Date   

Prosecco #general

George Beykovsky <beykovsky@...>
 

My ancestor was injured in WWI in the 7th Battle of Isonzo, and taken to
Prosek(Prosecco)hospital where he died and was burried in the cemetery
with the same name. Any ideas for a contact of holder of archives for that
cemetery?

George Beykovsky


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Prosecco #general

George Beykovsky <beykovsky@...>
 

My ancestor was injured in WWI in the 7th Battle of Isonzo, and taken to
Prosek(Prosecco)hospital where he died and was burried in the cemetery
with the same name. Any ideas for a contact of holder of archives for that
cemetery?

George Beykovsky


Re: Viewmate help please 1878 Galician Birth Record #galicia

Alexander Sharon
 

Dear Margaret,

I understand that Fran Segall has already forwarded copies of the birth
records under the question to the Viewmate. This will allow us following the
review to discuss the issue further.

The appearance of those scanned pages may take some time - delay maybe due
to the summer vacations or some other obstacles.

Best Regards,

Alexander

Moderator Note: Fran, let us know when the record has been posted to ViewMate, so
interested parties might study it. This thread is now on hold until then.

----- Original Message -----
From: "Margaret Mikulska" <silvagen@gmail.com>
To: "Alexander Sharon" <a.sharon@shaw.ca>
Cc: "Gesher Galicia SIG" <galicia@lyris.jewishgen.org>
Sent: Friday, August 12, 2005 12:51 PM
Subject: Re: [galicia] Viewmate help please 1878 Galician Birth Record


Alexander Sharon wrote:

Margaret,
What then in your opinion, profession/occupation represents "Morocznik"?
Alexander Sharon

Alexander Sharon wrote:

I read this word as "Molocznik" (Polish for the milkman).
Just a small correction: "molocznik" is *Russian* (definitely not
Polish) word for the milkman. The Polish word is "mleczarz".
First of all, I am not sure if "Morocznik" is indeed the name of a
profession and not a family name. If the original poster could post a
little bit of context -- that is, a larger snippet of the document -- it
would be easier to figure this out or at least to make a more educated
guess. (Is that possible?)

Second, I have not encountered this word in Polish (and the spelling of
this word, as shown on the record, is Polish), but there are so many words
completely forgotten nowadays that I can't claim such word never existed.
In any case, it (or rather "molocznik") certainly isn't the Polish word
for milkman.

I can't exclude the possibility that this is indeed the name of a
profession (in Polish); in such case, it would be a Ukrainian- influenced,
possibly dialectal word )which would be quite possible in Galicia). The
occurrence of the first vowel instead of two consonants in this position
in the word ("Mor-" instead of "Mr-") is very uncharacteristic for Polish,
but quite frequent in Ukrainian -- or Russian, for that matter.

The existence of the family name "Morocznik" is attested in Poland,
although it seems to be a rare name.

-Margaret Mikulska
Warsaw, Poland / Princeton, NJ, USA


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia Re: Viewmate help please 1878 Galician Birth Record #galicia

Alexander Sharon
 

Dear Margaret,

I understand that Fran Segall has already forwarded copies of the birth
records under the question to the Viewmate. This will allow us following the
review to discuss the issue further.

The appearance of those scanned pages may take some time - delay maybe due
to the summer vacations or some other obstacles.

Best Regards,

Alexander

Moderator Note: Fran, let us know when the record has been posted to ViewMate, so
interested parties might study it. This thread is now on hold until then.

----- Original Message -----
From: "Margaret Mikulska" <silvagen@gmail.com>
To: "Alexander Sharon" <a.sharon@shaw.ca>
Cc: "Gesher Galicia SIG" <galicia@lyris.jewishgen.org>
Sent: Friday, August 12, 2005 12:51 PM
Subject: Re: [galicia] Viewmate help please 1878 Galician Birth Record


Alexander Sharon wrote:

Margaret,
What then in your opinion, profession/occupation represents "Morocznik"?
Alexander Sharon

Alexander Sharon wrote:

I read this word as "Molocznik" (Polish for the milkman).
Just a small correction: "molocznik" is *Russian* (definitely not
Polish) word for the milkman. The Polish word is "mleczarz".
First of all, I am not sure if "Morocznik" is indeed the name of a
profession and not a family name. If the original poster could post a
little bit of context -- that is, a larger snippet of the document -- it
would be easier to figure this out or at least to make a more educated
guess. (Is that possible?)

Second, I have not encountered this word in Polish (and the spelling of
this word, as shown on the record, is Polish), but there are so many words
completely forgotten nowadays that I can't claim such word never existed.
In any case, it (or rather "molocznik") certainly isn't the Polish word
for milkman.

I can't exclude the possibility that this is indeed the name of a
profession (in Polish); in such case, it would be a Ukrainian- influenced,
possibly dialectal word )which would be quite possible in Galicia). The
occurrence of the first vowel instead of two consonants in this position
in the word ("Mor-" instead of "Mr-") is very uncharacteristic for Polish,
but quite frequent in Ukrainian -- or Russian, for that matter.

The existence of the family name "Morocznik" is attested in Poland,
although it seems to be a rare name.

-Margaret Mikulska
Warsaw, Poland / Princeton, NJ, USA


Re: Viewmate help please 1878 Galician Birth Record #galicia

Margaret Mikulska
 

Alexander Sharon wrote:

Margaret,
What then in your opinion, profession/occupation represents "Morocznik"?
Alexander Sharon

Alexander Sharon wrote:

I read this word as "Molocznik" (Polish for the milkman).
Just a small correction: "molocznik" is *Russian* (definitely not
Polish) word for the milkman. The Polish word is "mleczarz".
First of all, I am not sure if "Morocznik" is indeed the name of a
profession and not a family name. If the original poster could post a
little bit of context -- that is, a larger snippet of the document -- it
would be easier to figure this out or at least to make a more educated
guess. (Is that possible?)

Second, I have not encountered this word in Polish (and the spelling of
this word, as shown on the record, is Polish), but there are so many
words completely forgotten nowadays that I can't claim such word never
existed. In any case, it (or rather "molocznik") certainly isn't the
Polish word for milkman.

I can't exclude the possibility that this is indeed the name of a
profession (in Polish); in such case, it would be a Ukrainian-
influenced, possibly dialectal word )which would be quite possible in
Galicia). The occurrence of the first vowel instead of two consonants in
this position in the word ("Mor-" instead of "Mr-") is very
uncharacteristic for Polish, but quite frequent in Ukrainian -- or
Russian, for that matter.

The existence of the family name "Morocznik" is attested in Poland,
although it seems to be a rare name.

-Margaret Mikulska
Warsaw, Poland / Princeton, NJ, USA


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia Re: Viewmate help please 1878 Galician Birth Record #galicia

Margaret Mikulska
 

Alexander Sharon wrote:

Margaret,
What then in your opinion, profession/occupation represents "Morocznik"?
Alexander Sharon

Alexander Sharon wrote:

I read this word as "Molocznik" (Polish for the milkman).
Just a small correction: "molocznik" is *Russian* (definitely not
Polish) word for the milkman. The Polish word is "mleczarz".
First of all, I am not sure if "Morocznik" is indeed the name of a
profession and not a family name. If the original poster could post a
little bit of context -- that is, a larger snippet of the document -- it
would be easier to figure this out or at least to make a more educated
guess. (Is that possible?)

Second, I have not encountered this word in Polish (and the spelling of
this word, as shown on the record, is Polish), but there are so many
words completely forgotten nowadays that I can't claim such word never
existed. In any case, it (or rather "molocznik") certainly isn't the
Polish word for milkman.

I can't exclude the possibility that this is indeed the name of a
profession (in Polish); in such case, it would be a Ukrainian-
influenced, possibly dialectal word )which would be quite possible in
Galicia). The occurrence of the first vowel instead of two consonants in
this position in the word ("Mor-" instead of "Mr-") is very
uncharacteristic for Polish, but quite frequent in Ukrainian -- or
Russian, for that matter.

The existence of the family name "Morocznik" is attested in Poland,
although it seems to be a rare name.

-Margaret Mikulska
Warsaw, Poland / Princeton, NJ, USA


Finding Your Jewish Roots in Galicia #galicia

Suzan & Ron Wynne <srwynne@...>
 

I have had many inquiries about when the second edition of my book will be
out. I had hoped that Avotaynu would have the book ready for the conference
in Las Vegas in July because I had completed the manuscript many months
before that. The publisher has at last begun work on the manuscript. I
continue to be hopeful that it will be out by the end of the year. The
Avotaynu catalog gives a 2005 publication date.

The book is quite different since it focuses less on resources that are now
available online and more on background and history and online resources, as
well as books and articles. In many respects, it is not the same book as the
first, but it will include the "gazetteer" that so many found useful
(including some corrections and additions left out of the first edition).
There will be some additional illustrations. It will be in paperback, which
should make it a bit less expensive.

Suzan Wynne
Kensington, MD


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia Finding Your Jewish Roots in Galicia #galicia

Suzan & Ron Wynne <srwynne@...>
 

I have had many inquiries about when the second edition of my book will be
out. I had hoped that Avotaynu would have the book ready for the conference
in Las Vegas in July because I had completed the manuscript many months
before that. The publisher has at last begun work on the manuscript. I
continue to be hopeful that it will be out by the end of the year. The
Avotaynu catalog gives a 2005 publication date.

The book is quite different since it focuses less on resources that are now
available online and more on background and history and online resources, as
well as books and articles. In many respects, it is not the same book as the
first, but it will include the "gazetteer" that so many found useful
(including some corrections and additions left out of the first edition).
There will be some additional illustrations. It will be in paperback, which
should make it a bit less expensive.

Suzan Wynne
Kensington, MD


Emigration from Galicia to Hungary #galicia

Suzan & Ron Wynne <srwynne@...>
 

Before 1830, very few Jews lived in Hungary and many of those who were
there, were Sephardim who had come during the Ottoman period. But, between
1830 and 1848, Galician and other Jews >from the Austrian empire, began to
find their way to the economic opportunities that Hungary offered. In 1848,
Hungarians rose up in armed revolt against Austrian rule and the status quo.
In the days before Austria put down the revolt, the revolutionary Hungarian
Diet emancipated the Jews, among many other actions. Although Austria
regained its hold over Hungary, Emperor Franz Josef had to give in to
pressure and create what became a power sharing arrangement in the dual
monarchy known subsequently as the Austro-Hungarian Empire.

Until Franz Josef emancipated his empire's Jewish subjects in a series of
decrees >from 1868-1869, with Galician Jews being the last to be emancipated,
Hungary continued to be a place that offered Jews more freedom and greater
economic opportunities. Also, as Franz Josef sought to appease revolutionary
pressures in Galicia, he gave more local control to regional government in
that Crownland and those governments were able to pass their own very harsh
and restrictive laws with respect to the Jews. Hungary, on the other hand,
was a more liberal environment where Jews were relatively protected. All of
these developments encourged emigration >from Galicia to Hungary.

The emigration seems to have involved more Jews >from the western portion of
Galicia, rather than the eastern portion, most likely because of proximity
and ease of travel by long established trade routes. I have been struck by
how many Jews born in Galicia were represented in Hungarian vital records
and the censuses.

Suzan Wynne
Kensington, MD


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia Emigration from Galicia to Hungary #galicia

Suzan & Ron Wynne <srwynne@...>
 

Before 1830, very few Jews lived in Hungary and many of those who were
there, were Sephardim who had come during the Ottoman period. But, between
1830 and 1848, Galician and other Jews >from the Austrian empire, began to
find their way to the economic opportunities that Hungary offered. In 1848,
Hungarians rose up in armed revolt against Austrian rule and the status quo.
In the days before Austria put down the revolt, the revolutionary Hungarian
Diet emancipated the Jews, among many other actions. Although Austria
regained its hold over Hungary, Emperor Franz Josef had to give in to
pressure and create what became a power sharing arrangement in the dual
monarchy known subsequently as the Austro-Hungarian Empire.

Until Franz Josef emancipated his empire's Jewish subjects in a series of
decrees >from 1868-1869, with Galician Jews being the last to be emancipated,
Hungary continued to be a place that offered Jews more freedom and greater
economic opportunities. Also, as Franz Josef sought to appease revolutionary
pressures in Galicia, he gave more local control to regional government in
that Crownland and those governments were able to pass their own very harsh
and restrictive laws with respect to the Jews. Hungary, on the other hand,
was a more liberal environment where Jews were relatively protected. All of
these developments encourged emigration >from Galicia to Hungary.

The emigration seems to have involved more Jews >from the western portion of
Galicia, rather than the eastern portion, most likely because of proximity
and ease of travel by long established trade routes. I have been struck by
how many Jews born in Galicia were represented in Hungarian vital records
and the censuses.

Suzan Wynne
Kensington, MD


Translation of Romanian on back of of picture postcard #romania

bud484bg@...
 

To fellow researchers:

I need help with 8 words, legibly handwritten, in what appears to be
Romanian, in order to confirm the identify of the woman in the photo on
the other side of the postcard.

Please, can someone help. I will email the written words to whoever
contacts me privately, of course.

Thanks so much.

Beatrice Markel
Redondo Beach, California


Romania SIG #Romania Translation of Romanian on back of of picture postcard #romania

bud484bg@...
 

To fellow researchers:

I need help with 8 words, legibly handwritten, in what appears to be
Romanian, in order to confirm the identify of the woman in the photo on
the other side of the postcard.

Please, can someone help. I will email the written words to whoever
contacts me privately, of course.

Thanks so much.

Beatrice Markel
Redondo Beach, California


OKEN #general

mhlcswc2@...
 

Unfortunately the name OKEN is very familiar in Baltimore. It will not be
easy to contact relatives. Steve OKEN would be approximately 43 now. He was
executed last summer for the deaths of three women. Steve and his family
were neighbors. His parents are David and Davida. They are keeping a low
profile. The Baltimore Jewish Times has some stories in their archives.

Marcia G. Hoffman
Baltimore, MD

In a message dated 8/12/2005 2:51:15 AM Eastern Standard Time,
jewishgen@lyris.jewishgen.org writes:
Subject: Looking for Frieda Fishman SILVER
From: <landy_h@bellsouth.net>
Date: Thu, 11 Aug 2005 12:42:08 -0400
X-Message-Number: 10

My husband is looking for anyone who might know Frieda Fishman SILVER or her
family. We were recently told by another cousin that Frieda would have
lived in the Philadelphia area and would have been related to our family
names Okyen.The spelling could have been (Oken, Okyn, Okun). Our
grandfather Morris Okyen and his brother Harry Oken lived in Baltimore and
came to America in the early 1900's. Their father was Yudel Oken and is
possibly buried in Philadelphia at the Har Nebo cemetery.
Please contact us if you know Frieda Fishman Silver or the name Oken.

Thank you
Sandy Landy
Hank32230@bellsouth.net
Miami, Florida


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen OKEN #general

mhlcswc2@...
 

Unfortunately the name OKEN is very familiar in Baltimore. It will not be
easy to contact relatives. Steve OKEN would be approximately 43 now. He was
executed last summer for the deaths of three women. Steve and his family
were neighbors. His parents are David and Davida. They are keeping a low
profile. The Baltimore Jewish Times has some stories in their archives.

Marcia G. Hoffman
Baltimore, MD

In a message dated 8/12/2005 2:51:15 AM Eastern Standard Time,
jewishgen@lyris.jewishgen.org writes:
Subject: Looking for Frieda Fishman SILVER
From: <landy_h@bellsouth.net>
Date: Thu, 11 Aug 2005 12:42:08 -0400
X-Message-Number: 10

My husband is looking for anyone who might know Frieda Fishman SILVER or her
family. We were recently told by another cousin that Frieda would have
lived in the Philadelphia area and would have been related to our family
names Okyen.The spelling could have been (Oken, Okyn, Okun). Our
grandfather Morris Okyen and his brother Harry Oken lived in Baltimore and
came to America in the early 1900's. Their father was Yudel Oken and is
possibly buried in Philadelphia at the Har Nebo cemetery.
Please contact us if you know Frieda Fishman Silver or the name Oken.

Thank you
Sandy Landy
Hank32230@bellsouth.net
Miami, Florida


Place of birth: Millevelt #general

Evelien <evelienr@...>
 

Hello,

An ancestor apply by his wedding in Amsterdam the name Millevelt as his
place of birth.
I presume that my ancester came >from Germany or Poland
I can't find this place in Europe

Have anyone heared of this place?

I believe by myself that the registrar in Amsterdam himself has written
the name of the place and that he heared Millevelt, but that the place
in fact Muhlfeld was.
My ancestor probable has spoken Dutch with an accent.

Anyone more ideas???

Evelien van Ruitenbeek
Almere
The Netherlands


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Place of birth: Millevelt #general

Evelien <evelienr@...>
 

Hello,

An ancestor apply by his wedding in Amsterdam the name Millevelt as his
place of birth.
I presume that my ancester came >from Germany or Poland
I can't find this place in Europe

Have anyone heared of this place?

I believe by myself that the registrar in Amsterdam himself has written
the name of the place and that he heared Millevelt, but that the place
in fact Muhlfeld was.
My ancestor probable has spoken Dutch with an accent.

Anyone more ideas???

Evelien van Ruitenbeek
Almere
The Netherlands


Catskills Institute Conference 26-28 August #general

Schelly Talalay Dardashti
 

Dear Genners,
Did you have family in the Catskills? Did you spend
summers there with your family? Any connection to area
hotels and bungalow colonies?

If so, this is for you. The 11th Catskills Institute
Conference will be held at Kutsher's, Fri-Sun August
26-28.

The non-profit Catskills Institute preserves the
legacy of area Jewish life, headed by Brown University
sociology professor Dr. Phil Brown, whom I've known
for years. He's amassed a great archive of Catskills
information on people and places. The conferences,
speakers, attendees are fascinating.

As a product of long summers at Kauneonga Lake (the
other side of White Lake, 10 miles past Monticello), I
am impressed by his great success in creating and
growing this archive. Phil's parents ran a hotel
called Brown's in White Lake.

This year's theme, co-sponsored by the Jewish Women's
Archive, is "Jewish Women, Comedy, and the Catskills."
The weekend includes slide shows, lectures, live
klezmer music. Talks include "Staging the Ideal Jewish
Community: Women Hotel Owners in the Catskills
1950-1970," ">from Alan King to Billy Crystal: The
Changing Face of Catskills Comedy," "'For the
Amusement of the Guests:' "How Gertrude Berg Brought
the Catskills to Radio and Television,""Catskills and
Context: Putting Together a Museum Exhibition on
Jewish-American Vacation Culture," "My Yiddishe/Red
Hot Mama: A Short History of Jewish Women in Comedy,"
"Catskills Revisited: Creating a Book for Young
Readers," "The Unkosher Comediennes: >from Sophie
Tucker to Joan Rivers."

For more information go to catskills.brown.edu.
For info on the Jewish Women's Archive,go to
www.jwa.org.

With great nostalgia for the long ago and far away,

Schelly Talalay Dardashti
Tel Aviv
schelly@allrelative.net

Granddaughter of Sidney and Bertha (Tollin) Fink of
Fink's Kauneonga Lake bungalow colony.
FINK: Galicia: Suchastow, Skalat, now UKR
TALALAY/TOLLIN: Vorotinschtina, Mogilev, BEL


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Catskills Institute Conference 26-28 August #general

Schelly Talalay Dardashti
 

Dear Genners,
Did you have family in the Catskills? Did you spend
summers there with your family? Any connection to area
hotels and bungalow colonies?

If so, this is for you. The 11th Catskills Institute
Conference will be held at Kutsher's, Fri-Sun August
26-28.

The non-profit Catskills Institute preserves the
legacy of area Jewish life, headed by Brown University
sociology professor Dr. Phil Brown, whom I've known
for years. He's amassed a great archive of Catskills
information on people and places. The conferences,
speakers, attendees are fascinating.

As a product of long summers at Kauneonga Lake (the
other side of White Lake, 10 miles past Monticello), I
am impressed by his great success in creating and
growing this archive. Phil's parents ran a hotel
called Brown's in White Lake.

This year's theme, co-sponsored by the Jewish Women's
Archive, is "Jewish Women, Comedy, and the Catskills."
The weekend includes slide shows, lectures, live
klezmer music. Talks include "Staging the Ideal Jewish
Community: Women Hotel Owners in the Catskills
1950-1970," ">from Alan King to Billy Crystal: The
Changing Face of Catskills Comedy," "'For the
Amusement of the Guests:' "How Gertrude Berg Brought
the Catskills to Radio and Television,""Catskills and
Context: Putting Together a Museum Exhibition on
Jewish-American Vacation Culture," "My Yiddishe/Red
Hot Mama: A Short History of Jewish Women in Comedy,"
"Catskills Revisited: Creating a Book for Young
Readers," "The Unkosher Comediennes: >from Sophie
Tucker to Joan Rivers."

For more information go to catskills.brown.edu.
For info on the Jewish Women's Archive,go to
www.jwa.org.

With great nostalgia for the long ago and far away,

Schelly Talalay Dardashti
Tel Aviv
schelly@allrelative.net

Granddaughter of Sidney and Bertha (Tollin) Fink of
Fink's Kauneonga Lake bungalow colony.
FINK: Galicia: Suchastow, Skalat, now UKR
TALALAY/TOLLIN: Vorotinschtina, Mogilev, BEL


JGSGB (Boston) Meeting #general

Thomas F. Weiss
 

Jewish Genealogical Society of Greater Boston

presents

Write Your Family History Now!

Mike Karsen

Bring Your Own Written Family History
To Display Before and After the Talk

Sunday, September 11, 2005
1:30-4:30 PM
Temple Emanuel, Newton Center (Reisman Hall)

Genealogists are very good at doing research and collecting
many facts about their family, but they frequently fail to
publish the results of their research. Mike Karsen will show
how you can publish your findings in book formats ranging
from a 30-page pamphlet to one that contains detailed
biographies and places your family in historical context.
Karsen emphasizes the importance of organizing your findings
and sharing them as soon as possible.

Mike Karsen is a professional genealogy speaker and
instructor. He is a member of the National Genealogical
Society and the Genealogical Speakers Guild. Mike has spoken
at state, national, and international conferences on
genealogical topics and has taught classes on genealogy. He
has published five of his own family histories and has
inspired many others to write their own family history.

Temple Emanuel, 385 Ward St., Newton Centre, is our new
meeting place. For maps and detailed directions, go to:

http://emanuel.jgsgb.org/

Jewish Genealogical Society of Greater Boston (JGSGB)
website: http://jgsgb.org

Thomas Fischer Weiss
Newton, MA
USA
tfweiss@mit.edu

Researching:
FRENKEL (Buchach, Vienna); BUCHHALTER (Skalat); ENGEL (Vienna);
FISCHER (Hriskov, Schlan, Prague); FRAENKEL, FRUCHTER (Rozhnyatov,
Vienna); KATZ (Schlan); KLEPETAR (Jistebnice); MEISELS (Nadworna,
Vienna); OLLOP (Vienna); ORLIK (Pohor, Jistebnice, Benesov, Tabor);
QUADRATSTEIN (Vienna, Saarbrucken); VODICKA (Dobronitz, Jistebnice,
Benesov, Tabor)


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen JGSGB (Boston) Meeting #general

Thomas F. Weiss
 

Jewish Genealogical Society of Greater Boston

presents

Write Your Family History Now!

Mike Karsen

Bring Your Own Written Family History
To Display Before and After the Talk

Sunday, September 11, 2005
1:30-4:30 PM
Temple Emanuel, Newton Center (Reisman Hall)

Genealogists are very good at doing research and collecting
many facts about their family, but they frequently fail to
publish the results of their research. Mike Karsen will show
how you can publish your findings in book formats ranging
from a 30-page pamphlet to one that contains detailed
biographies and places your family in historical context.
Karsen emphasizes the importance of organizing your findings
and sharing them as soon as possible.

Mike Karsen is a professional genealogy speaker and
instructor. He is a member of the National Genealogical
Society and the Genealogical Speakers Guild. Mike has spoken
at state, national, and international conferences on
genealogical topics and has taught classes on genealogy. He
has published five of his own family histories and has
inspired many others to write their own family history.

Temple Emanuel, 385 Ward St., Newton Centre, is our new
meeting place. For maps and detailed directions, go to:

http://emanuel.jgsgb.org/

Jewish Genealogical Society of Greater Boston (JGSGB)
website: http://jgsgb.org

Thomas Fischer Weiss
Newton, MA
USA
tfweiss@mit.edu

Researching:
FRENKEL (Buchach, Vienna); BUCHHALTER (Skalat); ENGEL (Vienna);
FISCHER (Hriskov, Schlan, Prague); FRAENKEL, FRUCHTER (Rozhnyatov,
Vienna); KATZ (Schlan); KLEPETAR (Jistebnice); MEISELS (Nadworna,
Vienna); OLLOP (Vienna); ORLIK (Pohor, Jistebnice, Benesov, Tabor);
QUADRATSTEIN (Vienna, Saarbrucken); VODICKA (Dobronitz, Jistebnice,
Benesov, Tabor)