Date   

RE Researching BUCHLER #hungary

מירי <micla5@...>
 

Hi David
I see that you are researching BUCHLER family
Do you know anything about Joshua Falk Buchler of Souditz ? - MORAVIA
Asher Anshel BUCHLER >from BALASSAGYARMAT -HUNGARY?

MIRY

Researching
LORINCZ - NAGYOROSZI, BALLASSAGYARMAT, NYIRLUGOS, SZOMBATHELY,
BUDAPEST ,KISSEBES(ERDELY}, KEKBODONY, SALGOTARJAN
EHRENTREU -POZSONY, (BRATISLAVA)
BUCHLER -BALASSAGYARMAT, BUDAPEST SOUDITS-SUDICE
KLEIN, - BUDAPEST, UJPEST ,HEDERVAR
-----

Original Message-----
From: David Conway [mailto:smerus@...]
Sent: Sunday, September 18, 2005 7:44 PM
To: H-SIG
Subject: [h-sig] Levoca Jewish cemetery

We have purchased and are restoring a house in Levoca (Slovakia). On our

last visit we were able to find, thanks to our friend Jana, the pre-war
Jewish cemetery of the town. It is located in an area of allotments
outside the town, and although unvandalised, it is completely overgrown
and invisible to anyone who doesn't know it is there. I took some
photographs (which include in one case a gravestone now half enclosed in

a tree which has grown round it). Many of the stones are however
completely legible (in Hebrew and Hungarian).

I would like to know if there is any organisation which may be
interested in restoring, or at least tidying up, the cemetery. My wife
speaks Slovak and we would be glad to intervene with the local
authorities for their support or assistance. Please let me have any
ideas.

David Conway, London
Researching BUCHLER, BLUM, ENGEL


Hungary SIG #Hungary RE Researching BUCHLER #hungary

מירי <micla5@...>
 

Hi David
I see that you are researching BUCHLER family
Do you know anything about Joshua Falk Buchler of Souditz ? - MORAVIA
Asher Anshel BUCHLER >from BALASSAGYARMAT -HUNGARY?

MIRY

Researching
LORINCZ - NAGYOROSZI, BALLASSAGYARMAT, NYIRLUGOS, SZOMBATHELY,
BUDAPEST ,KISSEBES(ERDELY}, KEKBODONY, SALGOTARJAN
EHRENTREU -POZSONY, (BRATISLAVA)
BUCHLER -BALASSAGYARMAT, BUDAPEST SOUDITS-SUDICE
KLEIN, - BUDAPEST, UJPEST ,HEDERVAR
-----

Original Message-----
From: David Conway [mailto:smerus@...]
Sent: Sunday, September 18, 2005 7:44 PM
To: H-SIG
Subject: [h-sig] Levoca Jewish cemetery

We have purchased and are restoring a house in Levoca (Slovakia). On our

last visit we were able to find, thanks to our friend Jana, the pre-war
Jewish cemetery of the town. It is located in an area of allotments
outside the town, and although unvandalised, it is completely overgrown
and invisible to anyone who doesn't know it is there. I took some
photographs (which include in one case a gravestone now half enclosed in

a tree which has grown round it). Many of the stones are however
completely legible (in Hebrew and Hungarian).

I would like to know if there is any organisation which may be
interested in restoring, or at least tidying up, the cemetery. My wife
speaks Slovak and we would be glad to intervene with the local
authorities for their support or assistance. Please let me have any
ideas.

David Conway, London
Researching BUCHLER, BLUM, ENGEL


Research in Slovakia, etc #hungary

George Farkas <gfarkas@...>
 

Not long ago, I read some excellent posts by Gabriela Svatos and
others on their trips to Slovakia and Hungary to do some genealogical
research. I hope to spend a week in Slovakia, Hungary and
Transylvania in early January to try to fill in missing information
in my research. I plan to visit ancestral villages, Jewish cemeteries
as well as the archives. I would like some help in planning my trip
from those who have been there. I plan to visit the villages around
Zilina (Zsolna), Lipto Szentmiklos, Nyirbator, and Marghita (Romania)
and the archives in Bittse among others.

1. How important is it to be able to speak Slovak? I do not speak
Slovak at all; I so speak Hungarian as well as English, French and
Hebrew, and I have some German.

2. Do I have to set up appointments to visit the archives,
cemeteries, Jewish community organizations in advance? This is
problematic because I do want to be flexible if possible.

3. How easy/difficult is it to find records of events, vital
information, etc prior to 1900? 1800?

4. How can I find out where (official and Jewish community) archives
are located? How easy/ difficult is it to get access? Are tips for
civil servants appreciated? (If yes, what amounts are reasonable?)

5. How easy is it to get about? I was thinking about renting a car,
so as not to be tied to the bus and train schedules. Are good maps
easily available? How easy/difficult is it to be able to get an
Internet connection for my laptop?

6. Is a week enough time or will I have to cut out some of the places?

7. Is kosher food available at all?

Thank you. I am sure that I have more questions, but I'm sure that is
enough for the moment.

george

George Farkas
Montreal, Quebec

Searching: FARKAS, FRIED, ALTMANN, FRIEDMANN, GROSS, KLEIN,
WEISZ, VIDOR, STEIN, LINKS, KNOPFELMACHER, LUSTIG, SPITZER


Hungary SIG #Hungary Research in Slovakia, etc #hungary

George Farkas <gfarkas@...>
 

Not long ago, I read some excellent posts by Gabriela Svatos and
others on their trips to Slovakia and Hungary to do some genealogical
research. I hope to spend a week in Slovakia, Hungary and
Transylvania in early January to try to fill in missing information
in my research. I plan to visit ancestral villages, Jewish cemeteries
as well as the archives. I would like some help in planning my trip
from those who have been there. I plan to visit the villages around
Zilina (Zsolna), Lipto Szentmiklos, Nyirbator, and Marghita (Romania)
and the archives in Bittse among others.

1. How important is it to be able to speak Slovak? I do not speak
Slovak at all; I so speak Hungarian as well as English, French and
Hebrew, and I have some German.

2. Do I have to set up appointments to visit the archives,
cemeteries, Jewish community organizations in advance? This is
problematic because I do want to be flexible if possible.

3. How easy/difficult is it to find records of events, vital
information, etc prior to 1900? 1800?

4. How can I find out where (official and Jewish community) archives
are located? How easy/ difficult is it to get access? Are tips for
civil servants appreciated? (If yes, what amounts are reasonable?)

5. How easy is it to get about? I was thinking about renting a car,
so as not to be tied to the bus and train schedules. Are good maps
easily available? How easy/difficult is it to be able to get an
Internet connection for my laptop?

6. Is a week enough time or will I have to cut out some of the places?

7. Is kosher food available at all?

Thank you. I am sure that I have more questions, but I'm sure that is
enough for the moment.

george

George Farkas
Montreal, Quebec

Searching: FARKAS, FRIED, ALTMANN, FRIEDMANN, GROSS, KLEIN,
WEISZ, VIDOR, STEIN, LINKS, KNOPFELMACHER, LUSTIG, SPITZER


Re: Given names caveat #hungary

tom klein <h-sig@...>
 

i've been trying to get this message across for years: *hungarian* jews did not necessarily follow the same naming customs as jews in poland/russia. for various reasons, they gave their children names that were blatantly secular, such as arpad, bela, gyula, and zoltan.

specifically, their jewish and secular names did not "correspond" in any way. this was the norm, rather than some kind of exception. even where the person's secular name was biblical (see * in the list below), it was usually not the same as their jewish name.

taking my own family as an example, what is the connection between these two sets of names:

hungarian jewish
tamas lajos shlomo barukh
geza moishe yankev
eva* sarah
adi moishe
gabi meir
simon* yehoshiyahu
lajos shlomo
erzsebet feigele
bernat barukh

the last one being the exception that proves the rule, since he was named in krakow, poland, and later migrated to hungary.


....... tom klein, toronto


ps. the other interesting aspect of my great-grandfather's name is that he was "barukh ben barukh". this is not an "aberration to custom" as you put it, but simply because his father had died before the bris. indeed, it is very much a jewish custom to give the child his father's name in such an unfortunate circumstance; we can just be glad that it doesn't occur often.

alex p miller <alex.miller@...> wrote:

Do you have a document that shows your ancestor's name being Jozsef,
Natan or Emmanuel? You may be chasing after the wrong name!

I had just reviewed 2000 tombstones in Hungary and some had both the
Hebrew names and the Hungarian or 'street' names. The following names
were adaptation >from Hebrew names to acceptable Hungarian --Hungbrew?--,
while the Hebrew names were different and totally unrelated, such as
Menahem, Yehiel, Simon or Zvi.

'Hungbrew' names:
Jozsef
Natan
Emmanuel
Mihaly(Mikhael)
Simon
Samuel
Jakab


In addition, there were three instances where the Hebew names of the
father and the son were the same-- an abberation to custom-- to my
knowledge!


Hungary SIG #Hungary Re: Given names caveat #hungary

tom klein <h-sig@...>
 

i've been trying to get this message across for years: *hungarian* jews did not necessarily follow the same naming customs as jews in poland/russia. for various reasons, they gave their children names that were blatantly secular, such as arpad, bela, gyula, and zoltan.

specifically, their jewish and secular names did not "correspond" in any way. this was the norm, rather than some kind of exception. even where the person's secular name was biblical (see * in the list below), it was usually not the same as their jewish name.

taking my own family as an example, what is the connection between these two sets of names:

hungarian jewish
tamas lajos shlomo barukh
geza moishe yankev
eva* sarah
adi moishe
gabi meir
simon* yehoshiyahu
lajos shlomo
erzsebet feigele
bernat barukh

the last one being the exception that proves the rule, since he was named in krakow, poland, and later migrated to hungary.


....... tom klein, toronto


ps. the other interesting aspect of my great-grandfather's name is that he was "barukh ben barukh". this is not an "aberration to custom" as you put it, but simply because his father had died before the bris. indeed, it is very much a jewish custom to give the child his father's name in such an unfortunate circumstance; we can just be glad that it doesn't occur often.

alex p miller <alex.miller@...> wrote:

Do you have a document that shows your ancestor's name being Jozsef,
Natan or Emmanuel? You may be chasing after the wrong name!

I had just reviewed 2000 tombstones in Hungary and some had both the
Hebrew names and the Hungarian or 'street' names. The following names
were adaptation >from Hebrew names to acceptable Hungarian --Hungbrew?--,
while the Hebrew names were different and totally unrelated, such as
Menahem, Yehiel, Simon or Zvi.

'Hungbrew' names:
Jozsef
Natan
Emmanuel
Mihaly(Mikhael)
Simon
Samuel
Jakab


In addition, there were three instances where the Hebew names of the
father and the son were the same-- an abberation to custom-- to my
knowledge!


Re: Given names caveat #hungary

Prof. G. L. Esterson <jerry@...>
 

Alex Miller posted as follows:

"I had just reviewed 2000 tombstones in Hungary and some had both the
Hebrew names and the Hungarian or 'street' names. The following names
were adaptation >from Hebrew names to acceptable Hungarian --Hungbrew?--,
while the Hebrew names were different and totally unrelated, such as
Menahem, Yehiel, Simon or Zvi.

'Hungbrew' names:
Jozsef
Natan
Emmanuel
Mihaly(Mikhael)
Simon
Samuel
Jakab"


It is true that throughout European countries, the names of Jews appeared
in official documents in their Yiddish/Hebrew and transliterated Local
Language versions. There were several reasons for why this happened but we
need not consider those here.

Many of the secular names used by Jews in Hungary came originally >from a
set of about 500 German secular names which had previously been popular
with German Jews. I am thinking here of German secular names like Abraham,
Adam, Adela, Adelgund, Adolf, Adolfa, Agnes, Albert, Alex, Alexandra,
Alfred, Amalie, Andreas, Benjamin, Bernard, and on and on. Jews throughout
Eastern Europe (particularly) found these German names so attractive that
they were widely used.

And as has been noted by the poster, these names were used more or less
indiscriminately together with the Hebrew names given at birth as their
legal Jewish name, to the people using the secular names. The only links
which are seen that make any sense were those where both the Hebrew legal
name and the secular name began with the same letter or sound, for example,
Avraham and Alfred. Other than this convention, there was usually no
relationship between the Hebrew and secular names of any one person.

However, these secular names (including a small number of genuinely
Hungarian secular names) were so popular that Hungarian Jews ceased to
realize that these were not Hungarian secular names at all, but rather
German names. So, many considered them to be Hungarian names.

Another indicator of how popular these names were is the fact that the
rabbis who wrote Jewish law for how the names of Jews must be written in
Gitin (Jewish divorce contracts) in order to be valid under Jewish divorce
law, specified that not only names like Yehuda Leyb (consisting of a Hebrew
name together with its Yiddish kinui) were valid, but also names like
Avraham Aleks (a Hebrew name with a secular kinui) or Avraham Eduard (a
Hebrew name with a German secular name) or Avraham Ede (a Hebrew name with
a true Hungarian secular name related to Eduard). This anchoring in Jewish
law of the customs of Hungarian Jews with respect to their adoption and use
of secular names >from around Europe (but chiefly >from Germany and their own
country) indicates the great extent of this usage by Jews.

Of the names listed by the poster, the following were indeed German secular
names adopted by Hungarian (and Polish) Jews: Emmanuel, Simon,
Samuel. The Hungarian secular name Mihaly was frequently substituted in
Hungary for the corresponding German secular name Michael. As for the name
Jozsef, this is but one variant found by Hungarian Jews for similar secular
names corresponding to the Hebrew name Yosef: Joszef, Joszif, Joszip,
Jozef, and Jozip. Many such "secular" names were in reality simple
transliterations of a Yiddish name into corresponding Hungarian characters.

In reality, one should realize that Jews had two different sets of given
names: Jewish names and secular names, and sometimes they were mixed
together. But both kinds were valid names for them and appear in archival
records.

Many examples of these Jewish double names can be found in the Given Names
Data Base for Hungary (and other European countries) on the JewishGen web site:

< http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/GivenNames/ >

Prof. G. L. Esterson, Ra'anana, Israel


Hungary SIG #Hungary Re: Given names caveat #hungary

Prof. G. L. Esterson <jerry@...>
 

Alex Miller posted as follows:

"I had just reviewed 2000 tombstones in Hungary and some had both the
Hebrew names and the Hungarian or 'street' names. The following names
were adaptation >from Hebrew names to acceptable Hungarian --Hungbrew?--,
while the Hebrew names were different and totally unrelated, such as
Menahem, Yehiel, Simon or Zvi.

'Hungbrew' names:
Jozsef
Natan
Emmanuel
Mihaly(Mikhael)
Simon
Samuel
Jakab"


It is true that throughout European countries, the names of Jews appeared
in official documents in their Yiddish/Hebrew and transliterated Local
Language versions. There were several reasons for why this happened but we
need not consider those here.

Many of the secular names used by Jews in Hungary came originally >from a
set of about 500 German secular names which had previously been popular
with German Jews. I am thinking here of German secular names like Abraham,
Adam, Adela, Adelgund, Adolf, Adolfa, Agnes, Albert, Alex, Alexandra,
Alfred, Amalie, Andreas, Benjamin, Bernard, and on and on. Jews throughout
Eastern Europe (particularly) found these German names so attractive that
they were widely used.

And as has been noted by the poster, these names were used more or less
indiscriminately together with the Hebrew names given at birth as their
legal Jewish name, to the people using the secular names. The only links
which are seen that make any sense were those where both the Hebrew legal
name and the secular name began with the same letter or sound, for example,
Avraham and Alfred. Other than this convention, there was usually no
relationship between the Hebrew and secular names of any one person.

However, these secular names (including a small number of genuinely
Hungarian secular names) were so popular that Hungarian Jews ceased to
realize that these were not Hungarian secular names at all, but rather
German names. So, many considered them to be Hungarian names.

Another indicator of how popular these names were is the fact that the
rabbis who wrote Jewish law for how the names of Jews must be written in
Gitin (Jewish divorce contracts) in order to be valid under Jewish divorce
law, specified that not only names like Yehuda Leyb (consisting of a Hebrew
name together with its Yiddish kinui) were valid, but also names like
Avraham Aleks (a Hebrew name with a secular kinui) or Avraham Eduard (a
Hebrew name with a German secular name) or Avraham Ede (a Hebrew name with
a true Hungarian secular name related to Eduard). This anchoring in Jewish
law of the customs of Hungarian Jews with respect to their adoption and use
of secular names >from around Europe (but chiefly >from Germany and their own
country) indicates the great extent of this usage by Jews.

Of the names listed by the poster, the following were indeed German secular
names adopted by Hungarian (and Polish) Jews: Emmanuel, Simon,
Samuel. The Hungarian secular name Mihaly was frequently substituted in
Hungary for the corresponding German secular name Michael. As for the name
Jozsef, this is but one variant found by Hungarian Jews for similar secular
names corresponding to the Hebrew name Yosef: Joszef, Joszif, Joszip,
Jozef, and Jozip. Many such "secular" names were in reality simple
transliterations of a Yiddish name into corresponding Hungarian characters.

In reality, one should realize that Jews had two different sets of given
names: Jewish names and secular names, and sometimes they were mixed
together. But both kinds were valid names for them and appear in archival
records.

Many examples of these Jewish double names can be found in the Given Names
Data Base for Hungary (and other European countries) on the JewishGen web site:

< http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/GivenNames/ >

Prof. G. L. Esterson, Ra'anana, Israel


Re: Levoca Jewish cemetery #hungary

Tomas Lang <tlang@...>
 

Dear David:
a Central Union of Yewish Communities in Slovakia established some years ago
an Office in Banska Bystrica dealing with restoring and maintaining Jewish
Cemeteries.
There are approx. 680 splitted in whole country around.
The Manager of the Office named "S.O.S." is Mr. Juraj TURCAN.
I may advice you to contact him at ZNOBB@...

If any more info needed please dont hesitate to contact me.
WBR
Tomas Lang, PhD.
Nove Zamky Jewish Community President
Ceská basta 5, POBox 100
SK-940 60 NOVÉ ZÁMKY
Slovak Republic
----------------------------------------------------------
Phone - Recorder +421 35 640 1759
Facsimile +421 35 640 0350
E-mail kehilanz@...
------------------------------------------------------------

----- Original Message -----
From: "David Conway" <smerus@...>
To: "H-SIG" <h-sig@...>
Sent: Sunday, September 18, 2005 7:44 PM
Subject: [h-sig] Levoca Jewish cemetery


We have purchased and are restoring a house in Levoca (Slovakia). On our
last visit we were able to find, thanks to our friend Jana, the pre-war
Jewish cemetery of the town. It is located in an area of allotments
outside the town, and although unvandalised, it is completely overgrown
and invisible to anyone who doesn't know it is there. I took some
photographs (which include in one case a gravestone now half enclosed in a
tree which has grown round it). Many of the stones are however completely
legible (in Hebrew and Hungarian).

I would like to know if there is any organisation which may be interested
in restoring, or at least tidying up, the cemetery. My wife speaks Slovak
and we would be glad to intervene with the local authorities for their
support or assistance. Please let me have any ideas.

David Conway, London
Researching BUCHLER, BLUM, ENGEL


Hungary SIG #Hungary Re: Levoca Jewish cemetery #hungary

Tomas Lang <tlang@...>
 

Dear David:
a Central Union of Yewish Communities in Slovakia established some years ago
an Office in Banska Bystrica dealing with restoring and maintaining Jewish
Cemeteries.
There are approx. 680 splitted in whole country around.
The Manager of the Office named "S.O.S." is Mr. Juraj TURCAN.
I may advice you to contact him at ZNOBB@...

If any more info needed please dont hesitate to contact me.
WBR
Tomas Lang, PhD.
Nove Zamky Jewish Community President
Ceská basta 5, POBox 100
SK-940 60 NOVÉ ZÁMKY
Slovak Republic
----------------------------------------------------------
Phone - Recorder +421 35 640 1759
Facsimile +421 35 640 0350
E-mail kehilanz@...
------------------------------------------------------------

----- Original Message -----
From: "David Conway" <smerus@...>
To: "H-SIG" <h-sig@...>
Sent: Sunday, September 18, 2005 7:44 PM
Subject: [h-sig] Levoca Jewish cemetery


We have purchased and are restoring a house in Levoca (Slovakia). On our
last visit we were able to find, thanks to our friend Jana, the pre-war
Jewish cemetery of the town. It is located in an area of allotments
outside the town, and although unvandalised, it is completely overgrown
and invisible to anyone who doesn't know it is there. I took some
photographs (which include in one case a gravestone now half enclosed in a
tree which has grown round it). Many of the stones are however completely
legible (in Hebrew and Hungarian).

I would like to know if there is any organisation which may be interested
in restoring, or at least tidying up, the cemetery. My wife speaks Slovak
and we would be glad to intervene with the local authorities for their
support or assistance. Please let me have any ideas.

David Conway, London
Researching BUCHLER, BLUM, ENGEL


"Hungbrew" Names #hungary

Vivian Kahn
 

Thanks to Alex for demonstrating the point that many of us have been
trying to make regarding the correspondence, or lack thereof, of
Hungarian and Hebrew names.

Hungarian Jews, and probably, in particular, those who were more
assimilated, were given (or took) whatever secular names struck their
parents (or their own) fancy. In my own family I have an Elemer/Aryeh
(my father) and a Leopold/Aryeh. I also have an Armin/Tzvi. (Some
might think that the "Hungbrew" version of Armin (Herman) should be
Aryeh because both names begin with the letter "A".) My tree also
includes Heinrich/Chaim, Benjamin/Dov Berisch, Gordon (Moshe Gershon).
Markusz (Mordechai), and Moricz (Moshe). Hope that this helps to make
the point! Sometime the names are related but that is very often not
the case.

Vivian Kahn, Oakland, CA

The following names
were adaptation >from Hebrew names to acceptable Hungarian
--Hungbrew?--,
while the Hebrew names were different and totally unrelated, such as
Menahem, Yehiel, Simon or Zvi.

'Hungbrew' names:
Jozsef
Natan
Emmanuel
Mihaly(Mikhael)
Simon
Samuel
Jakab
In addition, there were three instances where the Hebew names of the
father and the son were the same-- an abberation to custom-- to my
knowledge!

Regards,

Alex Miller, Chester CO. PA
alex.miller@ juno.com


Hungary SIG #Hungary "Hungbrew" Names #hungary

Vivian Kahn
 

Thanks to Alex for demonstrating the point that many of us have been
trying to make regarding the correspondence, or lack thereof, of
Hungarian and Hebrew names.

Hungarian Jews, and probably, in particular, those who were more
assimilated, were given (or took) whatever secular names struck their
parents (or their own) fancy. In my own family I have an Elemer/Aryeh
(my father) and a Leopold/Aryeh. I also have an Armin/Tzvi. (Some
might think that the "Hungbrew" version of Armin (Herman) should be
Aryeh because both names begin with the letter "A".) My tree also
includes Heinrich/Chaim, Benjamin/Dov Berisch, Gordon (Moshe Gershon).
Markusz (Mordechai), and Moricz (Moshe). Hope that this helps to make
the point! Sometime the names are related but that is very often not
the case.

Vivian Kahn, Oakland, CA

The following names
were adaptation >from Hebrew names to acceptable Hungarian
--Hungbrew?--,
while the Hebrew names were different and totally unrelated, such as
Menahem, Yehiel, Simon or Zvi.

'Hungbrew' names:
Jozsef
Natan
Emmanuel
Mihaly(Mikhael)
Simon
Samuel
Jakab
In addition, there were three instances where the Hebew names of the
father and the son were the same-- an abberation to custom-- to my
knowledge!

Regards,

Alex Miller, Chester CO. PA
alex.miller@ juno.com


Wroclaw cemetery list #poland

Sophie Frankenberg
 

I just spoke to the person in charge of the Slezna
Jewish Cemetery in Wroclaw. I was told that someone
from Israel [>from Tel Aviv] spent a week cataloguing
the names on the tombstones in the first and second
'fields', where the oldest graves, starting in 1856,
are.
Does anybody know who this person is, and where these
lists may be found? I would be very grateful for
contact details, or any other information.

Thanking you in advance

Sophie Frankenberg
Jerusalem


JRI Poland #Poland Wroclaw cemetery list #poland

Sophie Frankenberg
 

I just spoke to the person in charge of the Slezna
Jewish Cemetery in Wroclaw. I was told that someone
from Israel [>from Tel Aviv] spent a week cataloguing
the names on the tombstones in the first and second
'fields', where the oldest graves, starting in 1856,
are.
Does anybody know who this person is, and where these
lists may be found? I would be very grateful for
contact details, or any other information.

Thanking you in advance

Sophie Frankenberg
Jerusalem


Re: explanation of notation: "Sura dn. 18 I 1939 do Warszawy" #poland

Nicole Heymans <nheymans@...>
 

Hi,

"dn." is probably short for dzien (day), "do" means to (towards), so
it probably means "Sura went to Warsaw on date 18 January 1939."

Nicole Heymans, Brussels, Belgium

At 12:07 AM 9/18/05, you wrote:
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Hi
I recently came across the following notation/abbreviation, and I
was hoping that someone could tell me what it means.

"Sura dn. 18 I 1939 do Warszawy" The "18 I 1939" almost certainly
refers to a date of January 1, 1939.

The notation appears in the 1939 Biala Podlaska Census, and refers
to a woman named Sura Sztromwaser, born July 10, 1910 in Biala Podlaska.
Any help/thoughts will be greatly appreciated.
Thanks,

Robert Strumwasser
Sharon, MA, USA


JRI Poland #Poland Re: explanation of notation: "Sura dn. 18 I 1939 do Warszawy" #poland

Nicole Heymans <nheymans@...>
 

Hi,

"dn." is probably short for dzien (day), "do" means to (towards), so
it probably means "Sura went to Warsaw on date 18 January 1939."

Nicole Heymans, Brussels, Belgium

At 12:07 AM 9/18/05, you wrote:
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Hi
I recently came across the following notation/abbreviation, and I
was hoping that someone could tell me what it means.

"Sura dn. 18 I 1939 do Warszawy" The "18 I 1939" almost certainly
refers to a date of January 1, 1939.

The notation appears in the 1939 Biala Podlaska Census, and refers
to a woman named Sura Sztromwaser, born July 10, 1910 in Biala Podlaska.
Any help/thoughts will be greatly appreciated.
Thanks,

Robert Strumwasser
Sharon, MA, USA


Are you related to Harold Arlen? #general

Steve Orlen
 

Dear Cousins,

An article in a recent New Yorker tells us that the great composer Harold
ARLEN was the son of two Litvaks - I think >from Vilna: Cantor Chaim
(Samuel) ARLUCK & Celia nee ORLIN. Harold was raised in Syracuse, NY. Is
anyone related to either of his parents? I say "either" because both of
their surnames derive >from Aron.

Best, Steve Orlen
Tucson, AZ


ADLER'S in South Africa #general

Steve Orlen
 

Dear Cousins,

My wife's mother tells me that her ADLER cousins >from Zell on the Mosel
migrated variously to Cincinnati, Ohio, London, & South Africa. In 1939,
heading for Cincinnati, she and her father way-stopped in London and
briefly met one of her ADLER cousins. The ones who went to South Africa,
she says, founded a diamond mine, converted to Christianity, and maybe -
she wasn't sure - changed their surname.

Does anyone know of such a family?

Please respond privately.

Best, Steve Orlen
Tucson, AZ


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Are you related to Harold Arlen? #general

Steve Orlen
 

Dear Cousins,

An article in a recent New Yorker tells us that the great composer Harold
ARLEN was the son of two Litvaks - I think >from Vilna: Cantor Chaim
(Samuel) ARLUCK & Celia nee ORLIN. Harold was raised in Syracuse, NY. Is
anyone related to either of his parents? I say "either" because both of
their surnames derive >from Aron.

Best, Steve Orlen
Tucson, AZ


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen ADLER'S in South Africa #general

Steve Orlen
 

Dear Cousins,

My wife's mother tells me that her ADLER cousins >from Zell on the Mosel
migrated variously to Cincinnati, Ohio, London, & South Africa. In 1939,
heading for Cincinnati, she and her father way-stopped in London and
briefly met one of her ADLER cousins. The ones who went to South Africa,
she says, founded a diamond mine, converted to Christianity, and maybe -
she wasn't sure - changed their surname.

Does anyone know of such a family?

Please respond privately.

Best, Steve Orlen
Tucson, AZ