (VRI) project.
If you are interested in getting your town's records translated, contact
Joel Ratner of the LitvakSIG VRI Project at < joelrat1@hotmail.com >


Vital records indexed on Avotaynu fiche of Slovakian records #hungary

Warren D. Fishbaugh <WFISH@...>
 

Dear H-Sig: Can someone explain to me how to access the Jewish Vital Records
indexed on the Avotaynu fiche of Slovakian records, please? The index seems
to describe records >from Zilina, but is only an index. Was there an article
in 'Avotaynu' or where is the actual source of the records? Thanks for the
help.
Warren Dell Fishbaugh
Walworth, New York


Hungary SIG #Hungary Vital records indexed on Avotaynu fiche of Slovakian records #hungary

Warren D. Fishbaugh <WFISH@...>
 

Dear H-Sig: Can someone explain to me how to access the Jewish Vital Records
indexed on the Avotaynu fiche of Slovakian records, please? The index seems
to describe records >from Zilina, but is only an index. Was there an article
in 'Avotaynu' or where is the actual source of the records? Thanks for the
help.
Warren Dell Fishbaugh
Walworth, New York


Re: CZINNER/ZINNER and CZIN? #hungary

Marian Brown
 

Thanks, Lynn!

lynnsaul@theriver.com wrote:

Our Czinner/Zinner family (Satoraljaujhely area) is always Czinner or
Zinner. I've never seen the shorter form (back to approx 1850.) HOWEVER,
I have seen "errors" in the handwriting on records for various names, and
abbreviations used instead of full spelling.

Lynn Saul


Dear all,

My great grandfather has the surname CZINNER/ZINNER in most Slovakian
records but on one the surname is CZIN. I'm fairly sure it is the same
person because of his occupation as a glazier. Would someone know
whether it would be likely to have a shortened the name like this?

TX,

Marian Brown


Hungary SIG #Hungary Re: CZINNER/ZINNER and CZIN? #hungary

Marian Brown
 

Thanks, Lynn!

lynnsaul@theriver.com wrote:

Our Czinner/Zinner family (Satoraljaujhely area) is always Czinner or
Zinner. I've never seen the shorter form (back to approx 1850.) HOWEVER,
I have seen "errors" in the handwriting on records for various names, and
abbreviations used instead of full spelling.

Lynn Saul


Dear all,

My great grandfather has the surname CZINNER/ZINNER in most Slovakian
records but on one the surname is CZIN. I'm fairly sure it is the same
person because of his occupation as a glazier. Would someone know
whether it would be likely to have a shortened the name like this?

TX,

Marian Brown


1877 Dvorszak Gazetteer #hungary

Vivian Kahn
 

You can access the Dvorszak 1877 Gazetteer and find instructions for
using this invaluable resource at the Hungarian SIG website. Click on
http://www.jewishgen.org/Hungary/methods.htm and scroll down to General
Information Sources.

Pecs University has scanned and uploaded the entire gazetteer. You can
find it at http://kt.lib.pte.hu/konyvtar/kt03110501/tartalom.html Be
aware that it is in Hungarian. Search by county by scrolling down to
the county you're searching under Megye-Comitat. There's a guide for
using the Dvorzsak Gazetteer at
http://www.iabsi.com/gen/public/dvorzsak_gazetteer.htm

And, of course, you can also find the Gazetteer on microfiche at your
local FHL.

Vivian Kahn, Hungarian SIG Coordinator


Fw: Paul Linhart's query #hungary

Andrew Sanders <andrew-s@...>
 

I know nothing about Davidovka and Russian institution. But the Hungarian
Army had a field hospital at Kiev. After the Voronezh debacle, many forced
labour conscripts, my father included, marched back westward to Kiev, some
managed to get into that hospital for warmth, food and perhaps care. My
father did, and contacted typhoid fever there. He died within days at that
hospital. Could Paul Linhart's grandfather have found his way to the same
place?

Andrew Sanders
Toronto / Haifa