Date   

Samson KLEINMAN (Berlin) and Tojasz Bialecki (Berlin and Zelow, Poland) #germany

Reuven <reuvenkl@...>
 

Tried posting this before, but it did not go through for some reason:

MODERATOR NOTE: Messages sent to this forum must comply with our list rules.
If they do not they are rejected. That is the "some reason" that your earlier
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don't write according to our format standards. Those rules can be found at our
website. Please read them with care and observe them in the future. I have
approved this one message as a courtesy and have made some changes for you.
Thanks to you and all for future cooperation. =============== MODERATOR =====>>

I am looking for any information regarding my paternal grandfather's family.
His name was Samson KLEINMAN. d. about 1923 in Berlin.
Married to Cilli / Czarne nee UNGER.
Had a brother (name probably Morris KLEINMAN), who lived in the US before he died.
Had a son: Martin KLEINMAN, my grandfather.

Also looking for my grandmother's second husband: Tobjasz BIALECKI
who also lived in Berlin, and came >from Zelow in Poland. Died in
Auschwitz with my grandmother in 1943.

Reuven Kleinman reuvenkl@gmail.com City ???? State (USA) or nation ????


German SIG #Germany Samson KLEINMAN (Berlin) and Tojasz Bialecki (Berlin and Zelow, Poland) #germany

Reuven <reuvenkl@...>
 

Tried posting this before, but it did not go through for some reason:

MODERATOR NOTE: Messages sent to this forum must comply with our list rules.
If they do not they are rejected. That is the "some reason" that your earlier
attempt failed. Any future attempts to post to this list will also fail if you
don't write according to our format standards. Those rules can be found at our
website. Please read them with care and observe them in the future. I have
approved this one message as a courtesy and have made some changes for you.
Thanks to you and all for future cooperation. =============== MODERATOR =====>>

I am looking for any information regarding my paternal grandfather's family.
His name was Samson KLEINMAN. d. about 1923 in Berlin.
Married to Cilli / Czarne nee UNGER.
Had a brother (name probably Morris KLEINMAN), who lived in the US before he died.
Had a son: Martin KLEINMAN, my grandfather.

Also looking for my grandmother's second husband: Tobjasz BIALECKI
who also lived in Berlin, and came >from Zelow in Poland. Died in
Auschwitz with my grandmother in 1943.

Reuven Kleinman reuvenkl@gmail.com City ???? State (USA) or nation ????


Re: Question about JACOB Surname #germany

N.Landau@...
 

Possibly before the advent of the Internet there were firms advertising a
book containing all the persons of a particular surname in the UK, US, Germany
and some other countries. I bought the Book of Landaus as a birthday present for
my father.

The fact that most of my relatives in the UK were listed was some kind of
test of the accuracy of the book.

Of particular interest was the fact that there were >from memory about 1,000
people of the name LANDAU in probably West Germany. This was 50 per cent of
the total number if I remember.

It was therefore quite clear >from this that LANDAU was not a solely Jewish
name - at that time there were only 30,000 Jews in Germany so if these had
all been Jewish (and we would be talking about adults) that would make
Landau's to be about 1 in 20 of the German Jewish population which clearly
be ridiculous.

So it doesn't mean that LANDAU is a more popular name amongst non-Jewish
Germans than amongst Jews it does suggest that, say, 1 in 10,000 Germans
have that surname. If one compares that with a quite common name in a
telephone directory I would suggest that this is a reasonably high
percentage.

Nick Landau London, UK <N.Landau@btinternet.com>

COHNREICH (Anklam, Germany Krajenka, Poland) ATLAS (Wielkie Oczy (near
Lvov/Lemberg), Poland) WEITZMAN (Cracow), WECHSLER(Schwabach, Germany)
KOHN/WEISSKOPF (Wallerstein and Kleinerdlingen,Germany) LANDAU (only adopted
on leaving Belarus or later)/FREDKIN (?)

Scott L.<eurotrash123@yahoo.com> wrote:
Perhaps someone here can help answer my question. Is there any sense of
how Common the surname JACOB would have been among German Christians compared


German SIG #Germany Re: Question about JACOB Surname #germany

N.Landau@...
 

Possibly before the advent of the Internet there were firms advertising a
book containing all the persons of a particular surname in the UK, US, Germany
and some other countries. I bought the Book of Landaus as a birthday present for
my father.

The fact that most of my relatives in the UK were listed was some kind of
test of the accuracy of the book.

Of particular interest was the fact that there were >from memory about 1,000
people of the name LANDAU in probably West Germany. This was 50 per cent of
the total number if I remember.

It was therefore quite clear >from this that LANDAU was not a solely Jewish
name - at that time there were only 30,000 Jews in Germany so if these had
all been Jewish (and we would be talking about adults) that would make
Landau's to be about 1 in 20 of the German Jewish population which clearly
be ridiculous.

So it doesn't mean that LANDAU is a more popular name amongst non-Jewish
Germans than amongst Jews it does suggest that, say, 1 in 10,000 Germans
have that surname. If one compares that with a quite common name in a
telephone directory I would suggest that this is a reasonably high
percentage.

Nick Landau London, UK <N.Landau@btinternet.com>

COHNREICH (Anklam, Germany Krajenka, Poland) ATLAS (Wielkie Oczy (near
Lvov/Lemberg), Poland) WEITZMAN (Cracow), WECHSLER(Schwabach, Germany)
KOHN/WEISSKOPF (Wallerstein and Kleinerdlingen,Germany) LANDAU (only adopted
on leaving Belarus or later)/FREDKIN (?)

Scott L.<eurotrash123@yahoo.com> wrote:
Perhaps someone here can help answer my question. Is there any sense of
how Common the surname JACOB would have been among German Christians compared


Re: Could "Yitzhak" be translated as "Alexander?" #general

Stan Goodman <SPAM_FOILER@...>
 

On Tue, 8 Nov 2005 15:23:52 UTC, a.sharon@shaw.ca (Alexander Sharon)
opined:
Robert Israel wrote in his reply to Judy Segal question:
Would anyone know if, back in Czarist Russia, "Alexander" would have been
a reasonable interpretation of the Yiddish first name "Yitzhak?"
Theoretically, there is absolutely no relationship between the two names.
This, of course, would not prevent anyone with the name
Yitzhak >from calling himself Alexander.

Yitzhak is a biblical Hebrew name, and Alexander is a Greek name
which has found its way into many languages including Hebrew and
Russian (first made popular, of course, because of Alexander the
Great). Its popularity in 19th century Russia was presumably
increased because of the tsars of that name, especially (for the
Jews) the reformer Alexander II.

Actually, name Alexander and all other Christian names were forbidden for
Jews. Those restrictions were also applicable for the biblical names adopted by
the Russian Orthodox Church saints, like David, Moses (Moisey), Daniel,
Isaak.


Alex... There seems to be an inconsistency in your explanation; more
likely, you have omitted a step. If "Christian" names were forbidden
until the 1905 Revolution, and if a pre-Christian name like
"Alexander" counts as a Christian name, how do we account for the
observed occurence (including in my own family) of people named
Alexander thirty years before that revolution? One guesses that you
yourself can trace your name back to a forebear in that era.

I've already discussed this issue on this forum back in 1999 when I wrote:

"I believe that name should read: Avrum (>from Abram, Abraham). Name Aurum
would not be permitted by Russian anti-Semitic scribes. Too shiny.
=;-)

snip>>>>

Stan Goodman, Qiryat Tiv'on, Israel

Searching:
NEACHOWICZ/NOACHOWICZ, NEJMAN/NAJMAN, SURALSKI: >from Lomza Gubernia
ISMACH: >from Lomza Gubernia, Galicia, and Ukraina
HERTANU, ABRAMOVICI, LAUER: >from Dorohoi District, Romania
GRISARU, VATARU: >from Iasi, Dorohoi, and Mileanca, Romania

See my interactive family tree (requires Java 1.1.6 or better). the
URL is:
http://www.hashkedim.com

For reasons connected with anti-spam/junk security, the return address
is not valid. To communicate with me, please visit my website (see the
URL above -- no Java required for this purpose) and fill in the email form
there.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Could "Yitzhak" be translated as "Alexander?" #general

Stan Goodman <SPAM_FOILER@...>
 

On Tue, 8 Nov 2005 15:23:52 UTC, a.sharon@shaw.ca (Alexander Sharon)
opined:
Robert Israel wrote in his reply to Judy Segal question:
Would anyone know if, back in Czarist Russia, "Alexander" would have been
a reasonable interpretation of the Yiddish first name "Yitzhak?"
Theoretically, there is absolutely no relationship between the two names.
This, of course, would not prevent anyone with the name
Yitzhak >from calling himself Alexander.

Yitzhak is a biblical Hebrew name, and Alexander is a Greek name
which has found its way into many languages including Hebrew and
Russian (first made popular, of course, because of Alexander the
Great). Its popularity in 19th century Russia was presumably
increased because of the tsars of that name, especially (for the
Jews) the reformer Alexander II.

Actually, name Alexander and all other Christian names were forbidden for
Jews. Those restrictions were also applicable for the biblical names adopted by
the Russian Orthodox Church saints, like David, Moses (Moisey), Daniel,
Isaak.


Alex... There seems to be an inconsistency in your explanation; more
likely, you have omitted a step. If "Christian" names were forbidden
until the 1905 Revolution, and if a pre-Christian name like
"Alexander" counts as a Christian name, how do we account for the
observed occurence (including in my own family) of people named
Alexander thirty years before that revolution? One guesses that you
yourself can trace your name back to a forebear in that era.

I've already discussed this issue on this forum back in 1999 when I wrote:

"I believe that name should read: Avrum (>from Abram, Abraham). Name Aurum
would not be permitted by Russian anti-Semitic scribes. Too shiny.
=;-)

snip>>>>

Stan Goodman, Qiryat Tiv'on, Israel

Searching:
NEACHOWICZ/NOACHOWICZ, NEJMAN/NAJMAN, SURALSKI: >from Lomza Gubernia
ISMACH: >from Lomza Gubernia, Galicia, and Ukraina
HERTANU, ABRAMOVICI, LAUER: >from Dorohoi District, Romania
GRISARU, VATARU: >from Iasi, Dorohoi, and Mileanca, Romania

See my interactive family tree (requires Java 1.1.6 or better). the
URL is:
http://www.hashkedim.com

For reasons connected with anti-spam/junk security, the return address
is not valid. To communicate with me, please visit my website (see the
URL above -- no Java required for this purpose) and fill in the email form
there.


The Lurie Legacy: The House of Davidic Royal Descent #ukraine

Henry <henry@...>
 

Hi All,

does anyone have the book "The Lurie Legacy: The House of Davidic Royal
Descent". Please e-mail me in private.

Thank You

Henry Schwartz


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine The Lurie Legacy: The House of Davidic Royal Descent #ukraine

Henry <henry@...>
 

Hi All,

does anyone have the book "The Lurie Legacy: The House of Davidic Royal
Descent". Please e-mail me in private.

Thank You

Henry Schwartz


LUBIN Family #belarus

Esther & Bernie <perky@...>
 

I am searching for a family which came >from Homel. The original name was
LUBIN. One sister was Sarah. She married a Solomon BILCHOVSKY. They had at
least one daughter, names Tanya. I believe they moved to Moscow. Sarah's
sister was Jennie LUBIN who was my Mother-in-law. When she came to America,
she married David SARGRAD.
Anyone having information about this family..please contact me. Thank you.
ESTHER SARGRAD
CLEARWATER, FLORIDA
Perky@microd.com
MODERATOR NOTE: Please capitalize only surnames.


Belarus SIG #Belarus LUBIN Family #belarus

Esther & Bernie <perky@...>
 

I am searching for a family which came >from Homel. The original name was
LUBIN. One sister was Sarah. She married a Solomon BILCHOVSKY. They had at
least one daughter, names Tanya. I believe they moved to Moscow. Sarah's
sister was Jennie LUBIN who was my Mother-in-law. When she came to America,
she married David SARGRAD.
Anyone having information about this family..please contact me. Thank you.
ESTHER SARGRAD
CLEARWATER, FLORIDA
Perky@microd.com
MODERATOR NOTE: Please capitalize only surnames.


ROMAN #belarus

Alan Roman <aroman@...>
 

I'm researching Adolph ROMAN (my grandfather), last known address was
Koricin/ Korechin, he left in 1906.

Alan Roman, researching ROMAN, BENDER, SKUTNEK
MODERATOR NOTE: Please sign all messages with your location.


Belarus SIG #Belarus ROMAN #belarus

Alan Roman <aroman@...>
 

I'm researching Adolph ROMAN (my grandfather), last known address was
Koricin/ Korechin, he left in 1906.

Alan Roman, researching ROMAN, BENDER, SKUTNEK
MODERATOR NOTE: Please sign all messages with your location.


2006 IAJGS Annual Conference - Call for Papers #rabbinic

Hadassah Lipsius <kesher@...>
 

The Jewish Genealogical Society is the host society for the 2006
International Association of Jewish Genealogical Societies' annual
conference to be held at the Marriott Marquis here in New York City
from August 13th to 18th.
Our Call for Papers has been out for almost two month and we have
not received any submissions for rabbinical research topics. This is
an area of interest to many Jewish genealogists and we are writing
to encourage rabbinical research submissions.

All abstract submissions must be submitted via our on-line abstract
module process at < http://www.jgsny2006.org/call.cfm >. E-mail
submittals will not be accepted.

Just follow the instructions at the website.

The decision to accept a submission will be heavily weighted toward
presentations not given at previous IAJGS Conferences, that provide
specific research methodology and that include specific information
for researchers to replicate the success of the presenter in
acquiring information. Sessions will be one hour and fifteen
minutes, with the last 15 minutes reserved for questions and
answers. Proposal Deadline - December 1, 2005. Speakers will be
notified no later than February 1, 2006 Handout material/resource
material, due March 1, 2006, is required for each presentation and
will be included in the syllabus distributed to all conference
registrants. Further details of the handout material requirements
will be provided upon acceptance of lecture.

Gloria Berkenstat Freund
2006 Conference Program Committee Chair
gloria@jgsny2006.org

Hadassah Lipsius
2006 Conference Co-Chair
hadassah@jgsny2006.org


Rabbinic Genealogy SIG #Rabbinic 2006 IAJGS Annual Conference - Call for Papers #rabbinic

Hadassah Lipsius <kesher@...>
 

The Jewish Genealogical Society is the host society for the 2006
International Association of Jewish Genealogical Societies' annual
conference to be held at the Marriott Marquis here in New York City
from August 13th to 18th.
Our Call for Papers has been out for almost two month and we have
not received any submissions for rabbinical research topics. This is
an area of interest to many Jewish genealogists and we are writing
to encourage rabbinical research submissions.

All abstract submissions must be submitted via our on-line abstract
module process at < http://www.jgsny2006.org/call.cfm >. E-mail
submittals will not be accepted.

Just follow the instructions at the website.

The decision to accept a submission will be heavily weighted toward
presentations not given at previous IAJGS Conferences, that provide
specific research methodology and that include specific information
for researchers to replicate the success of the presenter in
acquiring information. Sessions will be one hour and fifteen
minutes, with the last 15 minutes reserved for questions and
answers. Proposal Deadline - December 1, 2005. Speakers will be
notified no later than February 1, 2006 Handout material/resource
material, due March 1, 2006, is required for each presentation and
will be included in the syllabus distributed to all conference
registrants. Further details of the handout material requirements
will be provided upon acceptance of lecture.

Gloria Berkenstat Freund
2006 Conference Program Committee Chair
gloria@jgsny2006.org

Hadassah Lipsius
2006 Conference Co-Chair
hadassah@jgsny2006.org


Re: NYC Death Certificates #general

Ira Leviton
 

Dear Cousins,

As already noted by Sally Bruckheimer, it's more or less impossible for
a death to have occurred in New York City without a death certificate. It
has been long required for burial, cremation, and even moving a body to
another locality.

Death certificates of people who commit suicide in New York City are
listed in the indices in the same way as all others. The only difference
is that it almost certainly was issued by the Medical Examiner, not by any
other doctor.

It's far more likely that the death was recorded or incorrectly indexed
under a different name (e.g., either a different first name or a mangled
last name), it occurred in a different year than is being sought, or
occurred outside of the five boroughs. If it occurred elsewhere in the
State of New York, it can be checked in the New York State death indices,
which are available at several locations, including through 1954 at the
NARA branch on Varick Street in New York City. If it occurred across the
Hudson River in New Jersey, I know no way of obtaining the certificate.

One additional remote possibility, depending on the circumstances of
the suicide, is that the person was not initially identified, and the
death certificate was issued as "Unknown, male." (There are many listings
for this and "Unknown, female" every year.) When the identification was
made and a new death certificate issued, the original listing was not
corrected in the index, especially if it occurred in the next calendar
year. However, I believe that in this instance, a correct listing should
still appear in the year of the identification.

I also suggest checking newspapers, which should be available on
microfilm through interlibrary loan at almost any local library, and also
creatively using the Steve Morse site, e.g, only the last name with
Soundex and limiting the year of death, or even just using the first
letter of the surname but also limiting the year of death, birth, and age.

Ira
Ira Leviton
New York, N.Y.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: NYC Death Certificates #general

Ira Leviton
 

Dear Cousins,

As already noted by Sally Bruckheimer, it's more or less impossible for
a death to have occurred in New York City without a death certificate. It
has been long required for burial, cremation, and even moving a body to
another locality.

Death certificates of people who commit suicide in New York City are
listed in the indices in the same way as all others. The only difference
is that it almost certainly was issued by the Medical Examiner, not by any
other doctor.

It's far more likely that the death was recorded or incorrectly indexed
under a different name (e.g., either a different first name or a mangled
last name), it occurred in a different year than is being sought, or
occurred outside of the five boroughs. If it occurred elsewhere in the
State of New York, it can be checked in the New York State death indices,
which are available at several locations, including through 1954 at the
NARA branch on Varick Street in New York City. If it occurred across the
Hudson River in New Jersey, I know no way of obtaining the certificate.

One additional remote possibility, depending on the circumstances of
the suicide, is that the person was not initially identified, and the
death certificate was issued as "Unknown, male." (There are many listings
for this and "Unknown, female" every year.) When the identification was
made and a new death certificate issued, the original listing was not
corrected in the index, especially if it occurred in the next calendar
year. However, I believe that in this instance, a correct listing should
still appear in the year of the identification.

I also suggest checking newspapers, which should be available on
microfilm through interlibrary loan at almost any local library, and also
creatively using the Steve Morse site, e.g, only the last name with
Soundex and limiting the year of death, or even just using the first
letter of the surname but also limiting the year of death, birth, and age.

Ira
Ira Leviton
New York, N.Y.


Tarnobrzeg #general

Gayle Schlissel Riley <key2pst@...>
 

I am looking for the location of the spot where they put the tombstones
taken >from the old Jewish cemetery along the road outside of Tarnobrzeg.
Anyone know where that is or was? any photographs? Thanks
Gayle >from San Gabriel


Rabbi Szaja LONDON in Sobota from 1861 #rabbinic

Kirsten Gradel <kmgradel@...>
 

I am looking for information on a Rabbi Szaja LONDON, ggrandfather of
a friend who I have helped looking into her family roots in Poland.
from the 1863 marriage dokument of her grandparents >from Pia,tek I
know that the groom was >from Sobota and son of Szaja LONDON.

I have just been through the 1826-65 filmed years of Sobota vital
records and no LONDONers were born. married or died in that span of
years, *but* nonetheless I suddenly found the name Szaja LONDON in a
document: >from the end of 1861 till 1866 when the film ends that was
the name of the new town rabbi!

If someone know anything about this rabbi, please write me.

Kirsten Gradel
Nyborg, Denmark
Zamosc Archives Project Coordinator
Jewish Records Indexing - Poland


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Tarnobrzeg #general

Gayle Schlissel Riley <key2pst@...>
 

I am looking for the location of the spot where they put the tombstones
taken >from the old Jewish cemetery along the road outside of Tarnobrzeg.
Anyone know where that is or was? any photographs? Thanks
Gayle >from San Gabriel


Rabbinic Genealogy SIG #Rabbinic Rabbi Szaja LONDON in Sobota from 1861 #rabbinic

Kirsten Gradel <kmgradel@...>
 

I am looking for information on a Rabbi Szaja LONDON, ggrandfather of
a friend who I have helped looking into her family roots in Poland.
from the 1863 marriage dokument of her grandparents >from Pia,tek I
know that the groom was >from Sobota and son of Szaja LONDON.

I have just been through the 1826-65 filmed years of Sobota vital
records and no LONDONers were born. married or died in that span of
years, *but* nonetheless I suddenly found the name Szaja LONDON in a
document: >from the end of 1861 till 1866 when the film ends that was
the name of the new town rabbi!

If someone know anything about this rabbi, please write me.

Kirsten Gradel
Nyborg, Denmark
Zamosc Archives Project Coordinator
Jewish Records Indexing - Poland