Date   

Prussian geography and statistics c. 1800 #poland

Logan J. Kleinwaks
 

On the website of the Kujawsko-Pomorska Digital Library (http://kpbc.umk.pl)
are volumes one (http://kpbc.umk.pl/dlibra/docmetadata?id=623) and two
(http://kpbc.umk.pl/dlibra/docmetadata?id=726) of "Geographie und Statistik
von West- Sued- und Neu- Ostpreussen : nebst einer kurzen Geschichte des
Koenigreichs Polen bis zu dessen Zertheilung," by August Karl von Holsche,
published in Berlin in 1800 and 1804. (The file format in which these
appear, .DjVu, requires that they be viewed using a special viewer.
Instructions for downloading this viewer can be found in the archives of
this group.)

I am not qualified to fully assess the genealogical usefulness of these
works, but two points struck me while perusing their contents: 1) each
begins with a list of prenumeranten (pre-subscribers), which could be useful
to genealogists, though it is not clear to me whether any Jews are included;
and 2) beginning on image 397 (p. 385) of volume two, there is a list of
census statistics that includes the number of Jews for several places near
Leczyca (e.g., Gabin).

Perhaps, someone with sufficient expertise can more closely examine these
works and apprise us of their Jewish content?

Thanks very much to Edward Luft for publicizing this Digital Library's
website (and others) in his article in the most recent issue of Gen Dobry!,
the e-zine of PolishRoots.

Best regards,

Logan Kleinwaks
kleinwaks@alumni.princeton.edu
near Washington, D.C.


JRI Poland #Poland Prussian geography and statistics c. 1800 #poland

Logan J. Kleinwaks
 

On the website of the Kujawsko-Pomorska Digital Library (http://kpbc.umk.pl)
are volumes one (http://kpbc.umk.pl/dlibra/docmetadata?id=623) and two
(http://kpbc.umk.pl/dlibra/docmetadata?id=726) of "Geographie und Statistik
von West- Sued- und Neu- Ostpreussen : nebst einer kurzen Geschichte des
Koenigreichs Polen bis zu dessen Zertheilung," by August Karl von Holsche,
published in Berlin in 1800 and 1804. (The file format in which these
appear, .DjVu, requires that they be viewed using a special viewer.
Instructions for downloading this viewer can be found in the archives of
this group.)

I am not qualified to fully assess the genealogical usefulness of these
works, but two points struck me while perusing their contents: 1) each
begins with a list of prenumeranten (pre-subscribers), which could be useful
to genealogists, though it is not clear to me whether any Jews are included;
and 2) beginning on image 397 (p. 385) of volume two, there is a list of
census statistics that includes the number of Jews for several places near
Leczyca (e.g., Gabin).

Perhaps, someone with sufficient expertise can more closely examine these
works and apprise us of their Jewish content?

Thanks very much to Edward Luft for publicizing this Digital Library's
website (and others) in his article in the most recent issue of Gen Dobry!,
the e-zine of PolishRoots.

Best regards,

Logan Kleinwaks
kleinwaks@alumni.princeton.edu
near Washington, D.C.


VRI Project - Call for Shtetl Coordinators #lithuania

Joel Ratner
 

As you read yesterday, the progress with the Keidan vital records has been
extraordinary, due to the dedication of Olga Zabludoff.

What about my town and how can I help?

The possibility exists for similar rapid progress in translating records for
the 100 other towns for which we have vital records. There are several
requirements. The first is personnel. Right now, the VRI project needs
Shtetl Coordinators like Olga. Olga works exclusively with the Keidan
records and does not work the other towns. I coordinate the entire project
for now, and although this entails managing the flow of translations,
dealing with Shtetl Coordinators and translators, and ultimately ensuring
the records are ready to go into the ALD, I do not get into the day to day
fundraising for individual towns. As a result, donations come in, but not
due to an organized, structured effort. The result for some towns,
particularly the smaller ones, is a balance that may stay static for many
months or a few years. I receive inquiries on a regular basis where
individuals who supported the VRI project 2 and 3 years ago ask why they
haven't received their translations. The fact is the project needs people to
step up and be counted. We need individuals such as Olga who are willing to
post messages to the Digest asking for support for their town - people who
will follow up with questions posed by potential donors and who will proof
the translations once they are submitted by the translators.

Below is a list of all the towns with vital records that are part of the VRI
project. Next to the town name you will see the name of the Shtetl
Coordinator, if there currently is one. We are looking for Shtetl
Coordinators for all towns that currently are doing without.

Alytus (Alyta)
Antakalnis (Antokol)
Aukstadvaris (Visokidvor)
Babtai (Bobt) Paul Epner
Bagaslaviskis (Bogoslavishok)
Balbieriskis (Balbirishok)
Bezdonys (Bezdany)
Birzai (Birzh) Michael Witkin
Butrimonys (Butrimantz)
Cekiske (Chaikishok)
Ciobiskis (Chabishki)
Darsuniskis (Darshunishok)
Daugai (Daug)
Dotnuva (Datnuva)
Eisiskes (Eishishok) records translated, Judy Baston proofing
Garliava (Godlevo)
Gelvonai (Gelvan)
Giedraiciai (Gedrovitz)
Grinkiskis (Grinkishok)
Inturke (Inturik)
Jasiunai (Yashny)
Jieznas (Vezna)
Jokubonys (Yakubantse)
Jonava (Yanova)
Joniskelis (Yanishkel)
Josvainiai (Yosvain)
Kalveliai (Kovalchuki)
Kaunas (Kovna)
Kedainiai (Keidan) Olga Zabludoff
Kelme (Kelme)
Kernave (Kernava)
Knyszyn, Poland (Knysinas)
Krakes (Krok)
Kudirkos Naumiestis (Vladislavov)
Kupiskis (Kupishok) some translations received, need coordinator
to proof
Laibiskis (Leibishok)
Linkuva (Linkova)
Maisiagala (Maishigola)
Marijampole (Mariampole)
Merkine (Merech) records translated, need coordinator to
proof
Mikailiskis (Mikhalishok)
Moletai (Maliat) Cheryl Sofer
Musninkai (Musnik)
Namajunai (Namajunai)
Naujamiestis (Novigorod)
Naujoji Vilna (Novo-Vileisk)
Nemencine (Nemenchin)
Nemunaitis (Nemunaitz)
Novodvor, Lida, Belarus (Naujadvaris)
Orlya, Lida, Belarus (Orly)
Paberze (Podberezhe)
Pakruojis (Pokroi)
Panemune (Ponemun-Fergissa)
Panevezys (Ponevezh)
Pasvalys (Posvol)
Plunge (Plungian) Elaine Cohen
Prienai (Pren)
Pumpenai (Pumpian) Chaim Luria
Punia (Pun)
Pusalotas (Poshelat)
Radun, Lida, Belarus (Radun) Joe Fibel
Radviliskis (Radvilishok) Records for region
Ramygala (Remigola)
Raseiniai (Rasein)
Ratnycia (Rotnitsa)
Rudamina (Rudamin)
Rumsiskes (Rumshishok)
Sakiai (Shaki)
Salcininkai (Solechniki)
Seredzius (Srednik)
Sesuoliai (Sheshol)
Shchuchin, Lida, Belarus (Sciucin)
Silale (Shilel)
Sirvintos (Shirvint) Tova Jaffe
Snipiskes (Snipiskes)
Sokolka, Poland (Sokol)
Stakliskes (Stoklishok)
Stundishki (Stundishki)
Suvainiskis (Suvinishok)
Suvalkai, Poland (Suwalki)
Telsiai (Telz)
Trakai (Troki)
Turgeliai (Turgeli)
Ukmerge (Vilkomir)
Vabalninkas (Vabolnik)
Valkininkai (Olkenik)
Vandziogala (Vendzhigola)
Varena (Oran)
Varnenai (Vorniany)
Varniai (Vorna)
Veliuona (Vilon)
Vievis (Veviya)
Vilijampole (Slobodka) Illona Hope
Vilkija (Vilki) Marc Berger
Vilnius (Vilna) Eden Joachim / Joel Ratner
Vilnius County (Vilna County)
Zapyskis (Sapizishok)
Zaskevichi, Belarus (Zaskevichi)
Zasliai (Zhusli)
Zeimelis (Zhaimel) Barry Mann
Ziezmariai (Zhezmir)

Anyone interested in seeing the records for their town move along at a
faster pace and are willing to put in some time to make it happen should
contact me privately at Joelrat1@hotmail.com

Joel Ratner
Coordinator, Vilna District Research Group


One day seminar at the Museum of the Diaspora in Tel Aviv #lithuania

Martha LEV-ZION <martha@...>
 

We at the Israel Genealogical Society [IGS] are fairly bursting our
buttons with pride in the one day seminar [Yom Iyun] that we have
arranged for the 28th of November 2005 at Beit Hatefutzot [the
Diaspora Museum] on the Tel Aviv University campus. If you could have
one genealogical wish, wouldn't it be that you could find that
illusive document that would allow you to prove once and for all that
a tie that binds was true? We at the IGS have been feverishly working
for over a year to arrange just such a seminar that would allow you
to find the missing key.

Without fear of contradiction, I can categorically state that every
Jewish family in the world has family - known or unknown - in
Israel. Our seminar, "Family Roots in the Land of Israel and in the
World," will demonstrate what I mean. We have invited archivists >from
the smaller, but sometimes more interesting archives, to address us
with talks on their holdings. When we invited proposals, even we
didn't know details of all the treasures these archives hold, but
after reading the abstracts and talking with the archivists, it is
hard not to jump up and down with enthusiasm!

Go to our website's direct seminar access:

http://www.isragen.org.il/NROS/YY2005/

There you can get .pdf files in Hebrew and/or in English of the
program, the abstracts and the biographies of the speakers. See for
yourself what an incredible program we have arranged for you! >from
our opening keynote speaker on Eastern European Aliyah >from the late
1800's to 1920, to a detailed description of the microfilm collection
of the Diaspora Museum, at the close of the day, you will be
enthralled for the entire time.

One caveat: regretfully, places are limited due to the number of
seats available and we can only accept reservations on a first come
first serve basis. Early registration ends on 10 November, if there
are still places available. Registration includes coffee and cake and
a chance for a greatly discounted hot lunch, but here too, places are
limited. Please register early so you will not be disappointed. When
the places are gone, they are gone and that's it.

The registration form can be downloaded at

http://www.isragen.org.il/NROS/YY2005/YY-reg-HE-2005.pdf

You are going to love this day and we are looking forward to seeing
you there!

Martha Levinson Lev-Zion
for the Organizing Committee
Israel Genealogical Society


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania VRI Project - Call for Shtetl Coordinators #lithuania

Joel Ratner
 

As you read yesterday, the progress with the Keidan vital records has been
extraordinary, due to the dedication of Olga Zabludoff.

What about my town and how can I help?

The possibility exists for similar rapid progress in translating records for
the 100 other towns for which we have vital records. There are several
requirements. The first is personnel. Right now, the VRI project needs
Shtetl Coordinators like Olga. Olga works exclusively with the Keidan
records and does not work the other towns. I coordinate the entire project
for now, and although this entails managing the flow of translations,
dealing with Shtetl Coordinators and translators, and ultimately ensuring
the records are ready to go into the ALD, I do not get into the day to day
fundraising for individual towns. As a result, donations come in, but not
due to an organized, structured effort. The result for some towns,
particularly the smaller ones, is a balance that may stay static for many
months or a few years. I receive inquiries on a regular basis where
individuals who supported the VRI project 2 and 3 years ago ask why they
haven't received their translations. The fact is the project needs people to
step up and be counted. We need individuals such as Olga who are willing to
post messages to the Digest asking for support for their town - people who
will follow up with questions posed by potential donors and who will proof
the translations once they are submitted by the translators.

Below is a list of all the towns with vital records that are part of the VRI
project. Next to the town name you will see the name of the Shtetl
Coordinator, if there currently is one. We are looking for Shtetl
Coordinators for all towns that currently are doing without.

Alytus (Alyta)
Antakalnis (Antokol)
Aukstadvaris (Visokidvor)
Babtai (Bobt) Paul Epner
Bagaslaviskis (Bogoslavishok)
Balbieriskis (Balbirishok)
Bezdonys (Bezdany)
Birzai (Birzh) Michael Witkin
Butrimonys (Butrimantz)
Cekiske (Chaikishok)
Ciobiskis (Chabishki)
Darsuniskis (Darshunishok)
Daugai (Daug)
Dotnuva (Datnuva)
Eisiskes (Eishishok) records translated, Judy Baston proofing
Garliava (Godlevo)
Gelvonai (Gelvan)
Giedraiciai (Gedrovitz)
Grinkiskis (Grinkishok)
Inturke (Inturik)
Jasiunai (Yashny)
Jieznas (Vezna)
Jokubonys (Yakubantse)
Jonava (Yanova)
Joniskelis (Yanishkel)
Josvainiai (Yosvain)
Kalveliai (Kovalchuki)
Kaunas (Kovna)
Kedainiai (Keidan) Olga Zabludoff
Kelme (Kelme)
Kernave (Kernava)
Knyszyn, Poland (Knysinas)
Krakes (Krok)
Kudirkos Naumiestis (Vladislavov)
Kupiskis (Kupishok) some translations received, need coordinator
to proof
Laibiskis (Leibishok)
Linkuva (Linkova)
Maisiagala (Maishigola)
Marijampole (Mariampole)
Merkine (Merech) records translated, need coordinator to
proof
Mikailiskis (Mikhalishok)
Moletai (Maliat) Cheryl Sofer
Musninkai (Musnik)
Namajunai (Namajunai)
Naujamiestis (Novigorod)
Naujoji Vilna (Novo-Vileisk)
Nemencine (Nemenchin)
Nemunaitis (Nemunaitz)
Novodvor, Lida, Belarus (Naujadvaris)
Orlya, Lida, Belarus (Orly)
Paberze (Podberezhe)
Pakruojis (Pokroi)
Panemune (Ponemun-Fergissa)
Panevezys (Ponevezh)
Pasvalys (Posvol)
Plunge (Plungian) Elaine Cohen
Prienai (Pren)
Pumpenai (Pumpian) Chaim Luria
Punia (Pun)
Pusalotas (Poshelat)
Radun, Lida, Belarus (Radun) Joe Fibel
Radviliskis (Radvilishok) Records for region
Ramygala (Remigola)
Raseiniai (Rasein)
Ratnycia (Rotnitsa)
Rudamina (Rudamin)
Rumsiskes (Rumshishok)
Sakiai (Shaki)
Salcininkai (Solechniki)
Seredzius (Srednik)
Sesuoliai (Sheshol)
Shchuchin, Lida, Belarus (Sciucin)
Silale (Shilel)
Sirvintos (Shirvint) Tova Jaffe
Snipiskes (Snipiskes)
Sokolka, Poland (Sokol)
Stakliskes (Stoklishok)
Stundishki (Stundishki)
Suvainiskis (Suvinishok)
Suvalkai, Poland (Suwalki)
Telsiai (Telz)
Trakai (Troki)
Turgeliai (Turgeli)
Ukmerge (Vilkomir)
Vabalninkas (Vabolnik)
Valkininkai (Olkenik)
Vandziogala (Vendzhigola)
Varena (Oran)
Varnenai (Vorniany)
Varniai (Vorna)
Veliuona (Vilon)
Vievis (Veviya)
Vilijampole (Slobodka) Illona Hope
Vilkija (Vilki) Marc Berger
Vilnius (Vilna) Eden Joachim / Joel Ratner
Vilnius County (Vilna County)
Zapyskis (Sapizishok)
Zaskevichi, Belarus (Zaskevichi)
Zasliai (Zhusli)
Zeimelis (Zhaimel) Barry Mann
Ziezmariai (Zhezmir)

Anyone interested in seeing the records for their town move along at a
faster pace and are willing to put in some time to make it happen should
contact me privately at Joelrat1@hotmail.com

Joel Ratner
Coordinator, Vilna District Research Group


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania One day seminar at the Museum of the Diaspora in Tel Aviv #lithuania

Martha LEV-ZION <martha@...>
 

We at the Israel Genealogical Society [IGS] are fairly bursting our
buttons with pride in the one day seminar [Yom Iyun] that we have
arranged for the 28th of November 2005 at Beit Hatefutzot [the
Diaspora Museum] on the Tel Aviv University campus. If you could have
one genealogical wish, wouldn't it be that you could find that
illusive document that would allow you to prove once and for all that
a tie that binds was true? We at the IGS have been feverishly working
for over a year to arrange just such a seminar that would allow you
to find the missing key.

Without fear of contradiction, I can categorically state that every
Jewish family in the world has family - known or unknown - in
Israel. Our seminar, "Family Roots in the Land of Israel and in the
World," will demonstrate what I mean. We have invited archivists >from
the smaller, but sometimes more interesting archives, to address us
with talks on their holdings. When we invited proposals, even we
didn't know details of all the treasures these archives hold, but
after reading the abstracts and talking with the archivists, it is
hard not to jump up and down with enthusiasm!

Go to our website's direct seminar access:

http://www.isragen.org.il/NROS/YY2005/

There you can get .pdf files in Hebrew and/or in English of the
program, the abstracts and the biographies of the speakers. See for
yourself what an incredible program we have arranged for you! >from
our opening keynote speaker on Eastern European Aliyah >from the late
1800's to 1920, to a detailed description of the microfilm collection
of the Diaspora Museum, at the close of the day, you will be
enthralled for the entire time.

One caveat: regretfully, places are limited due to the number of
seats available and we can only accept reservations on a first come
first serve basis. Early registration ends on 10 November, if there
are still places available. Registration includes coffee and cake and
a chance for a greatly discounted hot lunch, but here too, places are
limited. Please register early so you will not be disappointed. When
the places are gone, they are gone and that's it.

The registration form can be downloaded at

http://www.isragen.org.il/NROS/YY2005/YY-reg-HE-2005.pdf

You are going to love this day and we are looking forward to seeing
you there!

Martha Levinson Lev-Zion
for the Organizing Committee
Israel Genealogical Society


camps in Lebanon and Syria for european Jews in 1939-40. #general

Pierre KOGAN
 

Dear Jewish Genners,

I'm searching the fate of an european family, (>from Romania or Austria and
Turkey)
EFFRAYIM Aaron, his wife BAUM Rosa and their daughters
Becky, Rebecca born 1923
and
Dora born 1924?
The daughters married and lived in Beyrouth or Aleppo.
Were there internment's camps in Lebanon and Syria for european Jews in
1939-40. ?

Thank you for your answer,
Chana tova
P. Kogan
Strasbourg
France


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen camps in Lebanon and Syria for european Jews in 1939-40. #general

Pierre KOGAN
 

Dear Jewish Genners,

I'm searching the fate of an european family, (>from Romania or Austria and
Turkey)
EFFRAYIM Aaron, his wife BAUM Rosa and their daughters
Becky, Rebecca born 1923
and
Dora born 1924?
The daughters married and lived in Beyrouth or Aleppo.
Were there internment's camps in Lebanon and Syria for european Jews in
1939-40. ?

Thank you for your answer,
Chana tova
P. Kogan
Strasbourg
France


Note from Moderator John Paul Lowens #germany

GerSIG@...
 

Your Moderator is visiting relatives for the holiday and is having
trouble using the computer at their home.
Please note that messages to this list that need special attention may
not be posted until I return to my office and a keyboard that fits my fingers.

To those of you who have sent me private Shana Tova greetings: Thank you!

Your messages are much appreciated and will be returned when I am home again on Thursday.

On behalf of all our 1100+ members - Shana Tova to all!

John Paul Lowens - MOD 1


German SIG #Germany Note from Moderator John Paul Lowens #germany

GerSIG@...
 

Your Moderator is visiting relatives for the holiday and is having
trouble using the computer at their home.
Please note that messages to this list that need special attention may
not be posted until I return to my office and a keyboard that fits my fingers.

To those of you who have sent me private Shana Tova greetings: Thank you!

Your messages are much appreciated and will be returned when I am home again on Thursday.

On behalf of all our 1100+ members - Shana Tova to all!

John Paul Lowens - MOD 1


Passage to America #germany

sandra <rodsandra@...>
 

Could anyone advise me of a source in which to research ticket sales/or
emmigration list for passengers >from Bavaria on board a ship sailing >from
LeHavre, France, but bought in Germany? Or would the passenger have traveled
from hometown to Bavaria to purchase passage ticket?
I am also researching a companion of my g.g.grandfather, Abraham Nathan,
aboard Ship Rotunda: one, Emanuel Rubel, also >from Bavaria. Both, age 17,
1854 when ship arrived to New York. Thank you.
Sandra Nathan-Moody Gulf Shores, Alabama USA rodsandra@gulftel.com

MOD NOTE: RUBEL family operated a store in Corinth, Mississippi. My GGF came
from the RheinPfalz, then part of Bavaria, and worked in their store. RUBEL
Family is well researched. Use our archives and web search engines to learn
about this.

Family names you are researching ( like RUBEL ) must be typed in ALL CAPITAL
letteers in your future email to this list.


German SIG #Germany Passage to America #germany

sandra <rodsandra@...>
 

Could anyone advise me of a source in which to research ticket sales/or
emmigration list for passengers >from Bavaria on board a ship sailing >from
LeHavre, France, but bought in Germany? Or would the passenger have traveled
from hometown to Bavaria to purchase passage ticket?
I am also researching a companion of my g.g.grandfather, Abraham Nathan,
aboard Ship Rotunda: one, Emanuel Rubel, also >from Bavaria. Both, age 17,
1854 when ship arrived to New York. Thank you.
Sandra Nathan-Moody Gulf Shores, Alabama USA rodsandra@gulftel.com

MOD NOTE: RUBEL family operated a store in Corinth, Mississippi. My GGF came
from the RheinPfalz, then part of Bavaria, and worked in their store. RUBEL
Family is well researched. Use our archives and web search engines to learn
about this.

Family names you are researching ( like RUBEL ) must be typed in ALL CAPITAL
letteers in your future email to this list.


Research Assistance in Poznan #germany

A & B Algaze <Algaze@...>
 

I have had wonderful results working with a researcher
in Poznan, who did research for me in the former towns
of Culmsee/Chelmza, Culm/Chelmno, Thorn/Torun,
Golub, and Flatau,

I know she has also done research for the towns
of Bromberg/Bydgoszcz, Schwetz/Swiecie, and
Vistula/Wisla and I believe that there are many
more towns in which she does research.

You can contact me privately for more details.

Barbara Algaze Los Angeles, California Algaze@comcast.net

Jeff Lewy wrote:

"... If anyone can advise me how to locate a researcher working
in the Poznan area who can help unravel some of these
questions, I would be very appreciative."


German SIG #Germany Research Assistance in Poznan #germany

A & B Algaze <Algaze@...>
 

I have had wonderful results working with a researcher
in Poznan, who did research for me in the former towns
of Culmsee/Chelmza, Culm/Chelmno, Thorn/Torun,
Golub, and Flatau,

I know she has also done research for the towns
of Bromberg/Bydgoszcz, Schwetz/Swiecie, and
Vistula/Wisla and I believe that there are many
more towns in which she does research.

You can contact me privately for more details.

Barbara Algaze Los Angeles, California Algaze@comcast.net

Jeff Lewy wrote:

"... If anyone can advise me how to locate a researcher working
in the Poznan area who can help unravel some of these
questions, I would be very appreciative."


One day seminar at the Museum of the Diaspora in Tel Aviv #latvia

Martha LEV-ZION <martha@...>
 

We at the Israel Genealogical Society [IGS] are fairly bursting our
buttons with pride in the one day seminar [Yom Iyun] that we have
arranged for the 28th of November 2005 at Beit Hatefutzot [the
Diaspora Museum] on the Tel Aviv University campus. If you could have
one genealogical wish, wouldn't it be that you could find that
illusive document that would allow you to prove once and for all that
a tie that binds was true? We at the IGS have been feverishly working
for over a year to arrange just such a seminar that would allow you
to find the missing key.

Without fear of contradiction, I can categorically state that every
Jewish family in the world has family - known or unknown - in
Israel. Our seminar, "Family Roots in the Land of Israel and in the
World," will demonstrate what I mean. We have invited archivists >from
the smaller, but sometimes more interesting archives, to address us
with talks on their holdings. When we invited proposals, even we
didn't know details of all the treasures these archives hold, but
after reading the abstracts and talking with the archivists, it is
hard not to jump up and down with enthusiasm!

Go to our website's direct seminar access:

http://www.isragen.org.il/NROS/YY2005/

There you can get .pdf files in Hebrew and/or in English of the
program, the abstracts and the biographies of the speakers. See for
yourself what an incredible program we have arranged for you! >from
our opening keynote speaker on Eastern European Aliyah >from the late
1800's to 1920, to a detailed description of the microfilm collection
of the Diaspora Museum, at the close of the day, you will be
enthralled for the entire time.

One caveat: regretfully, places are limited due to the number of
seats available and we can only accept reservations on a first come
first serve basis. Early registration ends on 10 November, if there
are still places available. Registration includes coffee and cake and
a chance for a greatly discounted hot lunch, but here too, places are
limited. Please register early so you will not be disappointed. When
the places are gone, they are gone and that's it.

The registration form can be downloaded at

http://www.isragen.org.il/NROS/YY2005/YY-reg-HE-2005.pdf

You are going to love this day and we are looking forward to seeing
you there!

Martha Levinson Lev-Zion
for the Organizing Committee
Israel Genealogical Society


Latvia SIG #Latvia One day seminar at the Museum of the Diaspora in Tel Aviv #latvia

Martha LEV-ZION <martha@...>
 

We at the Israel Genealogical Society [IGS] are fairly bursting our
buttons with pride in the one day seminar [Yom Iyun] that we have
arranged for the 28th of November 2005 at Beit Hatefutzot [the
Diaspora Museum] on the Tel Aviv University campus. If you could have
one genealogical wish, wouldn't it be that you could find that
illusive document that would allow you to prove once and for all that
a tie that binds was true? We at the IGS have been feverishly working
for over a year to arrange just such a seminar that would allow you
to find the missing key.

Without fear of contradiction, I can categorically state that every
Jewish family in the world has family - known or unknown - in
Israel. Our seminar, "Family Roots in the Land of Israel and in the
World," will demonstrate what I mean. We have invited archivists >from
the smaller, but sometimes more interesting archives, to address us
with talks on their holdings. When we invited proposals, even we
didn't know details of all the treasures these archives hold, but
after reading the abstracts and talking with the archivists, it is
hard not to jump up and down with enthusiasm!

Go to our website's direct seminar access:

http://www.isragen.org.il/NROS/YY2005/

There you can get .pdf files in Hebrew and/or in English of the
program, the abstracts and the biographies of the speakers. See for
yourself what an incredible program we have arranged for you! >from
our opening keynote speaker on Eastern European Aliyah >from the late
1800's to 1920, to a detailed description of the microfilm collection
of the Diaspora Museum, at the close of the day, you will be
enthralled for the entire time.

One caveat: regretfully, places are limited due to the number of
seats available and we can only accept reservations on a first come
first serve basis. Early registration ends on 10 November, if there
are still places available. Registration includes coffee and cake and
a chance for a greatly discounted hot lunch, but here too, places are
limited. Please register early so you will not be disappointed. When
the places are gone, they are gone and that's it.

The registration form can be downloaded at

http://www.isragen.org.il/NROS/YY2005/YY-reg-HE-2005.pdf

You are going to love this day and we are looking forward to seeing
you there!

Martha Levinson Lev-Zion
for the Organizing Committee
Israel Genealogical Society


Travel to Hungary and Slovakia #hungary

Vivian Kahn
 

Dear All,

Although Linda Rakoff and Gabi Svatos have already responded to the
questions that George Farkas posed about travel to Hungary, Slovakia,
and Romania, thought that I'd add my comments as well.

I spent three weeks in Hungary and Slovakia in August doing some
research but primarily just experiencing the places where my father and
paternal relatives once lived. Gabi and Linda and I coordinated our
schedules before departure and met at several locations during the
trip. In addition to 3 days in Bratislava with Linda and Gabi, my
husband and I were in Budapest for 7 days at the beginning and end of
our trip, 2 days in Miskolc, 2 days in Kosice, and 4 days in Michalovce
and the Sobrance area in far eastern Slovakia. We also took a short
side-trip to Vienna and spent a night with Pavel Simko, my second
cousin-once removed, and his Hungarian-born wife Elizabeth. Pavel and
his older brother Dusan were born in Kosice .

Based on my experience, seems very difficult to get anything >from
archives and municipal offices in Slovakia if you don't speak Slovak.
You also need to plan ahead. I was assisted by Jan Hlavinka, a young
historian >from Medzilaborce who works for the Institute of National
Memory in Bratislava. Coincidentally ( and fortunately) his
mother-in-law works in the registry office in Michalovce, which happens
to be where my grandparents and great-grandparents lived after WWI and
where my paternal grandfather Viktor NEUMAN and his MOSKOVITS in-laws
are buried.

Most Slovaks do not speak Hungarian and, as others have pointed out,
many Slovaks bear some animosity to the Hungarians so trying to
communicate in Hungarian is not advised. We found taxi drivers, some
waiters, bank tellers, train ticket sellers,and hotel staff who did
speak English but many others don't. I carried a Slovak-English phrase
book and dictionary and consulted it regularly. (The book by Sylvia
and John M. Lorinc published by Hippocrene was small enough to fit in
my fanny pack.) Some people whose work brings them into contact with
foreign visitors also understand German but I don't so that didn't help
at all. I was intrigued to find a Hungarian bookshop on Hlavna Ulica in Kosice with a window display including works by Sandor Marai and my cousin Dusan.

Yes, you should make appointments to visit archives, municipal offices,
cemeteries and Jewish community organizations. You can find municipal
addresses on-line in most cases. Write to the mayor or registrar in
Hungarian or Slovak well in advance of your arrival and identify the
records you would like to see. The clerk in Kristy, Slovakia (formerly
Kereszt, Hungary) didn't receive my letter until the day we arrived
although I sent it almost 2 weeks in advance. Be aware that you may
not be able to sit down and examine municipal record books by yourself.
Prepare a list of names, dates, and events that you can hand to the
clerk.

As Linda Rakoff noted, you should also make arrangements to visit
cemeteries ahead of time. The well-maintained Jewish cemetery in
Michalovce is identified on the city map that we got at the Jalta Hotel
and was easy to find but the cemetery is gated and locked. Jan had
to contact Rabbi Steiner in Kosice to get the name and phone number of
the elderly man in Michalovce who has both the key and burial record
book for the well-maintained cemetery in Michalovce. Mr. Haber
(Halber?) was initially wary of telling Jan exactly where he lived so
we made arrangements to pick him up near his apartment. After we got
to know one another he was very friendly and my husband even took a
picture of Mr. H. and me at the cemetery. We couldn't find a squeegee
in the variety store in Michalovce so we bought a couple of ruler to
scrape shaving cream off the stones. Bring along a good-sized bottle
of water and a rag to wipe off the headstones after you've taken
pictures. We also found the Jewish cemetery near Sobrance. As I'd
been warned by some previous visitors, that cemetery was completely
overgrown. I found a few stones but clearing the brush and brambles
will be a major job. (If you're interested in getting the Sobrance
cemetery cleared and photographed, please contact me off-list.) BTW,
be prepared to offer tips or gifts to anyone who helps you. Your guide
should be able to indicate an appropriate amount.

It will be difficult to find any records before 1800 unless you go to
national archives in Budapest and Bratislava. (Be aware that the
records in Budapest are not in the Archives building on Castle Hill but
a new building in Obuda on Becsi utca, about a 30-minute bus ride >from
the Batthyany ter Metro station. You don't need an appointment but
you should arrive with a list of film numbers and be prepared to wait
for staff to pull the films. If you want to purchase films you need to
pay the archives in advance or pay when you arrive and wait for them to
mail the films to you. I still haven't received the films I paid for
at the end of August.) Because civil registration didn't start in
Hungary until 1895, you won't find municipal records older than that.
Some Jewish communities may have older Jewish records, but in most
cases you will probably have to go to archives. Municipal archives may
be more difficult to access than state or regional archives. Remember
that they're part of a municipal government and providing records for
researchers is not really part of their charge.

In contrast to relatively cool reception we received in most of the
archives and municipal offices, we were made to feel very welcome when
we visited the old shul in Miskolc. The young rabbi, who's actually
from Sziget, pulled out old record books and let us take pictures of
the building's interior. Staff in the Miskolc library were also very
helpful. I transcribed all of the KOHN and NEUMANN names and addresses
from a 1912 Miskolcz Directory that one of the librarians found for us.
(Based on that source, appears that my grandparents had not yet moved
to Miskolc by 1912.)

We travelled by train and bus except for one afternoon when we hired a
driver to find the Sobrance Jewish Cemetery and go to Kristy and
Ostrov, little villages south of Sobrance where my father, his
brothers, and my grandmother were born and my great-grandfather had a
farm. Public transportation is inexpensive and easy to use. Even
though some of the stations are a bit grimy, the Budapest Metro is
wonderful. Line 1 (also known as the yellow line), which runs beneath
Andrassy ut and the Varosliget, Budapest's beautiful urban park, is
particularly charming and quite clean. Line 1 is the oldest subway on
the European continent and the second oldest in all of Europe after the
London Underground. Buy inter-city train tickets in advance because
the lines at the ticket booths can be rather long. We walked to the
Keleti Station to buy train tix to Miskolc and Kosice several days
ahead. Ask the ticket agent if you need a reserved seat (we did >from
Budapest to Miskolc). Travelled standard class except for the 5 1/2
hour train trip >from Kosice to Bratislava where we upgraded to First
Class. Cars are very expensive to rent and rentals may be hard to
find unless you plan in advance. We brought some maps with us,
obtained maps of Miskolc, Michalovce and Bratislava >from hotels and
tourist offices, and bought a good map of eastern Slovakia in a
bookstore.

I did not bring a laptop because we wanted to travel light and didn't
want to have to carry it around all the time. Also didn't want to
hassle with voltage converters and chargers. I printed up the family
files needed for reference and kept them in a light binder along with
hotel info, downloaded maps, etc. If you've uploaded your records to
the FTJP or one of the commercial genealogy websites you could, in a
pinch, find an internet cafe to check the details of any records you
didn't bring along.

I think that you will find it very difficult to include Romania,
Hungary, and Slovakia in a week-long trip. Get yourself a good map and
just check the distance between Zilina and Marghita. I decided to
postpone a visit to Transylvania, where my mother's family lived, until
our next trip.

I don't keep Kosher so that wasn't a problem for us. I suspect that
it's impossible to find kosher restaurants outside of major cities
because the sad truth is that there are very few Jews left in Hungary
and Slovakia outside of Budapest and Bratislava. If you're willing to
eat a lot of cheese, eggs, pasta, and veggies you will probably do OK.
Fried cheese is a favorite lunch in Slovakia. There were vegetarian
entrees on most menus but unless you go to a vegetarian restaurant the
same restaurant will, of course, also be cooking meat including, in
most cases, a lot of pork.

Even though it was somewhat disappointing that I didn't find that many
new records, I decided early on that the primary objective for this
trip was to explore these places and find out more about this part of
my heritage. Rather than spending hours in archives looking for
records that may eventually be filmed by the FHL or turn up on line, it
was much more satisfying to see the people, buildings, and landscapes.
We also visited museums in Budapest, Kosice, Michalovce, and
Bratislava. Having seen the countryside around Sobrance where my
father was born, I better understand, for example, why he never seemed
to enjoy city life. The Carpathian foothills east of Sobrance reminded
me, in fact, of the agricultural areas that I remember seeing during
childhood visits to the Catskills. We enjoyed visiting outdoor cafes,
which abound in both Hungary and Slovakia, for an afternoon beer and to
watch the passing crowd. Except for Budapest, where the prices are
still much lower than we'd pay for comparable food and drink in the San
Francisco area, food and drink are very inexpensive. All of the
hotels and pensions where we stayed included breakfast in the price of
the room. The Delibab even packed a breakfast to go on our last day
because we had to leave before dawn to catch our flight to Frankfurt.
In addition to developing a taste for pear palinka and a rather quirky
Hungarian digestif called Unicum, we found several very acceptable
wines.

As it turned out, I did find some new family branches. I also
identified three of my paternal great-great-grandparents and added a
new surname--LEFKOVITS--to my list of direct ancestors.

All in all, an incomparable experience!

Vivian Kahn, Oakland, CA



Subject: Research in Slovakia, etc
From: George Farkas <gfarkas@xbisoftware.com>
Date: Mon, 19 Sep 2005 11:14:39 -0400
X-Message-Number: 5

Not long ago, I read some excellent posts by Gabriela Svatos and
others on their trips to Slovakia and Hungary to do some genealogical
research. I hope to spend a week in Slovakia, Hungary and
Transylvania in early January to try to fill in missing information
in my research. I plan to visit ancestral villages, Jewish cemeteries
as well as the archives. I would like some help in planning my trip
from those who have been there. I plan to visit the villages around
Zilina (Zsolna), Lipto Szentmiklos, Nyirbator, and Marghita (Romania)
and the archives in Bittse among others.

1. How important is it to be able to speak Slovak? I do not speak
Slovak at all; I so speak Hungarian as well as English, French and
Hebrew, and I have some German.

2. Do I have to set up appointments to visit the archives,
cemeteries, Jewish community organizations in advance? This is
problematic because I do want to be flexible if possible.

3. How easy/difficult is it to find records of events, vital
information, etc prior to 1900? 1800?

4. How can I find out where (official and Jewish community) archives
are located? How easy/ difficult is it to get access? Are tips for
civil servants appreciated? (If yes, what amounts are reasonable?)

5. How easy is it to get about? I was thinking about renting a car,
so as not to be tied to the bus and train schedules. Are good maps
easily available? How easy/difficult is it to be able to get an
Internet connection for my laptop?

6. Is a week enough time or will I have to cut out some of the places?

7. Is kosher food available at all?

Thank you. I am sure that I have more questions, but I'm sure that is
enough for the moment.

george

George Farkas
Montreal, Quebec

Searching: FARKAS, FRIED, ALTMANN, FRIEDMANN, GROSS, KLEIN,
WEISZ, VIDOR, STEIN, LINKS, KNOPFELMACHER, LUSTIG, SPITZER


Hungary SIG #Hungary Travel to Hungary and Slovakia #hungary

Vivian Kahn
 

Dear All,

Although Linda Rakoff and Gabi Svatos have already responded to the
questions that George Farkas posed about travel to Hungary, Slovakia,
and Romania, thought that I'd add my comments as well.

I spent three weeks in Hungary and Slovakia in August doing some
research but primarily just experiencing the places where my father and
paternal relatives once lived. Gabi and Linda and I coordinated our
schedules before departure and met at several locations during the
trip. In addition to 3 days in Bratislava with Linda and Gabi, my
husband and I were in Budapest for 7 days at the beginning and end of
our trip, 2 days in Miskolc, 2 days in Kosice, and 4 days in Michalovce
and the Sobrance area in far eastern Slovakia. We also took a short
side-trip to Vienna and spent a night with Pavel Simko, my second
cousin-once removed, and his Hungarian-born wife Elizabeth. Pavel and
his older brother Dusan were born in Kosice .

Based on my experience, seems very difficult to get anything >from
archives and municipal offices in Slovakia if you don't speak Slovak.
You also need to plan ahead. I was assisted by Jan Hlavinka, a young
historian >from Medzilaborce who works for the Institute of National
Memory in Bratislava. Coincidentally ( and fortunately) his
mother-in-law works in the registry office in Michalovce, which happens
to be where my grandparents and great-grandparents lived after WWI and
where my paternal grandfather Viktor NEUMAN and his MOSKOVITS in-laws
are buried.

Most Slovaks do not speak Hungarian and, as others have pointed out,
many Slovaks bear some animosity to the Hungarians so trying to
communicate in Hungarian is not advised. We found taxi drivers, some
waiters, bank tellers, train ticket sellers,and hotel staff who did
speak English but many others don't. I carried a Slovak-English phrase
book and dictionary and consulted it regularly. (The book by Sylvia
and John M. Lorinc published by Hippocrene was small enough to fit in
my fanny pack.) Some people whose work brings them into contact with
foreign visitors also understand German but I don't so that didn't help
at all. I was intrigued to find a Hungarian bookshop on Hlavna Ulica in Kosice with a window display including works by Sandor Marai and my cousin Dusan.

Yes, you should make appointments to visit archives, municipal offices,
cemeteries and Jewish community organizations. You can find municipal
addresses on-line in most cases. Write to the mayor or registrar in
Hungarian or Slovak well in advance of your arrival and identify the
records you would like to see. The clerk in Kristy, Slovakia (formerly
Kereszt, Hungary) didn't receive my letter until the day we arrived
although I sent it almost 2 weeks in advance. Be aware that you may
not be able to sit down and examine municipal record books by yourself.
Prepare a list of names, dates, and events that you can hand to the
clerk.

As Linda Rakoff noted, you should also make arrangements to visit
cemeteries ahead of time. The well-maintained Jewish cemetery in
Michalovce is identified on the city map that we got at the Jalta Hotel
and was easy to find but the cemetery is gated and locked. Jan had
to contact Rabbi Steiner in Kosice to get the name and phone number of
the elderly man in Michalovce who has both the key and burial record
book for the well-maintained cemetery in Michalovce. Mr. Haber
(Halber?) was initially wary of telling Jan exactly where he lived so
we made arrangements to pick him up near his apartment. After we got
to know one another he was very friendly and my husband even took a
picture of Mr. H. and me at the cemetery. We couldn't find a squeegee
in the variety store in Michalovce so we bought a couple of ruler to
scrape shaving cream off the stones. Bring along a good-sized bottle
of water and a rag to wipe off the headstones after you've taken
pictures. We also found the Jewish cemetery near Sobrance. As I'd
been warned by some previous visitors, that cemetery was completely
overgrown. I found a few stones but clearing the brush and brambles
will be a major job. (If you're interested in getting the Sobrance
cemetery cleared and photographed, please contact me off-list.) BTW,
be prepared to offer tips or gifts to anyone who helps you. Your guide
should be able to indicate an appropriate amount.

It will be difficult to find any records before 1800 unless you go to
national archives in Budapest and Bratislava. (Be aware that the
records in Budapest are not in the Archives building on Castle Hill but
a new building in Obuda on Becsi utca, about a 30-minute bus ride >from
the Batthyany ter Metro station. You don't need an appointment but
you should arrive with a list of film numbers and be prepared to wait
for staff to pull the films. If you want to purchase films you need to
pay the archives in advance or pay when you arrive and wait for them to
mail the films to you. I still haven't received the films I paid for
at the end of August.) Because civil registration didn't start in
Hungary until 1895, you won't find municipal records older than that.
Some Jewish communities may have older Jewish records, but in most
cases you will probably have to go to archives. Municipal archives may
be more difficult to access than state or regional archives. Remember
that they're part of a municipal government and providing records for
researchers is not really part of their charge.

In contrast to relatively cool reception we received in most of the
archives and municipal offices, we were made to feel very welcome when
we visited the old shul in Miskolc. The young rabbi, who's actually
from Sziget, pulled out old record books and let us take pictures of
the building's interior. Staff in the Miskolc library were also very
helpful. I transcribed all of the KOHN and NEUMANN names and addresses
from a 1912 Miskolcz Directory that one of the librarians found for us.
(Based on that source, appears that my grandparents had not yet moved
to Miskolc by 1912.)

We travelled by train and bus except for one afternoon when we hired a
driver to find the Sobrance Jewish Cemetery and go to Kristy and
Ostrov, little villages south of Sobrance where my father, his
brothers, and my grandmother were born and my great-grandfather had a
farm. Public transportation is inexpensive and easy to use. Even
though some of the stations are a bit grimy, the Budapest Metro is
wonderful. Line 1 (also known as the yellow line), which runs beneath
Andrassy ut and the Varosliget, Budapest's beautiful urban park, is
particularly charming and quite clean. Line 1 is the oldest subway on
the European continent and the second oldest in all of Europe after the
London Underground. Buy inter-city train tickets in advance because
the lines at the ticket booths can be rather long. We walked to the
Keleti Station to buy train tix to Miskolc and Kosice several days
ahead. Ask the ticket agent if you need a reserved seat (we did >from
Budapest to Miskolc). Travelled standard class except for the 5 1/2
hour train trip >from Kosice to Bratislava where we upgraded to First
Class. Cars are very expensive to rent and rentals may be hard to
find unless you plan in advance. We brought some maps with us,
obtained maps of Miskolc, Michalovce and Bratislava >from hotels and
tourist offices, and bought a good map of eastern Slovakia in a
bookstore.

I did not bring a laptop because we wanted to travel light and didn't
want to have to carry it around all the time. Also didn't want to
hassle with voltage converters and chargers. I printed up the family
files needed for reference and kept them in a light binder along with
hotel info, downloaded maps, etc. If you've uploaded your records to
the FTJP or one of the commercial genealogy websites you could, in a
pinch, find an internet cafe to check the details of any records you
didn't bring along.

I think that you will find it very difficult to include Romania,
Hungary, and Slovakia in a week-long trip. Get yourself a good map and
just check the distance between Zilina and Marghita. I decided to
postpone a visit to Transylvania, where my mother's family lived, until
our next trip.

I don't keep Kosher so that wasn't a problem for us. I suspect that
it's impossible to find kosher restaurants outside of major cities
because the sad truth is that there are very few Jews left in Hungary
and Slovakia outside of Budapest and Bratislava. If you're willing to
eat a lot of cheese, eggs, pasta, and veggies you will probably do OK.
Fried cheese is a favorite lunch in Slovakia. There were vegetarian
entrees on most menus but unless you go to a vegetarian restaurant the
same restaurant will, of course, also be cooking meat including, in
most cases, a lot of pork.

Even though it was somewhat disappointing that I didn't find that many
new records, I decided early on that the primary objective for this
trip was to explore these places and find out more about this part of
my heritage. Rather than spending hours in archives looking for
records that may eventually be filmed by the FHL or turn up on line, it
was much more satisfying to see the people, buildings, and landscapes.
We also visited museums in Budapest, Kosice, Michalovce, and
Bratislava. Having seen the countryside around Sobrance where my
father was born, I better understand, for example, why he never seemed
to enjoy city life. The Carpathian foothills east of Sobrance reminded
me, in fact, of the agricultural areas that I remember seeing during
childhood visits to the Catskills. We enjoyed visiting outdoor cafes,
which abound in both Hungary and Slovakia, for an afternoon beer and to
watch the passing crowd. Except for Budapest, where the prices are
still much lower than we'd pay for comparable food and drink in the San
Francisco area, food and drink are very inexpensive. All of the
hotels and pensions where we stayed included breakfast in the price of
the room. The Delibab even packed a breakfast to go on our last day
because we had to leave before dawn to catch our flight to Frankfurt.
In addition to developing a taste for pear palinka and a rather quirky
Hungarian digestif called Unicum, we found several very acceptable
wines.

As it turned out, I did find some new family branches. I also
identified three of my paternal great-great-grandparents and added a
new surname--LEFKOVITS--to my list of direct ancestors.

All in all, an incomparable experience!

Vivian Kahn, Oakland, CA



Subject: Research in Slovakia, etc
From: George Farkas <gfarkas@xbisoftware.com>
Date: Mon, 19 Sep 2005 11:14:39 -0400
X-Message-Number: 5

Not long ago, I read some excellent posts by Gabriela Svatos and
others on their trips to Slovakia and Hungary to do some genealogical
research. I hope to spend a week in Slovakia, Hungary and
Transylvania in early January to try to fill in missing information
in my research. I plan to visit ancestral villages, Jewish cemeteries
as well as the archives. I would like some help in planning my trip
from those who have been there. I plan to visit the villages around
Zilina (Zsolna), Lipto Szentmiklos, Nyirbator, and Marghita (Romania)
and the archives in Bittse among others.

1. How important is it to be able to speak Slovak? I do not speak
Slovak at all; I so speak Hungarian as well as English, French and
Hebrew, and I have some German.

2. Do I have to set up appointments to visit the archives,
cemeteries, Jewish community organizations in advance? This is
problematic because I do want to be flexible if possible.

3. How easy/difficult is it to find records of events, vital
information, etc prior to 1900? 1800?

4. How can I find out where (official and Jewish community) archives
are located? How easy/ difficult is it to get access? Are tips for
civil servants appreciated? (If yes, what amounts are reasonable?)

5. How easy is it to get about? I was thinking about renting a car,
so as not to be tied to the bus and train schedules. Are good maps
easily available? How easy/difficult is it to be able to get an
Internet connection for my laptop?

6. Is a week enough time or will I have to cut out some of the places?

7. Is kosher food available at all?

Thank you. I am sure that I have more questions, but I'm sure that is
enough for the moment.

george

George Farkas
Montreal, Quebec

Searching: FARKAS, FRIED, ALTMANN, FRIEDMANN, GROSS, KLEIN,
WEISZ, VIDOR, STEIN, LINKS, KNOPFELMACHER, LUSTIG, SPITZER


NEW BOOK :JEWISH ORTHODOX COMMUNITY EXPERIENCE IN HUNGARY by Sandor BACSKAI #hungary

Andres Carciente
 

I have found here in Budapest a great new book :

It is 230 pages of testimonies >from 64 former members
of the Jewish Orthodox Communities in Hungary. Most of
them live now outside Hungary(the
States,Israel,etc...)

It covers the period before,during and after the war.
Among the testimonies which touched me most was one
about the refugees coming >from Poland,specially great
Rabbis,who lost all their families:

For example the szobranci rabbi and the bobovi rabbi
who begged,urged people in 1943 to "hide, to make
bunkers because there is danger,do not believe that
the hungarian authorities will help you when the
germans come"

"The voloci rabbi talked for at least two hours,
cried,begged: escape >from here,escape >from Europe
anywhere,but escape! But there was no place where to
go. Never I will forget,there everybody cried with
him,then went home..."

The book is in hungarian: Its title is:

Az elso nap (the first day)
Publisher: Mult es Jovo
Date: 2004
The writer: Sandor BACSKAI who contributes also to the
Jewish Gen.

Happy New Year. Shana TOVA!!!

Andres Carciente
Budapest



RAPAPORT, STARK, ROTTMAN, BREUER, DICK, SCHWARCZ,
NEULANDER, ALTER, GOLDBERGER, FELDMAR, POLLAK,
JEREMIAS, ADLER, LIPSCHITZ, WEISZ, GRUNWALD, SPITZ,
HERSKOVITS, BRUNNER, SZIMKOWICZ,
WEINSTOCK:(Satoraljaujhely)
RAPAPORT,FOHN (Monostorpalyi)

Moderator: Please contact Andres or Sandor off-list if you want further info.


Hungary SIG #Hungary NEW BOOK :JEWISH ORTHODOX COMMUNITY EXPERIENCE IN HUNGARY by Sandor BACSKAI #hungary

Andres Carciente
 

I have found here in Budapest a great new book :

It is 230 pages of testimonies >from 64 former members
of the Jewish Orthodox Communities in Hungary. Most of
them live now outside Hungary(the
States,Israel,etc...)

It covers the period before,during and after the war.
Among the testimonies which touched me most was one
about the refugees coming >from Poland,specially great
Rabbis,who lost all their families:

For example the szobranci rabbi and the bobovi rabbi
who begged,urged people in 1943 to "hide, to make
bunkers because there is danger,do not believe that
the hungarian authorities will help you when the
germans come"

"The voloci rabbi talked for at least two hours,
cried,begged: escape >from here,escape >from Europe
anywhere,but escape! But there was no place where to
go. Never I will forget,there everybody cried with
him,then went home..."

The book is in hungarian: Its title is:

Az elso nap (the first day)
Publisher: Mult es Jovo
Date: 2004
The writer: Sandor BACSKAI who contributes also to the
Jewish Gen.

Happy New Year. Shana TOVA!!!

Andres Carciente
Budapest



RAPAPORT, STARK, ROTTMAN, BREUER, DICK, SCHWARCZ,
NEULANDER, ALTER, GOLDBERGER, FELDMAR, POLLAK,
JEREMIAS, ADLER, LIPSCHITZ, WEISZ, GRUNWALD, SPITZ,
HERSKOVITS, BRUNNER, SZIMKOWICZ,
WEINSTOCK:(Satoraljaujhely)
RAPAPORT,FOHN (Monostorpalyi)

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