Date   

Re: city location #hungary

Ted Grossman <tgrossman@...>
 

By any chance to you mean Csuz? It's where my father was born, and is
now a part of Slovakia, and with the name Domika.
Ted Grossman
Eastsound

On Aug 11, 2005, at 5:26 AM, Cass Twitchell wrote:

Does anyone have any information re the location of the town, vilage
or city
of Csur Hungary 11/87?
Cassandra Csuri Twitchell,
Ashland Ohio USA


Osztrogoszk #hungary

more0318@...
 

I found a record for one of my relatives, who was last recorded in a
Hungarian Labour Battalion in 1943 at Osztrogoszk. I can't find this
location on a map. Does anyone know where it is and what it is called now?
Thanks.

Mike More
mikemore@rogers.com


Hungary SIG #Hungary Re: city location #hungary

Ted Grossman <tgrossman@...>
 

By any chance to you mean Csuz? It's where my father was born, and is
now a part of Slovakia, and with the name Domika.
Ted Grossman
Eastsound

On Aug 11, 2005, at 5:26 AM, Cass Twitchell wrote:

Does anyone have any information re the location of the town, vilage
or city
of Csur Hungary 11/87?
Cassandra Csuri Twitchell,
Ashland Ohio USA


Hungary SIG #Hungary Osztrogoszk #hungary

more0318@...
 

I found a record for one of my relatives, who was last recorded in a
Hungarian Labour Battalion in 1943 at Osztrogoszk. I can't find this
location on a map. Does anyone know where it is and what it is called now?
Thanks.

Mike More
mikemore@rogers.com


FHL JEWISH RECORDS FOR HUNGARY #hungary

B. Frederics <picturethisfilm@...>
 

Genners,

Does anyone know if there are more Jewish records for Hungarian towns that
have not yet been filmed? Is it worth it to contact the county archives to
ask if these records exist?

Thanks.

Regards,
Bonnie Frederics
Tucson, AZ
picturethisfilm@email.com


Hungary SIG #Hungary FHL JEWISH RECORDS FOR HUNGARY #hungary

B. Frederics <picturethisfilm@...>
 

Genners,

Does anyone know if there are more Jewish records for Hungarian towns that
have not yet been filmed? Is it worth it to contact the county archives to
ask if these records exist?

Thanks.

Regards,
Bonnie Frederics
Tucson, AZ
picturethisfilm@email.com


translation/interpretation help #hungary

Marc D. Machtinger <marc@...>
 

Dear Fellow Researchers:

I would be grateful for translation/interpretation assistance on a Hungarian
marriage record. The record is an 1872 marriage for Sigmund BRAUNER and
Betti NEUMAN in Komarom, Hungary. Since I have several images of the
record, I have placed it on a web page rather than on ViewMate. I have
indicated my specific questions on the web page. The URL is:
http://www.patentstation.com/family2/braunerneumann.htm

I would greatly appreciate any responses. Please respond directly to me at
marc@patentstation.com.

Very truly yours,

Marc D. Machtinger, Buffalo Grove, Illinois, U.S.A.
email: marc@patentstation.com


Hungary SIG #Hungary translation/interpretation help #hungary

Marc D. Machtinger <marc@...>
 

Dear Fellow Researchers:

I would be grateful for translation/interpretation assistance on a Hungarian
marriage record. The record is an 1872 marriage for Sigmund BRAUNER and
Betti NEUMAN in Komarom, Hungary. Since I have several images of the
record, I have placed it on a web page rather than on ViewMate. I have
indicated my specific questions on the web page. The URL is:
http://www.patentstation.com/family2/braunerneumann.htm

I would greatly appreciate any responses. Please respond directly to me at
marc@patentstation.com.

Very truly yours,

Marc D. Machtinger, Buffalo Grove, Illinois, U.S.A.
email: marc@patentstation.com


Re: Budapest - Buda - Pest Question #hungary

Robert Neu
 

Budapest is the city made up of what was originally
two cities: Buda on the left bank of the Danube and
Pest on the right bank. Buda was the original royal
city, and originally Pest was mostly marshes on the
right bank. Obuda is the place in Buda where the
original (so to speak) Jewish community was - as of
the early 18th Century - and was were probably where
earlier communities had been.

Today and since the second half of the 19th Century it
is all one city Budapest. As a point of interest the
Parliament, the main synagogue, District VII where
most Jews lived are all on the right bank - meaning
Pest. When people say they are >from Buda they mean the
left bank. When they say they are >from Pest it can
mean either Budapest as a whole or just Pest - i.e.
the right bank. Also by now the city has I believe 22
districts and after WWII, some of the suburbs became
part of the city.

Keep also in mind that the great influx of Jews in the
city - and city growth took place in the second part
of the 19th Century.

Robert Neu

--- Karen Cecilio <kcecilio@ureach.com> wrote:

Hello,

I am actively researching my husband's line, KAUNITZ
(KAUNICZ)
who lived in the villages of Baan, Nyitra, Illava,
Dubnicz, etc.
I am finding at some points that some of them move
to the city
of Budapest.

I am interested in looking at the LDS films of the
city, but am
rather baffled by what the differences are between
Buda, Pest,
Obuda, and Budapest itself. Are they all districts
of the same
city, or are they their own individual towns?

A little primer would be helpful. I can't seem to
find a good
explanation online.

Thank you,
Karen Cecilio
Akron, Ohio


Hungarian Woman, Photograph Posting #hungary

Alex W. Magocsi Jr. <alexander.magocsi@...>
 

I have posted a photograph >from the late 1930s of a group of Hungarian women.
The photograph shows my Grandmother Anna (Hani) Magocsi nee Grosz, b. in
Nyirbator HU, with other women, all dressed in what I assume are somewhat
tradional dresses.

I suspect that these women were all members of a Hungarian club in the greater
New York City area.

The photograph can be viewed at the following web site:
www.magocsi.org/hungarian_women_1930s.jpeg

Perhaps one of your ancestors is shown.
If someone has more information regarding the photograph, please eMail me.

Regards
Alex
York, Maine


Hungary SIG #Hungary Re: Budapest - Buda - Pest Question #hungary

Robert Neu
 

Budapest is the city made up of what was originally
two cities: Buda on the left bank of the Danube and
Pest on the right bank. Buda was the original royal
city, and originally Pest was mostly marshes on the
right bank. Obuda is the place in Buda where the
original (so to speak) Jewish community was - as of
the early 18th Century - and was were probably where
earlier communities had been.

Today and since the second half of the 19th Century it
is all one city Budapest. As a point of interest the
Parliament, the main synagogue, District VII where
most Jews lived are all on the right bank - meaning
Pest. When people say they are >from Buda they mean the
left bank. When they say they are >from Pest it can
mean either Budapest as a whole or just Pest - i.e.
the right bank. Also by now the city has I believe 22
districts and after WWII, some of the suburbs became
part of the city.

Keep also in mind that the great influx of Jews in the
city - and city growth took place in the second part
of the 19th Century.

Robert Neu

--- Karen Cecilio <kcecilio@ureach.com> wrote:

Hello,

I am actively researching my husband's line, KAUNITZ
(KAUNICZ)
who lived in the villages of Baan, Nyitra, Illava,
Dubnicz, etc.
I am finding at some points that some of them move
to the city
of Budapest.

I am interested in looking at the LDS films of the
city, but am
rather baffled by what the differences are between
Buda, Pest,
Obuda, and Budapest itself. Are they all districts
of the same
city, or are they their own individual towns?

A little primer would be helpful. I can't seem to
find a good
explanation online.

Thank you,
Karen Cecilio
Akron, Ohio


Hungary SIG #Hungary Hungarian Woman, Photograph Posting #hungary

Alex W. Magocsi Jr. <alexander.magocsi@...>
 

I have posted a photograph >from the late 1930s of a group of Hungarian women.
The photograph shows my Grandmother Anna (Hani) Magocsi nee Grosz, b. in
Nyirbator HU, with other women, all dressed in what I assume are somewhat
tradional dresses.

I suspect that these women were all members of a Hungarian club in the greater
New York City area.

The photograph can be viewed at the following web site:
www.magocsi.org/hungarian_women_1930s.jpeg

Perhaps one of your ancestors is shown.
If someone has more information regarding the photograph, please eMail me.

Regards
Alex
York, Maine


surname spellings #ukraine

Lynn Arroyo
 

BlankHello to All,

I am new to the list and I hope this reaches everyone.

I am particularly interested in the name Troyansky which has so many
spellings that it has become confusing to try to find the country of origin.
I can only trace my family back to 1800-1820 in the town of Romanivka, Kiev
Gubernia, but one of the spellings of this name is Trojanker and I am led to
believe by some family members that the 'anker' at the end of the name
means that the person came >from the town of Troyan, much like a New Yorker
is said to have originated in New York. This sounds logical since I
understand that surnames in the area were not available until this time
frame. I have listed some of the spellings of Troyansky that I have come up
against and these spellings occurred within the same immediate family! In
other words, my grandfather came to this country as Troianker, one of his
sisters came in as Troianski, a brother came in as Trojanowsky. They were
all known as Troyansky once they got to the USA. I realize that the 'i',
'j', and 'y' are interchangeable and probably are just a matter of
pronunciation, but maybe they can help pinpoint an origination as well .

Is there anyone out there who can shed some light on where a name like
Troyanker originated so I can research another area? I have come up against
a brick wall and can't get past 1800-1820 in Romanivka.

Thanks in advance,
Lynn Troyansky Arroyo
Largo, Florida

Researching: TROIANKER, TROIANSKY, TROYANSKY, TROIANSKJ, TROJANSKI,
TROJANOWSKY, TROJANOVSKY, YURIK, YURICK, URIK, URICK, URICH, ZAMHOFSKY,
ZALMECHOVSKY, SCHWARTZ.


Re: -Skomu Suffix #ukraine

Steve Franklin <cryptozoomorphic@...>
 

Thanks to everyone who replied to this question. The general consensus is that
the ending is actually -skomu and that it is the "dative case" of the name used
in addresses. Briefly, the dative would be the equivalent of "FOR So-and-So" in
English. >from what I am told, this particular form of the dative occurs across
Russian, Ukrainian, and even Polish, it being a broadly Slavic form. Just
another twist to be aware of when transcribing your ancestors' names.

There is another variation on this particular type of confusion that I have
noticed. The Yiddish form of the name of a town (shtetl) is sometimes taken from
the genitive case of that town name and not the nominative case. The genitive is
what one might find on the window of a store in that town. The example that
comes to mind is Vievio, in Lithuania, which is actually the genitive of Vievis.
Thus one might find the "Vievio Hardware Store" in the town of Vievis, the
equivalent of the English "Hardware Store OF Vievis." I'm sure there are
examples >from across the Pale of Settlement.

Steve Franklin
Baltimore
http://www.lordbalto.com/
If my email ever bounces,
you can always contact me
at my website.

| ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
| Just a thought, but the -u/-onu suffix looks Romanian to my eye!
|
| Brian Neil Burg
| Researching KHARATZ (CHARATZ in th U.S.) and BIK >from Chmielnik & Staraya
| Sinyava, Podolsk Gubernia
|
| In a message dated 8/14/2005 11:29:26 PM Pacific Standard Time,
| ukraine@lyris.jewishgen.org writes:
|
| "My great grandfather, Eudel SCHEFCZINSKY of Gorodische, went by many variati
| ons
| of his name over the years, but the one that fascinates me the most is from
| an
| entry in the Blitzstein Bank Passage Order Book records, where his
| son-in-law,
| my grandfather Samuel (FRENKEL) FRANKLIN, has him as Judku SCHEFCZINSKONU. I
| am curious if anyone recognizes the orthography of this name, that is, where
| would
| this particular rendering have come from? What country--what language--would
| the -u/-onu endings indicate? I realise Judku is a variation on Judke, which
| Eudel also used.


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine surname spellings #ukraine

Lynn Arroyo
 

BlankHello to All,

I am new to the list and I hope this reaches everyone.

I am particularly interested in the name Troyansky which has so many
spellings that it has become confusing to try to find the country of origin.
I can only trace my family back to 1800-1820 in the town of Romanivka, Kiev
Gubernia, but one of the spellings of this name is Trojanker and I am led to
believe by some family members that the 'anker' at the end of the name
means that the person came >from the town of Troyan, much like a New Yorker
is said to have originated in New York. This sounds logical since I
understand that surnames in the area were not available until this time
frame. I have listed some of the spellings of Troyansky that I have come up
against and these spellings occurred within the same immediate family! In
other words, my grandfather came to this country as Troianker, one of his
sisters came in as Troianski, a brother came in as Trojanowsky. They were
all known as Troyansky once they got to the USA. I realize that the 'i',
'j', and 'y' are interchangeable and probably are just a matter of
pronunciation, but maybe they can help pinpoint an origination as well .

Is there anyone out there who can shed some light on where a name like
Troyanker originated so I can research another area? I have come up against
a brick wall and can't get past 1800-1820 in Romanivka.

Thanks in advance,
Lynn Troyansky Arroyo
Largo, Florida

Researching: TROIANKER, TROIANSKY, TROYANSKY, TROIANSKJ, TROJANSKI,
TROJANOWSKY, TROJANOVSKY, YURIK, YURICK, URIK, URICK, URICH, ZAMHOFSKY,
ZALMECHOVSKY, SCHWARTZ.


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine Re: -Skomu Suffix #ukraine

Steve Franklin <cryptozoomorphic@...>
 

Thanks to everyone who replied to this question. The general consensus is that
the ending is actually -skomu and that it is the "dative case" of the name used
in addresses. Briefly, the dative would be the equivalent of "FOR So-and-So" in
English. >from what I am told, this particular form of the dative occurs across
Russian, Ukrainian, and even Polish, it being a broadly Slavic form. Just
another twist to be aware of when transcribing your ancestors' names.

There is another variation on this particular type of confusion that I have
noticed. The Yiddish form of the name of a town (shtetl) is sometimes taken from
the genitive case of that town name and not the nominative case. The genitive is
what one might find on the window of a store in that town. The example that
comes to mind is Vievio, in Lithuania, which is actually the genitive of Vievis.
Thus one might find the "Vievio Hardware Store" in the town of Vievis, the
equivalent of the English "Hardware Store OF Vievis." I'm sure there are
examples >from across the Pale of Settlement.

Steve Franklin
Baltimore
http://www.lordbalto.com/
If my email ever bounces,
you can always contact me
at my website.

| ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
| Just a thought, but the -u/-onu suffix looks Romanian to my eye!
|
| Brian Neil Burg
| Researching KHARATZ (CHARATZ in th U.S.) and BIK >from Chmielnik & Staraya
| Sinyava, Podolsk Gubernia
|
| In a message dated 8/14/2005 11:29:26 PM Pacific Standard Time,
| ukraine@lyris.jewishgen.org writes:
|
| "My great grandfather, Eudel SCHEFCZINSKY of Gorodische, went by many variati
| ons
| of his name over the years, but the one that fascinates me the most is from
| an
| entry in the Blitzstein Bank Passage Order Book records, where his
| son-in-law,
| my grandfather Samuel (FRENKEL) FRANKLIN, has him as Judku SCHEFCZINSKONU. I
| am curious if anyone recognizes the orthography of this name, that is, where
| would
| this particular rendering have come from? What country--what language--would
| the -u/-onu endings indicate? I realise Judku is a variation on Judke, which
| Eudel also used.


Publication of Pinkas ha-Kehillot Romania, Chapter of Iasi #ukraine

Robert Sherins <rsherins@...>
 

Dear Genners,

The English translation of the chapter about the Jewish community
(Kehillah) of Iasi, Romania, has just been published on the
Jewishgen.org/Yizkor Book Translations website
<http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/pinkas_romania/rom1_00141.html>. It is
a very lengthy (66 pages/contained on two webpages) and scholarly
document, which summarizes the history of the Kehillah of Iasi since
the 16th century. The details of the history contained in this article
encompass the most important facts that are relevant to the history of
the other Jewish communities located elsewhere in Moldavia.

Most importantly, there was a vital trading relationship between Brody,
Galicia, and Iasi, Moldavia, since the 1500s, when the exports >from
Brody and other Eastern European states required the transport of goods
for shipment to the Moldavian port of Galati, which was located in the
delta leading to the Black Sea. Many Polish and Russian Jews immigrated
to Moldavia during the18-19th centuries, when the Romanian government
offered tax free privileges (they were known as sudits) to merchants,
businessmen, and skilled craftsmen, to encourage the development of
Moldavia. The extensive pre-existing trading relationships between Iasi
and Brody, Galicia, was another reason why Jewish merchants immigrated
to Iasi and other towns in Moldavia.

We have published the English translations of the history of the
Kehillah >from the Pinkas ha-Kehillot, Romania, of eleven towns in
Moldavia, which include: Botosani, Frumusica, Galati, Hirlau, Husi,
Iasi, Negresti, Podul Iloaiei, Pungesti, Roman, and Vaslui. To access
the translations, search the following url link
<http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/translations.html>.

These translations >from the Pinkas ha-Kehillot Romania were made by the
donations of Robert S. Sherins, M.D., Richard J. Sherins, M.D., and
Beryle Solomon Buchman, and the English translations of Ziva Yavin,
Ph.D., and Rabbi Jack H Bloom, Ph.D. We encourage other "Genners" to
contribute to the Jewishgen.org/Yizkor Book Project and translate the
remaining chapters.

Robert S. Sherins, M.D.
Pacific Palisades, California


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine Publication of Pinkas ha-Kehillot Romania, Chapter of Iasi #ukraine

Robert Sherins <rsherins@...>
 

Dear Genners,

The English translation of the chapter about the Jewish community
(Kehillah) of Iasi, Romania, has just been published on the
Jewishgen.org/Yizkor Book Translations website
<http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/pinkas_romania/rom1_00141.html>. It is
a very lengthy (66 pages/contained on two webpages) and scholarly
document, which summarizes the history of the Kehillah of Iasi since
the 16th century. The details of the history contained in this article
encompass the most important facts that are relevant to the history of
the other Jewish communities located elsewhere in Moldavia.

Most importantly, there was a vital trading relationship between Brody,
Galicia, and Iasi, Moldavia, since the 1500s, when the exports >from
Brody and other Eastern European states required the transport of goods
for shipment to the Moldavian port of Galati, which was located in the
delta leading to the Black Sea. Many Polish and Russian Jews immigrated
to Moldavia during the18-19th centuries, when the Romanian government
offered tax free privileges (they were known as sudits) to merchants,
businessmen, and skilled craftsmen, to encourage the development of
Moldavia. The extensive pre-existing trading relationships between Iasi
and Brody, Galicia, was another reason why Jewish merchants immigrated
to Iasi and other towns in Moldavia.

We have published the English translations of the history of the
Kehillah >from the Pinkas ha-Kehillot, Romania, of eleven towns in
Moldavia, which include: Botosani, Frumusica, Galati, Hirlau, Husi,
Iasi, Negresti, Podul Iloaiei, Pungesti, Roman, and Vaslui. To access
the translations, search the following url link
<http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/translations.html>.

These translations >from the Pinkas ha-Kehillot Romania were made by the
donations of Robert S. Sherins, M.D., Richard J. Sherins, M.D., and
Beryle Solomon Buchman, and the English translations of Ziva Yavin,
Ph.D., and Rabbi Jack H Bloom, Ph.D. We encourage other "Genners" to
contribute to the Jewishgen.org/Yizkor Book Project and translate the
remaining chapters.

Robert S. Sherins, M.D.
Pacific Palisades, California


Re: jcr-uk digest: August 15, 2005 #unitedkingdom

Jill Whitehead
 

Dear all,

Re Bernstein, Borenstein, Rubenstein and family naming patterns

In regard to Richard Cooper's note, Bernstein and its derivatives are
incredibly common names, found throughout Eastern Europe. The surname and
its derivatives merely mean red stone.

My great great grandmother Rebecca (born about 1840, came to Edinburgh about
1870, died Edinburgh 1907) was known as Rubenstein, Bernstein and also
Borenstein on her different records - she came >from
Vistytis/Vishtinetz/Wistitten/Wiestieniec, now in Lithuania but for most of
19th century in NE Poland, in Suwalki area. However, her niece Janet Brown
(Brin) of Vishtinetz, married Harris Michaelson of Grodno in Warsaw, and
they came to Edinburgh via Warsaw in 1867 or 1868 (the first of the Brown
family to come over). Warsaw was a major railway centre, and emigration to
Hamburg and other ports, could be via the railway and Warsaw.

Note; Scottish records tell you a lot more than English records - recording
dates and places of parent's marriages on their children's birth
certificates - this has allowed me to piece together more information than
for my family that went to Northern England.

Also, my grandmother's sister Augusta Abrahams married a Harry Bernstein in
Manchester in 1910. As I discovered, there are a large number of Bernstein's
in Manchester, and they do not seem to be inter-related as far as I know.
They come >from all over Eastern Europe.

In regard to family naming patterns, it can be difficult to make assessments
because Jews used the same small pot of names. For example, Abraham tended
to be the name of the eldest son, in the majority of cases. I have Abraham
Abrahams in my family - and that must be one of the most common Jewish
names, but few would be related, due to using patronymics as a surname. It
is easier where there are two groups of names - for example Cyza Malka
appears in alternate generations in my Guttenberg family (which became
Cissie Miriam).

Jill Whitehead

Researching Abrahams/Abrams of Manchester
Brin/Bown of Vishtinetz and Edinburgh
Guttenberg/Graham of Rajgrod and Hull/Grimsby/.Sheffield
Servian/Serwianski of Lake Serwy near Augustow and Liverpool

----- Original Message -----
From: "JCR-UK SIG digest" <jcr-uk@lyris.jewishgen.org>
To: "jcr-uk digest recipients" <jcr-uk@lyris.jewishgen.org>
Sent: Tuesday, August 16, 2005 7:00 AM
Subject: jcr-uk digest: August 15, 2005


JCR-UK Digest for Monday, August 15, 2005.

1. JEWISH DIRECTORY
2. INTRO BERNSTEIN and ISAACS Families
3. MOSES family

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: JEWISH DIRECTORY
From: "B. Frederics" <picturethisfilm@email.com>
Date: Sun, 14 Aug 2005 21:13:53 -0700
X-Message-Number: 1

Hello,

I've been studiously following the advice given me >from my last email a
number of months ago regarding my elusive ADELSON family. I've even =
created
a spreadsheet that contains pertinent information gleaned >from =
directories
and census' so as to compare the different Adelson families on these
records, hoping to figure out which is mine. My great-uncle, Samuel =
Adelson,
noted on his 1920 passenger record (to the US) that he last resided with =
his
"aunt, Mrs. Adelson, at 88 Gosset St., Brick Lane, London." We presume =
that
her husband, Mr. Adelson, was my great-grandfather's brother, at that =
time
deceased. Unfortunately, we know of no given names. What we do know is =
that
Mr. Adelson's father's name was Hirsch and he was born in Lithuania. To =
get
to the point, after getting hold of some vital records, the two London
families I thought could be ours, are not. I'm trying for the third and
final Adelson Londoner, whom I found on the 1900 London City Directory. =
Can
somebody tell me if there are additional London City Directories online =
from
the period 1910-1920? Also, how can I get hold of this person's =
Immigration
record or any record that would indicate his father's name or his own =
place
of birth (other than Russia/Lithuania)? That's the only way I can =
conceive
of confirming a relationship.

Thanks in advance for your guidance.

Regards,
Bonnie Frederics
Tucson, Arizona USA
picturethisfilm@email.com
Seeking: ADELSON (London, Vilna, Butrimantz & surrounds)


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: INTRO BERNSTEIN and ISAACS Families
From: "Richard Cooper" <ricooper@ntlworld.com>
Date: Mon, 15 Aug 2005 11:57:37 +0100
X-Message-Number: 2

Re your search for ISAACS and BERNSTEIN families posted on 11/8/05:

My great-grandparents were Wolf BERNSTINE (also BERNSTEINE
and BORENSTIN) and Annie (Toibe Hinde) MATELEVITCH.
Wolf was born in Warsaw in 1856, son of Boruch and Rachel BORENSTEJN.
Annie was born in Warsaw in 1859, daughter of
Ephraim MATELEVITCH and Louise GOTTSCHINSKI.

Wolf and Annie had 9 children:
Abraham (1880, Warsaw)
Rachel (1882, Paris)
Jacob (1883, London)
David (1885, London)
Samuel (1886, Huntingdon)
Henry (1888, London)
Alfred (1891, Bramley, Surrey)
Frank (1899, Southsea, Hampshire)(my grandfather)
Dora (1902, Southsea - died infant)

In the late 19th century more Jews lived in Warsaw than in any other
city on earth apart >from New York, so the similarity of our BERNSTEIN
names (Rachel, Annie, Barnett = Boruch) may be coincidence.
The clincher would be if your BERNSTEINs were Levites, as was my
Wolf BERNSTINE,

Good luck in your research,
Yours sincerely
Richard Cooper
Gosport, UK
BORENSTEIN, MATELEVITCH and GODZINSKIJ >from Warsaw
LEZTER, RINENBERG & SALENDER >from Rzeszow & Kolbuszowa
MILLET & ENGELBERG >from Dabrowa Tarnowska, Zablocie & Lezajsk
ADLER & FINKELSTEIN >from Tarnopol
LEWINSTEIN >from Berdichev
YAROSHEVSKY & SHAPOCHNIKOW >from Odessa



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: MOSES family
From: Lawrence Blum <lblum1@tampabay.rr.com>
Date: Mon, 15 Aug 2005 14:24:01 -0400
X-Message-Number: 3

Hi,
My grandfather, Joseph FARBMAN, left Brest (now in Belarus) for London
in the late 1890s
and stayed with a cousin(?). The cousin's name was Nathan MOSES.
According to the census
they lived in White Chapel. Does anyone have information about the MOSES
family?
Please reply Private. lblum1@tampabay.rr.com
Thank You
Lawrence Blum of Port Richey, Florida




---

END OF DIGEST

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JCR-UK SIG #UnitedKingdom Re: jcr-uk digest: August 15, 2005 #unitedkingdom

Jill Whitehead
 

Dear all,

Re Bernstein, Borenstein, Rubenstein and family naming patterns

In regard to Richard Cooper's note, Bernstein and its derivatives are
incredibly common names, found throughout Eastern Europe. The surname and
its derivatives merely mean red stone.

My great great grandmother Rebecca (born about 1840, came to Edinburgh about
1870, died Edinburgh 1907) was known as Rubenstein, Bernstein and also
Borenstein on her different records - she came >from
Vistytis/Vishtinetz/Wistitten/Wiestieniec, now in Lithuania but for most of
19th century in NE Poland, in Suwalki area. However, her niece Janet Brown
(Brin) of Vishtinetz, married Harris Michaelson of Grodno in Warsaw, and
they came to Edinburgh via Warsaw in 1867 or 1868 (the first of the Brown
family to come over). Warsaw was a major railway centre, and emigration to
Hamburg and other ports, could be via the railway and Warsaw.

Note; Scottish records tell you a lot more than English records - recording
dates and places of parent's marriages on their children's birth
certificates - this has allowed me to piece together more information than
for my family that went to Northern England.

Also, my grandmother's sister Augusta Abrahams married a Harry Bernstein in
Manchester in 1910. As I discovered, there are a large number of Bernstein's
in Manchester, and they do not seem to be inter-related as far as I know.
They come >from all over Eastern Europe.

In regard to family naming patterns, it can be difficult to make assessments
because Jews used the same small pot of names. For example, Abraham tended
to be the name of the eldest son, in the majority of cases. I have Abraham
Abrahams in my family - and that must be one of the most common Jewish
names, but few would be related, due to using patronymics as a surname. It
is easier where there are two groups of names - for example Cyza Malka
appears in alternate generations in my Guttenberg family (which became
Cissie Miriam).

Jill Whitehead

Researching Abrahams/Abrams of Manchester
Brin/Bown of Vishtinetz and Edinburgh
Guttenberg/Graham of Rajgrod and Hull/Grimsby/.Sheffield
Servian/Serwianski of Lake Serwy near Augustow and Liverpool

----- Original Message -----
From: "JCR-UK SIG digest" <jcr-uk@lyris.jewishgen.org>
To: "jcr-uk digest recipients" <jcr-uk@lyris.jewishgen.org>
Sent: Tuesday, August 16, 2005 7:00 AM
Subject: jcr-uk digest: August 15, 2005


JCR-UK Digest for Monday, August 15, 2005.

1. JEWISH DIRECTORY
2. INTRO BERNSTEIN and ISAACS Families
3. MOSES family

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: JEWISH DIRECTORY
From: "B. Frederics" <picturethisfilm@email.com>
Date: Sun, 14 Aug 2005 21:13:53 -0700
X-Message-Number: 1

Hello,

I've been studiously following the advice given me >from my last email a
number of months ago regarding my elusive ADELSON family. I've even =
created
a spreadsheet that contains pertinent information gleaned >from =
directories
and census' so as to compare the different Adelson families on these
records, hoping to figure out which is mine. My great-uncle, Samuel =
Adelson,
noted on his 1920 passenger record (to the US) that he last resided with =
his
"aunt, Mrs. Adelson, at 88 Gosset St., Brick Lane, London." We presume =
that
her husband, Mr. Adelson, was my great-grandfather's brother, at that =
time
deceased. Unfortunately, we know of no given names. What we do know is =
that
Mr. Adelson's father's name was Hirsch and he was born in Lithuania. To =
get
to the point, after getting hold of some vital records, the two London
families I thought could be ours, are not. I'm trying for the third and
final Adelson Londoner, whom I found on the 1900 London City Directory. =
Can
somebody tell me if there are additional London City Directories online =
from
the period 1910-1920? Also, how can I get hold of this person's =
Immigration
record or any record that would indicate his father's name or his own =
place
of birth (other than Russia/Lithuania)? That's the only way I can =
conceive
of confirming a relationship.

Thanks in advance for your guidance.

Regards,
Bonnie Frederics
Tucson, Arizona USA
picturethisfilm@email.com
Seeking: ADELSON (London, Vilna, Butrimantz & surrounds)


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: INTRO BERNSTEIN and ISAACS Families
From: "Richard Cooper" <ricooper@ntlworld.com>
Date: Mon, 15 Aug 2005 11:57:37 +0100
X-Message-Number: 2

Re your search for ISAACS and BERNSTEIN families posted on 11/8/05:

My great-grandparents were Wolf BERNSTINE (also BERNSTEINE
and BORENSTIN) and Annie (Toibe Hinde) MATELEVITCH.
Wolf was born in Warsaw in 1856, son of Boruch and Rachel BORENSTEJN.
Annie was born in Warsaw in 1859, daughter of
Ephraim MATELEVITCH and Louise GOTTSCHINSKI.

Wolf and Annie had 9 children:
Abraham (1880, Warsaw)
Rachel (1882, Paris)
Jacob (1883, London)
David (1885, London)
Samuel (1886, Huntingdon)
Henry (1888, London)
Alfred (1891, Bramley, Surrey)
Frank (1899, Southsea, Hampshire)(my grandfather)
Dora (1902, Southsea - died infant)

In the late 19th century more Jews lived in Warsaw than in any other
city on earth apart >from New York, so the similarity of our BERNSTEIN
names (Rachel, Annie, Barnett = Boruch) may be coincidence.
The clincher would be if your BERNSTEINs were Levites, as was my
Wolf BERNSTINE,

Good luck in your research,
Yours sincerely
Richard Cooper
Gosport, UK
BORENSTEIN, MATELEVITCH and GODZINSKIJ >from Warsaw
LEZTER, RINENBERG & SALENDER >from Rzeszow & Kolbuszowa
MILLET & ENGELBERG >from Dabrowa Tarnowska, Zablocie & Lezajsk
ADLER & FINKELSTEIN >from Tarnopol
LEWINSTEIN >from Berdichev
YAROSHEVSKY & SHAPOCHNIKOW >from Odessa



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: MOSES family
From: Lawrence Blum <lblum1@tampabay.rr.com>
Date: Mon, 15 Aug 2005 14:24:01 -0400
X-Message-Number: 3

Hi,
My grandfather, Joseph FARBMAN, left Brest (now in Belarus) for London
in the late 1890s
and stayed with a cousin(?). The cousin's name was Nathan MOSES.
According to the census
they lived in White Chapel. Does anyone have information about the MOSES
family?
Please reply Private. lblum1@tampabay.rr.com
Thank You
Lawrence Blum of Port Richey, Florida




---

END OF DIGEST

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