Date   

DUBINSKY #ukraine

Ellen Gottfried <en@...>
 

Married into my husband's family is a Nisson Dubinsky who lived near Kiev.
He married Gnesa Greenblatt. They arrived in the US in 1911. If you are
interested I have more info. re: the Greenblatt family, and the children of
Gnesa and Nisson, and since my mother in law knew Nisson I can give you her
opinions. Ellen Gottfried

Dear Genners,
I'm seeking information about ancestors MOZYSON/MOZONSON and
DUBINISKY/DUBIN, from
Rzhishchev (Ryzhishchev) near Kiev.
Kerry Shrives (shrives@charter.net)


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine DUBINSKY #ukraine

Ellen Gottfried <en@...>
 

Married into my husband's family is a Nisson Dubinsky who lived near Kiev.
He married Gnesa Greenblatt. They arrived in the US in 1911. If you are
interested I have more info. re: the Greenblatt family, and the children of
Gnesa and Nisson, and since my mother in law knew Nisson I can give you her
opinions. Ellen Gottfried

Dear Genners,
I'm seeking information about ancestors MOZYSON/MOZONSON and
DUBINISKY/DUBIN, from
Rzhishchev (Ryzhishchev) near Kiev.
Kerry Shrives (shrives@charter.net)


Looking For Info. #ukraine

Lillian Siegfried <lillians@...>
 

Has anyone heard of or seen the names, Yankel Kusik and wife Baila,
Kourse???, Kusik >from Noble in the Ukraine formally Belarus. I
understand that Baila Kourse???, Kusik had a male cousin in Chicago also
with the same last name. Has anyone heard about him. Also has anyone seen
or heard of Moisha, Elia, Beryl, Malka, Basha, Kusik >from Noble in the
Ukraine.

Lillian Siegfried
Staten Island, NY


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine Looking For Info. #ukraine

Lillian Siegfried <lillians@...>
 

Has anyone heard of or seen the names, Yankel Kusik and wife Baila,
Kourse???, Kusik >from Noble in the Ukraine formally Belarus. I
understand that Baila Kourse???, Kusik had a male cousin in Chicago also
with the same last name. Has anyone heard about him. Also has anyone seen
or heard of Moisha, Elia, Beryl, Malka, Basha, Kusik >from Noble in the
Ukraine.

Lillian Siegfried
Staten Island, NY


Re: Free access to WW 1 Draft Registrations #general

Adelle Gloger
 

Dear Genners,

I hope this reaches you before the deadline to access these documents.

I just realized that I made an error (or was it my computer) in the URL for
the Access Genealogy site. I noticed there is an extra space between www. and
accessgenealogy.com.

Please note the website is: < www.accessgenealogy.com > There is no
charge to access the WW 1 draft registration cards.

I received an e-mail >from someone who stated there was a charge. I beleive
that person went to the Ancestry website. When you use the link on the Access
Genealogy site it will take you directly to Ancestry -- no charge.

Adelle Weintraub Gloger


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Free access to WW 1 Draft Registrations #general

Adelle Gloger
 

Dear Genners,

I hope this reaches you before the deadline to access these documents.

I just realized that I made an error (or was it my computer) in the URL for
the Access Genealogy site. I noticed there is an extra space between www. and
accessgenealogy.com.

Please note the website is: < www.accessgenealogy.com > There is no
charge to access the WW 1 draft registration cards.

I received an e-mail >from someone who stated there was a charge. I beleive
that person went to the Ancestry website. When you use the link on the Access
Genealogy site it will take you directly to Ancestry -- no charge.

Adelle Weintraub Gloger


How to get a book? #general

Tom Venetianer <tom.vene@...>
 

Dear all,

I need a tip. My uncle, a Holocaust victim and a quite prominent lawyer, wrote a
book, published in 1938. I discovered a copy in a Slovak library and tried to buy
it but was turned down by the chief librarian.

Any ideas about how I could convince her to sell it to me. To the library the
book is just an old tractate dusting on their shelves, for me an invaluable
memorabilia.

Many thanks and regards
Tom
--

Tom Venetianer <mailto:tom.vene@uol.com.br>
Sao Paulo - Brazil


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen How to get a book? #general

Tom Venetianer <tom.vene@...>
 

Dear all,

I need a tip. My uncle, a Holocaust victim and a quite prominent lawyer, wrote a
book, published in 1938. I discovered a copy in a Slovak library and tried to buy
it but was turned down by the chief librarian.

Any ideas about how I could convince her to sell it to me. To the library the
book is just an old tractate dusting on their shelves, for me an invaluable
memorabilia.

Many thanks and regards
Tom
--

Tom Venetianer <mailto:tom.vene@uol.com.br>
Sao Paulo - Brazil


Re: Town/City in Lomza Province #general

Peter Zavon <pzavon@...>
 

"Stan Goodman" <SPAM_FOILER@hashkedim.com> wrote in message
On Thu, 14 Jul 2005 14:55:26 UTC, pmwaddell@iimetro.com.au (Myra & Peter
Waddell) opined:

I have recently received my grandfather's application for English
naturalisation and note that he was born in (what looks like) "Kolnapin" -
in the Province of Lomza Russia. I can find online a lot of web-sites for
Lomza but Kolnapin doesn't exist, although I have tried numerous different
spelling to try to trace it.
Whatever your granddad wrote, there was never a "province" of Lomza. The
area was a "gubernia", in Russian terminology. At various times, it was in
the *province* of Warsaw or Bialystok. For what it's worth, the former Lomza
Gubernia no longr exists, but is absorbed into a larger area called Podlaskie
(the name signifies thatit is wooded, which it is).
I believe it is overly pedantic to say "there was never a 'province' of
Lomza" when the word "gubernia" is in fact a Russian word that is best
translated to English as "province." When completing a document for an
English-speaking government, it is entirely reasonable to indicate "province
of Lomza".

I wondered whether perhaps someone, with a greater knowledge than mine of
Lomza Province (that wouldn't be difficult), would be able to suggest what
this name really is. Also, why would the application say Russia when the
web-pages say that Lomza is in Poland?
The web pages also say somewhere, that Poland was not independent in the 19th
century, but was partitioned among its neighbors. Lomza Gubernia was in the
Russian Empire, and Russia was the sovereign power. An application for US
citizenship was interested in political boundaries, not ethnic or cultural
lines.
Perhaps I can provide a little more clarity on this. In the late 18th
century, Poland was carved up by Prussia, Russia, and Austria and ceased to
exist as an independent entity. When the dust had settled on this process
and the Napoleonic Wars, which also effected borders in this region, Lomza
was among those lands organized as "The Kingdom of Poland" or "Congress
Poland" and with the Czar of Russia also being the King of the Kingdom of
Poland. In the mid-19th century, as a result of Russian responses to
nationalistic revolts in the Kingdom of Poland, these lands came completely
within the Empire, rather than being administered as a separate kingdom of
which the person who was Russian Czar was also the King. This continued
until the end of WWI, so the grandfather in question was a subject of the
Czar. These lands were only "Poland" in the sense that many ethnic
Poles lived there and the lands had been part of Poland when there was an
independent Poland. Russia and Austria were multi-ethnic empires and their
subjects retained their ethnic identities despite being subject to the
Russian Czar or Austrian Emperor.

After WWI, Poland was restored as an independent nation and Lomza again
came under Polish control.

--
Peter Zavon
Penfield, NY


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Town/City in Lomza Province #general

Peter Zavon <pzavon@...>
 

"Stan Goodman" <SPAM_FOILER@hashkedim.com> wrote in message
On Thu, 14 Jul 2005 14:55:26 UTC, pmwaddell@iimetro.com.au (Myra & Peter
Waddell) opined:

I have recently received my grandfather's application for English
naturalisation and note that he was born in (what looks like) "Kolnapin" -
in the Province of Lomza Russia. I can find online a lot of web-sites for
Lomza but Kolnapin doesn't exist, although I have tried numerous different
spelling to try to trace it.
Whatever your granddad wrote, there was never a "province" of Lomza. The
area was a "gubernia", in Russian terminology. At various times, it was in
the *province* of Warsaw or Bialystok. For what it's worth, the former Lomza
Gubernia no longr exists, but is absorbed into a larger area called Podlaskie
(the name signifies thatit is wooded, which it is).
I believe it is overly pedantic to say "there was never a 'province' of
Lomza" when the word "gubernia" is in fact a Russian word that is best
translated to English as "province." When completing a document for an
English-speaking government, it is entirely reasonable to indicate "province
of Lomza".

I wondered whether perhaps someone, with a greater knowledge than mine of
Lomza Province (that wouldn't be difficult), would be able to suggest what
this name really is. Also, why would the application say Russia when the
web-pages say that Lomza is in Poland?
The web pages also say somewhere, that Poland was not independent in the 19th
century, but was partitioned among its neighbors. Lomza Gubernia was in the
Russian Empire, and Russia was the sovereign power. An application for US
citizenship was interested in political boundaries, not ethnic or cultural
lines.
Perhaps I can provide a little more clarity on this. In the late 18th
century, Poland was carved up by Prussia, Russia, and Austria and ceased to
exist as an independent entity. When the dust had settled on this process
and the Napoleonic Wars, which also effected borders in this region, Lomza
was among those lands organized as "The Kingdom of Poland" or "Congress
Poland" and with the Czar of Russia also being the King of the Kingdom of
Poland. In the mid-19th century, as a result of Russian responses to
nationalistic revolts in the Kingdom of Poland, these lands came completely
within the Empire, rather than being administered as a separate kingdom of
which the person who was Russian Czar was also the King. This continued
until the end of WWI, so the grandfather in question was a subject of the
Czar. These lands were only "Poland" in the sense that many ethnic
Poles lived there and the lands had been part of Poland when there was an
independent Poland. Russia and Austria were multi-ethnic empires and their
subjects retained their ethnic identities despite being subject to the
Russian Czar or Austrian Emperor.

After WWI, Poland was restored as an independent nation and Lomza again
came under Polish control.

--
Peter Zavon
Penfield, NY


Re: British-Jewish genealogy #general

Evertjan. <exjxw.hannivoort@...>
 

wrote on 16 jul 2005 in soc.genealogy.jewish:
The American Jewish Archives website has a great genealogical resource
on the first Jewish American families.

Does anyone know if their is something similar for British Jewry?
The first Jewish families arived in Britain perhaps with the Phoenicians,
far more tha 2000 years ago, as Simon Goulden of the United Synagogue
writes here:

Daf Hashavua 23/9/2000 <http://tinyurl.com/7ts5n>;

Or else they surely came with the Roman conquest, but even if they did
arrive with William the conqueror as late as 1066, your expectation of
great genealogical resources is not very reasonable. ;-}


--
Evertjan Hannivoort.
The Netherlands.
(Replace all crosses with dots in my emailaddress)


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: British-Jewish genealogy #general

Evertjan. <exjxw.hannivoort@...>
 

wrote on 16 jul 2005 in soc.genealogy.jewish:
The American Jewish Archives website has a great genealogical resource
on the first Jewish American families.

Does anyone know if their is something similar for British Jewry?
The first Jewish families arived in Britain perhaps with the Phoenicians,
far more tha 2000 years ago, as Simon Goulden of the United Synagogue
writes here:

Daf Hashavua 23/9/2000 <http://tinyurl.com/7ts5n>;

Or else they surely came with the Roman conquest, but even if they did
arrive with William the conqueror as late as 1066, your expectation of
great genealogical resources is not very reasonable. ;-}


--
Evertjan Hannivoort.
The Netherlands.
(Replace all crosses with dots in my emailaddress)


How to get a book? #austria-czech

Tom Venetianer <tom.vene@...>
 

Dear all,

I need a tip. My uncle, a Holocaust victim and a quite prominent lawyer,
wrote a book, published in 1938. I discovered a copy in a Slovak library and
tried to buy it but was turned down by the chief librarian.

Any ideas about how I could convince her to sell it to me. To the library
the book is just an old tractate dusting on their shelves, for me
an invaluable memorabilia.

Many thanks and regards
Tom

Tom Venetianer <mailto:tom.vene@uol.com.br>
Sao Paulo - Brazil

MODERATOR NOTE: Please respond privately


Austria-Czech SIG #Austria-Czech How to get a book? #austria-czech

Tom Venetianer <tom.vene@...>
 

Dear all,

I need a tip. My uncle, a Holocaust victim and a quite prominent lawyer,
wrote a book, published in 1938. I discovered a copy in a Slovak library and
tried to buy it but was turned down by the chief librarian.

Any ideas about how I could convince her to sell it to me. To the library
the book is just an old tractate dusting on their shelves, for me
an invaluable memorabilia.

Many thanks and regards
Tom

Tom Venetianer <mailto:tom.vene@uol.com.br>
Sao Paulo - Brazil

MODERATOR NOTE: Please respond privately


Last Call for Papers! #germany

Martha Lev-Zion <martha@...>
 

The Israel Genealogical Society is pleased to invite proposals >from
potential speakers for the First Annual One Day Seminar on Jewish
Genealogy. The seminar will be held on Monday, 28 November 2005 at
Beit Hatefutzot, Tel Aviv. The official language of the seminar will
be Hebrew, but presentations will be made in English as well.

The deadline for submitting proposals is the end of July. So far we
have received some very high quality and interesting proposals. If
you would like to add yours, time is running out! A number of you
made one line proposals that did not fit the parameters that we
posted on our website [see below]. If you intend to pursue your
endeavours, please note that Sunday, 31 July is the last day we can
accept submissions. The proposals will then be given to the program
committee to choose the proposals that they think would be the most
interesting and impart the most information to the seminar
participants. Since there is a whole procedure involved, we are
obligated to stick closely to our deadlines. We would not like anyone
to be disappointed because s/he missed the deadline, so please take
care to note the date and to get your proposals in beforehand!

The seminar is entitled:

FAMILY ROOTS IN THE LAND OF ISRAEL AND IN THE WORLD

The emphasis of this study day will be to introduce researchers to
new, possibly unknown resources.

For further details in English, please go to this site:
http://www.isragen.org.il/NROS/YY2005/yy2005-E-KK.html

The Hebrew details are in an automatically downloaded .pdf file at
this URL:
http://www.isragen.org.il/NROS/YY2005/SeminarCall2005-H.pdf

We look forward to your presentation proposals!

Martha Lev-Zion for the Projects Coordinating Committee, IGS - Israel
Genealogical Society


German SIG #Germany Last Call for Papers! #germany

Martha Lev-Zion <martha@...>
 

The Israel Genealogical Society is pleased to invite proposals >from
potential speakers for the First Annual One Day Seminar on Jewish
Genealogy. The seminar will be held on Monday, 28 November 2005 at
Beit Hatefutzot, Tel Aviv. The official language of the seminar will
be Hebrew, but presentations will be made in English as well.

The deadline for submitting proposals is the end of July. So far we
have received some very high quality and interesting proposals. If
you would like to add yours, time is running out! A number of you
made one line proposals that did not fit the parameters that we
posted on our website [see below]. If you intend to pursue your
endeavours, please note that Sunday, 31 July is the last day we can
accept submissions. The proposals will then be given to the program
committee to choose the proposals that they think would be the most
interesting and impart the most information to the seminar
participants. Since there is a whole procedure involved, we are
obligated to stick closely to our deadlines. We would not like anyone
to be disappointed because s/he missed the deadline, so please take
care to note the date and to get your proposals in beforehand!

The seminar is entitled:

FAMILY ROOTS IN THE LAND OF ISRAEL AND IN THE WORLD

The emphasis of this study day will be to introduce researchers to
new, possibly unknown resources.

For further details in English, please go to this site:
http://www.isragen.org.il/NROS/YY2005/yy2005-E-KK.html

The Hebrew details are in an automatically downloaded .pdf file at
this URL:
http://www.isragen.org.il/NROS/YY2005/SeminarCall2005-H.pdf

We look forward to your presentation proposals!

Martha Lev-Zion for the Projects Coordinating Committee, IGS - Israel
Genealogical Society


Re: Town/City in Lomza Province #general

Alexander Sharon
 

"Myra & Peter Waddell" wrote

I have recently received my grandfather's application for English
naturalisation and note that he was born in (what looks like) "Kolnapin" -
in the Province of Lomza Russia. I can find online a lot of web-sites for
Lomza but Kolnapin doesn't exist, although I have tried numerous different
spelling to try to trace it.
I wondered whether perhaps someone, with a greater knowledge than mine of
Lomza Province (that wouldn't be difficult), would be able to suggest what
this name really is. Also, why would the application say Russia when the
web-pages say that Lomza is in Poland?
Hi,

Would it be possible to scan the handwritten image of the elusive "Kolnapin"
to verify it's name?
There are several possibilities, personally I believe that this is village
Kobylin but it can be only verified after image examination.

It would be also helpful if you will provide your grandfather surname.

Lomza Guberniya (Russian administrative division equal to province) was part
of the Russian Empire till 1918.

Alexander Sharon
Calgary, Ab.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Town/City in Lomza Province #general

Alexander Sharon
 

"Myra & Peter Waddell" wrote

I have recently received my grandfather's application for English
naturalisation and note that he was born in (what looks like) "Kolnapin" -
in the Province of Lomza Russia. I can find online a lot of web-sites for
Lomza but Kolnapin doesn't exist, although I have tried numerous different
spelling to try to trace it.
I wondered whether perhaps someone, with a greater knowledge than mine of
Lomza Province (that wouldn't be difficult), would be able to suggest what
this name really is. Also, why would the application say Russia when the
web-pages say that Lomza is in Poland?
Hi,

Would it be possible to scan the handwritten image of the elusive "Kolnapin"
to verify it's name?
There are several possibilities, personally I believe that this is village
Kobylin but it can be only verified after image examination.

It would be also helpful if you will provide your grandfather surname.

Lomza Guberniya (Russian administrative division equal to province) was part
of the Russian Empire till 1918.

Alexander Sharon
Calgary, Ab.


poland death certificate translations #general

ben.forman <ben.forman@...>
 

Hi Genners

I have received >from JRI Poland the death certificates of
my paternal GGGGFs Aijyk Galonzka and Kelman Furman, and I
would be really greatful if someone was able to translate
them for me.

The addresses are

http://home.btconnect.com/benforman/AijyK_Death_Cert_WEB.jpg
http://home.btconnect.com/benforman/kelman_death_cert_WEB.jpg

thanks so much, 12 months ago I though the furthest I
could trace my Forman ancestors back was 1900 to an
unknown place in Germany/Poland but thanks to my dads
cousin, you guys and JRI I have traced the family back a
further 100 years :)

Thanks so much

Ben Forman


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen poland death certificate translations #general

ben.forman <ben.forman@...>
 

Hi Genners

I have received >from JRI Poland the death certificates of
my paternal GGGGFs Aijyk Galonzka and Kelman Furman, and I
would be really greatful if someone was able to translate
them for me.

The addresses are

http://home.btconnect.com/benforman/AijyK_Death_Cert_WEB.jpg
http://home.btconnect.com/benforman/kelman_death_cert_WEB.jpg

thanks so much, 12 months ago I though the furthest I
could trace my Forman ancestors back was 1900 to an
unknown place in Germany/Poland but thanks to my dads
cousin, you guys and JRI I have traced the family back a
further 100 years :)

Thanks so much

Ben Forman