Date   

Re: Dora Hirsch #germany

Christopher Massur <cmassur@...>
 

I suggest you contact either
Heimatmuseum Bad Wildungen
Lindenstraße 9, 34537 Bad Wildungen
Fon: 05621/72942, Fax: 05621/ 73666
or check with the Staatsarchiv Marburg (web-site) holding also information
on Bad Wildungen.

The Stadtarchiv Karlsruhe has a data-bank and issued a memory book on Jewish
inhabitants
http://www4.karlsruhe.de/kultur/stadtgeschichte/gedenkbuch.de (in German)

Christopher Massur, Curaçao <cmassur@hotmail.com>

"Phyllis Durra" <meldrum@absamail.co.za> wrote:

My Maternal Grandmother: Dora HIRSCH b. 1876 Karlsruhe d. 1957 New York
City was employed in photography at: phot. Atelier Bad Wildungen, Haus Dr. Fritz.


Seeking Living Children Of Samuel and Emma MENDELSON - NY #general

sacredsisters3@aol.com <sacredsisters3@...>
 

Hello To All

I am seeking any living decendants of Samuel & Emma MENDELSON. Samuel
is brother to my great-grandmother Anna(mendelson) RAKOFF who died in
1980. They were all >from russia, and came over in the early 1900's. In
1920 Samuel & Emma was living at 860 Myrtle Avenue in Brooklyn. In 1930
they were living still in brooklyn at 595 Euclid Avenue and had four
kids at that time. Their names were Fred, Murray, Herman, & Ruth.

I would love to know how to contact any of them if they are still
living. I am trying to find information on my mendelson ancestors. I
would love to get the information >from the right sources. According to
the 1930 census for brooklyn, New York Freda was born about 1920,
Murray 1921, Herman 1925, Ruth 1927.

If anyone out there can help me in this, I would greatly appreciate it.
I have no idea where the children are now, or if any of them got
married. They might remember my grandmother if they grew up with her.
Her name is ruth(Rakoff)Faikes. She got married in June of 1949, and
they may have gone to her wedding. I have my grandmothers wedding
photos and there are several people I can't identify. Perhaps they are
in some of them.

Again all help and advice is appreciated.

Sarah Greenberg
sacredsisters3@aol.com


New Holocaust Databases #general

Joyce Field
 

I have been asked by Warren Blatt to post the following important
message on his behalf regarding new databases.

JewishGen is pleased to announce the addition of 37,000 new records
to the JewishGen Holocaust Database <
http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Holocaust >.

There are 13 new datasets, and two updated datasets. The 13 new datasets are:

* "Lodz Transports to the Chelmno Extermination Camp":
Names of 7,168 individuals >from Lodz who were transferred to the
death camp at Chelmno, June-August 1944.

* "Gyor Victims at Auschwitz":
Names of over 3,000 victims >from Gyor, Hungary, deported to
Auschwitz, made by a Jewish communal organization.

* "Jewish Physicians >from Czechoslovakia":
Names of 1,668 Czechoslovakian physicians who died during the
Holocaust, >from an unpublished yizkor book manuscript.

* "Hannover-Ahlem Prisoners":
Names of 257 prisoners, mostly Polish Jews, who perished in a subcamp
of Neuengamme, located in Ahlem/Hannover.

* "Jews of Des (Dej) in the Ghettoization of May, 1944":
List of 3,250 Jewish residents in Des, Hungary (now Dej, Romania),
just prior to their deportation, May 3-10, 1944.

* "Kisvarda, Hungary - Records Before Deportation, 1944":
3,516 residents >from Kisvarda (Kleinwardein), Hungary ghetto prior to
their deportation, April 10-13, 1944.

* "Jews >from Iasi (Jassy) Who Survived the Transports":
List of over 1,600 Jews who survived two transports by train >from
Iasi (Jassy) Romania.

* "Kozienice Ghetto Census (Lista), 1939 - 1942":
4,023 inhabitants >from the census of Jews in the Kozienice ghetto,
made by the Jewish Council of Kozienice.

* "Holocaust Survivors Claiming American Citizenship":
Applications of 621 individuals claiming American citizenship,
processed in Zurich by the U.S. State Department.

* "Subotica Jews, Victims of the Fascist Occupation, 1941-45":
1,993 names of victims >from Subotica, now in Serbia (formerly
Szabadka, Hungary, before WWI).

* "Balta Ghetto":
2,817 Jews >from the Balta Ghetto, Transnistria, as of 1941.

* "Balta Orphans":
List of 220 orphaned children in the Balta Ghetto.

* "Balta Batallion":
List of 507 Jewish men in Batallion 120 - Romanian forced laborers in
Transnitria, 1941-1944.


We've also updated the following two datasets:

* Dachau Indexing Project:
Over 7,000 records added, for a total of over 135,000 records.

* North Bavarian Jews:
1,200 records added; now over 7,400 records total.


Thanks to all the volunteers who have made these possible, especially
project coordinators Nolan Altman and Mike Kalt.


The JewishGen Holocaust Database is a collection of nearly 100
different datasets, containing over one million entries about
Holocaust victims and survivors.

This database can be searched at <
http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Holocaust >.

Warren

Warren Blatt
JewishGen Editor-in-Chief
<wblatt@jewishgen.org>


German SIG #Germany RE: Dora Hirsch #germany

Christopher Massur <cmassur@...>
 

I suggest you contact either
Heimatmuseum Bad Wildungen
Lindenstraße 9, 34537 Bad Wildungen
Fon: 05621/72942, Fax: 05621/ 73666
or check with the Staatsarchiv Marburg (web-site) holding also information
on Bad Wildungen.

The Stadtarchiv Karlsruhe has a data-bank and issued a memory book on Jewish
inhabitants
http://www4.karlsruhe.de/kultur/stadtgeschichte/gedenkbuch.de (in German)

Christopher Massur, Curaçao <cmassur@hotmail.com>

"Phyllis Durra" <meldrum@absamail.co.za> wrote:

My Maternal Grandmother: Dora HIRSCH b. 1876 Karlsruhe d. 1957 New York
City was employed in photography at: phot. Atelier Bad Wildungen, Haus Dr. Fritz.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Seeking Living Children Of Samuel and Emma MENDELSON - NY #general

sacredsisters3@aol.com <sacredsisters3@...>
 

Hello To All

I am seeking any living decendants of Samuel & Emma MENDELSON. Samuel
is brother to my great-grandmother Anna(mendelson) RAKOFF who died in
1980. They were all >from russia, and came over in the early 1900's. In
1920 Samuel & Emma was living at 860 Myrtle Avenue in Brooklyn. In 1930
they were living still in brooklyn at 595 Euclid Avenue and had four
kids at that time. Their names were Fred, Murray, Herman, & Ruth.

I would love to know how to contact any of them if they are still
living. I am trying to find information on my mendelson ancestors. I
would love to get the information >from the right sources. According to
the 1930 census for brooklyn, New York Freda was born about 1920,
Murray 1921, Herman 1925, Ruth 1927.

If anyone out there can help me in this, I would greatly appreciate it.
I have no idea where the children are now, or if any of them got
married. They might remember my grandmother if they grew up with her.
Her name is ruth(Rakoff)Faikes. She got married in June of 1949, and
they may have gone to her wedding. I have my grandmothers wedding
photos and there are several people I can't identify. Perhaps they are
in some of them.

Again all help and advice is appreciated.

Sarah Greenberg
sacredsisters3@aol.com


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen New Holocaust Databases #general

Joyce Field
 

I have been asked by Warren Blatt to post the following important
message on his behalf regarding new databases.

JewishGen is pleased to announce the addition of 37,000 new records
to the JewishGen Holocaust Database <
http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Holocaust >.

There are 13 new datasets, and two updated datasets. The 13 new datasets are:

* "Lodz Transports to the Chelmno Extermination Camp":
Names of 7,168 individuals >from Lodz who were transferred to the
death camp at Chelmno, June-August 1944.

* "Gyor Victims at Auschwitz":
Names of over 3,000 victims >from Gyor, Hungary, deported to
Auschwitz, made by a Jewish communal organization.

* "Jewish Physicians >from Czechoslovakia":
Names of 1,668 Czechoslovakian physicians who died during the
Holocaust, >from an unpublished yizkor book manuscript.

* "Hannover-Ahlem Prisoners":
Names of 257 prisoners, mostly Polish Jews, who perished in a subcamp
of Neuengamme, located in Ahlem/Hannover.

* "Jews of Des (Dej) in the Ghettoization of May, 1944":
List of 3,250 Jewish residents in Des, Hungary (now Dej, Romania),
just prior to their deportation, May 3-10, 1944.

* "Kisvarda, Hungary - Records Before Deportation, 1944":
3,516 residents >from Kisvarda (Kleinwardein), Hungary ghetto prior to
their deportation, April 10-13, 1944.

* "Jews >from Iasi (Jassy) Who Survived the Transports":
List of over 1,600 Jews who survived two transports by train >from
Iasi (Jassy) Romania.

* "Kozienice Ghetto Census (Lista), 1939 - 1942":
4,023 inhabitants >from the census of Jews in the Kozienice ghetto,
made by the Jewish Council of Kozienice.

* "Holocaust Survivors Claiming American Citizenship":
Applications of 621 individuals claiming American citizenship,
processed in Zurich by the U.S. State Department.

* "Subotica Jews, Victims of the Fascist Occupation, 1941-45":
1,993 names of victims >from Subotica, now in Serbia (formerly
Szabadka, Hungary, before WWI).

* "Balta Ghetto":
2,817 Jews >from the Balta Ghetto, Transnistria, as of 1941.

* "Balta Orphans":
List of 220 orphaned children in the Balta Ghetto.

* "Balta Batallion":
List of 507 Jewish men in Batallion 120 - Romanian forced laborers in
Transnitria, 1941-1944.


We've also updated the following two datasets:

* Dachau Indexing Project:
Over 7,000 records added, for a total of over 135,000 records.

* North Bavarian Jews:
1,200 records added; now over 7,400 records total.


Thanks to all the volunteers who have made these possible, especially
project coordinators Nolan Altman and Mike Kalt.


The JewishGen Holocaust Database is a collection of nearly 100
different datasets, containing over one million entries about
Holocaust victims and survivors.

This database can be searched at <
http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Holocaust >.

Warren

Warren Blatt
JewishGen Editor-in-Chief
<wblatt@jewishgen.org>


New Holocaust Databases #poland

Joyce Field
 

I have been asked by Warren Blatt to post the following important
message on his behalf regarding new databases.

JewishGen is pleased to announce the addition of 37,000 new records
to the JewishGen Holocaust Database <
http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Holocaust >.

There are 13 new datasets, and two updated datasets. The 13 new datasets are:

* "Lodz Transports to the Chelmno Extermination Camp":
Names of 7,168 individuals >from Lodz who were transferred to the
death camp at Chelmno, June-August 1944.

* "Gyor Victims at Auschwitz":
Names of over 3,000 victims >from Gyor, Hungary, deported to
Auschwitz, made by a Jewish communal organization.

* "Jewish Physicians >from Czechoslovakia":
Names of 1,668 Czechoslovakian physicians who died during the
Holocaust, >from an unpublished yizkor book manuscript.

* "Hannover-Ahlem Prisoners":
Names of 257 prisoners, mostly Polish Jews, who perished in a subcamp
of Neuengamme, located in Ahlem/Hannover.

* "Jews of Des (Dej) in the Ghettoization of May, 1944":
List of 3,250 Jewish residents in Des, Hungary (now Dej, Romania),
just prior to their deportation, May 3-10, 1944.

* "Kisvarda, Hungary - Records Before Deportation, 1944":
3,516 residents >from Kisvarda (Kleinwardein), Hungary ghetto prior to
their deportation, April 10-13, 1944.

* "Jews >from Iasi (Jassy) Who Survived the Transports":
List of over 1,600 Jews who survived two transports by train >from
Iasi (Jassy) Romania.

* "Kozienice Ghetto Census (Lista), 1939 - 1942":
4,023 inhabitants >from the census of Jews in the Kozienice ghetto,
made by the Jewish Council of Kozienice.

* "Holocaust Survivors Claiming American Citizenship":
Applications of 621 individuals claiming American citizenship,
processed in Zurich by the U.S. State Department.

* "Subotica Jews, Victims of the Fascist Occupation, 1941-45":
1,993 names of victims >from Subotica, now in Serbia (formerly
Szabadka, Hungary, before WWI).

* "Balta Ghetto":
2,817 Jews >from the Balta Ghetto, Transnistria, as of 1941.

* "Balta Orphans":
List of 220 orphaned children in the Balta Ghetto.

* "Balta Batallion":
List of 507 Jewish men in Batallion 120 - Romanian forced laborers in
Transnitria, 1941-1944.


We've also updated the following two datasets:

* Dachau Indexing Project:
Over 7,000 records added, for a total of over 135,000 records.

* North Bavarian Jews:
1,200 records added; now over 7,400 records total.


Thanks to all the volunteers who have made these possible, especially
project coordinators Nolan Altman and Mike Kalt.

The JewishGen Holocaust Database is a collection of nearly 100
different datasets, containing over one million entries about
Holocaust victims and survivors.

This database can be searched at
< http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Holocaust >.


Warren Blatt
JewishGen Editor-in-Chief
<wblatt@jewishgen.org>


IAJGS 2006 Conference mailing list now active #germany

Carol W. Skydell <cskydell@...>
 

For JewishGenners interested in asking (or answering) questions about the
scheduled IAJGS Conference to be held in New York City in August 2006,
JewishGen is providing a conference mailing list.

To subscribe please visit http://lyris.jewishgen.org/Listmanager It is
no longer possible to subscribe to JewishGen mailing lists via e-mail. If
you need help write to support@jewishgen.org stating the specific problem
and someone at that desk will try to assist you.

Carol W. Skydell, Vice President JewishGen Special Projects


BialyGen: Bialystok Region #Bialystok #Poland New Holocaust Databases #poland

Joyce Field
 

I have been asked by Warren Blatt to post the following important
message on his behalf regarding new databases.

JewishGen is pleased to announce the addition of 37,000 new records
to the JewishGen Holocaust Database <
http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Holocaust >.

There are 13 new datasets, and two updated datasets. The 13 new datasets are:

* "Lodz Transports to the Chelmno Extermination Camp":
Names of 7,168 individuals >from Lodz who were transferred to the
death camp at Chelmno, June-August 1944.

* "Gyor Victims at Auschwitz":
Names of over 3,000 victims >from Gyor, Hungary, deported to
Auschwitz, made by a Jewish communal organization.

* "Jewish Physicians >from Czechoslovakia":
Names of 1,668 Czechoslovakian physicians who died during the
Holocaust, >from an unpublished yizkor book manuscript.

* "Hannover-Ahlem Prisoners":
Names of 257 prisoners, mostly Polish Jews, who perished in a subcamp
of Neuengamme, located in Ahlem/Hannover.

* "Jews of Des (Dej) in the Ghettoization of May, 1944":
List of 3,250 Jewish residents in Des, Hungary (now Dej, Romania),
just prior to their deportation, May 3-10, 1944.

* "Kisvarda, Hungary - Records Before Deportation, 1944":
3,516 residents >from Kisvarda (Kleinwardein), Hungary ghetto prior to
their deportation, April 10-13, 1944.

* "Jews >from Iasi (Jassy) Who Survived the Transports":
List of over 1,600 Jews who survived two transports by train >from
Iasi (Jassy) Romania.

* "Kozienice Ghetto Census (Lista), 1939 - 1942":
4,023 inhabitants >from the census of Jews in the Kozienice ghetto,
made by the Jewish Council of Kozienice.

* "Holocaust Survivors Claiming American Citizenship":
Applications of 621 individuals claiming American citizenship,
processed in Zurich by the U.S. State Department.

* "Subotica Jews, Victims of the Fascist Occupation, 1941-45":
1,993 names of victims >from Subotica, now in Serbia (formerly
Szabadka, Hungary, before WWI).

* "Balta Ghetto":
2,817 Jews >from the Balta Ghetto, Transnistria, as of 1941.

* "Balta Orphans":
List of 220 orphaned children in the Balta Ghetto.

* "Balta Batallion":
List of 507 Jewish men in Batallion 120 - Romanian forced laborers in
Transnitria, 1941-1944.


We've also updated the following two datasets:

* Dachau Indexing Project:
Over 7,000 records added, for a total of over 135,000 records.

* North Bavarian Jews:
1,200 records added; now over 7,400 records total.


Thanks to all the volunteers who have made these possible, especially
project coordinators Nolan Altman and Mike Kalt.

The JewishGen Holocaust Database is a collection of nearly 100
different datasets, containing over one million entries about
Holocaust victims and survivors.

This database can be searched at
< http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Holocaust >.


Warren Blatt
JewishGen Editor-in-Chief
<wblatt@jewishgen.org>


German SIG #Germany IAJGS 2006 Conference mailing list now active #germany

Carol W. Skydell <cskydell@...>
 

For JewishGenners interested in asking (or answering) questions about the
scheduled IAJGS Conference to be held in New York City in August 2006,
JewishGen is providing a conference mailing list.

To subscribe please visit http://lyris.jewishgen.org/Listmanager It is
no longer possible to subscribe to JewishGen mailing lists via e-mail. If
you need help write to support@jewishgen.org stating the specific problem
and someone at that desk will try to assist you.

Carol W. Skydell, Vice President JewishGen Special Projects


ARTICLE: Ynetnews, 2 new gen items #general

Micha Reisel
 

Dear list,

Ynetnews has Schelly Talalay Dardashti's new
article, "Roots search: What to do first."
It offers 10 steps to beginning a search,
aimed at newcomers to genealogy.

Also, on the same page, is a Jewish Genealogy
weblinks box with basic sites. Readers are
invited to submit additional links (with a brief
description of each) that they've found useful.

www.ynetnews.com/home/0,7340,L-3443,00.html

All genealogy stories will be in "Jewish Scene."

Micha Reisel
Hod Hasharon, Israel
Vice president of JFRA
the Jewish Family Research Association of Israel


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen ARTICLE: Ynetnews, 2 new gen items #general

Micha Reisel
 

Dear list,

Ynetnews has Schelly Talalay Dardashti's new
article, "Roots search: What to do first."
It offers 10 steps to beginning a search,
aimed at newcomers to genealogy.

Also, on the same page, is a Jewish Genealogy
weblinks box with basic sites. Readers are
invited to submit additional links (with a brief
description of each) that they've found useful.

www.ynetnews.com/home/0,7340,L-3443,00.html

All genealogy stories will be in "Jewish Scene."

Micha Reisel
Hod Hasharon, Israel
Vice president of JFRA
the Jewish Family Research Association of Israel


IAJGS 2006 Conference mailing list now active #poland

Carol W. Skydell <cskydell@...>
 

For JewishGenners interested in asking (or answering) questions about the
scheduled IAJGS Conference to be held in New York City in August 2006,
JewishGen is providing a conference mailing list.

To subscribe please visit http://lyris.jewishgen.org/Listmanager It is
no longer possible to subscribe to JewishGen mailing lists via e-mail. If
you need help write to support@jewishgen.org stating the specific problem
and someone at that desk will try to assist you.

Carol W. Skydell, Vice President
JewishGen Special Projects

MODERATOR'S NOTE: On the page that lists various discussion groups,
scroll down to the section headed "JewishGen Hosted Projects, and
click on "New York 2006 Conference".


BialyGen: Bialystok Region #Bialystok #Poland IAJGS 2006 Conference mailing list now active #poland

Carol W. Skydell <cskydell@...>
 

For JewishGenners interested in asking (or answering) questions about the
scheduled IAJGS Conference to be held in New York City in August 2006,
JewishGen is providing a conference mailing list.

To subscribe please visit http://lyris.jewishgen.org/Listmanager It is
no longer possible to subscribe to JewishGen mailing lists via e-mail. If
you need help write to support@jewishgen.org stating the specific problem
and someone at that desk will try to assist you.

Carol W. Skydell, Vice President
JewishGen Special Projects

MODERATOR'S NOTE: On the page that lists various discussion groups,
scroll down to the section headed "JewishGen Hosted Projects, and
click on "New York 2006 Conference".


Re: Buhl, Baden, Germany #germany

ellencleary <ellencleary@...>
 

I am one of the people affected by Hurricane Katrina, so I am not working
from my home computer and do not have access to all my usual resources.
But I have family >from Buhl, Baden, Germany. I am working >from memory here
but the name is GERNSBACHER.

Try looking for the location of that community with the spelling Buhl,
Baden, Germany.

I think I also have some other resources about that community that might be
helpful to you. If you will e-mail me directly, ellencleary@cox.net, I will
be glad to tell you about them when I am at my house and have access to
them. Although it may take me a while to do so.

Maybe we'll find out we have family connections.

Ellen Cleary Kenner Lousiana <ellencleary@cox.net>


German SIG #Germany Re: Buhl, Baden, Germany #germany

ellencleary <ellencleary@...>
 

I am one of the people affected by Hurricane Katrina, so I am not working
from my home computer and do not have access to all my usual resources.
But I have family >from Buhl, Baden, Germany. I am working >from memory here
but the name is GERNSBACHER.

Try looking for the location of that community with the spelling Buhl,
Baden, Germany.

I think I also have some other resources about that community that might be
helpful to you. If you will e-mail me directly, ellencleary@cox.net, I will
be glad to tell you about them when I am at my house and have access to
them. Although it may take me a while to do so.

Maybe we'll find out we have family connections.

Ellen Cleary Kenner Lousiana <ellencleary@cox.net>


Recent trip #poland

Jerry Levit <jerlevit@...>
 

I have just returned >from a month-long trip to Eastern Europe tracing
my family's roots. At the suggestion of both Mark Halpern and Stanley
Diamond, I humbly submit this dispatch. I am eager for corrections and
elucidations >from those wiser heads among you.

Journal
September 14, 2005
Bialystok and Sidra, Poland

This morning I met Chris Malczewski and Lucy at the Hotel Cristal
lobby, as per our prior arrangement. Chris was referred to me
by Stanley Diamond and Mark Halpern to act as my guide and translator
in my travels in the Bialystok area. Chris is JRI-Poland's man on the
ground in Poland, as well being an independent guide and a true
entrepreneurial spirit. Lucy is one of the four or five Jewish people
currently living in Bialystok. She is a Polish language teacher for 10
to 12-year olds in public school, but her passion is the preservation
of the Bialystok Jewish cemetery. More about that later.

Lucy was able to finagle me a room in the Hotel Branicki, a real feat
since there were over two thousand doctors in town for a convention
this week and every hotel in town was completely booked. I still don't
quite know how she did it, but she did. Thanks, again, to Mark Halpern
for putting her in touch with me. You both are angels.

My father's mother and family emigrated to the United States in 1913
from Sidra (pronounced Chidra and known as Shidza in Yiddish), about an
hour's drive north of Bialystok, so off to Sidra we went. Besides
being an excellent guide, Chris is an expert driver of Polish roads,
which is no mean feat. If you have not been to Poland yet, you need to
go if, for nothing else, then to experience the exhilaration and terror
of Polish roads. What can compare with an eighteen-wheeler attempting to
pass a line of eight or nine cars with your car closing >from the
opposite direction at ninety kmph?

First for some background on Sidra. In 1931, the Sokolskiego district
had a population of almost 85% ethnic Poles, 9% Jews, 6% Bielorussians
and .2% Tatars. In Sidra, one of many towns and villages in the
district, of the 1,000 souls, 374 were Jewish. The percentage had been
much higher, nearly 60% at the turn of the century, but the infamous
Bialystok pogroms of 1906 and general economic depression spurred many
area Jews to flee Poland and Sidra, like so many communities, was
drained. My grandmother recounted how she and her sister had been
protected by her well-muscled and determined older brothers when
Cossacks attempted to harm them when she was a girl.

The town square still exists, and it is a shadow of its former self.
Instead of a vibrant community hub, it is a quiet park where local high
school students hang out during their lunch break. The only sign of
commercial activity, past or present was a vacant pub/restaurant. The
former Jewish community center was in good shape and is now a private
residence. Homes and stores (it seems that these were fairly
interchangeable) formerly occupied by Jews still stood. >from an
American standard, they were quite shabby. But, this is not the place
to be applying American standards. The stone foundation of a Calvinist
church was easily discernible and had been memorialized. The modest
Catholic church stands at the far corner of the square and is in
excellent repair. A nearby building owned by the local parish tells a
familiar tale. Prior to the war, the large two-story structure had been
used by the parish for storage and, perhaps, meetings. The local
communist government took it over after the war and turned it into a
cultural center with a cinema and coffee house, enlarging it to its
current size. When communism collapsed, the parish petitioned to have
it returned, which was accomplished. However, the large building is
expensive to maintain, the coffers are small, so now it sits vacant and
gradually being diminished by the elements.

When we arrived in Sidra, Chris announced that we should go visit the
mayor; it will probably be the highlight of the year for the fellow.
Unfortunately, His Honor was not in, so we went into the town library,
where we met Margaret, the town librarian, who sat us down at the large
table in the middle of the room and began producing a variety of
documents. So many things that I take for granted in my work
researching tax and title records in the United States, are simply
non-existent in this place of shifting boundaries and countless wars.
For example, there was no map of the town as it existed before World
War II. However, she did have access to a number of interesting bits of
information. I found the Sidra section of the 1929 Annuaire De La
Pologne, a national listing of businesses, extraordinarily interesting.
As was the case in so many Polish communities, the core of business
owners were Jews. A good number of familiar Jewish names were listed --
Farber, Frydman and Lewicki -- among them. Please note that the last
name would be pronounced as Levitski. H. Lewicki was a carpenter,
as was I in an earlier career.

However, I was on the trail of Nowinski, my grandmother's surname. My
grandfather, Abraham Levit, was born in Odessa, so I doubt of any links
between him and the carpenter in Sidra. Since he was born in the
Ukraine, the English spelling of his last name was more likely to have
been Lewicky. In any event, we needed to press on.

Our next stop was at the home of an elderly woman, the mother-in-law of
the town social services administrator, a Maria Kondrat. Mrs. Kondrat
is a spry and vivacious woman well into her eighties. I asked her if
she had had any Jewish friends. She guffawed and said, 'We were all
friends.' When many of the Jews' homes were burned during the war,
her parents took in a Jewish family. She said that even though they only
had one cow, that cow helped to feed the eight people that lived in
that house for one year. At the end of the year, the Jews were rounded
up and liquidated, either on the spot or at Treblinka. She could
remember a few names, but Nowinski was not one that rang a bell for
her. Mrs. Kondrat also maintained that there had been not one, but two
shuls; one for men and one for women. As we left her, Lucy muttered to
me that there was no way that there could have been this arrangement.
Perhaps, the old lady had mistaken the mikvah for a synagogue.

Our next stop was to the local grammar school, where we met with the
principal, a burly, energetic fellow, a Mr. Romanovich. He showed us
the only pre-war records that he had. While Chris and I leafed through
the files of students enrolled in the academic year 1939-1940, Lucy
engaged him in conversation, identifying herself as a fellow educator
and someone who is actively working in the field of indexing such
records. And, because Lucy is Lucy, the principal, without asking,
suggested that she take these precious sixty-five year old files back
to Bialystok with her for copying. I could not believe that three
unannounced strangers could be welcomed with such trust. Lucy gathered
them up and held them as though they were a precious infant.

Mr. Romanovich escorted us out of the school building, being bid 'Good
day' by the students who were hurrying over >from the junior high to
his school for lunch. The gymnasium, apparently, does not have its own
lunch facilities. He showed us the remains of the town's castle,
though he said it would hardly qualify as a castle, on the highest point in
town, directly adjacent to the school. An area, about twenty by twenty
and covered by a tin roof, showed the shambles of a thick wall made of
large bricks. We also met one of the junior high teachers, who was also
hurrying to lunch, a youngish man whose master's thesis on early to
mid twentieth century Sidra Chris had perused earlier in the library and
from which the earlier mentioned statistical data had been gathered.
As we left the school grounds heading for our next stop, I asked Chris
if this work wasn't basically that of a detective. He enthusiastically
affirmed and added that the key is to gain the comfort of people, who
are normally reserved and not terribly trusting. In short, in order to
succeed in this work one must be a schmoozer, a diplomat and, above
all, keenly interested in what these people have to say about their
lives. Your interests can be advanced only at the appropriate time.

We paused on our mission to look at the well-kept three story apartment
building that now stands on the site of the synagogue. The wooden
building, so typical of this area, had been destroyed by the Nazis in
1941.

The family of one Jan Kucsinzki, born 1912, welcomed us into their
home. Mr. Kucsinzki hobbled in, his blue eyes sparkling, and sat down
with us. In keeping with Chris' dicta on conducting such interviews,
the old man told us how he had fought with the Polish Second Corps
under General Anders in Iraq, Iran and Palestine. He and his regiment
mates had ended the war in England and a number had stayed behind. He
returned to Sidra where he continued to work on the farm that was his
sole family inheritance. Recalling his experiences in Poland and abroad
in the 1940's, he remarked, 'The nature of a man changes during war'

Though the school records had revealed a Jewish/Gentile ratio of about
40/60, he said that he had had only a few Jewish schoolmates and that
he could not recall any names. With a beaming smile, he said he could
remember some of the Jewish girls and how beautiful they were. As Mrs.
Kondrat had claimed, he remembered two synagogues, too.

On the north side of town, where Mr. Kucsinzki now resided, Jews and
Christians had lived side-by-side in apparent harmony. He recalled that
the main trade shop in town was owned by a Kramski and had been quite
large. It had been destroyed, no doubt, during the war since all the
existing buildings still on the square, with the exception of the
former Jewish community center, were all small, certainly none larger
than a thousand square feet or so. He also remembered his Jewish
neighbors celebrating Sukkoth and how they ate and prayed in their huts
for a week.

Another family member, perhaps the elderly man's daughter-in-law, came
in and sat down. In the course of the conversation she invited Lucy to
come back as she had over two hundred old photos of Sidra, many of them
featuring Jewish life. As usual, Lucy engaged the woman with her usual
charm and the old man's relation had an astonishing story to tell. In
the two reference sources on the cemetery that Chris and I both had, it
was stated that the metzevot (headstones) had been taken >from the
cemetery and used to pave the road to an adjoining town during the Nazi
occupation. The woman stated that when she came to the town in 1952
there were still a good number of headstones in the cemetery and that
over the years townspeople had taken them and used them for
construction projects. My heart fell to my stomach. This place of
apparently good relations had, indeed, descended into the casual
barbarism of cultural ignorance.

We headed off to the cemetery and had some difficulty finding it,
though we had been told that a memorial had been installed and that it
was just beyond the river. Chris pulled over and, as he is wont to do,
asked a young woman pushing a baby in a stroller if she knew where the
old Jewish cemetery was. She said that she did and that she would show
us; it was just ahead.

We pulled over in the shade and Lucy said, 'I'm getting out. I smell
metzevot', and proceeded to prowl over a grassy field. The young women
caught up with us and Chris, charming as usual, took the stroller from
her and pushed the baby for 20 or 30 yards. Sure enough, Lucy had found
the cemetery on her own. We entered the sacred ground and took a
beeline to what appeared to be an absolutely pristine headstone. The
extraordinarily helpful woman, whose name unfortunately I forget, told
us that road crews had found it when repairing the road and had brought
it here and installed it. I asked if they had got any permission from
anybody for this job, and she shrugged and said no. She was quite
familiar with the spot, her husband is an environmental engineer and
her brother a forester and all three have a strong interest in
historical and environmental matters. For all that, she said that she
lived in a Jewish house built in 1905. I asked if that was special to
her in any way. No, not really - a house is a house. She also mentioned
that hunks of headstone had been incorporated into the foundation of
one of her neighbor's homes, thus backing up the content of our
previous conversation.

She also told us a story she had heard repeated when she was young.
Before the war several young men used to brag about going out to the
Jewish cemetery and urinating on the graves. To a man, they all came
back >from the war disabled or disfigured in some way. Other townspeople
pointed out that their blasphemous behavior had been repaid.

While Chris continued his conversation with her, I asked Lucy to
accompany me to one of the few barely distinguishable headstones.
Rounded and moss-covered, one could easily walk by them and not have a
second thought. Yet, on closer examination the faintest traces of
Hebrew lettering were unmistakable. We said Kaddish together under the
beautiful blue, autumn Polish sky.

I left Sidra feeling that this work was just beginning in many ways.
The indexing project had gotten a nice gift and, perhaps, Lucy's =
return visit will yield some photographic treasures, as well. Chris
said that there really is no end to this work. Once you peel back one
layer, there is another to greet you.

We got back to Bialystok after having stopped at a roadside
motel-cum-restaurant and had a very good lunch. I am amazed at how good
Polish food is, even in quite unlikely spots.

Lucy is the guardian angel of the Bialystok Jewish Cemetery and to
have her walk this sacred ground with me was quite a special thing.
As we passed through the gates, I was overwhelmed with the
beauty of the site; it sits on a slight hill and is backed by a stand
of trees. At first glance there appeared to be hundreds of headstones.
Some standing straight, others toppled over. On closer examination, I
saw that my first impression was erroneous. What dominates the
landscape are the low half-barrel shaped concrete gravemarkers. The
headstones, on the other hand, are sprinkled only here and there. Lucy
said that the theft of these granite and marble headstones is an
ongoing operation. The lack of security is obvious. The main gate has
no closure and one of the side portals has no gate. As we walked
through an area I thought was a natural forested area, I was again
pulled up short. This was also part of the burial ground, but had been
allowed to grow up into a thick woods.

The Jewish cemetery borders the Catholic cemetery to the rear. At one
time there had been a formidable brick wall separating the two. This,
too, had been looted for the beautiful, handmade bricks of which it had
been constructed. Large piles of trash, much of it the detritus from
the Catholic cemetery, were accumulating on the Jewish land. As we
meandered back to the car, we all picked up trash, but we made just a
small dent.

Lucy explained that the Foundation for the Preservation of Jewish
Heritage in Poland (FODZ) was in the process of seeking control of the
property >from the City of Bialystok. Presumably, once the bureaucratic
process winds it way, FODZ will be in a better position to see that the
cemetery is properly secured and maintained. In the meantime, she is
engaged in hand-to-hand diplomacy with the city government and through
its efforts and those of the occasional volunteer group some headway is
made. As many of you know, an effort is currently underway to raise
the resources that will be required to rebuild the wall and to
provide ongoing maintenance. >from my experience with the Jewish
cemetery in Staszow, FODZ cannot and will not proceed with sponsoring
any maintenance projects until adequate resources have been received.

Tomorrow: Bialystok and Tykocin


Respectfully submitted by: Jerry Levit, Chapel Hill, NC, researching
WEKSLER, WEXLER, GLADSTAJN, GLADSTEIN, NOWINSKI


BialyGen: Bialystok Region #Bialystok #Poland Recent trip #poland

Jerry Levit <jerlevit@...>
 

I have just returned >from a month-long trip to Eastern Europe tracing
my family's roots. At the suggestion of both Mark Halpern and Stanley
Diamond, I humbly submit this dispatch. I am eager for corrections and
elucidations >from those wiser heads among you.

Journal
September 14, 2005
Bialystok and Sidra, Poland

This morning I met Chris Malczewski and Lucy at the Hotel Cristal
lobby, as per our prior arrangement. Chris was referred to me
by Stanley Diamond and Mark Halpern to act as my guide and translator
in my travels in the Bialystok area. Chris is JRI-Poland's man on the
ground in Poland, as well being an independent guide and a true
entrepreneurial spirit. Lucy is one of the four or five Jewish people
currently living in Bialystok. She is a Polish language teacher for 10
to 12-year olds in public school, but her passion is the preservation
of the Bialystok Jewish cemetery. More about that later.

Lucy was able to finagle me a room in the Hotel Branicki, a real feat
since there were over two thousand doctors in town for a convention
this week and every hotel in town was completely booked. I still don't
quite know how she did it, but she did. Thanks, again, to Mark Halpern
for putting her in touch with me. You both are angels.

My father's mother and family emigrated to the United States in 1913
from Sidra (pronounced Chidra and known as Shidza in Yiddish), about an
hour's drive north of Bialystok, so off to Sidra we went. Besides
being an excellent guide, Chris is an expert driver of Polish roads,
which is no mean feat. If you have not been to Poland yet, you need to
go if, for nothing else, then to experience the exhilaration and terror
of Polish roads. What can compare with an eighteen-wheeler attempting to
pass a line of eight or nine cars with your car closing >from the
opposite direction at ninety kmph?

First for some background on Sidra. In 1931, the Sokolskiego district
had a population of almost 85% ethnic Poles, 9% Jews, 6% Bielorussians
and .2% Tatars. In Sidra, one of many towns and villages in the
district, of the 1,000 souls, 374 were Jewish. The percentage had been
much higher, nearly 60% at the turn of the century, but the infamous
Bialystok pogroms of 1906 and general economic depression spurred many
area Jews to flee Poland and Sidra, like so many communities, was
drained. My grandmother recounted how she and her sister had been
protected by her well-muscled and determined older brothers when
Cossacks attempted to harm them when she was a girl.

The town square still exists, and it is a shadow of its former self.
Instead of a vibrant community hub, it is a quiet park where local high
school students hang out during their lunch break. The only sign of
commercial activity, past or present was a vacant pub/restaurant. The
former Jewish community center was in good shape and is now a private
residence. Homes and stores (it seems that these were fairly
interchangeable) formerly occupied by Jews still stood. >from an
American standard, they were quite shabby. But, this is not the place
to be applying American standards. The stone foundation of a Calvinist
church was easily discernible and had been memorialized. The modest
Catholic church stands at the far corner of the square and is in
excellent repair. A nearby building owned by the local parish tells a
familiar tale. Prior to the war, the large two-story structure had been
used by the parish for storage and, perhaps, meetings. The local
communist government took it over after the war and turned it into a
cultural center with a cinema and coffee house, enlarging it to its
current size. When communism collapsed, the parish petitioned to have
it returned, which was accomplished. However, the large building is
expensive to maintain, the coffers are small, so now it sits vacant and
gradually being diminished by the elements.

When we arrived in Sidra, Chris announced that we should go visit the
mayor; it will probably be the highlight of the year for the fellow.
Unfortunately, His Honor was not in, so we went into the town library,
where we met Margaret, the town librarian, who sat us down at the large
table in the middle of the room and began producing a variety of
documents. So many things that I take for granted in my work
researching tax and title records in the United States, are simply
non-existent in this place of shifting boundaries and countless wars.
For example, there was no map of the town as it existed before World
War II. However, she did have access to a number of interesting bits of
information. I found the Sidra section of the 1929 Annuaire De La
Pologne, a national listing of businesses, extraordinarily interesting.
As was the case in so many Polish communities, the core of business
owners were Jews. A good number of familiar Jewish names were listed --
Farber, Frydman and Lewicki -- among them. Please note that the last
name would be pronounced as Levitski. H. Lewicki was a carpenter,
as was I in an earlier career.

However, I was on the trail of Nowinski, my grandmother's surname. My
grandfather, Abraham Levit, was born in Odessa, so I doubt of any links
between him and the carpenter in Sidra. Since he was born in the
Ukraine, the English spelling of his last name was more likely to have
been Lewicky. In any event, we needed to press on.

Our next stop was at the home of an elderly woman, the mother-in-law of
the town social services administrator, a Maria Kondrat. Mrs. Kondrat
is a spry and vivacious woman well into her eighties. I asked her if
she had had any Jewish friends. She guffawed and said, 'We were all
friends.' When many of the Jews' homes were burned during the war,
her parents took in a Jewish family. She said that even though they only
had one cow, that cow helped to feed the eight people that lived in
that house for one year. At the end of the year, the Jews were rounded
up and liquidated, either on the spot or at Treblinka. She could
remember a few names, but Nowinski was not one that rang a bell for
her. Mrs. Kondrat also maintained that there had been not one, but two
shuls; one for men and one for women. As we left her, Lucy muttered to
me that there was no way that there could have been this arrangement.
Perhaps, the old lady had mistaken the mikvah for a synagogue.

Our next stop was to the local grammar school, where we met with the
principal, a burly, energetic fellow, a Mr. Romanovich. He showed us
the only pre-war records that he had. While Chris and I leafed through
the files of students enrolled in the academic year 1939-1940, Lucy
engaged him in conversation, identifying herself as a fellow educator
and someone who is actively working in the field of indexing such
records. And, because Lucy is Lucy, the principal, without asking,
suggested that she take these precious sixty-five year old files back
to Bialystok with her for copying. I could not believe that three
unannounced strangers could be welcomed with such trust. Lucy gathered
them up and held them as though they were a precious infant.

Mr. Romanovich escorted us out of the school building, being bid 'Good
day' by the students who were hurrying over >from the junior high to
his school for lunch. The gymnasium, apparently, does not have its own
lunch facilities. He showed us the remains of the town's castle,
though he said it would hardly qualify as a castle, on the highest point in
town, directly adjacent to the school. An area, about twenty by twenty
and covered by a tin roof, showed the shambles of a thick wall made of
large bricks. We also met one of the junior high teachers, who was also
hurrying to lunch, a youngish man whose master's thesis on early to
mid twentieth century Sidra Chris had perused earlier in the library and
from which the earlier mentioned statistical data had been gathered.
As we left the school grounds heading for our next stop, I asked Chris
if this work wasn't basically that of a detective. He enthusiastically
affirmed and added that the key is to gain the comfort of people, who
are normally reserved and not terribly trusting. In short, in order to
succeed in this work one must be a schmoozer, a diplomat and, above
all, keenly interested in what these people have to say about their
lives. Your interests can be advanced only at the appropriate time.

We paused on our mission to look at the well-kept three story apartment
building that now stands on the site of the synagogue. The wooden
building, so typical of this area, had been destroyed by the Nazis in
1941.

The family of one Jan Kucsinzki, born 1912, welcomed us into their
home. Mr. Kucsinzki hobbled in, his blue eyes sparkling, and sat down
with us. In keeping with Chris' dicta on conducting such interviews,
the old man told us how he had fought with the Polish Second Corps
under General Anders in Iraq, Iran and Palestine. He and his regiment
mates had ended the war in England and a number had stayed behind. He
returned to Sidra where he continued to work on the farm that was his
sole family inheritance. Recalling his experiences in Poland and abroad
in the 1940's, he remarked, 'The nature of a man changes during war'

Though the school records had revealed a Jewish/Gentile ratio of about
40/60, he said that he had had only a few Jewish schoolmates and that
he could not recall any names. With a beaming smile, he said he could
remember some of the Jewish girls and how beautiful they were. As Mrs.
Kondrat had claimed, he remembered two synagogues, too.

On the north side of town, where Mr. Kucsinzki now resided, Jews and
Christians had lived side-by-side in apparent harmony. He recalled that
the main trade shop in town was owned by a Kramski and had been quite
large. It had been destroyed, no doubt, during the war since all the
existing buildings still on the square, with the exception of the
former Jewish community center, were all small, certainly none larger
than a thousand square feet or so. He also remembered his Jewish
neighbors celebrating Sukkoth and how they ate and prayed in their huts
for a week.

Another family member, perhaps the elderly man's daughter-in-law, came
in and sat down. In the course of the conversation she invited Lucy to
come back as she had over two hundred old photos of Sidra, many of them
featuring Jewish life. As usual, Lucy engaged the woman with her usual
charm and the old man's relation had an astonishing story to tell. In
the two reference sources on the cemetery that Chris and I both had, it
was stated that the metzevot (headstones) had been taken >from the
cemetery and used to pave the road to an adjoining town during the Nazi
occupation. The woman stated that when she came to the town in 1952
there were still a good number of headstones in the cemetery and that
over the years townspeople had taken them and used them for
construction projects. My heart fell to my stomach. This place of
apparently good relations had, indeed, descended into the casual
barbarism of cultural ignorance.

We headed off to the cemetery and had some difficulty finding it,
though we had been told that a memorial had been installed and that it
was just beyond the river. Chris pulled over and, as he is wont to do,
asked a young woman pushing a baby in a stroller if she knew where the
old Jewish cemetery was. She said that she did and that she would show
us; it was just ahead.

We pulled over in the shade and Lucy said, 'I'm getting out. I smell
metzevot', and proceeded to prowl over a grassy field. The young women
caught up with us and Chris, charming as usual, took the stroller from
her and pushed the baby for 20 or 30 yards. Sure enough, Lucy had found
the cemetery on her own. We entered the sacred ground and took a
beeline to what appeared to be an absolutely pristine headstone. The
extraordinarily helpful woman, whose name unfortunately I forget, told
us that road crews had found it when repairing the road and had brought
it here and installed it. I asked if they had got any permission from
anybody for this job, and she shrugged and said no. She was quite
familiar with the spot, her husband is an environmental engineer and
her brother a forester and all three have a strong interest in
historical and environmental matters. For all that, she said that she
lived in a Jewish house built in 1905. I asked if that was special to
her in any way. No, not really - a house is a house. She also mentioned
that hunks of headstone had been incorporated into the foundation of
one of her neighbor's homes, thus backing up the content of our
previous conversation.

She also told us a story she had heard repeated when she was young.
Before the war several young men used to brag about going out to the
Jewish cemetery and urinating on the graves. To a man, they all came
back >from the war disabled or disfigured in some way. Other townspeople
pointed out that their blasphemous behavior had been repaid.

While Chris continued his conversation with her, I asked Lucy to
accompany me to one of the few barely distinguishable headstones.
Rounded and moss-covered, one could easily walk by them and not have a
second thought. Yet, on closer examination the faintest traces of
Hebrew lettering were unmistakable. We said Kaddish together under the
beautiful blue, autumn Polish sky.

I left Sidra feeling that this work was just beginning in many ways.
The indexing project had gotten a nice gift and, perhaps, Lucy's =
return visit will yield some photographic treasures, as well. Chris
said that there really is no end to this work. Once you peel back one
layer, there is another to greet you.

We got back to Bialystok after having stopped at a roadside
motel-cum-restaurant and had a very good lunch. I am amazed at how good
Polish food is, even in quite unlikely spots.

Lucy is the guardian angel of the Bialystok Jewish Cemetery and to
have her walk this sacred ground with me was quite a special thing.
As we passed through the gates, I was overwhelmed with the
beauty of the site; it sits on a slight hill and is backed by a stand
of trees. At first glance there appeared to be hundreds of headstones.
Some standing straight, others toppled over. On closer examination, I
saw that my first impression was erroneous. What dominates the
landscape are the low half-barrel shaped concrete gravemarkers. The
headstones, on the other hand, are sprinkled only here and there. Lucy
said that the theft of these granite and marble headstones is an
ongoing operation. The lack of security is obvious. The main gate has
no closure and one of the side portals has no gate. As we walked
through an area I thought was a natural forested area, I was again
pulled up short. This was also part of the burial ground, but had been
allowed to grow up into a thick woods.

The Jewish cemetery borders the Catholic cemetery to the rear. At one
time there had been a formidable brick wall separating the two. This,
too, had been looted for the beautiful, handmade bricks of which it had
been constructed. Large piles of trash, much of it the detritus from
the Catholic cemetery, were accumulating on the Jewish land. As we
meandered back to the car, we all picked up trash, but we made just a
small dent.

Lucy explained that the Foundation for the Preservation of Jewish
Heritage in Poland (FODZ) was in the process of seeking control of the
property >from the City of Bialystok. Presumably, once the bureaucratic
process winds it way, FODZ will be in a better position to see that the
cemetery is properly secured and maintained. In the meantime, she is
engaged in hand-to-hand diplomacy with the city government and through
its efforts and those of the occasional volunteer group some headway is
made. As many of you know, an effort is currently underway to raise
the resources that will be required to rebuild the wall and to
provide ongoing maintenance. >from my experience with the Jewish
cemetery in Staszow, FODZ cannot and will not proceed with sponsoring
any maintenance projects until adequate resources have been received.

Tomorrow: Bialystok and Tykocin


Respectfully submitted by: Jerry Levit, Chapel Hill, NC, researching
WEKSLER, WEXLER, GLADSTAJN, GLADSTEIN, NOWINSKI


Re: Rabbi Elijah Ragoler #rabbinic

Neil@...
 

On 2005.10.03, Stanley H. Judd <stanleyjudd@earthlink.net> originally
wrote:

My data indicates Eliyahu later became Rabbi of Kalisch and wrote
"The Hand of Elija". A circa 1940 letter suggests he might be
listed in the "Jewish Encyclopedia". Is this a unique reference
and is it published in English? At this time I believe his father
to be Yacob NEUSTADTER and his grandfather Eliyahu NEUSTADTER.
**Please** let's not get carried away with someone called Elijah
Ragoler becoming confused with others of the same name.

One of them, the one under discussion in recent RavSIG messages has
no connection to the Gaon of Vilna family. *This* Elijah Ragoler was
son of Jacob and was not born in 1784 and thus is not the one of the
census. That was the Vilna Gaon family one, as Hoffman correctly
points out.

Below is a partial tree.

Dr. Neil Rosenstein
Email: neil@tali.com
http://tali.com/neilr

Descendants of Jacob NEUSTADTER

1 Jacob NEUSTADTER,, d: 1835, Lived in Neustadt-Sugnd
..2 Elijah Ragoler, b: 1794 in Neustadt-Tavrig, d: 1849 ABD Seta,
.. Ragola, Slobodka and then Kalisz
....3 Jacob RABINOWITZ, b: 1818 in Seta, d: 1887
....3 David RABINOWITZ,,, Of Helusk; published his father's work
.... "Yad Eliyahu", Warsaw, 1900
..2 Samuel Kelmer FRUMKIN, b: 1797 in Neustadt-Tavrig, d: 1867 in
.. Jerusalem, Lived in Kelme; to Israel in 1858
.. +Fruma b. Aryey Leib BRAUDE, b: Abt. 1800, d: 1891 in Jerusalem,
.. Braude family of Kelme
....3 Aryey Leib FRUMKIN, b: 1845 in Kelme,d: 1916 in Petach Tikva,
.... Author of "Toldot Chachmei Yerushalayim"
.... +Sheina b. Aaron Hadas,, d: 1929 in Petach Tikva
......4 Samuel FRUMKIN
......4 Eliyahu Zvi FRUMKIN
......4 Sarah Rivke FRUMKIN
......4 Elke FRUMKIN
......4 Channah Leah FRUMKIN
......4 Rachel FRUMKIN
....3 Daughter FRUMKIN
.... +Dov Mordecai of Luknik
....3 Daughter FRUMKIN
.... +grandson of Samuel Chassid of Rassein Bendet
....3 Daughter FRUMKIN
.... +Naftali IVANSKI
....3 Daughter FRUMKIN
..... +Aryey Leib Schlom
....3 Daughter FRUMKIN
.... +Jonah Schlom
....3 Rebecca FRUMKIN
..... +Hillel b. Jacob Elijah of Slobodka


Rabbinic Genealogy SIG #Rabbinic Re: Rabbi Elijah Ragoler #rabbinic

Neil@...
 

On 2005.10.03, Stanley H. Judd <stanleyjudd@earthlink.net> originally
wrote:

My data indicates Eliyahu later became Rabbi of Kalisch and wrote
"The Hand of Elija". A circa 1940 letter suggests he might be
listed in the "Jewish Encyclopedia". Is this a unique reference
and is it published in English? At this time I believe his father
to be Yacob NEUSTADTER and his grandfather Eliyahu NEUSTADTER.
**Please** let's not get carried away with someone called Elijah
Ragoler becoming confused with others of the same name.

One of them, the one under discussion in recent RavSIG messages has
no connection to the Gaon of Vilna family. *This* Elijah Ragoler was
son of Jacob and was not born in 1784 and thus is not the one of the
census. That was the Vilna Gaon family one, as Hoffman correctly
points out.

Below is a partial tree.

Dr. Neil Rosenstein
Email: neil@tali.com
http://tali.com/neilr

Descendants of Jacob NEUSTADTER

1 Jacob NEUSTADTER,, d: 1835, Lived in Neustadt-Sugnd
..2 Elijah Ragoler, b: 1794 in Neustadt-Tavrig, d: 1849 ABD Seta,
.. Ragola, Slobodka and then Kalisz
....3 Jacob RABINOWITZ, b: 1818 in Seta, d: 1887
....3 David RABINOWITZ,,, Of Helusk; published his father's work
.... "Yad Eliyahu", Warsaw, 1900
..2 Samuel Kelmer FRUMKIN, b: 1797 in Neustadt-Tavrig, d: 1867 in
.. Jerusalem, Lived in Kelme; to Israel in 1858
.. +Fruma b. Aryey Leib BRAUDE, b: Abt. 1800, d: 1891 in Jerusalem,
.. Braude family of Kelme
....3 Aryey Leib FRUMKIN, b: 1845 in Kelme,d: 1916 in Petach Tikva,
.... Author of "Toldot Chachmei Yerushalayim"
.... +Sheina b. Aaron Hadas,, d: 1929 in Petach Tikva
......4 Samuel FRUMKIN
......4 Eliyahu Zvi FRUMKIN
......4 Sarah Rivke FRUMKIN
......4 Elke FRUMKIN
......4 Channah Leah FRUMKIN
......4 Rachel FRUMKIN
....3 Daughter FRUMKIN
.... +Dov Mordecai of Luknik
....3 Daughter FRUMKIN
.... +grandson of Samuel Chassid of Rassein Bendet
....3 Daughter FRUMKIN
.... +Naftali IVANSKI
....3 Daughter FRUMKIN
..... +Aryey Leib Schlom
....3 Daughter FRUMKIN
.... +Jonah Schlom
....3 Rebecca FRUMKIN
..... +Hillel b. Jacob Elijah of Slobodka