Date   

ViewMate Images Identifications #general

Nathan Radin <natradin@...>
 

I have posted on ViewMate the following images: VM 7569, VM 7570, and VM
7571. They can be viewed for about seven day at
http://data.jewishgen.org/viewmate/toview.html. .

Tinasmuch as the images have been among fold family photos, I surmise
that they have to do with my mother’s family. The death of my mother
occurred in 1932 when I was thirteen years old. All connections with her
family in Odessa were then discontinued.

The VM 7570 is the back of the couple on VM7569. The photo was by K.
Mulman. The translated message is, "Keep for long time and remember your
sister Eva Kleiner. Don’t recall, when you look (at the photo), but
look, when you remember (me)." Odessa, June, 1914. The other message is,
"Life is short! And art is eternal." VM 7570 may be my mother’s brother.

Can anyone match these photos, and if so, can the people be identified.

Please reply privately to polaronate@mindspring.com.

Nathan radin
Atlanta, GA

MODERATOR NOTE: The direct links to these images are:
http://data.jewishgen.org/ViewMate/ALL/viewmateview.asp?key=7569
http://data.jewishgen.org/ViewMate/ALL/viewmateview.asp?key=7570
http://data.jewishgen.org/ViewMate/ALL/viewmateview.asp?key=7571


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen ViewMate Images Identifications #general

Nathan Radin <natradin@...>
 

I have posted on ViewMate the following images: VM 7569, VM 7570, and VM
7571. They can be viewed for about seven day at
http://data.jewishgen.org/viewmate/toview.html. .

Tinasmuch as the images have been among fold family photos, I surmise
that they have to do with my mother’s family. The death of my mother
occurred in 1932 when I was thirteen years old. All connections with her
family in Odessa were then discontinued.

The VM 7570 is the back of the couple on VM7569. The photo was by K.
Mulman. The translated message is, "Keep for long time and remember your
sister Eva Kleiner. Don’t recall, when you look (at the photo), but
look, when you remember (me)." Odessa, June, 1914. The other message is,
"Life is short! And art is eternal." VM 7570 may be my mother’s brother.

Can anyone match these photos, and if so, can the people be identified.

Please reply privately to polaronate@mindspring.com.

Nathan radin
Atlanta, GA

MODERATOR NOTE: The direct links to these images are:
http://data.jewishgen.org/ViewMate/ALL/viewmateview.asp?key=7569
http://data.jewishgen.org/ViewMate/ALL/viewmateview.asp?key=7570
http://data.jewishgen.org/ViewMate/ALL/viewmateview.asp?key=7571


ViewMate - What Address is This? #general

H Duboff
 

B"H

Hi.

I have submitted a file to ViewMate. It is online at
http://data.jewishgen.org/ViewMate/ALL/viewmateview.asp?key=7580

The scan is >from a bank ledger for a ticket purchased in Philadelphia
in 1913. The part that I have posted is the address where the person
had lived, prior to coming to the US.

Is this written in transliterated Russian, or is it Polish?

I am OK with the first line (Leibel Melschenkel -- should be an "r" at
the end, rather than an "l"; the name was later MAILSHANKER) and the
last line is, I believe, Podolsk Gub.

What are the middle 2 lines? Is the first group of characters in the
middle line "M-16" or is it something else? (M-Ko, etc?) Is that a 2
or an accent mark above "Scharifka?"

"Scharifka" is most likely the "Sharovka" that is referred to on an
envelope I have, where it is written in Cyrillic. (On the envelope,
the Gub. is Podolskoi.)

Please reply privately, unless you feel that there is some information
that would benefit the entire group.
--
Henoch Duboff
Milwaukee, WI

Researching: FAERSTEIN, TICHNER; (Skalo - Austria);
MAILSHANKER/MELSZENKER (Grading/Gorodok Podol. and Buenos Aires -
Argentina); OBLETZ, ROSOFF (Dokshytz - Belarus) ; PINTOV, FINN
(Gluboko - Vilna); RAFKIN/RAVKIN (Dwinsk - Russia); ZEMBLE (Lushnitz -
Russia);DUBOWY (Zalocie - Austria)


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen ViewMate - What Address is This? #general

H Duboff
 

B"H

Hi.

I have submitted a file to ViewMate. It is online at
http://data.jewishgen.org/ViewMate/ALL/viewmateview.asp?key=7580

The scan is >from a bank ledger for a ticket purchased in Philadelphia
in 1913. The part that I have posted is the address where the person
had lived, prior to coming to the US.

Is this written in transliterated Russian, or is it Polish?

I am OK with the first line (Leibel Melschenkel -- should be an "r" at
the end, rather than an "l"; the name was later MAILSHANKER) and the
last line is, I believe, Podolsk Gub.

What are the middle 2 lines? Is the first group of characters in the
middle line "M-16" or is it something else? (M-Ko, etc?) Is that a 2
or an accent mark above "Scharifka?"

"Scharifka" is most likely the "Sharovka" that is referred to on an
envelope I have, where it is written in Cyrillic. (On the envelope,
the Gub. is Podolskoi.)

Please reply privately, unless you feel that there is some information
that would benefit the entire group.
--
Henoch Duboff
Milwaukee, WI

Researching: FAERSTEIN, TICHNER; (Skalo - Austria);
MAILSHANKER/MELSZENKER (Grading/Gorodok Podol. and Buenos Aires -
Argentina); OBLETZ, ROSOFF (Dokshytz - Belarus) ; PINTOV, FINN
(Gluboko - Vilna); RAFKIN/RAVKIN (Dwinsk - Russia); ZEMBLE (Lushnitz -
Russia);DUBOWY (Zalocie - Austria)


Re: my grandfather -- the almost spy #general

Hilary Henkin <hilary@...>
 

I'd like to add to Todd's account that if you have good reason to
think there might be a FBI etc. file, and if you get a response to
your inquiry that no records were found, you have the right to appeal.

A few years ago, I'd sent in an FBI FOIA request for a relative of
mine. It was common family knowledge that he was a "Communist", and
that the FBI watched him, and restricted his movements.

My request came back "no file found", as did the appeal. Then last
year, I sent in a new request (not mentioning the first request at
all), and this time received almost 30 pages. Nothing
earth-shattering or genealogically significant, but very interesting
to know. A a matter of fact, there was nothing at all to merit
suspicion, other than he'd once signed a pro-communist petition, and
the furrier's union he was a member of was known to have Communist
backing. Ah, the days of Hoover and McCarthy

Hilary Henkin
Atlanta, Georgia

At 08:49 AM 3/2/2006, Todd Brody wrote:
(snip)
On a lark, I decided to send a FOIA ("Freedom of Information Act")
request to the FBI and CIA to see if they had any files on my
grandfather. The letter took about thirty minutes to write (there
are sample FOIA requests on the websites of both agencies) and the
total cost of the request was the price of a stamp.

Within a week I received my first letters >from the CIA and FBI
telling me that they were reviewing the request and asking for
additional information. (My wife who saw the mail first said to me
"oh my god Todd, what are you doing now!" -- she isn't as
interested in family history as I am.

A few weeks ago a received a letter >from the CIA saying that they
had no files on my grandfather. So I figured that this wasn't going
to lead anywhere. That's okay, I didn't really expect anything.

Yesterday, I got a big envelope >from the FBI, which contained his
whole case file, including interviews with my grandfather (which
discuss in detail his trips to the Soviet Union) and evaluations as
to whether he might be able to serve as a "potential security
informant" or "double agent." The file reads like a John Le Carre
novel. Ultimately, the FBI decided that he would not be a good spy
because he didn't speak enough Russian and was only in the Soviet
Union for 2-3 weeks per year.
(snip rest of message)


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: my grandfather -- the almost spy #general

Hilary Henkin <hilary@...>
 

I'd like to add to Todd's account that if you have good reason to
think there might be a FBI etc. file, and if you get a response to
your inquiry that no records were found, you have the right to appeal.

A few years ago, I'd sent in an FBI FOIA request for a relative of
mine. It was common family knowledge that he was a "Communist", and
that the FBI watched him, and restricted his movements.

My request came back "no file found", as did the appeal. Then last
year, I sent in a new request (not mentioning the first request at
all), and this time received almost 30 pages. Nothing
earth-shattering or genealogically significant, but very interesting
to know. A a matter of fact, there was nothing at all to merit
suspicion, other than he'd once signed a pro-communist petition, and
the furrier's union he was a member of was known to have Communist
backing. Ah, the days of Hoover and McCarthy

Hilary Henkin
Atlanta, Georgia

At 08:49 AM 3/2/2006, Todd Brody wrote:
(snip)
On a lark, I decided to send a FOIA ("Freedom of Information Act")
request to the FBI and CIA to see if they had any files on my
grandfather. The letter took about thirty minutes to write (there
are sample FOIA requests on the websites of both agencies) and the
total cost of the request was the price of a stamp.

Within a week I received my first letters >from the CIA and FBI
telling me that they were reviewing the request and asking for
additional information. (My wife who saw the mail first said to me
"oh my god Todd, what are you doing now!" -- she isn't as
interested in family history as I am.

A few weeks ago a received a letter >from the CIA saying that they
had no files on my grandfather. So I figured that this wasn't going
to lead anywhere. That's okay, I didn't really expect anything.

Yesterday, I got a big envelope >from the FBI, which contained his
whole case file, including interviews with my grandfather (which
discuss in detail his trips to the Soviet Union) and evaluations as
to whether he might be able to serve as a "potential security
informant" or "double agent." The file reads like a John Le Carre
novel. Ultimately, the FBI decided that he would not be a good spy
because he didn't speak enough Russian and was only in the Soviet
Union for 2-3 weeks per year.
(snip rest of message)


Yizkor Book Project Report for february 2006 #poland

Joyce Field
 

For the month of February 2006 nine updates, four new entries, and
one new book went online at
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/translations.html. All the new
material has flags in the index for easy identification.

New book:

-Rietavas, Lithuania

Updates:

-Chelm, Poland
-Czestochowa, Poland
-Ilya, Belarus
-Kalusz, Ukraine
-Novogrudok, Belarus
-Nowy Sacz, Poland
-Sosnowiec, Poland
-Svencionys,Lithuania
-Zloczew, Poland

-New entries:

-Branszczyk, Poland: Pinkas HaKehillot Polin, vol. 4
-Brest, Belarus: Pinkas HaKehillot Polin, vol. 5
-Kostopil, Ukraine: Pinkas HaKehillot, vol. 5
-Zaliztsi, Ukraine: Pinkas HaKehillot Polin, vol. 2

Many yizkor books are being translated by professional translators
paid by donations to the project fund. Donations to support these
worthy projects can be made at
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/v_projectslist.asp?project_cat=23.
Please also consider a donation to the JewishGen General Fund to
support the infrastructure for all online projects.

To start a translation project of a yizkor book of your ancestral
town, please contact me privately.

Joyce Field
JewishGen VP, Data Acquisition


JRI Poland #Poland Yizkor Book Project Report for february 2006 #poland

Joyce Field
 

For the month of February 2006 nine updates, four new entries, and
one new book went online at
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/translations.html. All the new
material has flags in the index for easy identification.

New book:

-Rietavas, Lithuania

Updates:

-Chelm, Poland
-Czestochowa, Poland
-Ilya, Belarus
-Kalusz, Ukraine
-Novogrudok, Belarus
-Nowy Sacz, Poland
-Sosnowiec, Poland
-Svencionys,Lithuania
-Zloczew, Poland

-New entries:

-Branszczyk, Poland: Pinkas HaKehillot Polin, vol. 4
-Brest, Belarus: Pinkas HaKehillot Polin, vol. 5
-Kostopil, Ukraine: Pinkas HaKehillot, vol. 5
-Zaliztsi, Ukraine: Pinkas HaKehillot Polin, vol. 2

Many yizkor books are being translated by professional translators
paid by donations to the project fund. Donations to support these
worthy projects can be made at
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/v_projectslist.asp?project_cat=23.
Please also consider a donation to the JewishGen General Fund to
support the infrastructure for all online projects.

To start a translation project of a yizkor book of your ancestral
town, please contact me privately.

Joyce Field
JewishGen VP, Data Acquisition


Re: Family Surname Mysteries #general

Robert Israel <israel@...>
 

Linda Shefler < linsilv@nc.rr.com > wrote:

Some background: My SILVERMAN family came >from Zinkov, Podolia in the
Ukraine. They emigrated to Providence, RI about 1887. Of course, the
family name in Zinkov wasn't Silverman; what it was is still open to debate.
One suggestion is APPLEBAUM.
My gg grandfather Mordechai/Max *SILVERMAN* was married to Sima Rivka
PLOTKER/PLOTKE/PLOTKA bat Yeruhim Fischel PLOTKER/PLOTKE/PLOTKA.
Sima Rivka's death certificate reads "daughter of Philip PLOTKER" but her
matzeva says: "Sima Rivka bat Yeruhim Fishel ZILBERMAN". I was surprised
when I read that and couldn't understand how the mistake could have been
made. My gg grandfather was very much alive at the time and he would have
known the proper name of his wife's father. Also, if it was an error the
family would definitely have changed the matzeva.
This is not a mistake: the ZILBERMAN on the matzeva refers not to
her father's name but to her own (married) name. Similarly, my
great-grandmother's matzeva says (in Hebrew) "Raizel bat R' David
KOBILNITSKY", but KOBILNITSKY was her married name, not her maiden name.

Then I found the matzeva for Sima's brother (who came to America with Max
and Sima as their son. He was about 20 years younger then Sima and
according to family legend, he adopted the Silverman name along with the
rest of the family). His death certificate reads "son of Philip SILVERMAN"
and his matzeva reads "Israel bar FISHEL ZILBERMAN". To have a mistake like
that once is well, a mistake. Twice is significant!
It often happened that for one reason or another, people adopted the
name of another family that they married into.

Please tell me if this logic makes sense: Since Fishel and
PLOTKER/PLOTKE/PLOTKA mean "fish", does it seem logical that in order to
keep the secret of the origin of the family name (and it was definitely a
secret) Max and Sima gave Yeruhim Fishel a redundant last name (in other
words he became Yeruhim Fish Fish) so that they could then use the SILVERMAN
name?
I don't follow you.
1) How does PLOTKER mean "fish"?
2) What's so secret?
3) Why couldn't they use SILVERMAN otherwise?

Robert Israel
israel@math.ubc.ca
Vancouver, BC, Canada


Samuel Freeedman to speak March 9 at Jewish Library in San Francisco #poland

Jrbaston
 

San Francisco Bay Area researchers will have a chance March 9 to hear
Samuel Freedman, author of "Who She Was: My Search for My Mother's
Life" and featured banquet speaker at the IAJGS Conference in New York,

Freedman will talk and read >from his book Thursday, March 9 at 7:30 p.m.
at the Jewish Community Library, 1835 Ellis Street, San Francisco. The
event is free and there is free parking in the building on Pierce Street
between Ellis and Eddy.

Freedman's mother died of cancer, in 1974, when he was 19. For the next
26 years he gave her little thought, becoming, "by default and by choice,"
his father's son. As he neared 50, the same age his mother was when she
died, Freedman began piecing together the fragments of his mother's life,
a task he understood as a filial duty and an act of atonement. Thus began
his investigative journey into researching his mother's life as she lived
it in the 30s, 40s, and 50s in the Bronx; her ambitions and yearnings, her
dreams and disappointments.

Freedman set out to learn who his mother was before she became his mother,
and about the forces that shaped her life. As his mother was coming of age
in the Bronx in the 1940s, her own mother was coming to terms with what
happened to her family who had remained in Bialystok during the Holocaust.

He researched in the "Bialystoker Stimme," the bilingual monthly magazine
of Bialystoker landslayt in America, >from letters between his grandmother
and her Polish relatives, as well as the scholarship of Rebecca Kobrin,
author of "Conflicting Diasporas, Shifting Centers: The Transnational
Bialystok Jewish Emigre Community in the United States, Argentina,
Australia and Palestine 1878-1949"

Although his grandmother had been born in Kolno (north of Lomza), her
family moved to Bialystok early in the 20th century. His grandmother's
maiden name was MARKIEWICZ, and other Bialystok family names mentioned
in the book are OSDER, KACZKOWICZ and GARTENBERG.

Freedman's journey into trying to understand his mother's life is
fascinating for any family history researcher.

For more information, one may contact the Jewish Community Library at
<library@bjesf.org>

Judy Baston
San Francisco, CA


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Family Surname Mysteries #general

Robert Israel <israel@...>
 

Linda Shefler < linsilv@nc.rr.com > wrote:

Some background: My SILVERMAN family came >from Zinkov, Podolia in the
Ukraine. They emigrated to Providence, RI about 1887. Of course, the
family name in Zinkov wasn't Silverman; what it was is still open to debate.
One suggestion is APPLEBAUM.
My gg grandfather Mordechai/Max *SILVERMAN* was married to Sima Rivka
PLOTKER/PLOTKE/PLOTKA bat Yeruhim Fischel PLOTKER/PLOTKE/PLOTKA.
Sima Rivka's death certificate reads "daughter of Philip PLOTKER" but her
matzeva says: "Sima Rivka bat Yeruhim Fishel ZILBERMAN". I was surprised
when I read that and couldn't understand how the mistake could have been
made. My gg grandfather was very much alive at the time and he would have
known the proper name of his wife's father. Also, if it was an error the
family would definitely have changed the matzeva.
This is not a mistake: the ZILBERMAN on the matzeva refers not to
her father's name but to her own (married) name. Similarly, my
great-grandmother's matzeva says (in Hebrew) "Raizel bat R' David
KOBILNITSKY", but KOBILNITSKY was her married name, not her maiden name.

Then I found the matzeva for Sima's brother (who came to America with Max
and Sima as their son. He was about 20 years younger then Sima and
according to family legend, he adopted the Silverman name along with the
rest of the family). His death certificate reads "son of Philip SILVERMAN"
and his matzeva reads "Israel bar FISHEL ZILBERMAN". To have a mistake like
that once is well, a mistake. Twice is significant!
It often happened that for one reason or another, people adopted the
name of another family that they married into.

Please tell me if this logic makes sense: Since Fishel and
PLOTKER/PLOTKE/PLOTKA mean "fish", does it seem logical that in order to
keep the secret of the origin of the family name (and it was definitely a
secret) Max and Sima gave Yeruhim Fishel a redundant last name (in other
words he became Yeruhim Fish Fish) so that they could then use the SILVERMAN
name?
I don't follow you.
1) How does PLOTKER mean "fish"?
2) What's so secret?
3) Why couldn't they use SILVERMAN otherwise?

Robert Israel
israel@math.ubc.ca
Vancouver, BC, Canada


JRI Poland #Poland Samuel Freeedman to speak March 9 at Jewish Library in San Francisco #poland

Jrbaston
 

San Francisco Bay Area researchers will have a chance March 9 to hear
Samuel Freedman, author of "Who She Was: My Search for My Mother's
Life" and featured banquet speaker at the IAJGS Conference in New York,

Freedman will talk and read >from his book Thursday, March 9 at 7:30 p.m.
at the Jewish Community Library, 1835 Ellis Street, San Francisco. The
event is free and there is free parking in the building on Pierce Street
between Ellis and Eddy.

Freedman's mother died of cancer, in 1974, when he was 19. For the next
26 years he gave her little thought, becoming, "by default and by choice,"
his father's son. As he neared 50, the same age his mother was when she
died, Freedman began piecing together the fragments of his mother's life,
a task he understood as a filial duty and an act of atonement. Thus began
his investigative journey into researching his mother's life as she lived
it in the 30s, 40s, and 50s in the Bronx; her ambitions and yearnings, her
dreams and disappointments.

Freedman set out to learn who his mother was before she became his mother,
and about the forces that shaped her life. As his mother was coming of age
in the Bronx in the 1940s, her own mother was coming to terms with what
happened to her family who had remained in Bialystok during the Holocaust.

He researched in the "Bialystoker Stimme," the bilingual monthly magazine
of Bialystoker landslayt in America, >from letters between his grandmother
and her Polish relatives, as well as the scholarship of Rebecca Kobrin,
author of "Conflicting Diasporas, Shifting Centers: The Transnational
Bialystok Jewish Emigre Community in the United States, Argentina,
Australia and Palestine 1878-1949"

Although his grandmother had been born in Kolno (north of Lomza), her
family moved to Bialystok early in the 20th century. His grandmother's
maiden name was MARKIEWICZ, and other Bialystok family names mentioned
in the book are OSDER, KACZKOWICZ and GARTENBERG.

Freedman's journey into trying to understand his mother's life is
fascinating for any family history researcher.

For more information, one may contact the Jewish Community Library at
<library@bjesf.org>

Judy Baston
San Francisco, CA


Leib, Lieb, Levi and Nimes #general

MBernet@...
 

In a message dated 3/2/2006 10:52:27 A.M. Eastern Standard Time,
jewishgen@ecologicaltech.com writes:

< I think you are confusing two German/Yiddish words here.
< "Lieb", pronounced leehb, is >from the same root as the English "love", while
< "Leib" (note the spelling, also "loeb" etc.), pronounced lahyb, is >from the
< word for "lion". . . . . . .
< I think the similarities between "leib" and "levi" might have led people to
< connect the two, but I would not automatically assume that any given "Leib"
< was a levite.

==There is really no danger of such confusion for those who speak Yiddish.
Leyb, (>from German Loewe) meaning lion, is written in Yiddish with the Hebrew
letter bet, Levi is written with the Hebrew letter vav. The only possible
"confusion" might be in Russian (I do not know Russian and do not read the
cyrillic alphabet), where, I understand, the name Lev is derived >from the word
for lion.

==There may be some "confusion" in German-Jewish Surnames. It is highly
likely that some Jews de-Judaized the surname Lewi or Lewin by assuming the
surname Loewenstein, Loewenberg etc.

==Levi or Lewi is a rare first name today for Jews who are Levites by
descent. The best-known American Jew with a first name Levi, wasn't born that way.
He was named Loew in his home village in Upper Franconia, Germany. It was
only in America, where Levi was not uncommon among Christians, that Loewi
Strauss "Americanized" his name to Levi, and so marked his jeans.

==Jews and people aren't the only ones whose name get changed with
geographic moves. Jeans are named not after some woman (or Frenchman) named Jean,
but after Genoa, the Italian port. And denims take their name >from the French
city Nimes.

Michael Bernet, New York


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Leib, Lieb, Levi and Nimes #general

MBernet@...
 

In a message dated 3/2/2006 10:52:27 A.M. Eastern Standard Time,
jewishgen@ecologicaltech.com writes:

< I think you are confusing two German/Yiddish words here.
< "Lieb", pronounced leehb, is >from the same root as the English "love", while
< "Leib" (note the spelling, also "loeb" etc.), pronounced lahyb, is >from the
< word for "lion". . . . . . .
< I think the similarities between "leib" and "levi" might have led people to
< connect the two, but I would not automatically assume that any given "Leib"
< was a levite.

==There is really no danger of such confusion for those who speak Yiddish.
Leyb, (>from German Loewe) meaning lion, is written in Yiddish with the Hebrew
letter bet, Levi is written with the Hebrew letter vav. The only possible
"confusion" might be in Russian (I do not know Russian and do not read the
cyrillic alphabet), where, I understand, the name Lev is derived >from the word
for lion.

==There may be some "confusion" in German-Jewish Surnames. It is highly
likely that some Jews de-Judaized the surname Lewi or Lewin by assuming the
surname Loewenstein, Loewenberg etc.

==Levi or Lewi is a rare first name today for Jews who are Levites by
descent. The best-known American Jew with a first name Levi, wasn't born that way.
He was named Loew in his home village in Upper Franconia, Germany. It was
only in America, where Levi was not uncommon among Christians, that Loewi
Strauss "Americanized" his name to Levi, and so marked his jeans.

==Jews and people aren't the only ones whose name get changed with
geographic moves. Jeans are named not after some woman (or Frenchman) named Jean,
but after Genoa, the Italian port. And denims take their name >from the French
city Nimes.

Michael Bernet, New York


Yizkor Book Project Report for february 2006 #poland

Joyce Field
 

For the month of February 2006 nine updates, four new entries, and
one new book went online at
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/translations.html. All the new
material has flags in the index for easy identification.

New book:

-Rietavas, Lithuania

Updates:

-Chelm, Poland
-Czestochowa, Poland
-Ilya, Belarus
-Kalusz, Ukraine
-Novogrudok, Belarus
-Nowy Sacz, Poland
-Sosnowiec, Poland
-Svencionys,Lithuania
-Zloczew, Poland

-New entries:

-Branszczyk, Poland: Pinkas HaKehillot Polin, vol. 4
-Brest, Belarus: Pinkas HaKehillot Polin, vol. 5
-Kostopil, Ukraine: Pinkas HaKehillot, vol. 5
-Zaliztsi, Ukraine: Pinkas HaKehillot Polin, vol. 2

Many yizkor books are being translated by professional translators
paid by donations to the project fund. Donations to support these
worthy projects can be made at
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/v_projectslist.asp?project_cat=23.
Please also consider a donation to the JewishGen General Fund to
support the infrastructure for all online projects.

To start a translation project of a yizkor book of your ancestral
town, please contact me privately.

Joyce Field
JewishGen VP, Data Acquisition


BialyGen: Bialystok Region #Bialystok #Poland Yizkor Book Project Report for february 2006 #poland

Joyce Field
 

For the month of February 2006 nine updates, four new entries, and
one new book went online at
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/translations.html. All the new
material has flags in the index for easy identification.

New book:

-Rietavas, Lithuania

Updates:

-Chelm, Poland
-Czestochowa, Poland
-Ilya, Belarus
-Kalusz, Ukraine
-Novogrudok, Belarus
-Nowy Sacz, Poland
-Sosnowiec, Poland
-Svencionys,Lithuania
-Zloczew, Poland

-New entries:

-Branszczyk, Poland: Pinkas HaKehillot Polin, vol. 4
-Brest, Belarus: Pinkas HaKehillot Polin, vol. 5
-Kostopil, Ukraine: Pinkas HaKehillot, vol. 5
-Zaliztsi, Ukraine: Pinkas HaKehillot Polin, vol. 2

Many yizkor books are being translated by professional translators
paid by donations to the project fund. Donations to support these
worthy projects can be made at
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/v_projectslist.asp?project_cat=23.
Please also consider a donation to the JewishGen General Fund to
support the infrastructure for all online projects.

To start a translation project of a yizkor book of your ancestral
town, please contact me privately.

Joyce Field
JewishGen VP, Data Acquisition


Bialystoker Samuel Freedman to speak March 9 in San Francisco #poland

Jrbaston
 

San Francisco Bay Area researchers will have a chance March 9 to hear
Samuel Freedman, author of "Who She Was: My Search for My Mother's
Life" and featured banquet speaker at the IAJGS Conference in New York,

Freedman will talk and read >from his book Thursday, March 9 at 7:30 p.m.
at the Jewish Community Library, 1835 Ellis Street, San Francisco.
The event is free and there is free parking in the building on Pierce
Street between Ellis and Eddy.

Freedman's mother died of cancer, in 1974, when he was 19. For the next
26 years he gave her little thought, becoming, "by default and by choice,"
his father's son. As he neared 50, the same age his mother was when she
died, Freedman began piecing together the fragments of his mother's life,
a task he understood as a filial duty and an act of atonement. Thus began
his investigative journey into researching his mother's life as she lived
it in the 30s, 40s, and 50s in the Bronx; her ambitions and yearnings,
her dreams and disappointments.

Freedman set out to learn who his mother was before she became his mother,
and about the forces that shaped her life. As his mother was coming of age
in the Bronx in the 1940s, her own mother was coming to terms with what
happened to her family who had remained in Bialystok during the Holocaust.

He researched in the "Bialystoker Stimme," the bilingual monthly
magazine of Bialystoker landslayt in America, >from letters between his
grandmother and her polish relatives, as well as the scholarship of
Rebecca Kobrin, author of "Conflicting Diasporas, Shifting Centers: The
Transnational Bialystok Jewish Emigre Community in the United States,
Argentina, Australia and Palestine 1878-1949"

Although his grandmother had been born in Kolno (north of Lomza), her
family moved to Bialystok early in the 20th century. His grandmother's
maiden name was MARKIEWICZ, and other Bialystok family names mentioned
in the book are OSDER, KACZKOWICZ and GARTENBERG.

Freedman's journey into trying to understand his mother's life is
fascinating for any family history researcher.

For more information, one may contact the Jewish Community Library at
<library@bjesf.org>

Judy Baston
San Francisco, CA


BialyGen: Bialystok Region #Bialystok #Poland Bialystoker Samuel Freedman to speak March 9 in San Francisco #poland

Jrbaston
 

San Francisco Bay Area researchers will have a chance March 9 to hear
Samuel Freedman, author of "Who She Was: My Search for My Mother's
Life" and featured banquet speaker at the IAJGS Conference in New York,

Freedman will talk and read >from his book Thursday, March 9 at 7:30 p.m.
at the Jewish Community Library, 1835 Ellis Street, San Francisco.
The event is free and there is free parking in the building on Pierce
Street between Ellis and Eddy.

Freedman's mother died of cancer, in 1974, when he was 19. For the next
26 years he gave her little thought, becoming, "by default and by choice,"
his father's son. As he neared 50, the same age his mother was when she
died, Freedman began piecing together the fragments of his mother's life,
a task he understood as a filial duty and an act of atonement. Thus began
his investigative journey into researching his mother's life as she lived
it in the 30s, 40s, and 50s in the Bronx; her ambitions and yearnings,
her dreams and disappointments.

Freedman set out to learn who his mother was before she became his mother,
and about the forces that shaped her life. As his mother was coming of age
in the Bronx in the 1940s, her own mother was coming to terms with what
happened to her family who had remained in Bialystok during the Holocaust.

He researched in the "Bialystoker Stimme," the bilingual monthly
magazine of Bialystoker landslayt in America, >from letters between his
grandmother and her polish relatives, as well as the scholarship of
Rebecca Kobrin, author of "Conflicting Diasporas, Shifting Centers: The
Transnational Bialystok Jewish Emigre Community in the United States,
Argentina, Australia and Palestine 1878-1949"

Although his grandmother had been born in Kolno (north of Lomza), her
family moved to Bialystok early in the 20th century. His grandmother's
maiden name was MARKIEWICZ, and other Bialystok family names mentioned
in the book are OSDER, KACZKOWICZ and GARTENBERG.

Freedman's journey into trying to understand his mother's life is
fascinating for any family history researcher.

For more information, one may contact the Jewish Community Library at
<library@bjesf.org>

Judy Baston
San Francisco, CA


Headstone Cleaning & Tracing Question #germany

B. Frederics <picturethisfilm@...>
 

Siggers,

Does anyone know how to remove graffiti >from old headstones? I'll be going
to the Illingen cemetery in a couple of months and I just read there's been
some vandalism and Nazi graffiti committed there recently. I'd like to try
to clean what I can.

Also, can you tell me how to trace a headstone whose writing is no longer
legible? What do I need? Thanks. Regards,

Bonnie Frederics Tucson, AZ picturethisfilm@email.com

Seeking: GOTTLIEB; LEVY; HEIMANN; HAHN; SILBER; ALEXANDER (Bosen, Consdorf,
Illingen, Mainstockheim, Schwanfeld, )


German SIG #Germany Headstone Cleaning & Tracing Question #germany

B. Frederics <picturethisfilm@...>
 

Siggers,

Does anyone know how to remove graffiti >from old headstones? I'll be going
to the Illingen cemetery in a couple of months and I just read there's been
some vandalism and Nazi graffiti committed there recently. I'd like to try
to clean what I can.

Also, can you tell me how to trace a headstone whose writing is no longer
legible? What do I need? Thanks. Regards,

Bonnie Frederics Tucson, AZ picturethisfilm@email.com

Seeking: GOTTLIEB; LEVY; HEIMANN; HAHN; SILBER; ALEXANDER (Bosen, Consdorf,
Illingen, Mainstockheim, Schwanfeld, )