Date   

Re: Searching for POT Submitter Maximilian GULDEN #general

Israel P
 

I spent some time looking into this request and did not find anything,
but I have several comments which might be helpful to others who submit
similar requests..

1. It would be useful if you were to tell us when the Pages were
submitted. A search for a 1999 submitter is quite different >from a
search for a 1955 submitter.

2. If you can tell us how a name is spelled in Hebrew by the submitter,
it saves us the trouble of looking up the Page itself. (In this case,
the name is spelled gimel-vav-lamed-dalet-nun.)

3. Even if you don't read Hebrew, you may notice that in the the
original, submitter's first name has only three letters. Yad VaShem
marks this submitter with an asterisk, meaning "Indicates an automatic
Translation >from Hebrew." In this case, none of his Pages really say
"Maximilian" - only "Max."

4. Yad VaShem has a search for "Pages of Testimony with submitter(s) with
the same name." In this case, they show none, while in fact there are
several - certainly more than the two mentioned in the poster's question.

5. One of the Pages is for his wife Caroline, born 1899. Stating that
helps us to realize that the chances Max is still alive are next to none
and that the search would be for children - or more likely grandchildren.

Israel Pickholtz

Please assist me in finding Mr. Maximilian Gulden or his descendants,
possibly in Tel Aviv. He submitted POT's for 2 members of the Tusch
family >from Lemberg (Lvov). It is urgent that I locate this man or his
children.

Thank you.

Felicia P. Zieff


Alexander - a common first name for Jews in the Habsburg Empire. #general

Celia Male <celiamale@...>
 

I have been following the discussion on *Alexander* as
a first name for Jews with some amusement. It appears
to be based on single examples presented by two or
three correspondents.

I would like to join this discussion too but I will
base my posting on recorded facts and the *900
Alexanders* buried in Jewish cemeteries in Austria
from the late 1700s to the present day. Most of them
are buried in Vienna at the huge Zentralfriedhof and
the earlier Wahring Jewish cemetery. In contrast,
there are not that many more Abrahams - ca 1,300, but
under 100 Adams.

Here are the earliest Alexanders I can find, buried in
the old Jewish cemetery at Wahring {Vienna}, with
clearly defined dates:

SCHIK Alexander aged 76 died 17.09.1843
SELINGER Alexander aged 76 died 03.04.1877
SOFFER Alexander aged 56 died 29.11.1859
SCHLESINGER Alexander aged 56 died 08.11.1863
KARPLUS Alexander aged 21 died 27.11.1831
EISLER Alexander aged 53 died 12.09.1866
SCHULBAUM Alexander aged 54 died 04.09.1871
SCHORSTEIN Alexander aged 29 died 22.07.1858
BADIO Alexander aged 42 died 26.11.1866
BRIX Alexander aged 40 16.02.1829 - 23.02.1869
OPPENHEIM Alexander aged 22 22.09.1829 - 29.06.1851
BARBAG Alexander aged 21 died 05.03.1853
TSUK Alexander aged 28 05.05.1843 - 17.04.1871
COHNER Alexander aged 21 06.04.1848 - 04.04.1869
WALTER Alexander aged 17 died 16.05.1864

Obviously these Alexanders are all sanitised forms [to
blend in with the prevalent non-Jewish culture] of
Abraham or possibly, the much rarer Adam or Alter. The
name was established already in the 1700s.

In the 1793 census of Bohemia, you can find a
sprinkling of Alexanders [some born in the mid 1700s],
but Abraham is still one of the commonest first names.


On my own tree I have an Alexander HIRSCH born in
Prossnitz, Moravia ca 1800. My own gt-grandfather born
30 Oct 1832 in Grossbock, Bohemia was named Albert
KOHN but the Hebrew inscription on the reverse of the
obelisk over his grave in Vienna clearly gives his
name as *Abraham*.

In early Vienna, Adolf [sadly], Albert, Alfred, Alois,
Anton, Arnold, Artur and Alexander were generally
based on Abraham. In the later [1900 onwards] more
secular era, the alternative names probably became
established in their own right.

Celia Male [U.K.]


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re:Searching for POT Submitter Maximilian GULDEN #general

Israel P
 

I spent some time looking into this request and did not find anything,
but I have several comments which might be helpful to others who submit
similar requests..

1. It would be useful if you were to tell us when the Pages were
submitted. A search for a 1999 submitter is quite different >from a
search for a 1955 submitter.

2. If you can tell us how a name is spelled in Hebrew by the submitter,
it saves us the trouble of looking up the Page itself. (In this case,
the name is spelled gimel-vav-lamed-dalet-nun.)

3. Even if you don't read Hebrew, you may notice that in the the
original, submitter's first name has only three letters. Yad VaShem
marks this submitter with an asterisk, meaning "Indicates an automatic
Translation >from Hebrew." In this case, none of his Pages really say
"Maximilian" - only "Max."

4. Yad VaShem has a search for "Pages of Testimony with submitter(s) with
the same name." In this case, they show none, while in fact there are
several - certainly more than the two mentioned in the poster's question.

5. One of the Pages is for his wife Caroline, born 1899. Stating that
helps us to realize that the chances Max is still alive are next to none
and that the search would be for children - or more likely grandchildren.

Israel Pickholtz

Please assist me in finding Mr. Maximilian Gulden or his descendants,
possibly in Tel Aviv. He submitted POT's for 2 members of the Tusch
family >from Lemberg (Lvov). It is urgent that I locate this man or his
children.

Thank you.

Felicia P. Zieff


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Alexander - a common first name for Jews in the Habsburg Empire. #general

Celia Male <celiamale@...>
 

I have been following the discussion on *Alexander* as
a first name for Jews with some amusement. It appears
to be based on single examples presented by two or
three correspondents.

I would like to join this discussion too but I will
base my posting on recorded facts and the *900
Alexanders* buried in Jewish cemeteries in Austria
from the late 1700s to the present day. Most of them
are buried in Vienna at the huge Zentralfriedhof and
the earlier Wahring Jewish cemetery. In contrast,
there are not that many more Abrahams - ca 1,300, but
under 100 Adams.

Here are the earliest Alexanders I can find, buried in
the old Jewish cemetery at Wahring {Vienna}, with
clearly defined dates:

SCHIK Alexander aged 76 died 17.09.1843
SELINGER Alexander aged 76 died 03.04.1877
SOFFER Alexander aged 56 died 29.11.1859
SCHLESINGER Alexander aged 56 died 08.11.1863
KARPLUS Alexander aged 21 died 27.11.1831
EISLER Alexander aged 53 died 12.09.1866
SCHULBAUM Alexander aged 54 died 04.09.1871
SCHORSTEIN Alexander aged 29 died 22.07.1858
BADIO Alexander aged 42 died 26.11.1866
BRIX Alexander aged 40 16.02.1829 - 23.02.1869
OPPENHEIM Alexander aged 22 22.09.1829 - 29.06.1851
BARBAG Alexander aged 21 died 05.03.1853
TSUK Alexander aged 28 05.05.1843 - 17.04.1871
COHNER Alexander aged 21 06.04.1848 - 04.04.1869
WALTER Alexander aged 17 died 16.05.1864

Obviously these Alexanders are all sanitised forms [to
blend in with the prevalent non-Jewish culture] of
Abraham or possibly, the much rarer Adam or Alter. The
name was established already in the 1700s.

In the 1793 census of Bohemia, you can find a
sprinkling of Alexanders [some born in the mid 1700s],
but Abraham is still one of the commonest first names.


On my own tree I have an Alexander HIRSCH born in
Prossnitz, Moravia ca 1800. My own gt-grandfather born
30 Oct 1832 in Grossbock, Bohemia was named Albert
KOHN but the Hebrew inscription on the reverse of the
obelisk over his grave in Vienna clearly gives his
name as *Abraham*.

In early Vienna, Adolf [sadly], Albert, Alfred, Alois,
Anton, Arnold, Artur and Alexander were generally
based on Abraham. In the later [1900 onwards] more
secular era, the alternative names probably became
established in their own right.

Celia Male [U.K.]


Re: Death Certificates from Israel #general

Israel P
 

Because when you say to Clerk X in Town A "why can't you do this? Clerk
Y in Town B had no trouble," you will find that next time need something
from Clerk Y, you may be told that (s)he can no longer help you.
Israel Pickholtz

I cannot understand why this subject is
so difficult to solve.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re:Death Certificates from Israel #general

Israel P
 

Because when you say to Clerk X in Town A "why can't you do this? Clerk
Y in Town B had no trouble," you will find that next time need something
from Clerk Y, you may be told that (s)he can no longer help you.
Israel Pickholtz

I cannot understand why this subject is
so difficult to solve.


Re: Need Books/Articles w/ basics #dna

garymaher@...
 

On 2005.11.05, Danielle James <daniandw@chariot.net.au> asked:

I had a Jewish father and Gentile mother. I believe that, being a
woman, I only inherit the DNA code >from my mother. That there would
be no evidence of my father's DNA.

However, on a recent TV program, a girl born through the IVF program
(her mother being the recipient of male donor sperm) traced her
father through a half-brother - different mother, but same father.
This was proven conclusively through a DNA test.

How would this be possible if the DNA line is only perpetuated from
mother to daughter, father to son.
You get about half of your DNA >from your mother and half >from your
father. That's how you get some attributes >from each of them.

The tests most commonly conducted for genealogical purposes are the
Y-DNA and mtDNA.

The Y-DNA test examines certain portions of the Y Chromosome, which
men inherit >from their fathers. Women have two X Chromosomes and no
Y Chromosome, so the Y-DNA test is useless to them. Because men get
their Y-DNA >from their fathers with no interference >from the mother,
Y-DNA can remain the same over many generations, making this test
ideal for determining whether two men are related through their
paternal lines.

The mtDNA test focuses on sections of the Mitochondrial DNA.
Mitochondria are tiny objects contained within our cells that oddly
enough have their very own DNA. Men and women inherit Mitochondrial
DNA >from their mothers with no interference >from their fathers. So
this test is to the maternal line what the Y-DNA test is to the
paternal line. The difference is that the test subjects can be
males or females, as long as there are only females connecting them.

As I said above, these are the tests that are most commonly
conducted. However, examining other areas of your DNA can determine
how related you are to others outside your maternal and paternal
lines. Maybe this sort of test would be of help to you.

Gary Maher
NJ / USA


DNA Research #DNA Re: Need Books/Articles w/ basics #dna

garymaher@...
 

On 2005.11.05, Danielle James <daniandw@chariot.net.au> asked:

I had a Jewish father and Gentile mother. I believe that, being a
woman, I only inherit the DNA code >from my mother. That there would
be no evidence of my father's DNA.

However, on a recent TV program, a girl born through the IVF program
(her mother being the recipient of male donor sperm) traced her
father through a half-brother - different mother, but same father.
This was proven conclusively through a DNA test.

How would this be possible if the DNA line is only perpetuated from
mother to daughter, father to son.
You get about half of your DNA >from your mother and half >from your
father. That's how you get some attributes >from each of them.

The tests most commonly conducted for genealogical purposes are the
Y-DNA and mtDNA.

The Y-DNA test examines certain portions of the Y Chromosome, which
men inherit >from their fathers. Women have two X Chromosomes and no
Y Chromosome, so the Y-DNA test is useless to them. Because men get
their Y-DNA >from their fathers with no interference >from the mother,
Y-DNA can remain the same over many generations, making this test
ideal for determining whether two men are related through their
paternal lines.

The mtDNA test focuses on sections of the Mitochondrial DNA.
Mitochondria are tiny objects contained within our cells that oddly
enough have their very own DNA. Men and women inherit Mitochondrial
DNA >from their mothers with no interference >from their fathers. So
this test is to the maternal line what the Y-DNA test is to the
paternal line. The difference is that the test subjects can be
males or females, as long as there are only females connecting them.

As I said above, these are the tests that are most commonly
conducted. However, examining other areas of your DNA can determine
how related you are to others outside your maternal and paternal
lines. Maybe this sort of test would be of help to you.

Gary Maher
NJ / USA


Geisher Galicia Meeting NYC Nov. 20,2005 #galicia

Pamela Weisberger <pweisberger@...>
 

Many people have expressed interest in the Gesher Galicia NYC Regional
Meeting to be held on November 20th in New York City, but, for one reason or
another, they cannot attend.

Although no one will be taking minutes of this meeting, rest assured that
there will be a detailed report on the main program, as well as the
birds-of-a-feather gatherings, in the winter issue of "The Galitzianer."

Space permitting...certain details will also be summarized on this SIG list
sometime shortly after the meeting including new projects discussed, town
information, research, and the lectures presented.

Pamela Weisberger
Research Coordinator
pweisberger@hotmail.com


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia Geisher Galicia Meeting NYC Nov. 20,2005 #galicia

Pamela Weisberger <pweisberger@...>
 

Many people have expressed interest in the Gesher Galicia NYC Regional
Meeting to be held on November 20th in New York City, but, for one reason or
another, they cannot attend.

Although no one will be taking minutes of this meeting, rest assured that
there will be a detailed report on the main program, as well as the
birds-of-a-feather gatherings, in the winter issue of "The Galitzianer."

Space permitting...certain details will also be summarized on this SIG list
sometime shortly after the meeting including new projects discussed, town
information, research, and the lectures presented.

Pamela Weisberger
Research Coordinator
pweisberger@hotmail.com


VM7054 -Cyrilic to English translation #general

Léon PORZYCKI <leon.porzycki@...>
 

hello,

Please inform this in the forum:

Thanks you for the translation of vieuwmate 7054 >from cyrilic to english.
Please answers directly to my Email adress

Leon Porzycki


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen VM7054 -Cyrilic to English translation #general

Léon PORZYCKI <leon.porzycki@...>
 

hello,

Please inform this in the forum:

Thanks you for the translation of vieuwmate 7054 >from cyrilic to english.
Please answers directly to my Email adress

Leon Porzycki


Re: NEWMAN #general

pamkosky@...
 

Hi
Does anyone have the family name of SUMMERS who lived in England in the
19th century. My great grandparents lived here then.

Pamela Elizabeth Kosky (nee NEWMAN)


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: NEWMAN #general

pamkosky@...
 

Hi
Does anyone have the family name of SUMMERS who lived in England in the
19th century. My great grandparents lived here then.

Pamela Elizabeth Kosky (nee NEWMAN)


Re: Could "Yitzhak" be translated as "Alexander?" #general

Ann Rabinowitz <annrab@...>
 

My great great grandfather was named "Aleksender" and was commonly called
the shortened form which is "Sender" as noted in records in Lithuania. He
lived in the early to mid part of the 1800's and the only reason his name
was not carried on in the family is that his name died with him as his son
had only daughters.

Options for you to consider as Yitzhak and Alexander are not >from the same
root at all:

1. Alexander could have been either a first or a middle name. Many
individuals were known by their middle name as I have seen in so many
records. An example is my Aleksender's son who was Shloime Dovid, who was
known as Dovid.

However, there is the other case where my grandfather, Shlaime Aron, was
known as Sam.

Use of names can be very idiosyncratic and confusing sometimes and people
don't always follow strict usage rules.

2. The two names of Yitzhak and Alexander represent two different people in
your family or two different branches.

3. The two names represent two different unrelated families.

I would suggest trying to locate additional documents to clarify your
relative's name.

Ann Rabinowitz
annrab@bellsouth.net


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Could "Yitzhak" be translated as "Alexander?" #general

Ann Rabinowitz <annrab@...>
 

My great great grandfather was named "Aleksender" and was commonly called
the shortened form which is "Sender" as noted in records in Lithuania. He
lived in the early to mid part of the 1800's and the only reason his name
was not carried on in the family is that his name died with him as his son
had only daughters.

Options for you to consider as Yitzhak and Alexander are not >from the same
root at all:

1. Alexander could have been either a first or a middle name. Many
individuals were known by their middle name as I have seen in so many
records. An example is my Aleksender's son who was Shloime Dovid, who was
known as Dovid.

However, there is the other case where my grandfather, Shlaime Aron, was
known as Sam.

Use of names can be very idiosyncratic and confusing sometimes and people
don't always follow strict usage rules.

2. The two names of Yitzhak and Alexander represent two different people in
your family or two different branches.

3. The two names represent two different unrelated families.

I would suggest trying to locate additional documents to clarify your
relative's name.

Ann Rabinowitz
annrab@bellsouth.net


November Meeting of Jewish Genealogical Society of Greater Philadelphia #general

JGLois@...
 

November Meeting of Jewish Genealogical Society of Greater Philadelphia

Date: November 14, 2005
Time: 7:45 PM
Place: The Newman Building at Gratz College
Old York Road (Route 611) and Melrose Avenue
Melrose Park, PA

********
Program: Movie

ECHOES THAT REMAIN (62 minutes)
A study of Jewish shtetl life before the Holocaust, combining hundreds
of rare archival photos and previously unseen film footage, with live
action sequences shot on location at the sites of former Jewish
communities in Czechoslovakia, Hungary, Poland and Romania.

****
Come to the meeting 30 minutes early for a Question and Answer session
preceding the general meeting.

****
For all who are researching Philadelphia roots and need information
on local resources; cemeteries, funeral directors, repositories (and
much more) please visit the JGSGP website:
http://www.jewishgen.org/jgsp

****
Interested friends are always welcome!
There is a $2.00 admission charge for non-members.
Refreshments will be served following the meeting

****
Delaware County Main Line Affiliate

Date: Tuesday, November 15, 2005
Time: 7:30 PM
Place: Martins Run Life Care Community
11 Martins Run
Media, PA
Speakers: Jonathan R. Stayer
Topic:Holdings of the Pennsylvania State Archives
****

Lois Sernoff [JGS GreaterPhiladelphia]
<JGLois@aol.com>


MAURER #general

Dorothy Rivers <dotvic@...>
 

Again I turn to you, fellow Genners.

Does anyone know the email address for Shmuel Herold? I understand he has a
lot of info on the MAURER family.

Shmuel, if you see this please get in touch with me at
<dotvic@earthlink.net>

Thank you all,

Dorothy AUERBACH Rivers
Tucson, Arizona USA

MODERATOR NOTE: Please respond privately


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen November Meeting of Jewish Genealogical Society of Greater Philadelphia #general

JGLois@...
 

November Meeting of Jewish Genealogical Society of Greater Philadelphia

Date: November 14, 2005
Time: 7:45 PM
Place: The Newman Building at Gratz College
Old York Road (Route 611) and Melrose Avenue
Melrose Park, PA

********
Program: Movie

ECHOES THAT REMAIN (62 minutes)
A study of Jewish shtetl life before the Holocaust, combining hundreds
of rare archival photos and previously unseen film footage, with live
action sequences shot on location at the sites of former Jewish
communities in Czechoslovakia, Hungary, Poland and Romania.

****
Come to the meeting 30 minutes early for a Question and Answer session
preceding the general meeting.

****
For all who are researching Philadelphia roots and need information
on local resources; cemeteries, funeral directors, repositories (and
much more) please visit the JGSGP website:
http://www.jewishgen.org/jgsp

****
Interested friends are always welcome!
There is a $2.00 admission charge for non-members.
Refreshments will be served following the meeting

****
Delaware County Main Line Affiliate

Date: Tuesday, November 15, 2005
Time: 7:30 PM
Place: Martins Run Life Care Community
11 Martins Run
Media, PA
Speakers: Jonathan R. Stayer
Topic:Holdings of the Pennsylvania State Archives
****

Lois Sernoff [JGS GreaterPhiladelphia]
<JGLois@aol.com>


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen MAURER #general

Dorothy Rivers <dotvic@...>
 

Again I turn to you, fellow Genners.

Does anyone know the email address for Shmuel Herold? I understand he has a
lot of info on the MAURER family.

Shmuel, if you see this please get in touch with me at
<dotvic@earthlink.net>

Thank you all,

Dorothy AUERBACH Rivers
Tucson, Arizona USA

MODERATOR NOTE: Please respond privately