Date   

Seeking: Heinrich FINKELSTEIN MD #general

Arthur Sugerman
 

Heinrich FINKELSTEIN was born 1865 in Leipzig and died 1942 in Santiago de Chile.
He was a very prominent pediatrician whose name is on a street in Berlin and a
prize given by the North German Pediatric Society. His bio is in the Encyclopedia
Judaica, the Neue Deutsche Biographie and other reference works but none of these
mentions his parentage or names of siblings, although he had a brother, a surgeon,
who died young, and a sister. I am looking for a connection to Agathe Finkelstein
who married Max HIRSCH, founder of the Humboldt Academy and Hirsch-Duncker
Gewerkverein.
If you have any information or suggestions for further research please get in
touch.
Arthur Sugerman


Re: Seeking: KOMAROVSKY, Khodorkov #general

Alexander Sharon
 

Michael G. Kramer wrote:

n 1922 My father Ysrul KOMAROVSKY (who became Joe KRAMER in USA at age 12) son
of Josef KOMAROVSKY left with his father the shtetl Khodorkov (Zhitomir oblast)
west of Kiev.
I would love to hear >from anyone knowing about Khodorkov or who may be or know
of KOMAROVSKY family.
Dear Michael,

JGFF (JewishGen Family Finder) database lists already 23 reserchers (42 entries)
associated with town Khodorkov. Surname Komarovsky is not listed. To commemorate
your family you should join JGFF and list Komarovsky for Khodorkov.

JGFF also list three entries for Komorovsky (exact spelling) form Kyiv and
Gornostaypol, village north of Kyiv.

BTW,
The ex Russian bilionaire chap Mikhail Borisovich Khodorkovsky who just a year
ago, in 2004, was rated as the 16th richest person in the world, had also his
roots in Khodorkov.

Pity that he didn't manage to donate his money to the JewishGen projects prior to
transfer it to the Russian Treasury.
--
Regards,

Alexander Sharon
JGFF editor
***
MODERATOR NOTE: You can search the JGFF and enter your own surname search at
http://www.jewishgen.org/jgff/


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Seeking: Heinrich FINKELSTEIN MD #general

Arthur Sugerman
 

Heinrich FINKELSTEIN was born 1865 in Leipzig and died 1942 in Santiago de Chile.
He was a very prominent pediatrician whose name is on a street in Berlin and a
prize given by the North German Pediatric Society. His bio is in the Encyclopedia
Judaica, the Neue Deutsche Biographie and other reference works but none of these
mentions his parentage or names of siblings, although he had a brother, a surgeon,
who died young, and a sister. I am looking for a connection to Agathe Finkelstein
who married Max HIRSCH, founder of the Humboldt Academy and Hirsch-Duncker
Gewerkverein.
If you have any information or suggestions for further research please get in
touch.
Arthur Sugerman


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Seeking: KOMAROVSKY, Khodorkov #general

Alexander Sharon
 

Michael G. Kramer wrote:

n 1922 My father Ysrul KOMAROVSKY (who became Joe KRAMER in USA at age 12) son
of Josef KOMAROVSKY left with his father the shtetl Khodorkov (Zhitomir oblast)
west of Kiev.
I would love to hear >from anyone knowing about Khodorkov or who may be or know
of KOMAROVSKY family.
Dear Michael,

JGFF (JewishGen Family Finder) database lists already 23 reserchers (42 entries)
associated with town Khodorkov. Surname Komarovsky is not listed. To commemorate
your family you should join JGFF and list Komarovsky for Khodorkov.

JGFF also list three entries for Komorovsky (exact spelling) form Kyiv and
Gornostaypol, village north of Kyiv.

BTW,
The ex Russian bilionaire chap Mikhail Borisovich Khodorkovsky who just a year
ago, in 2004, was rated as the 16th richest person in the world, had also his
roots in Khodorkov.

Pity that he didn't manage to donate his money to the JewishGen projects prior to
transfer it to the Russian Treasury.
--
Regards,

Alexander Sharon
JGFF editor
***
MODERATOR NOTE: You can search the JGFF and enter your own surname search at
http://www.jewishgen.org/jgff/


Seeking: MILGROM, Australia #general

Marilyn F <mrl516@...>
 

I am looking for Boris MILGROM in Australia. His father was Isaac and he has a
son.I believe Boris works as a computer programmer. If you know Boris, please
contact me. I believe he is my relative. Thanks. Marilyn Feingold USA

MILGROM,KORMAN-Tulchin SCHLAFFER, SZAFIR-Kamenka ( Moldova)
PEKARSKY/SOKOLOFSKY-Tashkent/Israel STEINBERG/LERNER/ELKUS/MILGROM/Kishinev/Odessa
TESLER/MALAMUD/LUBER-Kamenka (Moldova) KOLKER/TARTAKOV/SPIVAK-Obodivaka
FELDMAN, SHENKER-Obodivka ROSENTHAL-Worone/Pittsburgh
MILTER-Kodima (Moldova) TONKONOGY-Frunza (Tashkent)


Descendants of Jacob & Mary HERZBACH, Chicago>MN>OK? #general

shertzbach@...
 

I am seeking information on descendants of Jacob and Mary (STERN) HERZBACH of
Chicago IL. Some children seem to have moved to Minneapolis MN and Tulsa OK. Here
is an outline of what I know.

Jacob HERZBACH and Mary/Miriam STERN were married 11 Feb 1900 in the East London
Synagogue. (Rabbi Joseph F. Stern)
Three daughters were born while they lived at 115 Brady Street Buildings in
London: Betty/Bessie (11 Aug 1901), Sophy/Sophia (26 Mar 1903), and
Polly/Pauline/Paula (15 May 1905). A 4th daughter Cielie/Celia/Cele was born in
Chicago about 1910. (4 May 1910?) Mary was naturalized in 1942. Jacob died 20
March 1919, and Mary died 19 Feb 1950.

In her petition for naturalization, Mary stated that Bessie and Paula resided in
Minneapolis, and Sophia and Cele in Chicago.

What I found elsewhere implies that:
Sophia Married jack RUBEY, moved to Minneapolis, and died July 1983. (SSDI)

A Paula Herzbach married David Ralph MILLER, and gave birth to "Baby Boy Miller"
on 4 Sep 1937 in Hennepin County MN. She also gave birth to Jerome Mendle Miller
13 Dec 1938. in Hennepin County MN.
A Paula Miller is listed in the SSDI with the same dob, as died March 1980; SSN
issued in Oklahoma (1959-1960), Last benefit in Tulsa OK.

If you happen to know anything about the children or other descendants of Jacob
and Mary HERZBACH, please contact me privately, at
stan.hertzbach@comcast.net
--
Stan Hertzbach
Amherst MA, USA

Searching:
HER(T)ZBACH: Latvia; London, England; Anywhere
KAWETZKI/KAWCHKI/COHN: Brest Litovsk, Belarus; Baltimore MD
TURSHINSKY and PACKOUZ: Kolki or Osova, Ukraine
DEMBO: Latvia (Riga ?) GREENFELD: Panevezys, Lithuania
SAVAL/SCHOLOVITCH: Latvia; Lithuania; London, England; US
ZOLOTIROFF and RABINOWITZ: Nizhyn/Nezin, Ukraine; Baltimore MD


Seeking: Maria EISENBERG (FRIEDMANN) #general

My Sharona <sharona@...>
 

Please, please help me to find this information for my grandmother. All I know is
that she was in Germany during that time and was married to a man with the last
name FRIEDMANN. I need to get as much information as possible and quickly; I have
looked on my own, but have not had any success and am letting my grandmother down.

Please feel free to call or write and any and all help will be greatly
appreciated!

Sharona London Sharona@London.com
***
MODERATOR NOTE: If you are just getting started, you may want to review the
JewishGen FAQs and the list of JewishGen InfoFiles at
http://www.jewishgen.org/infofiles/faq.html and
http://www.jewishgen.org/infofiles/ for research suggestions and resources.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Seeking: MILGROM, Australia #general

Marilyn F <mrl516@...>
 

I am looking for Boris MILGROM in Australia. His father was Isaac and he has a
son.I believe Boris works as a computer programmer. If you know Boris, please
contact me. I believe he is my relative. Thanks. Marilyn Feingold USA

MILGROM,KORMAN-Tulchin SCHLAFFER, SZAFIR-Kamenka ( Moldova)
PEKARSKY/SOKOLOFSKY-Tashkent/Israel STEINBERG/LERNER/ELKUS/MILGROM/Kishinev/Odessa
TESLER/MALAMUD/LUBER-Kamenka (Moldova) KOLKER/TARTAKOV/SPIVAK-Obodivaka
FELDMAN, SHENKER-Obodivka ROSENTHAL-Worone/Pittsburgh
MILTER-Kodima (Moldova) TONKONOGY-Frunza (Tashkent)


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Descendants of Jacob & Mary HERZBACH, Chicago>MN>OK? #general

shertzbach@...
 

I am seeking information on descendants of Jacob and Mary (STERN) HERZBACH of
Chicago IL. Some children seem to have moved to Minneapolis MN and Tulsa OK. Here
is an outline of what I know.

Jacob HERZBACH and Mary/Miriam STERN were married 11 Feb 1900 in the East London
Synagogue. (Rabbi Joseph F. Stern)
Three daughters were born while they lived at 115 Brady Street Buildings in
London: Betty/Bessie (11 Aug 1901), Sophy/Sophia (26 Mar 1903), and
Polly/Pauline/Paula (15 May 1905). A 4th daughter Cielie/Celia/Cele was born in
Chicago about 1910. (4 May 1910?) Mary was naturalized in 1942. Jacob died 20
March 1919, and Mary died 19 Feb 1950.

In her petition for naturalization, Mary stated that Bessie and Paula resided in
Minneapolis, and Sophia and Cele in Chicago.

What I found elsewhere implies that:
Sophia Married jack RUBEY, moved to Minneapolis, and died July 1983. (SSDI)

A Paula Herzbach married David Ralph MILLER, and gave birth to "Baby Boy Miller"
on 4 Sep 1937 in Hennepin County MN. She also gave birth to Jerome Mendle Miller
13 Dec 1938. in Hennepin County MN.
A Paula Miller is listed in the SSDI with the same dob, as died March 1980; SSN
issued in Oklahoma (1959-1960), Last benefit in Tulsa OK.

If you happen to know anything about the children or other descendants of Jacob
and Mary HERZBACH, please contact me privately, at
stan.hertzbach@comcast.net
--
Stan Hertzbach
Amherst MA, USA

Searching:
HER(T)ZBACH: Latvia; London, England; Anywhere
KAWETZKI/KAWCHKI/COHN: Brest Litovsk, Belarus; Baltimore MD
TURSHINSKY and PACKOUZ: Kolki or Osova, Ukraine
DEMBO: Latvia (Riga ?) GREENFELD: Panevezys, Lithuania
SAVAL/SCHOLOVITCH: Latvia; Lithuania; London, England; US
ZOLOTIROFF and RABINOWITZ: Nizhyn/Nezin, Ukraine; Baltimore MD


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Seeking: Maria EISENBERG (FRIEDMANN) #general

My Sharona <sharona@...>
 

Please, please help me to find this information for my grandmother. All I know is
that she was in Germany during that time and was married to a man with the last
name FRIEDMANN. I need to get as much information as possible and quickly; I have
looked on my own, but have not had any success and am letting my grandmother down.

Please feel free to call or write and any and all help will be greatly
appreciated!

Sharona London Sharona@London.com
***
MODERATOR NOTE: If you are just getting started, you may want to review the
JewishGen FAQs and the list of JewishGen InfoFiles at
http://www.jewishgen.org/infofiles/faq.html and
http://www.jewishgen.org/infofiles/ for research suggestions and resources.


Letter to Polish Archives #general

RuthFire@...
 

I am sending a letter to the Warsaw Archives and I would like to know if I can
send it in English or must I have it translated? Also will they accept a U.S.
Postal Money Order? Thank you. Ruth Vidaver Firestone, Newington, CT


The names "Biniem" and "Benyamin" #general

Doug Mason
 

According to family tradition (records for Kurow, Poland are not publicly
available), around 1876 Simha Biniem MANDELBAUM had a son named Benyamin. Are the
names "Biniem" and "Benyamin" variants of one another?

The same family tradition says that Benyamin was not the youngest child.
Is it likely a son would be named after his living father?

Doug Mason
Melbourne
Australia
***
MODERATOR NOTE: A file about given names with a conversion tool can be found at:
http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/GivenNames


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Letter to Polish Archives #general

RuthFire@...
 

I am sending a letter to the Warsaw Archives and I would like to know if I can
send it in English or must I have it translated? Also will they accept a U.S.
Postal Money Order? Thank you. Ruth Vidaver Firestone, Newington, CT


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen The names "Biniem" and "Benyamin" #general

Doug Mason
 

According to family tradition (records for Kurow, Poland are not publicly
available), around 1876 Simha Biniem MANDELBAUM had a son named Benyamin. Are the
names "Biniem" and "Benyamin" variants of one another?

The same family tradition says that Benyamin was not the youngest child.
Is it likely a son would be named after his living father?

Doug Mason
Melbourne
Australia
***
MODERATOR NOTE: A file about given names with a conversion tool can be found at:
http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/GivenNames


Houston Street, New York Shuls #general

Lauren Shulsky Orenstein
 

Does anyone know about shuls on Houston Street in Manhattan that were converted to
day care centers in the early 1970's? Or, alternately, does anyone know a way to
get this info. I am looking for an address; shul names are less important.

Please repsond privately, as I am not monitoring the list consistently.

Thanks so much for any help.

-Andrew Orenstein
aorenstein@harrisbeach.com


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Houston Street, New York Shuls #general

Lauren Shulsky Orenstein
 

Does anyone know about shuls on Houston Street in Manhattan that were converted to
day care centers in the early 1970's? Or, alternately, does anyone know a way to
get this info. I am looking for an address; shul names are less important.

Please repsond privately, as I am not monitoring the list consistently.

Thanks so much for any help.

-Andrew Orenstein
aorenstein@harrisbeach.com


Re: Publishing Genealogies #general

Simon Tardell
 

Stan Goodman wrote:

It is indeed possible to bowdlerize a genealogy in deference to the neurotically
defensive. Remember that you are gathering this information as a way to preserve
information for the future, and that anything you omit because the person is
still alive is lost forever -- nobody, after you are gone, is going to fill in
the details as the nervous nellies die off.
I don't agree. The discussion was about publishing as in making publicly available
on the internet. No information is *lost* if you choose not to do that, or if you
choose to omit data on living people when publishing. The data in your unpublished
database remains. Also, this is not an all-or-nothing situation. Sharing your
data, your full data, with family you know and trust, is an entirely different
matter.

What is true is that it is foolish in many ways to publish sensitive and
identifying details, sometimes even of dead persons. Dates/places of birth,
marriage, and death are already matters of public record. You are not releasing
secrets into the public domain by publishing them.
Again, secret is not an absolute, it is the degree of difficulty in obtaining
information. Information available through a search with Google is ostensibly much
less secret than information available through public record only (or being called
out by the gabbai in your local shul). There used to be a sign in railroad cars in
Sweden saying "The opportunity makes the thief", it applies here as well: The more
difficult it is to obtain information, the less likely is it someone will bother
to use it for sinister purposes. If it were otherwise, genealogy would be much
easier.

Also, public record is not unconditionally public. Maybe your cousin has
protected identity and changed names and addresses because her husband used to
beat her up. Maybe *you* got the information on her through some family relation
who didn't realize you were going to publish it on the Internet.

Inevitably this discussion seems to turn to identity theft, and that may be a
problem, but it is definitely not the only problem that can arise >from publishing
personal information. There is the hide-and-seek of the ex-wife and the ex-husband
I mentioned. There are other reasons for harassing people, of course. Some people
may have taken offence with your father's business practice and would like to get
even, but decide to take it out on a family member who happens to get in their way
instead. Maybe you have a gay relative who has not come out in his workplace yet.

And, I understand this is not a problem in Israel, in some countries some people
fancy making list of Jews. This is a fear strong enough that the Jewish
communities in Sweden do not collect their membership fees through the tax
returns, even though it would be much cheaper, because that would mean that there
would be a public database of all Jews in the country.

Once again there is no way you can know what concerns are valid for other members
of your family tree, so if you don't have their consent, filter them out before
publishing. As I mentioned, this is actually a EU directive, and one reason I'd
favour to see Israel as member. The same directive also forbids the export of
personal data of non-consenters to a third country which effectively means that
Europeans that participate in the FTJP are breaking the law.

Simon Tardell,
Stockholm, Sweden.


Re: publishing genealogies redux #general

Sam Schleman <Samara99@...>
 

I hate to contribute to the beating of this topic to death, but I will anyway.

Why not create two "web sites?"

One web site would leave out all the details and information that relate to
privacy, identify theft, or whatever. That web site would be published to the
Internet and would enable relatives and interested parties to "find" you and
contribute to what you already know.

The second "web site" would contain all the gory details that you have amassed in
your research, but would not be published on the Internet. Instead, it would be
put on a CD. That CD could be cheaply copied and distributed to interested
relatives only, and would provide a means to ensure the preservation of your
research. The cost of a CD and a mailer plus postage would amount to less than $3
each. Send a copy to any relative who sends you $5 to cover your costs. Anyone who
won't pay you $5 for the CD isn't really interested in their family history
anyway. Since it's not in the public eye, no one's privacy should be compromised,
unless you have an identity thief in your family.

It seems to me that two conflicting ends are being mixed together in this
discussion: The need to create a web site so you can be "found" and the need to
provide and preserve your detailed research.

Since one "web site" is a subset of the other, it shouldn't require a whole lot of
additional work. Putting a web site on a CD is also a big advantage for all those
relatives with older, slower computers with dial-up connections. Since everything
is on the CD, it's very fast to zoom around despite connection and/or processor
speed.

<As for the recently dead, a good rule of thumb is to consider the privacy rules
<SNIP>

Sam Schleman
Malvern, PA


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Publishing Genealogies #general

Simon Tardell
 

Stan Goodman wrote:

It is indeed possible to bowdlerize a genealogy in deference to the neurotically
defensive. Remember that you are gathering this information as a way to preserve
information for the future, and that anything you omit because the person is
still alive is lost forever -- nobody, after you are gone, is going to fill in
the details as the nervous nellies die off.
I don't agree. The discussion was about publishing as in making publicly available
on the internet. No information is *lost* if you choose not to do that, or if you
choose to omit data on living people when publishing. The data in your unpublished
database remains. Also, this is not an all-or-nothing situation. Sharing your
data, your full data, with family you know and trust, is an entirely different
matter.

What is true is that it is foolish in many ways to publish sensitive and
identifying details, sometimes even of dead persons. Dates/places of birth,
marriage, and death are already matters of public record. You are not releasing
secrets into the public domain by publishing them.
Again, secret is not an absolute, it is the degree of difficulty in obtaining
information. Information available through a search with Google is ostensibly much
less secret than information available through public record only (or being called
out by the gabbai in your local shul). There used to be a sign in railroad cars in
Sweden saying "The opportunity makes the thief", it applies here as well: The more
difficult it is to obtain information, the less likely is it someone will bother
to use it for sinister purposes. If it were otherwise, genealogy would be much
easier.

Also, public record is not unconditionally public. Maybe your cousin has
protected identity and changed names and addresses because her husband used to
beat her up. Maybe *you* got the information on her through some family relation
who didn't realize you were going to publish it on the Internet.

Inevitably this discussion seems to turn to identity theft, and that may be a
problem, but it is definitely not the only problem that can arise >from publishing
personal information. There is the hide-and-seek of the ex-wife and the ex-husband
I mentioned. There are other reasons for harassing people, of course. Some people
may have taken offence with your father's business practice and would like to get
even, but decide to take it out on a family member who happens to get in their way
instead. Maybe you have a gay relative who has not come out in his workplace yet.

And, I understand this is not a problem in Israel, in some countries some people
fancy making list of Jews. This is a fear strong enough that the Jewish
communities in Sweden do not collect their membership fees through the tax
returns, even though it would be much cheaper, because that would mean that there
would be a public database of all Jews in the country.

Once again there is no way you can know what concerns are valid for other members
of your family tree, so if you don't have their consent, filter them out before
publishing. As I mentioned, this is actually a EU directive, and one reason I'd
favour to see Israel as member. The same directive also forbids the export of
personal data of non-consenters to a third country which effectively means that
Europeans that participate in the FTJP are breaking the law.

Simon Tardell,
Stockholm, Sweden.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: publishing genealogies redux #general

Sam Schleman <Samara99@...>
 

I hate to contribute to the beating of this topic to death, but I will anyway.

Why not create two "web sites?"

One web site would leave out all the details and information that relate to
privacy, identify theft, or whatever. That web site would be published to the
Internet and would enable relatives and interested parties to "find" you and
contribute to what you already know.

The second "web site" would contain all the gory details that you have amassed in
your research, but would not be published on the Internet. Instead, it would be
put on a CD. That CD could be cheaply copied and distributed to interested
relatives only, and would provide a means to ensure the preservation of your
research. The cost of a CD and a mailer plus postage would amount to less than $3
each. Send a copy to any relative who sends you $5 to cover your costs. Anyone who
won't pay you $5 for the CD isn't really interested in their family history
anyway. Since it's not in the public eye, no one's privacy should be compromised,
unless you have an identity thief in your family.

It seems to me that two conflicting ends are being mixed together in this
discussion: The need to create a web site so you can be "found" and the need to
provide and preserve your detailed research.

Since one "web site" is a subset of the other, it shouldn't require a whole lot of
additional work. Putting a web site on a CD is also a big advantage for all those
relatives with older, slower computers with dial-up connections. Since everything
is on the CD, it's very fast to zoom around despite connection and/or processor
speed.

<As for the recently dead, a good rule of thumb is to consider the privacy rules
<SNIP>

Sam Schleman
Malvern, PA