Date   

Seeking: Treuhaft Family #poland

Henry <henry@...>
 

Hi all,

Has anyone ever heard or come across a family surname called Treuhaft?

Thank You

Henry Schwartz

MODERATOR'S NOTE: Please respond privately.


JRI Poland #Poland Seeking: Treuhaft Family #poland

Henry <henry@...>
 

Hi all,

Has anyone ever heard or come across a family surname called Treuhaft?

Thank You

Henry Schwartz

MODERATOR'S NOTE: Please respond privately.


Re: Seeking Treuhaft Family #hungary

Vivian Kahn
 

Henry,

Robert Treuhaft was a well-known Oakland attorney who died several
years ago. He was born in New York City in 1912 to Hungarian
immigrants. I don't know where they came from. Treuhaft was married
to author Jessica Mitford. I believe that they had two sons. I
think that Benjamin lives in NYC. Contact me off-list for his e-mail address. Their son Noah is a computer scientist who may still
be at UC Berkeley.

If you Google Treuhaft you will find many references.

Vivian Kahn, Oakland, CA

"Henry" <henry@glitterygifts.com>
Subject: Seeking: Treuhaft Family
Date: Thu, 10 Nov 2005 23:24:52 -0500
Hi all,

Has anyone ever heard or come across a family surname called Treuhaft?

Thank You

Henry Schwartz


Hungary SIG #Hungary Re: Seeking Treuhaft Family #hungary

Vivian Kahn
 

Henry,

Robert Treuhaft was a well-known Oakland attorney who died several
years ago. He was born in New York City in 1912 to Hungarian
immigrants. I don't know where they came from. Treuhaft was married
to author Jessica Mitford. I believe that they had two sons. I
think that Benjamin lives in NYC. Contact me off-list for his e-mail address. Their son Noah is a computer scientist who may still
be at UC Berkeley.

If you Google Treuhaft you will find many references.

Vivian Kahn, Oakland, CA

"Henry" <henry@glitterygifts.com>
Subject: Seeking: Treuhaft Family
Date: Thu, 10 Nov 2005 23:24:52 -0500
Hi all,

Has anyone ever heard or come across a family surname called Treuhaft?

Thank You

Henry Schwartz


Re: Stan and Ruth wedding anniversary #poland

Gary Mokotoff (Optonline) <garymokotoff@...>
 

Stanley Diamond and I have a lot in common:

1. We are both married to women named Ruth.
2. We are both married 40 years.
3. I was married on July 4, the day I lost my independence. Stanley was
married on November 11, the day he surrendered.

Gary Mokotoff


JRI Poland #Poland RE: Stan and Ruth wedding anniversary #poland

Gary Mokotoff (Optonline) <garymokotoff@...>
 

Stanley Diamond and I have a lot in common:

1. We are both married to women named Ruth.
2. We are both married 40 years.
3. I was married on July 4, the day I lost my independence. Stanley was
married on November 11, the day he surrendered.

Gary Mokotoff


Vasarosnameny #hungary

Miriam Klein <mpklein@...>
 

Vasarosnameny is still in Hungary. I visited a few years ago as my paternal
grandfather was born there. Not much remains of the Jewish cemetery. While I
never looked for records >from that town (since the family has roots
elsewhere) I do have a copy of my grandfather's 1917 birth record that was
certified in Vasarosnameny in 1947.

Miriam Klein
Brooklyn, NY


Re: Seeking: Treuhaft Family #hungary

Amos Israel Zezmer <amos.zezmer@...>
 

There was a Treuhaft family living in Kalamazoo, Michigan at least as
late as the late 1980's, who were close friends of ours. The parents
have passed away, being survived by a son, Tommy.

Best regards,
Amos Zezmer
Yerres, France

Henry wrote:

Hi all,

Has anyone ever heard or come across a family surname called Treuhaft?

Thank You

Henry Schwartz


Re: Tom Venetianer's interface #hungary

Judy Young <jy-abcd@...>
 

This is to thank Tom for his help in making the FHL films on Hungary easily
accessible through his interface web page. It will be great to have the
Slovak ones too.

Judy

Judy Young Drache
jy-abcd@cyberus.ca
Ottawa


Hungary SIG #Hungary Vasarosnameny #hungary

Miriam Klein <mpklein@...>
 

Vasarosnameny is still in Hungary. I visited a few years ago as my paternal
grandfather was born there. Not much remains of the Jewish cemetery. While I
never looked for records >from that town (since the family has roots
elsewhere) I do have a copy of my grandfather's 1917 birth record that was
certified in Vasarosnameny in 1947.

Miriam Klein
Brooklyn, NY


Hungary SIG #Hungary Re: Seeking: Treuhaft Family #hungary

Amos Israel Zezmer <amos.zezmer@...>
 

There was a Treuhaft family living in Kalamazoo, Michigan at least as
late as the late 1980's, who were close friends of ours. The parents
have passed away, being survived by a son, Tommy.

Best regards,
Amos Zezmer
Yerres, France

Henry wrote:

Hi all,

Has anyone ever heard or come across a family surname called Treuhaft?

Thank You

Henry Schwartz


Hungary SIG #Hungary RE: Tom Venetianer's interface #hungary

Judy Young <jy-abcd@...>
 

This is to thank Tom for his help in making the FHL films on Hungary easily
accessible through his interface web page. It will be great to have the
Slovak ones too.

Judy

Judy Young Drache
jy-abcd@cyberus.ca
Ottawa


Re: Seeking: Treuhaft Family #hungary

Moshe & Esther Davis <davis@...>
 

Has anyone ever heard or come across a family surname called Treuhaft?
A second cousin of mine's married name is Treuhaft. They live in
Ohio. If you need more details, please contact me off-list.

Moshe Davis
Jerusalem


Hungary SIG #Hungary Re: Seeking: Treuhaft Family #hungary

Moshe & Esther Davis <davis@...>
 

Has anyone ever heard or come across a family surname called Treuhaft?
A second cousin of mine's married name is Treuhaft. They live in
Ohio. If you need more details, please contact me off-list.

Moshe Davis
Jerusalem


Reminder - Rules for writing E-mail to this Forum #germany

gersig@...
 

Please follow the rules for writing email to this list. The rules were
made for the benefit of all members and the GerSIG
Moderators will not approve email >from members who ignore those rules.

Remember to:
Sign every email to this list with your full name then your city and
state of residence (as per my own signing, below).

Write the last names / surnames / family names of people you are
researching in ALL CAPITAL LETTERS (ALL CAPS).
Do not write anything else in ALL CAPS. Do not use ALL CAPS to sign
your email message.

Other rules and guidelines are listed at our website under "Discussion
Group House Rules and Netiquette" at:

http://www.jewishgen.org/GerSIG/email.htm

Messages that don't comply with our list rules will not be posted.

John Paul Lowens, NY NY USA Suburbs <gersig@aol.com>


Seeking: Treuhaft Family #hungary

Henry <henry@...>
 

Hi all,

Has anyone ever heard or come across a family surname called Treuhaft?

Thank You

Henry Schwartz


German SIG #Germany Reminder - Rules for writing E-mail to this Forum #germany

gersig@...
 

Please follow the rules for writing email to this list. The rules were
made for the benefit of all members and the GerSIG
Moderators will not approve email >from members who ignore those rules.

Remember to:
Sign every email to this list with your full name then your city and
state of residence (as per my own signing, below).

Write the last names / surnames / family names of people you are
researching in ALL CAPITAL LETTERS (ALL CAPS).
Do not write anything else in ALL CAPS. Do not use ALL CAPS to sign
your email message.

Other rules and guidelines are listed at our website under "Discussion
Group House Rules and Netiquette" at:

http://www.jewishgen.org/GerSIG/email.htm

Messages that don't comply with our list rules will not be posted.

John Paul Lowens, NY NY USA Suburbs <gersig@aol.com>


Hungary SIG #Hungary Seeking: Treuhaft Family #hungary

Henry <henry@...>
 

Hi all,

Has anyone ever heard or come across a family surname called Treuhaft?

Thank You

Henry Schwartz


Re: Vital Records - Germany mid 1800's #germany

Roger Lustig <trovato@...>
 

Dear Geoff:
No, I haven't encountered first-before-last and last-before-first in the
same table of records. Could you post an example to ViewMate?

More than one given name: not at all unlikely. Moreover, the second
given name was often the patronym, and sometimes the patronym-surname
combination was wielded like a surname. But a simple pair of given
names was also entirely possible. My great-great-grandfather, born in
1831, was named Jakob Simon TROPLOWITZ. His father was named Salomon,
so Simon isn't a patronym. Jakob Simon (who usually went by Simon) had
a brother named Simon Ludwig, who later tended to go by Louis.
Obviously double given names here and not patronyms.

Protocols: I think the most important stricture was consistency within a
single register. The content, layout, and indexing of registers varied
wildly >from place to place. For instance, in Sohrau in Upper Silesia,
the 1812-1836 birth register gives the father's name but rarely the
mother's! The father's occupation is rarely given either. A few cities
away, in Gleiwitz, you get:
--father's name and occupation;
--mother's name and maiden name, often with patronym (e.g., Barbara geb.
Daniel FEIST);
--mohel for boys, name-advisor for girls, generally with residence and
occupation;
--usually one or two witnesses/godparents complete with residence and
(if male) occupation or (if female) maiden name, husband's name and
profession.

Some registers seem to have been kept entirely by the civil
authorities. Others have Hebrew writing in them, often right next to
the citizenship number or similar administrative item.

Having transcribed or proofread Prussian tabular registers of the
1812-1847 period >from at least a dozen places (all in Silesia) and
looked at several more >from elsewhere in now-Polish Prussia I can only
say that each new one contains a surprise or six.

After 1847 the tabular records are rarer. Instead, you get the verbose
form, with all of the information strung together into one unwieldy
sentence, >from which you have to separate the actual information >from
the boilerplate. Those are closer to conforming to a single standard,
though even there the amount of information recorded (especially for
marriages) may vary >from register to register.

Thank heaven for aspirin!

By the way, all of the above may be entirely irrelevant for Posen, where
surnames themselves were not universal until fairly late. The Prussian
reforms of 1812 didn't all apply to Posen, which was not fully
integrated into Prussia until 1847 (I think). The citizenship/surname
register of 1834/5 (ably transcribed by Ed. Luft) clearly doesn't
represent anywhere near the total of Jewish families. Having spent very
little time with Posen materials to date, I can only comment on my
experience with materials >from the rest of Prussia. Best,

Roger Lustig Princeton, NJ <trovato@verizon.net>
researching Upper Silesia (and cousins everywhere)


German SIG #Germany Re: Vital Records - Germany mid 1800's #germany

Roger Lustig <trovato@...>
 

Dear Geoff:
No, I haven't encountered first-before-last and last-before-first in the
same table of records. Could you post an example to ViewMate?

More than one given name: not at all unlikely. Moreover, the second
given name was often the patronym, and sometimes the patronym-surname
combination was wielded like a surname. But a simple pair of given
names was also entirely possible. My great-great-grandfather, born in
1831, was named Jakob Simon TROPLOWITZ. His father was named Salomon,
so Simon isn't a patronym. Jakob Simon (who usually went by Simon) had
a brother named Simon Ludwig, who later tended to go by Louis.
Obviously double given names here and not patronyms.

Protocols: I think the most important stricture was consistency within a
single register. The content, layout, and indexing of registers varied
wildly >from place to place. For instance, in Sohrau in Upper Silesia,
the 1812-1836 birth register gives the father's name but rarely the
mother's! The father's occupation is rarely given either. A few cities
away, in Gleiwitz, you get:
--father's name and occupation;
--mother's name and maiden name, often with patronym (e.g., Barbara geb.
Daniel FEIST);
--mohel for boys, name-advisor for girls, generally with residence and
occupation;
--usually one or two witnesses/godparents complete with residence and
(if male) occupation or (if female) maiden name, husband's name and
profession.

Some registers seem to have been kept entirely by the civil
authorities. Others have Hebrew writing in them, often right next to
the citizenship number or similar administrative item.

Having transcribed or proofread Prussian tabular registers of the
1812-1847 period >from at least a dozen places (all in Silesia) and
looked at several more >from elsewhere in now-Polish Prussia I can only
say that each new one contains a surprise or six.

After 1847 the tabular records are rarer. Instead, you get the verbose
form, with all of the information strung together into one unwieldy
sentence, >from which you have to separate the actual information >from
the boilerplate. Those are closer to conforming to a single standard,
though even there the amount of information recorded (especially for
marriages) may vary >from register to register.

Thank heaven for aspirin!

By the way, all of the above may be entirely irrelevant for Posen, where
surnames themselves were not universal until fairly late. The Prussian
reforms of 1812 didn't all apply to Posen, which was not fully
integrated into Prussia until 1847 (I think). The citizenship/surname
register of 1834/5 (ably transcribed by Ed. Luft) clearly doesn't
represent anywhere near the total of Jewish families. Having spent very
little time with Posen materials to date, I can only comment on my
experience with materials >from the rest of Prussia. Best,

Roger Lustig Princeton, NJ <trovato@verizon.net>
researching Upper Silesia (and cousins everywhere)