Date   

Abraham Stern {Krummau} - Cross-references in the 1793 census of Bohemia Pt 1 #austria-czech

Celia Male <celiamale@...>
 

Again I should clarify: We have to thank the census-takers in 1793
for these cross-references, not the modern transcribers. The modern
transcribers just picked upon and indexed place names when they were
mentioned by the 1793 transcribers.

Hence Abraham STERN was mentioned as living in Trebon by the pernickety
1793 transcriber >from Stadt Neuhaus, Tabor Kreis, but the transcriber
in Trebon, Budweiser Kreis omitted to mention that his family lived
in the Tabor Kreis.

The modern transcribers, did not undertake genealogical cross-referencing.
That would be too speculative and they have left it to us. Now here
is a good example where census-takers in two separate locations noted
the present and previous abode of their enummerated person and he can
therefore be tracked on relatively easily by cross-references in the index.

Joachim FRANKENSTEIN - single and the auditor at the tobacco concession
in Stadt Prachatitz/Prachatice - Prachiner Kreis. It mentions here that
he is resident at Furst Lobkowitz in the *Tabor Kreis*. No place is
indicated see: Vol III Prachiner Kreis p 105. Joachim is therefore
indexed here under name only.

Now go to Vol III *Tabor* Kreis and look for Joachim FRANKENSTEIN. You
will *not* find him listed by name. This is because only the family heads
are indexed, *not* other family members. Luckily for us, others including
teacher, doctors, maids, apprentices etc are listed separately. I find
this system rather bizarre. Perhaps it was to stop the index being too
bulky.

There are four FRANKENSTEIN family heads in the Tabor Kreis: Simon,
Moises, Abraham and Markus.

You can look through them - and you will find Joachim on p 403. He is
listed as the first-born son of Simon who lives in Zeltsch {Plan/Plana
nad Luznici}: Joachim "single in Prachatitz" - and if you look in the
Tabor Kreis index for *Prachatitz* - you will find him - as the place
name *Prachatitz* is listed but *not* his name!

So now more by luck than anything else we know that Plan belongs to
the estates of Count Lobkowitz. This was only discovered by chance
on p 105 as Count Lobkowitz is not indexed either.

And here is a strange coincidence: go back to p. 105 and look up Joachim,
the tobacco auditor at his place of work. You will find that he works
for Abraham STERN of Prachatitz. Yes, he is another Abraham STERN who
is also a tobacco concessioner and another fascinating link develops -
see part II. This Abraham STERN is listed as coming >from Herrschaft
Krummau, Bechiner Kreis - a Kreis which no longer existed as a separate
entity in the 1793 period - see: for Bohemian Kreis maps through the
centuries: http://ekeil.gmxhome.de/vwe-a-m.htm

More about our doppelganger Abraham STERN >from Krummau in part II.

Using the indices and the annotated notes in the 1793 census is an art
in itself.

Celia Male [U.K.]


Austria-Czech SIG #Austria-Czech Abraham Stern {Krummau} - Cross-references in the 1793 census of Bohemia Pt 1 #austria-czech

Celia Male <celiamale@...>
 

Again I should clarify: We have to thank the census-takers in 1793
for these cross-references, not the modern transcribers. The modern
transcribers just picked upon and indexed place names when they were
mentioned by the 1793 transcribers.

Hence Abraham STERN was mentioned as living in Trebon by the pernickety
1793 transcriber >from Stadt Neuhaus, Tabor Kreis, but the transcriber
in Trebon, Budweiser Kreis omitted to mention that his family lived
in the Tabor Kreis.

The modern transcribers, did not undertake genealogical cross-referencing.
That would be too speculative and they have left it to us. Now here
is a good example where census-takers in two separate locations noted
the present and previous abode of their enummerated person and he can
therefore be tracked on relatively easily by cross-references in the index.

Joachim FRANKENSTEIN - single and the auditor at the tobacco concession
in Stadt Prachatitz/Prachatice - Prachiner Kreis. It mentions here that
he is resident at Furst Lobkowitz in the *Tabor Kreis*. No place is
indicated see: Vol III Prachiner Kreis p 105. Joachim is therefore
indexed here under name only.

Now go to Vol III *Tabor* Kreis and look for Joachim FRANKENSTEIN. You
will *not* find him listed by name. This is because only the family heads
are indexed, *not* other family members. Luckily for us, others including
teacher, doctors, maids, apprentices etc are listed separately. I find
this system rather bizarre. Perhaps it was to stop the index being too
bulky.

There are four FRANKENSTEIN family heads in the Tabor Kreis: Simon,
Moises, Abraham and Markus.

You can look through them - and you will find Joachim on p 403. He is
listed as the first-born son of Simon who lives in Zeltsch {Plan/Plana
nad Luznici}: Joachim "single in Prachatitz" - and if you look in the
Tabor Kreis index for *Prachatitz* - you will find him - as the place
name *Prachatitz* is listed but *not* his name!

So now more by luck than anything else we know that Plan belongs to
the estates of Count Lobkowitz. This was only discovered by chance
on p 105 as Count Lobkowitz is not indexed either.

And here is a strange coincidence: go back to p. 105 and look up Joachim,
the tobacco auditor at his place of work. You will find that he works
for Abraham STERN of Prachatitz. Yes, he is another Abraham STERN who
is also a tobacco concessioner and another fascinating link develops -
see part II. This Abraham STERN is listed as coming >from Herrschaft
Krummau, Bechiner Kreis - a Kreis which no longer existed as a separate
entity in the 1793 period - see: for Bohemian Kreis maps through the
centuries: http://ekeil.gmxhome.de/vwe-a-m.htm

More about our doppelganger Abraham STERN >from Krummau in part II.

Using the indices and the annotated notes in the 1793 census is an art
in itself.

Celia Male [U.K.]


BLATT from Philadelphia #general

Harry D. Boonin <hdboonin@...>
 

I am trying to locate two BLATTs. I believe that they were related.
Rose BLATT, died December 24, 1953.
Alter BLATT, lived in the XXX block of Gaskill Street in Philadelphia in
1947.
Harry D. Boonin
Warrington, PA
hdboonin@erols.com

MODERATOR NOTE: House number was replaced by X's in accordance with
JewishGen's privacy policy.


Re: Given name Chaim #general

rojac
 

Hello,

There is no mention of particular names given to sick people but most of the
time it was Chaim as it means life. Many times also the name *Alter* was given,
which means *Older* in german and Yidish with the hope that this person will
recover and become old.
My father had a sister who became very sick as a young lady and the
Czortkower Rebbe added a name to her name and this name was : *Babbe* which
means grandmother and he said : she will became a grandmother! And this was
the case as she recovered and passed away at age 82.

Regards

S. Rotkopf
Antwerp/Belgium


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen BLATT from Philadelphia #general

Harry D. Boonin <hdboonin@...>
 

I am trying to locate two BLATTs. I believe that they were related.
Rose BLATT, died December 24, 1953.
Alter BLATT, lived in the XXX block of Gaskill Street in Philadelphia in
1947.
Harry D. Boonin
Warrington, PA
hdboonin@erols.com

MODERATOR NOTE: House number was replaced by X's in accordance with
JewishGen's privacy policy.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Given name Chaim #general

rojac
 

Hello,

There is no mention of particular names given to sick people but most of the
time it was Chaim as it means life. Many times also the name *Alter* was given,
which means *Older* in german and Yidish with the hope that this person will
recover and become old.
My father had a sister who became very sick as a young lady and the
Czortkower Rebbe added a name to her name and this name was : *Babbe* which
means grandmother and he said : she will became a grandmother! And this was
the case as she recovered and passed away at age 82.

Regards

S. Rotkopf
Antwerp/Belgium


BOOK CITE - Family tree of the LIEBERMANNs from Berlin #germany

HHHeilbut@...
 

Just published was a book about the most famous family
LIEBERMANN >from Berlin. It includes the whole family tree starting in
1710 with LIEBERMANN BENDIX (Maerkisch Friedland).
Marina Sandig: Die Liebermanns
Verlag Degener & Co. 2005 ISBN 3-7686-5190-8

Regards Helga HEILBUT, Bergisch Gladbach, Deutschland <HHHeilbut@T-Online.de>


German SIG #Germany BOOK CITE - Family tree of the LIEBERMANNs from Berlin #germany

HHHeilbut@...
 

Just published was a book about the most famous family
LIEBERMANN >from Berlin. It includes the whole family tree starting in
1710 with LIEBERMANN BENDIX (Maerkisch Friedland).
Marina Sandig: Die Liebermanns
Verlag Degener & Co. 2005 ISBN 3-7686-5190-8

Regards Helga HEILBUT, Bergisch Gladbach, Deutschland <HHHeilbut@T-Online.de>


Joseph Family of London and Sydney #unitedkingdom

The Lockyers <keira@...>
 

A JOSEPH Family of London and Sydney.

After six years of research have been able to finalise facts on my JOSEPH
ancestors and am happy to share knowledge with anyone who is related.

Generation One
Isaac JOSEPH probably born before 1865, alive in 1820 at Drury Lane.

Generation Two - Isaac's known children
Elizabeth 1. ELLIS, 2 KYEZOR, c1784 -1859
Joseph JOSEPH c1790 -1872, Watchmaker, wife Sarah, son Louis/Lewis
Watchmaker, other known descendants BRAUN of London and Sydney.
Israel JOSEPH, Jeweller and Silversmith, possibly also a tailor,113 Drury
Lane 1820, (am looking for more information - wife might be an ABRAHAMS.
Israel's sister in law in 1820 was a Sophia ABRAHAMS)

Benjamin JOSEPH (c1791-1838), wife Amelia HARRIS, daughter of Joseph HARRIS,
Army Contractor, children included Alfred JOSEPH and Henry JOSEPH, Jewellers
and Pawnbrokers of Sydney, Julia KYEZOR, Jane KEYZOR, Bloom HASTINGS and
Belle MURRAY of London. The oldest son was Isaac JOSEPH who we have not
found.

Julia WATERS 1813- Aft 1839, Isaac's daughter by his second marriage.

Generation Two - Isaac's known step children
Abby POLACK/POLLOCK nee MURRAY c1800-1902
Joseph MURRAY c1807-1881
George Joseph MURRAY c1808-1887

Keira Lockyer
Australia keira@netcon.net.au


JCR-UK SIG #UnitedKingdom Joseph Family of London and Sydney #unitedkingdom

The Lockyers <keira@...>
 

A JOSEPH Family of London and Sydney.

After six years of research have been able to finalise facts on my JOSEPH
ancestors and am happy to share knowledge with anyone who is related.

Generation One
Isaac JOSEPH probably born before 1865, alive in 1820 at Drury Lane.

Generation Two - Isaac's known children
Elizabeth 1. ELLIS, 2 KYEZOR, c1784 -1859
Joseph JOSEPH c1790 -1872, Watchmaker, wife Sarah, son Louis/Lewis
Watchmaker, other known descendants BRAUN of London and Sydney.
Israel JOSEPH, Jeweller and Silversmith, possibly also a tailor,113 Drury
Lane 1820, (am looking for more information - wife might be an ABRAHAMS.
Israel's sister in law in 1820 was a Sophia ABRAHAMS)

Benjamin JOSEPH (c1791-1838), wife Amelia HARRIS, daughter of Joseph HARRIS,
Army Contractor, children included Alfred JOSEPH and Henry JOSEPH, Jewellers
and Pawnbrokers of Sydney, Julia KYEZOR, Jane KEYZOR, Bloom HASTINGS and
Belle MURRAY of London. The oldest son was Isaac JOSEPH who we have not
found.

Julia WATERS 1813- Aft 1839, Isaac's daughter by his second marriage.

Generation Two - Isaac's known step children
Abby POLACK/POLLOCK nee MURRAY c1800-1902
Joseph MURRAY c1807-1881
George Joseph MURRAY c1808-1887

Keira Lockyer
Australia keira@netcon.net.au


vital records from Lithuania #lithuania

Debra Price <dsprice@...>
 

I have ordered several LDS microfilms containing birth, marriage and
death records for the towns of Vabalninkas and Pakruojis for the
1870's and 1880's. The records are in Russian and Hebrew. I am
hoping that my moderate knowledge of Hebrew and chart of the Russian
alphabet will permit me to pick out the names that I am interested
in. It would, however, be helpful to know in advance how these
documents are generally laid out, i.e., where to look for what
information. I would appreciate hearing >from anyone with experience
in using them.

Debra Price
Plainview, NY

PRUCE/PRUSEL - Kovno Gub. (possibly Vabalninkas or Kupreliskis) to Baltimore
PUMPIAN(SKY) - Kovno Gub. (possibly Pakruojis), to Baltimore
WEINER/WEINEREIS - Gorodnitsa and Rovno, Volhynia Gub., Ukraine to Baltimore
GOLDSTEIN - Lomza (?) to Baltimore


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania vital records from Lithuania #lithuania

Debra Price <dsprice@...>
 

I have ordered several LDS microfilms containing birth, marriage and
death records for the towns of Vabalninkas and Pakruojis for the
1870's and 1880's. The records are in Russian and Hebrew. I am
hoping that my moderate knowledge of Hebrew and chart of the Russian
alphabet will permit me to pick out the names that I am interested
in. It would, however, be helpful to know in advance how these
documents are generally laid out, i.e., where to look for what
information. I would appreciate hearing >from anyone with experience
in using them.

Debra Price
Plainview, NY

PRUCE/PRUSEL - Kovno Gub. (possibly Vabalninkas or Kupreliskis) to Baltimore
PUMPIAN(SKY) - Kovno Gub. (possibly Pakruojis), to Baltimore
WEINER/WEINEREIS - Gorodnitsa and Rovno, Volhynia Gub., Ukraine to Baltimore
GOLDSTEIN - Lomza (?) to Baltimore


Re: Wandering Jew #lithuania

water wind & stars <shiralunacy@...>
 

Denis Nathan writes: "One last word on physiognomy. There have been studies
showing DNA similarities between Jews >from Africa, Europe and Asia. Also DNA
between Jews >from all continents is very much closer to that >from the
Middle East than it is to the host country populations. One explanation
may be that once intermarriage did occur, the offspring were usually
raised as gentiles.Which would explain why our features are not Balt or
Slavic."

'last word' among this group? hardly, until our moderator proclaims it so!

My reply to Denis is that our features often ARE indeed Balt or Slavic!
Some Jews do, even when they retain distinctively Jewish characteristics,
come to resemble the surrounding populations. In other words, there are
distinct types of Jews (even if not a dominant Jewish type) who come >from
particular areas, e.g. blond, hefty, sometimes blue-eyed Jews [cf. a great
Russians]; slender, somewhat tall, and fair (with reddish or lighth brown
hair) Jews [cf. Lithunians]; stocky, broad, somewhat short Jews with black
hair [cf. a particular strain of Ukrainians].

Please realize I am not generalizing across the board but am describing
a phenomenon that has been noticed by many other people as well. I have
wondered about thiis for a LONG time in light of centuries of Jews' strict
separation >from surrounding peoples (goyim), as expressed in the custom of
sitting shiva for those who marry out. I have asked and wondered and then
a few years ago was told, to my initial disbelief as well as sad dismay,
that genetic mixtures characteristic of the locale are the result of the
medieval custom of 'droit de seigneur' or 'jus primae noctae' ('right of
the first night'). This would mean that women who were forced to submit
were not banished.

I am not putting this forth as necessarily the whole story, but mainly
to ask whether any of you are aware of reliable research on this topic.
What kind of primary or even secondary historical (as opposed to medical?)
sources could one possibly find to document the presence of genetic
characteristics that definitely do NOT originate in our middle-eastern
genetic material. The situation is hard even to describe precisely, for
on the one hand we retain our genetic Jewish identity to a large degree,
and on the other, we do in many cases resemble the surrounding population.

Sonia Kovitz


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania Re: Wandering Jew #lithuania

water wind & stars <shiralunacy@...>
 

Denis Nathan writes: "One last word on physiognomy. There have been studies
showing DNA similarities between Jews >from Africa, Europe and Asia. Also DNA
between Jews >from all continents is very much closer to that >from the
Middle East than it is to the host country populations. One explanation
may be that once intermarriage did occur, the offspring were usually
raised as gentiles.Which would explain why our features are not Balt or
Slavic."

'last word' among this group? hardly, until our moderator proclaims it so!

My reply to Denis is that our features often ARE indeed Balt or Slavic!
Some Jews do, even when they retain distinctively Jewish characteristics,
come to resemble the surrounding populations. In other words, there are
distinct types of Jews (even if not a dominant Jewish type) who come >from
particular areas, e.g. blond, hefty, sometimes blue-eyed Jews [cf. a great
Russians]; slender, somewhat tall, and fair (with reddish or lighth brown
hair) Jews [cf. Lithunians]; stocky, broad, somewhat short Jews with black
hair [cf. a particular strain of Ukrainians].

Please realize I am not generalizing across the board but am describing
a phenomenon that has been noticed by many other people as well. I have
wondered about thiis for a LONG time in light of centuries of Jews' strict
separation >from surrounding peoples (goyim), as expressed in the custom of
sitting shiva for those who marry out. I have asked and wondered and then
a few years ago was told, to my initial disbelief as well as sad dismay,
that genetic mixtures characteristic of the locale are the result of the
medieval custom of 'droit de seigneur' or 'jus primae noctae' ('right of
the first night'). This would mean that women who were forced to submit
were not banished.

I am not putting this forth as necessarily the whole story, but mainly
to ask whether any of you are aware of reliable research on this topic.
What kind of primary or even secondary historical (as opposed to medical?)
sources could one possibly find to document the presence of genetic
characteristics that definitely do NOT originate in our middle-eastern
genetic material. The situation is hard even to describe precisely, for
on the one hand we retain our genetic Jewish identity to a large degree,
and on the other, we do in many cases resemble the surrounding population.

Sonia Kovitz


New Book: The Jews of Eastern Europe, 1772-1881, by Israel Bartal #general

jeremy frankel
 

Perusing the New Book stacks in the University of California at
Berkeley's Main Library I saw a new book which looks like a useful
history of the Jews of Eastern Europe between 1772 - 1881. These
dates were picked because 1772 was when Poland was first partitioned,
and 1881 was when the the major pogroms began as well as being the
beginning of the major emigration to other countries.

The book was originally written in Hebrew and translated by Chaya Naor.

Author: Bartal, Israel
Title: The Jews of Eastern Europe, 1772 - 1881
Publisher: University of Pennsylvania, 2005. 203 pages
ISBN: 0-8122-3887-7

--
Jeremy G Frankel
ex Edgware, London, England
Berkeley, California, USA

EBIN: Russia -> New York, USA
FRANKEL: Poland -> London, England
GOLD (RATH): Praszka, Poland -> London, England
KOENIGSBERG: Vilkaviskis, Lithuania -> London, England -> NYC, NY, USA
LEVY (later LEADER): Kalisz, Poland -> London, England
PRINCZ/PRINCE: Krakow, Poland -> London, England -> NYC, NY, USA

MODERATOR NOTE: This message is being posted in accordance with
JewishGen's one-time sales mention policy, which allows a one-time commercial
mention of books relating to Jewish Genealogy.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen New Book: The Jews of Eastern Europe, 1772-1881, by Israel Bartal #general

jeremy frankel
 

Perusing the New Book stacks in the University of California at
Berkeley's Main Library I saw a new book which looks like a useful
history of the Jews of Eastern Europe between 1772 - 1881. These
dates were picked because 1772 was when Poland was first partitioned,
and 1881 was when the the major pogroms began as well as being the
beginning of the major emigration to other countries.

The book was originally written in Hebrew and translated by Chaya Naor.

Author: Bartal, Israel
Title: The Jews of Eastern Europe, 1772 - 1881
Publisher: University of Pennsylvania, 2005. 203 pages
ISBN: 0-8122-3887-7

--
Jeremy G Frankel
ex Edgware, London, England
Berkeley, California, USA

EBIN: Russia -> New York, USA
FRANKEL: Poland -> London, England
GOLD (RATH): Praszka, Poland -> London, England
KOENIGSBERG: Vilkaviskis, Lithuania -> London, England -> NYC, NY, USA
LEVY (later LEADER): Kalisz, Poland -> London, England
PRINCZ/PRINCE: Krakow, Poland -> London, England -> NYC, NY, USA

MODERATOR NOTE: This message is being posted in accordance with
JewishGen's one-time sales mention policy, which allows a one-time commercial
mention of books relating to Jewish Genealogy.


Re: Subject: Missing letter in given name is ?? #general

Dana Rosenfeld <rosenfeld.dana@...>
 

Could the second letter be 'he'?
Then it should be Yehoshu'a (Joshua).
The difference between dalet and he is a little line...
I can't think of any other name (and my native language is Hebrew).

Hope it helped,

Dana Rosenfeld,

Searching for:
BRANDYS - Warsaw,
JACUBOWICZ - Warsaw,
MILLER/BALSAM-Poland/NY


Original message
----------------
Can anyone supply the probable missing 3rd letter and name for my great-
grandfather? A photograph of his tombstone shows his first name as yud-daled
-?-shin-eyin. The missing letter appears to be a vav, resh, daled or
even a lamed. However, none of those sound like any name that I know. If
it helps, his second given name was Eliezer and that is how he was known,
ie, Lazar. TIA

Steven Chall
Wellington, FL


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen RE:Subject: Missing letter in given name is ?? #general

Dana Rosenfeld <rosenfeld.dana@...>
 

Could the second letter be 'he'?
Then it should be Yehoshu'a (Joshua).
The difference between dalet and he is a little line...
I can't think of any other name (and my native language is Hebrew).

Hope it helped,

Dana Rosenfeld,

Searching for:
BRANDYS - Warsaw,
JACUBOWICZ - Warsaw,
MILLER/BALSAM-Poland/NY


Original message
----------------
Can anyone supply the probable missing 3rd letter and name for my great-
grandfather? A photograph of his tombstone shows his first name as yud-daled
-?-shin-eyin. The missing letter appears to be a vav, resh, daled or
even a lamed. However, none of those sound like any name that I know. If
it helps, his second given name was Eliezer and that is how he was known,
ie, Lazar. TIA

Steven Chall
Wellington, FL


GREAT NEWS: Dobra Books of Residents found and transcribed #poland

Marcus Byruck <byruckfam@...>
 

Dear Fellow Researchers

I have wonderful news for you regarding the extraordinary discovery of
Books of Residents >from the town of Dobra, and the availability of the
data in Excel Spreadsheet form.

A GREAT DISCOVERY

Many researchers of Dobra and nearby areas have long been disappointed
because there are no surviving Jewish vital (birth, marriage, death)
records for the town. To make matters worse, the vital records for the
neighboring town of Turek have also been lost. That has impeded a large
amount of family research. Thanks to JRI-Poland, this situation has been
miraculously remedied.

Dobra (Latitude 51 55' Longitude: 18 37') is located in the Turek
Province 103.7 miles West-South-West of Warsaw, in the middle of the
triangle between Konin, Kalisz and Lodz. It was an important center of
Jewish life until the 1930s. About one half of the residents of
nineteenth century Dobra were Jewish.

JRI-Poland is proud to announce that, after a long and delicate
negotiation process, it was allowed to inventory and photograph the two
series (pre-1930 and post-1930) of the Dobra Books of Residents (BoRs),
and their corresponding alphabetized Indexes.

Since many residents of Dobra moved to or >from other nearby towns for
marriage or work, this unique resource will be valuable not only to Dobra
researchers but also to those with ancestors in many other towns in the
Area, such as Turek, Warta, Konin, and so on. (In fact, the books mention
114 towns where Dobra-ites came >from or moved to.)

The BoRs and Indexes are housed in the Dobra Town Hall.

As a gesture of good will and appreciation, JRI-Poland donated the funds
needed to have the registers rebound, to ensure their survival as
well as to open the door for the photography.

After being granted access to these books last year, JRI-Poland hired a
Polish photographer, and he and his assistant spent several days in Dobra,
extracting images of records of the Jewish families in the registers.

Over the last several months, in order to make this precious data
available to researchers, our volunteers have completed the task of
transcribing the information on the photographed register pages into
searchable Excel spreadsheet format.

THE REGISTERS AND INDEXES

In many respects, BoRs can be significantly superior for research compared
to vital birth, marriage, and death records because they contain more
family and personal information than an individual record. BoRs are
Census-type registers that list the names, parents, and birth dates of
permanent residents of each dwelling in the village. They show each family
as a group, where they lived, other families living in the same building,
and many columns of supplementary notes.

The BoRs contain genealogical information for about 2,500 Jewish residents
born between 1820 and 1931, including nearly five hundred different
surnames (and some spelling variants), of individuals, wives maiden names
and mothers' maiden names. (See end of this posting for the hundreds of
names for which data is now available.)

The original BoRs consisted of fifteen volumes, of which six, plus the
alphabetized Index, have survived. The records are all in Polish, but are
in the Russian series format -- namely, referring to dwellings by house
number rather than by street address. (We are still analyzing the format of
the post 1930 volumes, which is different >from the pre-1930 registers.)

The Index is a summary of all Dobra permanent residents, alphabetized by
surname, contained in the fifteen volumes. This index alone is a
remarkable resource, since it includes surname, given name, father's
name, house number, and year of birth.

For a complete list of surnames, go to
<http://www.jri-poland.org/psa/dobra_surn.htm>

A list of the 20 most frequent surnames is at the end of this message.

There is an extraordinary wealth of information in these books. Dobra area
researchers will be able to find relatives even though none of their towns'
vital records might have survived. Phase 1, the pre-1930 records; when
Phase 2 is finished, both will be made available to the Jewish Records
Indexing Poland online database.

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

The following JRI-Poland members were crucial in bringing this project to
fruition: Leon Weintraub, who first discovered the existence of these
volumes and facilitated the connection between the Dobra authorities and
JRI-Poland; David Ansley, who reorganized the hundreds of photographic
images into logical order to make data entry practical; Madeleine Okladek,
who performed with enormous diligence over the last several months the
arduous and painstaking work of translating and transcribing the
photographic images into Excel spreadsheet format; and Stanley Diamond, for
agreeing to take this new project under JRI-Poland's wing, to advance the
necessary funds, and for his unstinting support and encouragement.

Please contact me if you have further questions about this unique project.

Sincerely

Marcus Byruck
Cambridge, Ma 02138
byruckfam@comcast.net
Project Coordinator
Dobra Books of Residents Project
Jewish Records Indexing---Poland

Here are just the TOP TWENTY, by type and by frequency, out of the several
hundred names for which information is available.

Index Names Frequency Maiden Names Frequency
Mothers Maiden Name Frequency
BAJROCH 100 BAJROCH 7
BAJROCH 34
TRZASKALA 92 SZAJNIAK 4
GLICENSZTEJN 22
GLICENSZTEJN 85 TRZASKALA 4
SZAJNIAK 18
GRAUDENS 72 TRZON 4
KON 15
WAJNSZTEJN 67 PARENCZEW 3
TRZASKALA 15
MOSZKOWICZ 48 BRESLER 2
SZWARC 12
OPAS 48 GLICENSZTEJN 2
TRZON 12
SENDOWSKA 48 GRAUDENS 2
BRESLER 11
PRAJS 43 GUTMAN 2
WOLF 11
LEWIN 42 HERTZBERG 2
KOCHEN 10
JAKUBOWICZ 41 HOBIS 2
MIZES 10
NEJMAN 40 KALISKA 2
SWIDERSKA 10
SZAJNIAK 39 KIWALA 2
OKLADEK 9
FRANCUZ 37 KON 2
ROZPRECER 9
FRYMER 37 KOTT 2
WIDAWSKA 9
KOTT 35 PERMAN 2
BERKOWSKA 8
PODCHLEBNIK 34 SZUREK 2
ERLICH 8
KIBEL 32 SZWARC 2
GRAUDENS 8
KON 31 UNIKOWSKA 2
KOTT 8


JRI Poland #Poland GREAT NEWS: Dobra Books of Residents found and transcribed #poland

Marcus Byruck <byruckfam@...>
 

Dear Fellow Researchers

I have wonderful news for you regarding the extraordinary discovery of
Books of Residents >from the town of Dobra, and the availability of the
data in Excel Spreadsheet form.

A GREAT DISCOVERY

Many researchers of Dobra and nearby areas have long been disappointed
because there are no surviving Jewish vital (birth, marriage, death)
records for the town. To make matters worse, the vital records for the
neighboring town of Turek have also been lost. That has impeded a large
amount of family research. Thanks to JRI-Poland, this situation has been
miraculously remedied.

Dobra (Latitude 51 55' Longitude: 18 37') is located in the Turek
Province 103.7 miles West-South-West of Warsaw, in the middle of the
triangle between Konin, Kalisz and Lodz. It was an important center of
Jewish life until the 1930s. About one half of the residents of
nineteenth century Dobra were Jewish.

JRI-Poland is proud to announce that, after a long and delicate
negotiation process, it was allowed to inventory and photograph the two
series (pre-1930 and post-1930) of the Dobra Books of Residents (BoRs),
and their corresponding alphabetized Indexes.

Since many residents of Dobra moved to or >from other nearby towns for
marriage or work, this unique resource will be valuable not only to Dobra
researchers but also to those with ancestors in many other towns in the
Area, such as Turek, Warta, Konin, and so on. (In fact, the books mention
114 towns where Dobra-ites came >from or moved to.)

The BoRs and Indexes are housed in the Dobra Town Hall.

As a gesture of good will and appreciation, JRI-Poland donated the funds
needed to have the registers rebound, to ensure their survival as
well as to open the door for the photography.

After being granted access to these books last year, JRI-Poland hired a
Polish photographer, and he and his assistant spent several days in Dobra,
extracting images of records of the Jewish families in the registers.

Over the last several months, in order to make this precious data
available to researchers, our volunteers have completed the task of
transcribing the information on the photographed register pages into
searchable Excel spreadsheet format.

THE REGISTERS AND INDEXES

In many respects, BoRs can be significantly superior for research compared
to vital birth, marriage, and death records because they contain more
family and personal information than an individual record. BoRs are
Census-type registers that list the names, parents, and birth dates of
permanent residents of each dwelling in the village. They show each family
as a group, where they lived, other families living in the same building,
and many columns of supplementary notes.

The BoRs contain genealogical information for about 2,500 Jewish residents
born between 1820 and 1931, including nearly five hundred different
surnames (and some spelling variants), of individuals, wives maiden names
and mothers' maiden names. (See end of this posting for the hundreds of
names for which data is now available.)

The original BoRs consisted of fifteen volumes, of which six, plus the
alphabetized Index, have survived. The records are all in Polish, but are
in the Russian series format -- namely, referring to dwellings by house
number rather than by street address. (We are still analyzing the format of
the post 1930 volumes, which is different >from the pre-1930 registers.)

The Index is a summary of all Dobra permanent residents, alphabetized by
surname, contained in the fifteen volumes. This index alone is a
remarkable resource, since it includes surname, given name, father's
name, house number, and year of birth.

For a complete list of surnames, go to
<http://www.jri-poland.org/psa/dobra_surn.htm>

A list of the 20 most frequent surnames is at the end of this message.

There is an extraordinary wealth of information in these books. Dobra area
researchers will be able to find relatives even though none of their towns'
vital records might have survived. Phase 1, the pre-1930 records; when
Phase 2 is finished, both will be made available to the Jewish Records
Indexing Poland online database.

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

The following JRI-Poland members were crucial in bringing this project to
fruition: Leon Weintraub, who first discovered the existence of these
volumes and facilitated the connection between the Dobra authorities and
JRI-Poland; David Ansley, who reorganized the hundreds of photographic
images into logical order to make data entry practical; Madeleine Okladek,
who performed with enormous diligence over the last several months the
arduous and painstaking work of translating and transcribing the
photographic images into Excel spreadsheet format; and Stanley Diamond, for
agreeing to take this new project under JRI-Poland's wing, to advance the
necessary funds, and for his unstinting support and encouragement.

Please contact me if you have further questions about this unique project.

Sincerely

Marcus Byruck
Cambridge, Ma 02138
byruckfam@comcast.net
Project Coordinator
Dobra Books of Residents Project
Jewish Records Indexing---Poland

Here are just the TOP TWENTY, by type and by frequency, out of the several
hundred names for which information is available.

Index Names Frequency Maiden Names Frequency
Mothers Maiden Name Frequency
BAJROCH 100 BAJROCH 7
BAJROCH 34
TRZASKALA 92 SZAJNIAK 4
GLICENSZTEJN 22
GLICENSZTEJN 85 TRZASKALA 4
SZAJNIAK 18
GRAUDENS 72 TRZON 4
KON 15
WAJNSZTEJN 67 PARENCZEW 3
TRZASKALA 15
MOSZKOWICZ 48 BRESLER 2
SZWARC 12
OPAS 48 GLICENSZTEJN 2
TRZON 12
SENDOWSKA 48 GRAUDENS 2
BRESLER 11
PRAJS 43 GUTMAN 2
WOLF 11
LEWIN 42 HERTZBERG 2
KOCHEN 10
JAKUBOWICZ 41 HOBIS 2
MIZES 10
NEJMAN 40 KALISKA 2
SWIDERSKA 10
SZAJNIAK 39 KIWALA 2
OKLADEK 9
FRANCUZ 37 KON 2
ROZPRECER 9
FRYMER 37 KOTT 2
WIDAWSKA 9
KOTT 35 PERMAN 2
BERKOWSKA 8
PODCHLEBNIK 34 SZUREK 2
ERLICH 8
KIBEL 32 SZWARC 2
GRAUDENS 8
KON 31 UNIKOWSKA 2
KOTT 8