Date   

Re: Seek advice about MICHAELIS ancestors just recognized as Jewish #germany

Roger Lustig <trovato@...>
 

Dear Lorraine:

There have been many Jews with the surname MICHAELIS. Someone named Max
Paul MICHAELIS may have been Jewish--or not. That he was murdered by
Nazi criminals doesn't make him Jewish, of course--the Nazis found lots
of people to murder. You may indeed have Jewish ancestors, and I wish
you all the best of luck in your research--no matter what the outcome. But:

What Internet checking told you that the name MICHAELIS is Jewish? I
just did some myself, and found tons of Gentile MICHAELISes in Germany.

For starters, there's always the phone book.

www.dastelefonbuch.de

gives you the whole country at a glance. There are businesses and
multiple listings, so take their counts and divide by two. 400+
listings for MICHAELIS in Berlin; 182 in Hamburg; 87 in Bremen; and so
on. And that's in 2005!

Next, hop over to www.familysearch.org and search for the name in
Germany. Again, lots of listings. Many are baptismal records. Many
more come >from before 1800, when very few Jews had surnames at all.

The name MICHAELIS is a Latinized possessive: "of Michael." It's always
used when referring to a church of St. Michael: that's a
Michaelis-Kirche. Latinized names are not uncommon in Germany: the
composer Michael PRAETORIUS was Michael SCHULZE before he translated
himself. Some even used Greek, like Luther's colleague Philipp
MELANCHTHON (black earth), who was Philipp SCHWARZERD (black earth) to
his parents.

In general, there are hardly any surnames that, by themselves, indicate
a high probability that a person or his/her ancestry was Jewish. That's
true in Germany and elsewhere. The only reliable exceptions are rare
surnames that were only used by one family, where that family was
Jewish. There are several names I've worked with that most likely fall
into that category--but they obviously won't ever add up to a large
percentage of the population.

That said, you should contact the Standesamt (registry office) in
Charlottenburg [note spelling!], which is part of Berlin. (There *is* a
Charlottenberg in Hessen, but it had a population of under 200 in the
1930's, so I'm going to assume you meant the one in Berlin.) You might
also share with us the names of her parents. Does she have any old
passports of theirs, or other papers?

There's more than one researcher listed on the JewishGen Family Finder
who's into MICHAELIS/Berlin, and you can contact them with a
query--that's why they're listed.

Best of luck, and keep in touch!

Roger Lustig Princeton, NJ
...whose mother was born in Charlottenburg, too!

Lorraine Garcia wrote:

I'm wondering if I can perhaps get some guidance in this particular
matter. My mother was born in Charlottenberg, Germany, and came to the
US as an infant alone with only her parents. Her parents never told her
anything but the sketchiest details of her relatives or their past. As
I was talking with her today she said she wanted to do some family
history research. We did some internet checking and found that her
family surname, MICHAELIS is Jewish, at least in Germany. We have a
family picture of my great grandfather, Max Paul MICHAELIS, on which my
grandfather wrote he was "murdered by Nazi criminals" in 1944. Until
yesterday, we had no idea, and please forgive our ignorance, that
MICHAELIS was a Jewish surname. So you can imagine our shock when we
realized that many of our family may have died in death camps. This is
rather overwhelming information for us and we feel an urgent need to
find out the truth about our ancestry. Any suggestions for information
would be welcome. Also, any information about the MICHAELIS family in
Germany would be greatly appreciated.


German SIG #Germany Re: Seek advice about MICHAELIS ancestors just recognized as Jewish #germany

Roger Lustig <trovato@...>
 

Dear Lorraine:

There have been many Jews with the surname MICHAELIS. Someone named Max
Paul MICHAELIS may have been Jewish--or not. That he was murdered by
Nazi criminals doesn't make him Jewish, of course--the Nazis found lots
of people to murder. You may indeed have Jewish ancestors, and I wish
you all the best of luck in your research--no matter what the outcome. But:

What Internet checking told you that the name MICHAELIS is Jewish? I
just did some myself, and found tons of Gentile MICHAELISes in Germany.

For starters, there's always the phone book.

www.dastelefonbuch.de

gives you the whole country at a glance. There are businesses and
multiple listings, so take their counts and divide by two. 400+
listings for MICHAELIS in Berlin; 182 in Hamburg; 87 in Bremen; and so
on. And that's in 2005!

Next, hop over to www.familysearch.org and search for the name in
Germany. Again, lots of listings. Many are baptismal records. Many
more come >from before 1800, when very few Jews had surnames at all.

The name MICHAELIS is a Latinized possessive: "of Michael." It's always
used when referring to a church of St. Michael: that's a
Michaelis-Kirche. Latinized names are not uncommon in Germany: the
composer Michael PRAETORIUS was Michael SCHULZE before he translated
himself. Some even used Greek, like Luther's colleague Philipp
MELANCHTHON (black earth), who was Philipp SCHWARZERD (black earth) to
his parents.

In general, there are hardly any surnames that, by themselves, indicate
a high probability that a person or his/her ancestry was Jewish. That's
true in Germany and elsewhere. The only reliable exceptions are rare
surnames that were only used by one family, where that family was
Jewish. There are several names I've worked with that most likely fall
into that category--but they obviously won't ever add up to a large
percentage of the population.

That said, you should contact the Standesamt (registry office) in
Charlottenburg [note spelling!], which is part of Berlin. (There *is* a
Charlottenberg in Hessen, but it had a population of under 200 in the
1930's, so I'm going to assume you meant the one in Berlin.) You might
also share with us the names of her parents. Does she have any old
passports of theirs, or other papers?

There's more than one researcher listed on the JewishGen Family Finder
who's into MICHAELIS/Berlin, and you can contact them with a
query--that's why they're listed.

Best of luck, and keep in touch!

Roger Lustig Princeton, NJ
...whose mother was born in Charlottenburg, too!

Lorraine Garcia wrote:

I'm wondering if I can perhaps get some guidance in this particular
matter. My mother was born in Charlottenberg, Germany, and came to the
US as an infant alone with only her parents. Her parents never told her
anything but the sketchiest details of her relatives or their past. As
I was talking with her today she said she wanted to do some family
history research. We did some internet checking and found that her
family surname, MICHAELIS is Jewish, at least in Germany. We have a
family picture of my great grandfather, Max Paul MICHAELIS, on which my
grandfather wrote he was "murdered by Nazi criminals" in 1944. Until
yesterday, we had no idea, and please forgive our ignorance, that
MICHAELIS was a Jewish surname. So you can imagine our shock when we
realized that many of our family may have died in death camps. This is
rather overwhelming information for us and we feel an urgent need to
find out the truth about our ancestry. Any suggestions for information
would be welcome. Also, any information about the MICHAELIS family in
Germany would be greatly appreciated.


Afrikaans Spellcheck #southafrica

Saul Issroff <saul@...>
 

Colin Pretorius, of the e-GSSA digest has advised about a good Afrikaans
spell-checker that has been posted on the Sa Genealogie mailing list,
www.wspel.co.za

Highly recommended for anyone who does any sort of work in Afrikaans.

Thanks to Colin in Australia.

Saul


South Africa SIG #SouthAfrica Afrikaans Spellcheck #southafrica

Saul Issroff <saul@...>
 

Colin Pretorius, of the e-GSSA digest has advised about a good Afrikaans
spell-checker that has been posted on the Sa Genealogie mailing list,
www.wspel.co.za

Highly recommended for anyone who does any sort of work in Afrikaans.

Thanks to Colin in Australia.

Saul


Re: SA Country Communities Vol. 2 #southafrica

stan hart <stanhart@...>
 

Dear Genners

I respect what has been said by Saul about the book "Jewish Life in SA
Country Communities Vol 2" and am sure that it will be a must for anyone
tracing the families of those who lived in the area covered by the book.

However, I will disagree with Saul's last statement ..... "For me it has
also highlighted, again, the problem of no equivalent project
for the 'urban' Jews of the cities of South Africa."

There is a team of writers and compilers working feverishly in Durban to
finalise a major work which will be published on the Durban Jewish
community. This obviously takes into account the previous two works in
the past, and traces the history of families, personalities, those in
professions, art, drama, music and sport almost to the present day.
Hopefully this work will be completed within the next year. I will keep
you posted on progress.

Stan Hart


South Africa SIG #SouthAfrica Re: SA Country Communities Vol. 2 #southafrica

stan hart <stanhart@...>
 

Dear Genners

I respect what has been said by Saul about the book "Jewish Life in SA
Country Communities Vol 2" and am sure that it will be a must for anyone
tracing the families of those who lived in the area covered by the book.

However, I will disagree with Saul's last statement ..... "For me it has
also highlighted, again, the problem of no equivalent project
for the 'urban' Jews of the cities of South Africa."

There is a team of writers and compilers working feverishly in Durban to
finalise a major work which will be published on the Durban Jewish
community. This obviously takes into account the previous two works in
the past, and traces the history of families, personalities, those in
professions, art, drama, music and sport almost to the present day.
Hopefully this work will be completed within the next year. I will keep
you posted on progress.

Stan Hart


Smikha in Palestine #rabbinic

malkajef <malkajef@...>
 

What was the procedure for obtaining a rabbinical smikha in Tiberias
and Sfad during the period 1895 to 1901? Were there several
institutions that granted it? Were records kept somewhere? Where?

My gradfather who became a Sephardic rabbi there during that period
told a story of being "examined by 3 Ashkenazi rabbis" when he
obtained his smikha. I am trying to locate records of his
"ordination," if that is the correct term.

Thank you.

Jeff Malka
(searching for records of Rabbi Shlomo MALKA).


Rabbinic Genealogy SIG #Rabbinic Smikha in Palestine #rabbinic

malkajef <malkajef@...>
 

What was the procedure for obtaining a rabbinical smikha in Tiberias
and Sfad during the period 1895 to 1901? Were there several
institutions that granted it? Were records kept somewhere? Where?

My gradfather who became a Sephardic rabbi there during that period
told a story of being "examined by 3 Ashkenazi rabbis" when he
obtained his smikha. I am trying to locate records of his
"ordination," if that is the correct term.

Thank you.

Jeff Malka
(searching for records of Rabbi Shlomo MALKA).


RE. Care of Gravestones [in Germany] #germany

Justin Levy <levyduffy@...>
 

Many thanks to everyone for their comments and advice.
On reflection, it was probably not clear that I was really interested in knowing
whether there would be any religious reasons for not having the gravestone re-set.

The guide who showed me round is an 82-year-old retired Evangelical minister,
who has devoted the last 20 years to researching the small community of
Bad Segeberg and ensuring the conservation of the small cemetery.

He explained to me that a post-war German government and the Central Council of
the Jews of Germany agreed that the former would pay for the maintenance and
upkeep of all the surviving Jewish cemeteries. In the recent past, some of the
newly established or re-established communities have taken on the responsibility
for the upkeep.

In this case, as in many others, a well-intentioned non-Jew does not believe that
he has the right to interfere with the gravestones themselves. I wanted to put his
mind at rest. Regards,

Justin Levy (Dublin, Ireland) <levyduffy@eircom.net>


German SIG #Germany RE. Care of Gravestones [in Germany] #germany

Justin Levy <levyduffy@...>
 

Many thanks to everyone for their comments and advice.
On reflection, it was probably not clear that I was really interested in knowing
whether there would be any religious reasons for not having the gravestone re-set.

The guide who showed me round is an 82-year-old retired Evangelical minister,
who has devoted the last 20 years to researching the small community of
Bad Segeberg and ensuring the conservation of the small cemetery.

He explained to me that a post-war German government and the Central Council of
the Jews of Germany agreed that the former would pay for the maintenance and
upkeep of all the surviving Jewish cemeteries. In the recent past, some of the
newly established or re-established communities have taken on the responsibility
for the upkeep.

In this case, as in many others, a well-intentioned non-Jew does not believe that
he has the right to interfere with the gravestones themselves. I wanted to put his
mind at rest. Regards,

Justin Levy (Dublin, Ireland) <levyduffy@eircom.net>


Re: INTRO - Seeking MICHAELIS #germany

Roger Lustig <trovato@...>
 

Monica, you may have found him!

On the other hand, the Berliner Adressbuch for 1925 (site cited here
before) has no fewer than 35 entries for people named Max MICHAELIS.
Seriously. Thirty-five.

Prime candidate: Eisenbahn-Beamte Max M., Charlottenbg. Wilmersdorfer
Str. 109.110 II. In English: a railway official, living at 109-110
Wilmersdorfer Str., 2 flights up. In Germany, then as now, one
identified people by their profession far more regularly than one would do in,
say, the US. So most entries have this information.

Lorraine: does this fit?

Roger Lustig Princeton, NJ <trovato@verizon.net>

m leonards wrote:
Lorraine Garcia has just discovered that her MICHAELIS ancestors [may
have been] Jewish, and that her great-grandfather, born 1866, was
murdered in the Holocaust....
"If you go to the Yad Vashem Central Database of Holocaust Victims'
Names(http://www.yadvashem.org/wps/portal/IY_HON_Welcome) you will
find three listings >from compilations for a Max MICHAELIS, born in
1865. They are all almost certainly the same man. Compiling all the
information, it appears that _Dr._ Max MICHAELIS was born in Meseritz,
Germany; lived in Berlin; and was transported first to Theresienstadt
(a holding camp in Czechoslovakia); and >from there to Treblinka. He
died in Minsk, Belarus..........."


German SIG #Germany Re: INTRO - Seeking MICHAELIS #germany

Roger Lustig <trovato@...>
 

Monica, you may have found him!

On the other hand, the Berliner Adressbuch for 1925 (site cited here
before) has no fewer than 35 entries for people named Max MICHAELIS.
Seriously. Thirty-five.

Prime candidate: Eisenbahn-Beamte Max M., Charlottenbg. Wilmersdorfer
Str. 109.110 II. In English: a railway official, living at 109-110
Wilmersdorfer Str., 2 flights up. In Germany, then as now, one
identified people by their profession far more regularly than one would do in,
say, the US. So most entries have this information.

Lorraine: does this fit?

Roger Lustig Princeton, NJ <trovato@verizon.net>

m leonards wrote:
Lorraine Garcia has just discovered that her MICHAELIS ancestors [may
have been] Jewish, and that her great-grandfather, born 1866, was
murdered in the Holocaust....
"If you go to the Yad Vashem Central Database of Holocaust Victims'
Names(http://www.yadvashem.org/wps/portal/IY_HON_Welcome) you will
find three listings >from compilations for a Max MICHAELIS, born in
1865. They are all almost certainly the same man. Compiling all the
information, it appears that _Dr._ Max MICHAELIS was born in Meseritz,
Germany; lived in Berlin; and was transported first to Theresienstadt
(a holding camp in Czechoslovakia); and >from there to Treblinka. He
died in Minsk, Belarus..........."


Inherited photo shows gg uncle high in a NYC garden. What were they growing? #germany

Elizabeth Levy <levyliz@...>
 

Dear Friends,

I don't think I've laughed that hard in a long time. I bet lots of you did
too. This is to teach us all a valuable lesson on how important it is to
speak German if you're doing German research. I just made a fool of myself!

Thanks to everyone who gave me my first official Gersig German lesson and a
great laugh... Unser Blumengarten means our flower garden! Oy vey!

Elizabeth Levy in Israel <levyliz@smile.net.il>

[MOD NOTE: FYI that balcony is still there - Park Ave. at 58th Street. The German
Consulate used to be in the building next door - not sure if it is still.]

As I go through photos left to me by my ggaunt, I'm looking for clues as to
who most of these people can be. Occassionally I run across a name that is
clearly not our family and instead probably a friend who came to visit.
I have nothing to do with these photos and would love to pass them on to their
rightful family. The first being "Unser BLUMENGARTEN". The photo is taken on the
balcony at 480 Park Ave, 15th Fl, in New York in August 1931.
Does this sound like someone you know?
I am hoping something out there knows this man. If so, write me directly
(levyliz@smile.net.il ) and I'll be happy to send it to you.


German SIG #Germany Inherited photo shows gg uncle high in a NYC garden. What were they growing? #germany

Elizabeth Levy <levyliz@...>
 

Dear Friends,

I don't think I've laughed that hard in a long time. I bet lots of you did
too. This is to teach us all a valuable lesson on how important it is to
speak German if you're doing German research. I just made a fool of myself!

Thanks to everyone who gave me my first official Gersig German lesson and a
great laugh... Unser Blumengarten means our flower garden! Oy vey!

Elizabeth Levy in Israel <levyliz@smile.net.il>

[MOD NOTE: FYI that balcony is still there - Park Ave. at 58th Street. The German
Consulate used to be in the building next door - not sure if it is still.]

As I go through photos left to me by my ggaunt, I'm looking for clues as to
who most of these people can be. Occassionally I run across a name that is
clearly not our family and instead probably a friend who came to visit.
I have nothing to do with these photos and would love to pass them on to their
rightful family. The first being "Unser BLUMENGARTEN". The photo is taken on the
balcony at 480 Park Ave, 15th Fl, in New York in August 1931.
Does this sound like someone you know?
I am hoping something out there knows this man. If so, write me directly
(levyliz@smile.net.il ) and I'll be happy to send it to you.


Re: SA Country Communities Vol. 2 #southafrica

KelAbraz@...
 

Dear All,
I do want to bring your attention to the following two books, both richly
illustrated and referenced:
Charles Press: The Light of Israel. The story of the Paarl Jewish community.
1993.
Surdut, Esther: The First 100 Years 1904-2004. The story of the Claremont
Hebrew Congregation. 2004.
(Esther is Charles' sister)


South Africa SIG #SouthAfrica Re: Re:SA Country Communities Vol. 2 #southafrica

KelAbraz@...
 

Dear All,
I do want to bring your attention to the following two books, both richly
illustrated and referenced:
Charles Press: The Light of Israel. The story of the Paarl Jewish community.
1993.
Surdut, Esther: The First 100 Years 1904-2004. The story of the Claremont
Hebrew Congregation. 2004.
(Esther is Charles' sister)


research REDSTONE/ISAACS Family - #southafrica

ashleyd80 <ashleyd80@...>
 

Hi, I was wondering if anyone could help my research - I am researching
among other names the SACKS family. In my research I ascertained that one
of twin sisters ,with the surname of Redstone(the family was >from England
but the twins married and immigrated to South Africa in the early 1900's)
married Bernard ISAACS - they had a daughter Freda ISAACS who would marry
Ephraim SACKS[his parents traveled >from Lithuania to Oudtshoorn) they would
have three children - including Eric and Ralph who would immigrate to
Chicago , USA.

I believe the Redstone family settled in Port Elizabeth - I was wondering if
anyone could shed a little more light on the Redstone Family

Any help would be most appreciated

Ashley Dworsky


South Africa SIG #SouthAfrica research REDSTONE/ISAACS Family - #southafrica

ashleyd80 <ashleyd80@...>
 

Hi, I was wondering if anyone could help my research - I am researching
among other names the SACKS family. In my research I ascertained that one
of twin sisters ,with the surname of Redstone(the family was >from England
but the twins married and immigrated to South Africa in the early 1900's)
married Bernard ISAACS - they had a daughter Freda ISAACS who would marry
Ephraim SACKS[his parents traveled >from Lithuania to Oudtshoorn) they would
have three children - including Eric and Ralph who would immigrate to
Chicago , USA.

I believe the Redstone family settled in Port Elizabeth - I was wondering if
anyone could shed a little more light on the Redstone Family

Any help would be most appreciated

Ashley Dworsky


Re: SA Country Communities Vol. 2 #southafrica

Richard Newman <genserch@...>
 

FOR ATT MIKE, SAUL ET AL

Just to add that I have now completed the writing of my book, Where the
Desert Ends, The Jews of Namibia. Some 260 pages and 150 photographs,
covering over 100 families and 150 years.
The mss is in Windhoek and will be published by the Windhoek Hebrew
Congregation.

Richard Newman
Cape Town

From: "Mike Getz" <MikeGetz005@comcast.net>
Reply-To: "South Africa SIG" <safrica@lyris.jewishgen.org>
To: "South Africa SIG" <safrica@lyris.jewishgen.org>
Subject: Re:[safrica] SA Country Communities Vol. 2
Date: Tue, 13 Sep 2005 11:14:08 -0400

I want to support Saul's standpoint that urban Jewry in South Africa has
not
been methodically addressed, although the Durban project is to be praised.

We are dealing with an issue that involved the majority of S African Jewry,
its institutions,and families.
I suggest we begin with those of >from urban and suburban communities to at
least record details, of family, neighbours, friends in their
neighbourhood.
Perhaps all subscribers/recipients of the SA SIG newsletter should lead the
way.

A modest example appeared in our first newsletter on Woodstock by yours
truly.

I cannot think of anything more worthwhile in our current priorities.

Mike Getz
----- Original Message -----
From: "stan hart" <stanhart@absamail.co.za>
To: "South Africa SIG" <safrica@lyris.jewishgen.org>
Sent: Saturday, September 10, 2005 1:14 AM
Subject: Re:[safrica] SA Country Communities Vol. 2


Dear Genners

I respect what has been said by Saul about the book "Jewish Life in SA
Country Communities Vol 2" and am sure that it will be a must for anyone
tracing the families of those who lived in the area covered by the book.

However, I will disagree with Saul's last statement ..... "For me it has
also highlighted, again, the problem of no equivalent project
for the 'urban' Jews of the cities of South Africa."

There is a team of writers and compilers working feverishly in Durban to
finalise a major work which will be published on the Durban Jewish
community. This obviously takes into account the previous two works in
the past, and traces the history of families, personalities, those in
professions, art, drama, music and sport almost to the present day.
Hopefully this work will be completed within the next year. I will keep
you posted on progress.

Stan Hart


South Africa SIG #SouthAfrica Re:SA Country Communities Vol. 2 #southafrica

Richard Newman <genserch@...>
 

FOR ATT MIKE, SAUL ET AL

Just to add that I have now completed the writing of my book, Where the
Desert Ends, The Jews of Namibia. Some 260 pages and 150 photographs,
covering over 100 families and 150 years.
The mss is in Windhoek and will be published by the Windhoek Hebrew
Congregation.

Richard Newman
Cape Town

From: "Mike Getz" <MikeGetz005@comcast.net>
Reply-To: "South Africa SIG" <safrica@lyris.jewishgen.org>
To: "South Africa SIG" <safrica@lyris.jewishgen.org>
Subject: Re:[safrica] SA Country Communities Vol. 2
Date: Tue, 13 Sep 2005 11:14:08 -0400

I want to support Saul's standpoint that urban Jewry in South Africa has
not
been methodically addressed, although the Durban project is to be praised.

We are dealing with an issue that involved the majority of S African Jewry,
its institutions,and families.
I suggest we begin with those of >from urban and suburban communities to at
least record details, of family, neighbours, friends in their
neighbourhood.
Perhaps all subscribers/recipients of the SA SIG newsletter should lead the
way.

A modest example appeared in our first newsletter on Woodstock by yours
truly.

I cannot think of anything more worthwhile in our current priorities.

Mike Getz
----- Original Message -----
From: "stan hart" <stanhart@absamail.co.za>
To: "South Africa SIG" <safrica@lyris.jewishgen.org>
Sent: Saturday, September 10, 2005 1:14 AM
Subject: Re:[safrica] SA Country Communities Vol. 2


Dear Genners

I respect what has been said by Saul about the book "Jewish Life in SA
Country Communities Vol 2" and am sure that it will be a must for anyone
tracing the families of those who lived in the area covered by the book.

However, I will disagree with Saul's last statement ..... "For me it has
also highlighted, again, the problem of no equivalent project
for the 'urban' Jews of the cities of South Africa."

There is a team of writers and compilers working feverishly in Durban to
finalise a major work which will be published on the Durban Jewish
community. This obviously takes into account the previous two works in
the past, and traces the history of families, personalities, those in
professions, art, drama, music and sport almost to the present day.
Hopefully this work will be completed within the next year. I will keep
you posted on progress.

Stan Hart