Date   

Searching Roots Starting in Ukraine/Moldova & Romania... #general

Avi K. <israeli@...>
 

Hello there,

Am new to JewishGen...! Therefore, I will be enormously grateful & endlessly
indebted to ANYBODY who may have/offer any information regarding following:

Maternal Grandmother: Zlatta (Goldie) Levitan/Levitt (born in 1900, in
Mogilev Podolski, Ukraine) who's had 3 brothers (all emigrated to U.S) & 2
or 3 sisters (who've stayed in the Russian Federation & whom I know NOTHING
about, except for names: Reva/Reeva (English:Rebecca), Havah (English: Eve)
& possibly Rachel. Brothers (Asher/Usher-in Yiddish, David/Dave/Toyve-in
Yiddish, Morris). Married to my maternal grandfather: Abraham/Avram Dubenko,
born in Ataki OR Soroki/Soroka ?!? (who's died in labor camp when separated
from wife & childern upon deportation to Siberia). Great grandparents' names
(on which side?!?): Eliezer/Lazer (English: Larry) & Beyle.

Paternal grandparents' (Romania) names: Solomon ("Didica") & Tsiporah
(Cecilia) Klammer (Clamer-in Romanian) originally, Austrian last name
(great-grandfather: Philip Klammer, was Austrian/Austro-Hungarian?!?).

Thank you ever-so much!

Please feel free & welcome to contact me with any possibly (hopefully)
relevant information directly via e-mail: israeli@sbcglobal.net

May many blessings be your daily share,

Avi Klammer

MODERATOR NOTE: Thanks for your inaugural posting, Avi. Your first move
shold be to register the names and places you are researching in the
JewishGen Family Finder. You may also be able to obtain information and
contacts by subscribing to and posting to other Lists which are more
closely focused on certain geographic areas - AustriaCzech SIG and
UkraineSIG are ones that come to mind, as well as Gesher Galicia.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Searching Roots Starting in Ukraine/Moldova & Romania... #general

Avi K. <israeli@...>
 

Hello there,

Am new to JewishGen...! Therefore, I will be enormously grateful & endlessly
indebted to ANYBODY who may have/offer any information regarding following:

Maternal Grandmother: Zlatta (Goldie) Levitan/Levitt (born in 1900, in
Mogilev Podolski, Ukraine) who's had 3 brothers (all emigrated to U.S) & 2
or 3 sisters (who've stayed in the Russian Federation & whom I know NOTHING
about, except for names: Reva/Reeva (English:Rebecca), Havah (English: Eve)
& possibly Rachel. Brothers (Asher/Usher-in Yiddish, David/Dave/Toyve-in
Yiddish, Morris). Married to my maternal grandfather: Abraham/Avram Dubenko,
born in Ataki OR Soroki/Soroka ?!? (who's died in labor camp when separated
from wife & childern upon deportation to Siberia). Great grandparents' names
(on which side?!?): Eliezer/Lazer (English: Larry) & Beyle.

Paternal grandparents' (Romania) names: Solomon ("Didica") & Tsiporah
(Cecilia) Klammer (Clamer-in Romanian) originally, Austrian last name
(great-grandfather: Philip Klammer, was Austrian/Austro-Hungarian?!?).

Thank you ever-so much!

Please feel free & welcome to contact me with any possibly (hopefully)
relevant information directly via e-mail: israeli@sbcglobal.net

May many blessings be your daily share,

Avi Klammer

MODERATOR NOTE: Thanks for your inaugural posting, Avi. Your first move
shold be to register the names and places you are researching in the
JewishGen Family Finder. You may also be able to obtain information and
contacts by subscribing to and posting to other Lists which are more
closely focused on certain geographic areas - AustriaCzech SIG and
UkraineSIG are ones that come to mind, as well as Gesher Galicia.


Re: The names "Biniem" and "Benyamin" #general

David Brostoff <listaddr@...>
 

At 1:33 PM +1000 on 8/19/05, Doug Mason wrote:

According to family tradition (records for Kurow, Poland are not
publiclyavailable), around 1876 Simha Biniem MANDELBAUM had a son
named Benyamin. Are the names "Biniem" and "Benyamin" variants of
one another?
Two of my relatives >from the Bialystok region are brothers, b. ca.
1915, named Bunyem and Benjamin. In the U.S. they were known as
Bernard (nicknamed Benny) and Ben, respectively.

David Brostoff


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: The names "Biniem" and "Benyamin" #general

David Brostoff <listaddr@...>
 

At 1:33 PM +1000 on 8/19/05, Doug Mason wrote:

According to family tradition (records for Kurow, Poland are not
publiclyavailable), around 1876 Simha Biniem MANDELBAUM had a son
named Benyamin. Are the names "Biniem" and "Benyamin" variants of
one another?
Two of my relatives >from the Bialystok region are brothers, b. ca.
1915, named Bunyem and Benjamin. In the U.S. they were known as
Bernard (nicknamed Benny) and Ben, respectively.

David Brostoff


A Guide To Jewish Genealogy In Lithuania #general

Saul Issroff <saul@...>
 

The Jewish Genealogy Society of Great Britain announces

A GUIDE TO JEWISH GENEALOGY IN LITHUANIA

ISBN: 0-9537669-8-5 (140 pages p/b)

By: SAM AARON

"Genealogical research in Lithuania is often difficult because so many of
the old records >from Czarist times (1794 to 1917) were lost or destroyed.
Here is a practical guide that will tell you what types of records there
were, which have survived for each of the three provinces that Lithuania was
divided into, how to access them, and what information you can expect to
find.


Archives often take a long time to reply to researchers because of the large
number of enquiries they receive. The guide describes the large amount of
information that can be directly accessed in on-line databases, or in
databases which are made available by e-mail to subscribers, and provides an
up-to-date list of all these resources, and should help you make quicker
progress with your researches.


For beginners, the Guide explains how to identify your ancestral shtetl (the
small town in which Jews were obliged to live), how to start off your
research, and eventually find information on your ancestors. Included are
also suggestions as to where you can look for clues to your ancestors in UK,
USA, Israeli and South African records. The latter section should be useful
also to those researching their roots in Eastern European countries other
than Lithuania". The Guide includes a full list of original town names with
their current equivalents, and a map showing the location of approximately
150 of these.


Price: £5.95 plus postage (UK 80p, Europe £2.00, rest of world £3.00.This is
$16 at current exchange rates].

Orders to:

JGSGB Publications
PO Box 180
St. Albans
Herts AL2 3WH
United Kingdom

Publications@jgsgb.org.uk

www.jgsgb.org.uk

Payment by cheques with orders payable to 'Jewish Genealogical Society of
Great Britain' or credit card giving:
Name as shown on card, Card number, Expiry date
Address where guide to be sent and if possible e-mail address in case of any
queries.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen A Guide To Jewish Genealogy In Lithuania #general

Saul Issroff <saul@...>
 

The Jewish Genealogy Society of Great Britain announces

A GUIDE TO JEWISH GENEALOGY IN LITHUANIA

ISBN: 0-9537669-8-5 (140 pages p/b)

By: SAM AARON

"Genealogical research in Lithuania is often difficult because so many of
the old records >from Czarist times (1794 to 1917) were lost or destroyed.
Here is a practical guide that will tell you what types of records there
were, which have survived for each of the three provinces that Lithuania was
divided into, how to access them, and what information you can expect to
find.


Archives often take a long time to reply to researchers because of the large
number of enquiries they receive. The guide describes the large amount of
information that can be directly accessed in on-line databases, or in
databases which are made available by e-mail to subscribers, and provides an
up-to-date list of all these resources, and should help you make quicker
progress with your researches.


For beginners, the Guide explains how to identify your ancestral shtetl (the
small town in which Jews were obliged to live), how to start off your
research, and eventually find information on your ancestors. Included are
also suggestions as to where you can look for clues to your ancestors in UK,
USA, Israeli and South African records. The latter section should be useful
also to those researching their roots in Eastern European countries other
than Lithuania". The Guide includes a full list of original town names with
their current equivalents, and a map showing the location of approximately
150 of these.


Price: £5.95 plus postage (UK 80p, Europe £2.00, rest of world £3.00.This is
$16 at current exchange rates].

Orders to:

JGSGB Publications
PO Box 180
St. Albans
Herts AL2 3WH
United Kingdom

Publications@jgsgb.org.uk

www.jgsgb.org.uk

Payment by cheques with orders payable to 'Jewish Genealogical Society of
Great Britain' or credit card giving:
Name as shown on card, Card number, Expiry date
Address where guide to be sent and if possible e-mail address in case of any
queries.


September 4: Jewish Genealogy Society of Miami, Inc #general

Barbara Musikar
 

On September 4, 2005 the Jewish Genealogy Society of Greater Miami, Inc will
meet at the Federation Building at 4200 Biscayne Blvd. at 10 AM sharp.
Attendees may call for the Federation for directions at (305) 576-4000 as
the entrance has been changed. Please bring photo ID.

The program will include Joan Parker's report on the 25th International
Association of Jewish Genealogical Societies Conference in Las Vegas and a
discussion by Barbara Musikar on the newly published online 1911 Canadian
Census.

For more information, please contact Barbara Musikar: by e-mail at
bar945@hotmail.com.

Barbara Musikar
President JGS of Greater Miami, Inc.
Surfside, FL
bmusikar@atlanticbb.net


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen September 4: Jewish Genealogy Society of Miami, Inc #general

Barbara Musikar
 

On September 4, 2005 the Jewish Genealogy Society of Greater Miami, Inc will
meet at the Federation Building at 4200 Biscayne Blvd. at 10 AM sharp.
Attendees may call for the Federation for directions at (305) 576-4000 as
the entrance has been changed. Please bring photo ID.

The program will include Joan Parker's report on the 25th International
Association of Jewish Genealogical Societies Conference in Las Vegas and a
discussion by Barbara Musikar on the newly published online 1911 Canadian
Census.

For more information, please contact Barbara Musikar: by e-mail at
bar945@hotmail.com.

Barbara Musikar
President JGS of Greater Miami, Inc.
Surfside, FL
bmusikar@atlanticbb.net


Gulag One -Step - Steve Does It Again! #belarus

David M. Fox <davefox73@...>
 

I am happy to report that Stephen Morse has just created the One-Step
English-language interface to the Gulag website that I announced previously
from an AVOTAYNU "Nu, What's New" (with permission). The interface tool can
be found on his one-step website (http://stevemorse.org) in a new section
called "Holocaust and Eastern Europe".

Stephen also just created a one-step interface to a Polish website also
reported in a recent issue of Nu-whats-new as being difficult to use for
a similar reason -- it was all in Polish. That interface is now also in
his "Holocaust and Eastern Europe" section.

Both of these databases are useful to Belarus researchers. Please share
your successes in finding data on these two databases using Steve's tools.

Thank you Steve for your contributions to genealogy research and making it
easier for all of us to find our ancestors.

Dave
--
David Fox
Mail to: davefox73@earthlink.net
Belarus SIG Founder and Past Coordinator
Arnold, MD USA
http://www.jewishgen.org/belarus



********************
There is now an online database at http://www.memo.ru of some 1.5 million
people, about 20,000 identified as Jewish, who were interned and died in
Soviet gulags form 1935-1955. Apparently it also includes persons executed
in Moscow. There are introductions at the site in Russian, German and
English, but currently the search engine and resulting information is only
in Russian.

Included for each person is last name, first name, patronymic, year of
birth, place of birth, nationality (Jewish is a nationality), education,
party membership, profession and place of work, place of residence, date of
arrest, arrest charge, date of decision, decision agency, law under which
convicted, sentence, date of execution, place of execution, date of
exoneration, exonerating agency, basis of exoneration and source of
information.

For those who do not have Russian keyboards, the Stephen P. Morse site
provides character for character transliteration of Roman alphabet letters
into Cyrillic. The Morse site is at http://www.stevemorse.org.
***************************


Belarus SIG #Belarus Gulag One -Step - Steve Does It Again! #belarus

David M. Fox <davefox73@...>
 

I am happy to report that Stephen Morse has just created the One-Step
English-language interface to the Gulag website that I announced previously
from an AVOTAYNU "Nu, What's New" (with permission). The interface tool can
be found on his one-step website (http://stevemorse.org) in a new section
called "Holocaust and Eastern Europe".

Stephen also just created a one-step interface to a Polish website also
reported in a recent issue of Nu-whats-new as being difficult to use for
a similar reason -- it was all in Polish. That interface is now also in
his "Holocaust and Eastern Europe" section.

Both of these databases are useful to Belarus researchers. Please share
your successes in finding data on these two databases using Steve's tools.

Thank you Steve for your contributions to genealogy research and making it
easier for all of us to find our ancestors.

Dave
--
David Fox
Mail to: davefox73@earthlink.net
Belarus SIG Founder and Past Coordinator
Arnold, MD USA
http://www.jewishgen.org/belarus



********************
There is now an online database at http://www.memo.ru of some 1.5 million
people, about 20,000 identified as Jewish, who were interned and died in
Soviet gulags form 1935-1955. Apparently it also includes persons executed
in Moscow. There are introductions at the site in Russian, German and
English, but currently the search engine and resulting information is only
in Russian.

Included for each person is last name, first name, patronymic, year of
birth, place of birth, nationality (Jewish is a nationality), education,
party membership, profession and place of work, place of residence, date of
arrest, arrest charge, date of decision, decision agency, law under which
convicted, sentence, date of execution, place of execution, date of
exoneration, exonerating agency, basis of exoneration and source of
information.

For those who do not have Russian keyboards, the Stephen P. Morse site
provides character for character transliteration of Roman alphabet letters
into Cyrillic. The Morse site is at http://www.stevemorse.org.
***************************


ABRAHAMs in Wales #unitedkingdom

Shannon Weber <Shannon.Weber@...>
 

Hello, JCR-UK discussion group;

I am a new member; please forgive any errors made on my part, until I can
get the hang of things.

I am researching Griffith ABRAHAM who was married to Joan LEWIS 4 June 1749
in Llangyfelach, Wales. This marriage is recorded in the Bishop's
Transcripts. I have also found record of a death of a daughter, Rachel
ABRAHAM, in Llangyfelach 12 Apr 1751. Rachel was never baptized in the
local parish.

I am researching this family with the help of another ABRAHAM descendant
that lives in Llansamlet, Wales. He has access to records that I don't have
- but he hasn't been able to find any Jewish records for the area.

This is my question: My friend in Wales has linked all of the ABRAHAMs that
appear to have resided in this area of Wales. Griffith ABRAHAM appears to
not have had his first four children baptized in the local parish, but in
1758 he began baptizing his children in the Llansamlet parish. (Very close
to Llangyfelach) We are guessing this is when Griffith stopped practicing
Judaism. Is my logic fuzzy? Is there something that I am not seeing here?
Can I assume that Griffith was once Jewish, but left his faith?

I am having a very hard time finding records >from the 1700's that could
prove who my Griffith's father was, or his origins. Does anyone have any
ideas of where I could look?

I am so grateful to have found this group, I am hoping to finally find some
answers for my Griffith. Thank you for any help you can offer.

Mrs. Shannon Weber
Shannon.Weber@comcast.net
West Valley City, Utah USA

My research is focused on Griffith ABRAHAM and Joan LEWIS married in 1749


LADEN Ellis Island Records #unitedkingdom

Carol Marcus <carol.marcus1@...>
 

I am having trouble locating Ellis Island records for my grandfather's
family (Judah LADEN). I know >from his birth certificate that he was
born in 1898 in London. My cousin recalls hearing that the family came
to the US in 1901.

I have found an Ellis Island record for my great-grandfather, Solomon
LADEN, with an arrival date of 1923; however, according to the manifest,
he was already a US citizen at that time, with a naturalization date of
1906 in Brooklyn, NY. Solomon LADEN recorded his son Judah's birth, so
he was still in London in 1898. Given the 1898 birth and the 1906
naturalization, a 1901 arrival date makes sense. However, there is no
other passenger record for Solomon LADEN other than the 1923 record, and
none at all for Judah, any of his older sisters, or his mother.

I can't imagine them arriving anywhere other than Ellis Island, since
they settled in New York, but I'm wondering if, in fact, they did arrive
in a different entry port. Is anyone aware of any other routes they
might have taken to arrive in the US other than Ellis Island? Were
there any other routes used by immigrants between England and the US at
that time?

Carol Laden Marcus
Fair Lawn, NJ, USA


JCR-UK SIG #UnitedKingdom ABRAHAMs in Wales #unitedkingdom

Shannon Weber <Shannon.Weber@...>
 

Hello, JCR-UK discussion group;

I am a new member; please forgive any errors made on my part, until I can
get the hang of things.

I am researching Griffith ABRAHAM who was married to Joan LEWIS 4 June 1749
in Llangyfelach, Wales. This marriage is recorded in the Bishop's
Transcripts. I have also found record of a death of a daughter, Rachel
ABRAHAM, in Llangyfelach 12 Apr 1751. Rachel was never baptized in the
local parish.

I am researching this family with the help of another ABRAHAM descendant
that lives in Llansamlet, Wales. He has access to records that I don't have
- but he hasn't been able to find any Jewish records for the area.

This is my question: My friend in Wales has linked all of the ABRAHAMs that
appear to have resided in this area of Wales. Griffith ABRAHAM appears to
not have had his first four children baptized in the local parish, but in
1758 he began baptizing his children in the Llansamlet parish. (Very close
to Llangyfelach) We are guessing this is when Griffith stopped practicing
Judaism. Is my logic fuzzy? Is there something that I am not seeing here?
Can I assume that Griffith was once Jewish, but left his faith?

I am having a very hard time finding records >from the 1700's that could
prove who my Griffith's father was, or his origins. Does anyone have any
ideas of where I could look?

I am so grateful to have found this group, I am hoping to finally find some
answers for my Griffith. Thank you for any help you can offer.

Mrs. Shannon Weber
Shannon.Weber@comcast.net
West Valley City, Utah USA

My research is focused on Griffith ABRAHAM and Joan LEWIS married in 1749


JCR-UK SIG #UnitedKingdom LADEN Ellis Island Records #unitedkingdom

Carol Marcus <carol.marcus1@...>
 

I am having trouble locating Ellis Island records for my grandfather's
family (Judah LADEN). I know >from his birth certificate that he was
born in 1898 in London. My cousin recalls hearing that the family came
to the US in 1901.

I have found an Ellis Island record for my great-grandfather, Solomon
LADEN, with an arrival date of 1923; however, according to the manifest,
he was already a US citizen at that time, with a naturalization date of
1906 in Brooklyn, NY. Solomon LADEN recorded his son Judah's birth, so
he was still in London in 1898. Given the 1898 birth and the 1906
naturalization, a 1901 arrival date makes sense. However, there is no
other passenger record for Solomon LADEN other than the 1923 record, and
none at all for Judah, any of his older sisters, or his mother.

I can't imagine them arriving anywhere other than Ellis Island, since
they settled in New York, but I'm wondering if, in fact, they did arrive
in a different entry port. Is anyone aware of any other routes they
might have taken to arrive in the US other than Ellis Island? Were
there any other routes used by immigrants between England and the US at
that time?

Carol Laden Marcus
Fair Lawn, NJ, USA


Re: 2006 Conference - Research at LBI #germany

khsmus@...
 

The Leo Baeck Institute Staff is already planning for the 2006 IAJGS
Conference in order to make sure that we can accommodate the research needs of the
anticipated large number of users during the conference period. We will issue
research guidelines and recommendations prior to the conference which will
enable us to have ready and available the collections you request when you arrive
at the reading room. We will also provide updated research requests to make
it easier for staff to answer inquiries. The LBI staff members have expertise
in many areas which may be useful to genealogists and are always willing to
help. I encourage you to submit requests and inquiries early (and be patient as
reponses may require some time), and to utilize our *** online catalog***
at: http://www.lbi.org

Karen Franklin Director, Family Research Program, LBI khsmus@aol.com


German SIG #Germany re: 2006 Conference - Research at LBI #germany

khsmus@...
 

The Leo Baeck Institute Staff is already planning for the 2006 IAJGS
Conference in order to make sure that we can accommodate the research needs of the
anticipated large number of users during the conference period. We will issue
research guidelines and recommendations prior to the conference which will
enable us to have ready and available the collections you request when you arrive
at the reading room. We will also provide updated research requests to make
it easier for staff to answer inquiries. The LBI staff members have expertise
in many areas which may be useful to genealogists and are always willing to
help. I encourage you to submit requests and inquiries early (and be patient as
reponses may require some time), and to utilize our *** online catalog***
at: http://www.lbi.org

Karen Franklin Director, Family Research Program, LBI khsmus@aol.com


Re: Research at LBI #germany

Brad Fanta <bradfanta@...>
 

Barbara:

I was at the Center for Jewish History for the first
time last April and had a very positive experience. I
identified the documents/books I wanted to see ahead
of time on line. I e-mailed LBI the date I would be
arriving as well as the catalogue numbers of the
material I wanted to see. Although I didn't receive a
confirmation message >from LBI, all of the material was
waiting for me when I arrived. You will need to go
through security on the entry level and then take the
elevator upstairs to the Reading Room.

The reading room is skylit and a beautiful space for
research--equipped with wi-fi if you need to bring
your laptop. Librarians are helpful, however the
staff does rotate on a regular basis so there is no
guarantee that information >from one librarian will be
shared with the next librarian coming onto the new
shift. Also, make sure you go to the LBI desk and not
YIVO or any of the other organizations represented at
the Center. Each organization operates independently
and has their own staff. It's a pity there isn't more
cross referencing, but that's probably too complicated.

Another advise is to make sure you go to the Center
early in your visit rather than later in case any
request takes longer than a day. I had several pages
copied out of books and manuscripts and had to return
the next day when I discovered wrong pages had been
photocopied (only staff is allowed to make copies).

As you know, genealogical research is often a slow
process but the rewards of finding unexpected gems is
worth the time. The most helpful material I found was
a hand-typed narrative on the Jewish History of
Osterberg, a small village in Bavaria near Ulm where
one of my ancestors (LAUPHEIMER) immigrated >from in
the early 19th century. Good luck on your research.

Brad Fanta Seattle, Washington <bradfanta@yahoo.com>

Barbara Algaze Los Angeles, California Algaze@comcast.net asked:

I am very much looking forward to the IAJGS
conference to be held in New
York City in August of 2006. I am especially
interested in doing genealogical
research at the Leo Baeck Institute. I understand
that it is part of the
Center for Jewish History and is located at 15 W
16th Street in Manhattan.
[Aprox. 15 to 20 minutes by subway or shuttle bus
from Conference headquarters.]
I would be interested in hearing >from anyone who has
done any genealogical
research at Leo Baeck Institute and had success (or
perhaps did not have success).

What was your experience? What were you looking
for? What did you find?
Was the staff knowledgeable? Were they helpful?
Any suggestions for searching
the on-line catalogue and doing research on site?


German SIG #Germany Re: Research at LBI #germany

Brad Fanta <bradfanta@...>
 

Barbara:

I was at the Center for Jewish History for the first
time last April and had a very positive experience. I
identified the documents/books I wanted to see ahead
of time on line. I e-mailed LBI the date I would be
arriving as well as the catalogue numbers of the
material I wanted to see. Although I didn't receive a
confirmation message >from LBI, all of the material was
waiting for me when I arrived. You will need to go
through security on the entry level and then take the
elevator upstairs to the Reading Room.

The reading room is skylit and a beautiful space for
research--equipped with wi-fi if you need to bring
your laptop. Librarians are helpful, however the
staff does rotate on a regular basis so there is no
guarantee that information >from one librarian will be
shared with the next librarian coming onto the new
shift. Also, make sure you go to the LBI desk and not
YIVO or any of the other organizations represented at
the Center. Each organization operates independently
and has their own staff. It's a pity there isn't more
cross referencing, but that's probably too complicated.

Another advise is to make sure you go to the Center
early in your visit rather than later in case any
request takes longer than a day. I had several pages
copied out of books and manuscripts and had to return
the next day when I discovered wrong pages had been
photocopied (only staff is allowed to make copies).

As you know, genealogical research is often a slow
process but the rewards of finding unexpected gems is
worth the time. The most helpful material I found was
a hand-typed narrative on the Jewish History of
Osterberg, a small village in Bavaria near Ulm where
one of my ancestors (LAUPHEIMER) immigrated >from in
the early 19th century. Good luck on your research.

Brad Fanta Seattle, Washington <bradfanta@yahoo.com>

Barbara Algaze Los Angeles, California Algaze@comcast.net asked:

I am very much looking forward to the IAJGS
conference to be held in New
York City in August of 2006. I am especially
interested in doing genealogical
research at the Leo Baeck Institute. I understand
that it is part of the
Center for Jewish History and is located at 15 W
16th Street in Manhattan.
[Aprox. 15 to 20 minutes by subway or shuttle bus
from Conference headquarters.]
I would be interested in hearing >from anyone who has
done any genealogical
research at Leo Baeck Institute and had success (or
perhaps did not have success).

What was your experience? What were you looking
for? What did you find?
Was the staff knowledgeable? Were they helpful?
Any suggestions for searching
the on-line catalogue and doing research on site?


Polish and German Gothic Viewmate translations requested #galicia

HJB <hjb@...>
 

Hello JGenners,

I'm hoping for translations of these birth records which are
posted on Viewmate:

Polish - Dine Haber pt. 1 & pt. 2 VM 6690 & 6691 (2nd row down)
http://data.jewishgen.org/viewmate/ALL/viewmateview.asp?key=6690
http://data.jewishgen.org/viewmate/ALL/viewmateview.asp?key=6691

I believe the last one is German Gothic Script. The quality is
very poor but I'd truly appreciate it if anyone can pull out the
names for whom this could be a record as I can't seem to ID which
ancestor's record this is. VM6692
http://data.jewishgen.org/viewmate/ALL/viewmateview.asp?key=6692

Please reply directly to me. Thanks to all who help with
translations. Your assistance is appreciated.

Hazel Sandow Boon
Hamilton, ON, Canada
Researching: HABER - Konyushki & Zurów, Galicia (now Zhuriv,
Ukraine), NYC;
STARK - Bóbrka, Galicia (now Ukraine), NYC; BELY - Rzeszów,
Poland
SADOVSKI/SADOWSKY - Belchatów & Lodz, Poland, NYC;
KANET/KANNETT/KANNATT - Czyzewo, Poland, NYC


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia Polish and German Gothic Viewmate translations requested #galicia

HJB <hjb@...>
 

Hello JGenners,

I'm hoping for translations of these birth records which are
posted on Viewmate:

Polish - Dine Haber pt. 1 & pt. 2 VM 6690 & 6691 (2nd row down)
http://data.jewishgen.org/viewmate/ALL/viewmateview.asp?key=6690
http://data.jewishgen.org/viewmate/ALL/viewmateview.asp?key=6691

I believe the last one is German Gothic Script. The quality is
very poor but I'd truly appreciate it if anyone can pull out the
names for whom this could be a record as I can't seem to ID which
ancestor's record this is. VM6692
http://data.jewishgen.org/viewmate/ALL/viewmateview.asp?key=6692

Please reply directly to me. Thanks to all who help with
translations. Your assistance is appreciated.

Hazel Sandow Boon
Hamilton, ON, Canada
Researching: HABER - Konyushki & Zurów, Galicia (now Zhuriv,
Ukraine), NYC;
STARK - Bóbrka, Galicia (now Ukraine), NYC; BELY - Rzeszów,
Poland
SADOVSKI/SADOWSKY - Belchatów & Lodz, Poland, NYC;
KANET/KANNETT/KANNATT - Czyzewo, Poland, NYC