Date   

NYC 2006 conference Call for Papers #yizkorbooks

Paula Zieselman <pzieselman@...>
 

The Jewish Genealogical Society is the host society for the 2006
International Association of Jewish Genealogical Societies' annual
conference to be held at the Marriott Marquis here in New York City from
August 13th to 18th.

We are pleased to announce our Call for Papers. Submissions should be made
at the Conference website at
<http://www.jgsny2006.org/call.cfm>http://www.jgsny2006.org/call.cfm

All abstract submissions must be submitted via our on-line abstract module
process. E-mail submittals will not be accepted.

Presentation categories are listed below:

Computer Training Workshops
Eastern and Central European research
Genetics and DNA Research
Holocaust research
Immigration, naturalization and migration
Methodology
Metropolitan New York City and New York State research
Non-European research (e.g. India, China)
Rabbinical research
Repositories
Sephardic research
Technology and Internet resources
United States research
Yiddish theater/Tin Pan Alley

Just follow the instructions at the website.

The decision to accept a submission will be heavily weighted toward
presentations not given at previous IAJGS Conferences, that provide
specific research methodology and that include specific information for
researchers to replicate the success of the presenter in acquiring
information.

Sessions will be one hour and fifteen minutes, with the last 15 minutes
reserved for questions and answers.

Proposal Deadline - December 1, 2005.

Speakers will be notified no later than February 1, 2006

Handout material/resource material, due March 1, 2006, is required for each
presentation and will be included in the syllabus distributed to all
conference registrants. Further details of the handout material
requirements will be provided upon acceptance of lecture.

Gloria Berkenstat Freund
2006 Conference Program Committee Chair
gloria@jgsny2006.org


Yizkor Books #YizkorBooks NYC 2006 conference Call for Papers #yizkorbooks

Paula Zieselman <pzieselman@...>
 

The Jewish Genealogical Society is the host society for the 2006
International Association of Jewish Genealogical Societies' annual
conference to be held at the Marriott Marquis here in New York City from
August 13th to 18th.

We are pleased to announce our Call for Papers. Submissions should be made
at the Conference website at
<http://www.jgsny2006.org/call.cfm>http://www.jgsny2006.org/call.cfm

All abstract submissions must be submitted via our on-line abstract module
process. E-mail submittals will not be accepted.

Presentation categories are listed below:

Computer Training Workshops
Eastern and Central European research
Genetics and DNA Research
Holocaust research
Immigration, naturalization and migration
Methodology
Metropolitan New York City and New York State research
Non-European research (e.g. India, China)
Rabbinical research
Repositories
Sephardic research
Technology and Internet resources
United States research
Yiddish theater/Tin Pan Alley

Just follow the instructions at the website.

The decision to accept a submission will be heavily weighted toward
presentations not given at previous IAJGS Conferences, that provide
specific research methodology and that include specific information for
researchers to replicate the success of the presenter in acquiring
information.

Sessions will be one hour and fifteen minutes, with the last 15 minutes
reserved for questions and answers.

Proposal Deadline - December 1, 2005.

Speakers will be notified no later than February 1, 2006

Handout material/resource material, due March 1, 2006, is required for each
presentation and will be included in the syllabus distributed to all
conference registrants. Further details of the handout material
requirements will be provided upon acceptance of lecture.

Gloria Berkenstat Freund
2006 Conference Program Committee Chair
gloria@jgsny2006.org


NYC 2006 conference Call for Papers #belarus

Paula Zieselman <pzieselman@...>
 

The Jewish Genealogical Society is the host society for the 2006
International Association of Jewish Genealogical Societies' annual
conference to be held at the Marriott Marquis here in New York City from
August 13th to 18th.

We are pleased to announce our Call for Papers. Submissions should be made
at the Conference website at
<http://www.jgsny2006.org/call.cfm>http://www.jgsny2006.org/call.cfm

All abstract submissions must be submitted via our on-line abstract module
process. E-mail submittals will not be accepted.

Presentation categories are listed below:

Computer Training Workshops
Eastern and Central European research
Genetics and DNA Research
Holocaust research
Immigration, naturalization and migration
Methodology
Metropolitan New York City and New York State research
Non-European research (e.g. India, China)
Rabbinical research
Repositories
Sephardic research
Technology and Internet resources
United States research
Yiddish theater/Tin Pan Alley

Just follow the instructions at the website.

The decision to accept a submission will be heavily weighted toward
presentations not given at previous IAJGS Conferences, that provide
specific research methodology and that include specific information for
researchers to replicate the success of the presenter in acquiring
information.

Sessions will be one hour and fifteen minutes, with the last 15 minutes
reserved for questions and answers.

Proposal Deadline - December 1, 2005.

Speakers will be notified no later than February 1, 2006

Handout material/resource material, due March 1, 2006, is required for each
presentation and will be included in the syllabus distributed to all
conference registrants. Further details of the handout material
requirements will be provided upon acceptance of lecture.

Gloria Berkenstat Freund
2006 Conference Program Committee Chair
gloria@jgsny2006.org


NYC 2006 Conference...Call for papers! #romania

Rosanne Leeson <rdleeson@...>
 

The Jewish Genealogical Society is the host society for the 2006
International Association of Jewish Genealogical Societies’ annual
conference to be held at the Marriott Marquis here in New York City >from
August 13th to 18th.

We are pleased to announce our Call for Papers. Submissions should be
made at the Conference website at
<http://www.jgsny2006.org/call.cfm>http://www.jgsny2006.org/call.cfm

All abstract submissions must be submitted via our on-line abstract
module process. E-mail submittals will not be accepted.

Presentation categories are listed below:

Computer Training Workshops
Eastern and Central European research
Genetics and DNA Research
Holocaust research
Immigration, naturalization and migration
Methodology
Metropolitan New York City and New York State research
Non-European research (e.g. India, China)
Rabbinical research
Repositories
Sephardic research
Technology and Internet resources
United States research
Yiddish theater/Tin Pan Alley

Just follow the instructions at the website.

The decision to accept a submission will be heavily weighted toward
presentations not given at previous IAJGS Conferences, that provide
specific research methodology and that include specific information for
researchers to replicate the success of the presenter in acquiring
information.

Sessions will be one hour and fifteen minutes, with the last 15 minutes
reserved for questions and answers.

Proposal Deadline – December 1, 2005.

Speakers will be notified no later than February 1, 2006

Handout material/resource material, due March 1, 2006, is required for
each presentation and will be included in the syllabus distributed to
all conference registrants. Further details of the handout material
requirements will be provided upon acceptance of lecture.

Gloria Berkenstat Freund
2006 Conference Program Committee Chair
gloria@jgsny2006.org


Belarus SIG #Belarus NYC 2006 conference Call for Papers #belarus

Paula Zieselman <pzieselman@...>
 

The Jewish Genealogical Society is the host society for the 2006
International Association of Jewish Genealogical Societies' annual
conference to be held at the Marriott Marquis here in New York City from
August 13th to 18th.

We are pleased to announce our Call for Papers. Submissions should be made
at the Conference website at
<http://www.jgsny2006.org/call.cfm>http://www.jgsny2006.org/call.cfm

All abstract submissions must be submitted via our on-line abstract module
process. E-mail submittals will not be accepted.

Presentation categories are listed below:

Computer Training Workshops
Eastern and Central European research
Genetics and DNA Research
Holocaust research
Immigration, naturalization and migration
Methodology
Metropolitan New York City and New York State research
Non-European research (e.g. India, China)
Rabbinical research
Repositories
Sephardic research
Technology and Internet resources
United States research
Yiddish theater/Tin Pan Alley

Just follow the instructions at the website.

The decision to accept a submission will be heavily weighted toward
presentations not given at previous IAJGS Conferences, that provide
specific research methodology and that include specific information for
researchers to replicate the success of the presenter in acquiring
information.

Sessions will be one hour and fifteen minutes, with the last 15 minutes
reserved for questions and answers.

Proposal Deadline - December 1, 2005.

Speakers will be notified no later than February 1, 2006

Handout material/resource material, due March 1, 2006, is required for each
presentation and will be included in the syllabus distributed to all
conference registrants. Further details of the handout material
requirements will be provided upon acceptance of lecture.

Gloria Berkenstat Freund
2006 Conference Program Committee Chair
gloria@jgsny2006.org


Romania SIG #Romania NYC 2006 Conference...Call for papers! #romania

Rosanne Leeson <rdleeson@...>
 

The Jewish Genealogical Society is the host society for the 2006
International Association of Jewish Genealogical Societies’ annual
conference to be held at the Marriott Marquis here in New York City >from
August 13th to 18th.

We are pleased to announce our Call for Papers. Submissions should be
made at the Conference website at
<http://www.jgsny2006.org/call.cfm>http://www.jgsny2006.org/call.cfm

All abstract submissions must be submitted via our on-line abstract
module process. E-mail submittals will not be accepted.

Presentation categories are listed below:

Computer Training Workshops
Eastern and Central European research
Genetics and DNA Research
Holocaust research
Immigration, naturalization and migration
Methodology
Metropolitan New York City and New York State research
Non-European research (e.g. India, China)
Rabbinical research
Repositories
Sephardic research
Technology and Internet resources
United States research
Yiddish theater/Tin Pan Alley

Just follow the instructions at the website.

The decision to accept a submission will be heavily weighted toward
presentations not given at previous IAJGS Conferences, that provide
specific research methodology and that include specific information for
researchers to replicate the success of the presenter in acquiring
information.

Sessions will be one hour and fifteen minutes, with the last 15 minutes
reserved for questions and answers.

Proposal Deadline – December 1, 2005.

Speakers will be notified no later than February 1, 2006

Handout material/resource material, due March 1, 2006, is required for
each presentation and will be included in the syllabus distributed to
all conference registrants. Further details of the handout material
requirements will be provided upon acceptance of lecture.

Gloria Berkenstat Freund
2006 Conference Program Committee Chair
gloria@jgsny2006.org


NYC 2006 Conference...Call for papers! #france

Rosanne Leeson <rdleeson@...>
 

The Jewish Genealogical Society is the host society for the 2006
International Association of Jewish Genealogical Societies’ annual
conference to be held at the Marriott Marquis here in New York City >from
August 13th to 18th.

We are pleased to announce our Call for Papers. Submissions should be
made at the Conference website at
<http://www.jgsny2006.org/call.cfm>http://www.jgsny2006.org/call.cfm

All abstract submissions must be submitted via our on-line abstract
module process. E-mail submittals will not be accepted.

Presentation categories are listed below:

Computer Training Workshops
Eastern and Central European research
Genetics and DNA Research
Holocaust research
Immigration, naturalization and migration
Methodology
Metropolitan New York City and New York State research
Non-European research (e.g. India, China)
Rabbinical research
Repositories
Sephardic research
Technology and Internet resources
United States research
Yiddish theater/Tin Pan Alley

Just follow the instructions at the website.

The decision to accept a submission will be heavily weighted toward
presentations not given at previous IAJGS Conferences, that provide
specific research methodology and that include specific information for
researchers to replicate the success of the presenter in acquiring
information.

Sessions will be one hour and fifteen minutes, with the last 15 minutes
reserved for questions and answers.

Proposal Deadline – December 1, 2005.

Speakers will be notified no later than February 1, 2006

Handout material/resource material, due March 1, 2006, is required for
each presentation and will be included in the syllabus distributed to
all conference registrants. Further details of the handout material
requirements will be provided upon acceptance of lecture.

Gloria Berkenstat Freund
2006 Conference Program Committee Chair
gloria@jgsny2006.org


French SIG #France NYC 2006 Conference...Call for papers! #france

Rosanne Leeson <rdleeson@...>
 

The Jewish Genealogical Society is the host society for the 2006
International Association of Jewish Genealogical Societies’ annual
conference to be held at the Marriott Marquis here in New York City >from
August 13th to 18th.

We are pleased to announce our Call for Papers. Submissions should be
made at the Conference website at
<http://www.jgsny2006.org/call.cfm>http://www.jgsny2006.org/call.cfm

All abstract submissions must be submitted via our on-line abstract
module process. E-mail submittals will not be accepted.

Presentation categories are listed below:

Computer Training Workshops
Eastern and Central European research
Genetics and DNA Research
Holocaust research
Immigration, naturalization and migration
Methodology
Metropolitan New York City and New York State research
Non-European research (e.g. India, China)
Rabbinical research
Repositories
Sephardic research
Technology and Internet resources
United States research
Yiddish theater/Tin Pan Alley

Just follow the instructions at the website.

The decision to accept a submission will be heavily weighted toward
presentations not given at previous IAJGS Conferences, that provide
specific research methodology and that include specific information for
researchers to replicate the success of the presenter in acquiring
information.

Sessions will be one hour and fifteen minutes, with the last 15 minutes
reserved for questions and answers.

Proposal Deadline – December 1, 2005.

Speakers will be notified no later than February 1, 2006

Handout material/resource material, due March 1, 2006, is required for
each presentation and will be included in the syllabus distributed to
all conference registrants. Further details of the handout material
requirements will be provided upon acceptance of lecture.

Gloria Berkenstat Freund
2006 Conference Program Committee Chair
gloria@jgsny2006.org


From Odessa to Ports in Eng/France #ukraine

Stephenson <graysgrandma@...>
 

Does anyone have information on what might have been the most common route
that emigrants traveled >from Odessa to London about 1900? My grandfather
(>from Odessa) arrived in Quebec, Canada in 1905. He traveled on the ship,
Sarmatian, which sailed >from London/Havre. Did most emigrants travel by
ship >from Odessa to London or did they use railroad? If by ship, what ships
traveled this course? If by railroad, would there be any documentation as
they went through each country (VISA requirements, etc)?

Any information would be appreciated. Please e-mail me at
graysgrandm@bellsouth.net

Regards,
Barbara Stephenson
Athens, GA
USA


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine From Odessa to Ports in Eng/France #ukraine

Stephenson <graysgrandma@...>
 

Does anyone have information on what might have been the most common route
that emigrants traveled >from Odessa to London about 1900? My grandfather
(>from Odessa) arrived in Quebec, Canada in 1905. He traveled on the ship,
Sarmatian, which sailed >from London/Havre. Did most emigrants travel by
ship >from Odessa to London or did they use railroad? If by ship, what ships
traveled this course? If by railroad, would there be any documentation as
they went through each country (VISA requirements, etc)?

Any information would be appreciated. Please e-mail me at
graysgrandm@bellsouth.net

Regards,
Barbara Stephenson
Athens, GA
USA


JGSCT Program on September 18th #general

Arthur Meyers <marciarthur@...>
 

Greetings

"Poland, a Tour of Archival Resources" presented by Magda Teter, Assistant
Professor of History at Wesleyan University.

The JGS of Connecticut will host this program on Sunday, September 18th, 2 p.m. at
Godfrey Memorial Library 134 Newfield in Middletown CT.

Marcia Indianer Meyers
President JGSCT
marciarthur@msn.com


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen JGSCT Program on September 18th #general

Arthur Meyers <marciarthur@...>
 

Greetings

"Poland, a Tour of Archival Resources" presented by Magda Teter, Assistant
Professor of History at Wesleyan University.

The JGS of Connecticut will host this program on Sunday, September 18th, 2 p.m. at
Godfrey Memorial Library 134 Newfield in Middletown CT.

Marcia Indianer Meyers
President JGSCT
marciarthur@msn.com


Offer to copy documents: Punsk & Sejny #poland

dayna reader <zoeys_mom@...>
 

I've recently ordered 3 films >from the LDS library
which have Jewish birth, marriage & death documents
from the towns of Sejny and Punsk.
They are film #s
1496954
747764
1191986

They should arrive in the next few weeks. If you have
a document on one of these films that you would like a
copy of, please email me the film #, person's name (on
the document), year of event and akt. #, as well as
your mailing address, and I will be happy to make a
copy of your document and send it to you.

PLEASE NOTE: I do need ALL of the above info in order
to find your document (especially the akt. #), as I do
not read Polish or Cyrillic and would otherwise not be
able to identify the correct document.

Please reply privately.

Dayna Chalif
San Francisco


JRI Poland #Poland Offer to copy documents: Punsk & Sejny #poland

dayna reader <zoeys_mom@...>
 

I've recently ordered 3 films >from the LDS library
which have Jewish birth, marriage & death documents
from the towns of Sejny and Punsk.
They are film #s
1496954
747764
1191986

They should arrive in the next few weeks. If you have
a document on one of these films that you would like a
copy of, please email me the film #, person's name (on
the document), year of event and akt. #, as well as
your mailing address, and I will be happy to make a
copy of your document and send it to you.

PLEASE NOTE: I do need ALL of the above info in order
to find your document (especially the akt. #), as I do
not read Polish or Cyrillic and would otherwise not be
able to identify the correct document.

Please reply privately.

Dayna Chalif
San Francisco


Jewish book #poland

ADDRESSING@...
 

I recently bought a book originally published in the UK called >from the Ends
of the Earth-The Jews in the 21st Century by Martin Gilbert. There are many
candid pictures of small towns in Poland and elsewhere with many unnamed
people in them. Some towns are not named, just regions like Galicia, or the
Polish German Border. The pictures start in the early 1900s. Many of them
are also >from Palestine then the state of Israel >from the beginning.
Perhaps some of you can find faces of relatives or friends.

Jeanette Isenberg Bersh


JRI Poland #Poland Jewish book #poland

ADDRESSING@...
 

I recently bought a book originally published in the UK called >from the Ends
of the Earth-The Jews in the 21st Century by Martin Gilbert. There are many
candid pictures of small towns in Poland and elsewhere with many unnamed
people in them. Some towns are not named, just regions like Galicia, or the
Polish German Border. The pictures start in the early 1900s. Many of them
are also >from Palestine then the state of Israel >from the beginning.
Perhaps some of you can find faces of relatives or friends.

Jeanette Isenberg Bersh


Education of immigrants #lithuania

Olga Zabludoff <oz@...>
 

The September 11 LitvakSIG digest posted my inquiry:

"Can anyone venture an opinion based on the known experience of an ancestor?

A petite 14-year-old Jewish girl >from a small Lithuanian shtetl immigrates
to the United States in 1921. She doesn't speak a word of English--only
Yiddish. She lives with her uncle and aunt (both of whom immigrated much
earlier) in a town in Massachusetts. They enter the girl into the local
public school. How would the school handle the girl's education? Would they
place her in the grade where most 14-year-olds are, or in kindergarten,
elementary school or what?"

I have received so many wonderful responses privately that I would like to
share some of these with readers of this list. The consensus, based on real
cases, is that ability, not age, determined the grade in which a
non-English-speaking immigrant was placed upon arrival in the U.S. The
following stories reflect the trials and triumphs of our young immigrant
ancestors:

*******************************************************

My mother arrived with her family in NYC in 1923, age 9, non-English
speaking. She was placed in either kindergarten or 1st grade and was
quickly moved up so that she was, within the year (I think), with children
her own age. Her older sister was a teenager and had a similar experience,
starting with K or 1st and very quickly moving through the grades.
* * *
I am not sure how your ancestor's education was handled but my grandmother
told me that when she arrived here in America as a 10 year old speaking no
English she started in kindergarden and as she learned English she was
skipped through the grades until she was in the appropriate grade after
learning enough English to keep up with her age group ... My grandmother
used to have my children laughing with her stories about her experience in
school here. She told us that she once jumped 3 grades in one year as her
English improved. Later in life she sounded like she was born and raised
in either Brooklyn or the Bronx because of the way she pronounced her words,
but this was actually a result of learning English >from those who lived in
her neighborhood, and were in school with her.
* * *
When my father came to America in 1921 (January) >from Romania, he spoke
only Hungarian and Yiddish. He was 11 years old and to his great
embarrassment was put in a first grade class, as were his older brother and
sister-and I assume his 2 younger sisters who were also of school age.
He was so embarrassed that he set out to learn English as fast as
possible and before June had moved on several grades . He was in the 5th
grade either by June or the following September --he didn't turn 12 until
the middle of that following semester, but I don't remember the exact timing
he told me.
Since in those days grades were promoted in semester increments in NY,
(for example, you could be promoted >from 1A to 2A in the winter break,
and then again sometime later >from 3B to 4A --just examples) it was possible
by the end of High School to have "skipped 1, 2 or more semesters. Thus
my Dad graduated High School at least "on time", and my mother, living in
upstate NY, graduated at 16 when most kids were 18.
* * *
This would be exactly what would happen. In those days, school was
sink-or-swim English. Older adults might attend night school to learn
English (or, my ggf learned by reading the paper, similar to how many people
today learn English--or in my part of the country--Tucson--Spanish--by
watching TV.)
There was almost no consideration for immigrants in those days. Social
services were provided through the settlement houses, but for children young
enough to be in school, it was--just go. Many children loved it, spent long
hours at the libraries and took books out--the idea of a free library was
like gold to many Jewish immigrants, as well as some others--and were young
enough to be flexible and learn a new language.
Grade level was determined by ability, not age. My grandfather wound up
spending his youth and teen years traveling back and forth between Hungary
and the US. He never learned enough in either language or country to
progress. He told a story about being maybe 15 and placed in a second grade
classroom in Pennsylvania--including having to sit on tiny chairs. He had
only the most rudimentary education although he was eventually successful in
business.
* * *
My mother came >from the Ukraine in 1913. She was placed in a classroom
with first graders, one of whom would translate what the teacher said. At
that time there were many immigrants >from Russia, Poland and Italy in that
school. My mother completed through the eighth grade and then went to work.
Her English was so good (she spoke it with a Boston accent) that on
reentering the United States following a trip through Canada, the Border
Patrol passed her without asking for papers, but my brother-in-law, who
was >from Brooklyn, had to present his credentials. Go figure.
* * *
Based on my father's experience in both Argentina and Palestine in the
1920's - she [the girl] would have been placed with very young children, and
moved along as her English improved.
* * *
I had a great-aunt who came to the US as an 11 year old... she
was put into a class with younger children until she was able to
have enough language to be promoted. She talked about how unhappy she
was...but she did it.
* * *
Write to the school district in Massachusetts and ask about the policy at
the time. Also request the girl's school records (you will need a death
certificate probably). [Good suggestion!]

************************************************************

Thanks very much to everyone who also posted responses to the digest.

Olga Zabludoff
Washington, DC


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania Education of immigrants #lithuania

Olga Zabludoff <oz@...>
 

The September 11 LitvakSIG digest posted my inquiry:

"Can anyone venture an opinion based on the known experience of an ancestor?

A petite 14-year-old Jewish girl >from a small Lithuanian shtetl immigrates
to the United States in 1921. She doesn't speak a word of English--only
Yiddish. She lives with her uncle and aunt (both of whom immigrated much
earlier) in a town in Massachusetts. They enter the girl into the local
public school. How would the school handle the girl's education? Would they
place her in the grade where most 14-year-olds are, or in kindergarten,
elementary school or what?"

I have received so many wonderful responses privately that I would like to
share some of these with readers of this list. The consensus, based on real
cases, is that ability, not age, determined the grade in which a
non-English-speaking immigrant was placed upon arrival in the U.S. The
following stories reflect the trials and triumphs of our young immigrant
ancestors:

*******************************************************

My mother arrived with her family in NYC in 1923, age 9, non-English
speaking. She was placed in either kindergarten or 1st grade and was
quickly moved up so that she was, within the year (I think), with children
her own age. Her older sister was a teenager and had a similar experience,
starting with K or 1st and very quickly moving through the grades.
* * *
I am not sure how your ancestor's education was handled but my grandmother
told me that when she arrived here in America as a 10 year old speaking no
English she started in kindergarden and as she learned English she was
skipped through the grades until she was in the appropriate grade after
learning enough English to keep up with her age group ... My grandmother
used to have my children laughing with her stories about her experience in
school here. She told us that she once jumped 3 grades in one year as her
English improved. Later in life she sounded like she was born and raised
in either Brooklyn or the Bronx because of the way she pronounced her words,
but this was actually a result of learning English >from those who lived in
her neighborhood, and were in school with her.
* * *
When my father came to America in 1921 (January) >from Romania, he spoke
only Hungarian and Yiddish. He was 11 years old and to his great
embarrassment was put in a first grade class, as were his older brother and
sister-and I assume his 2 younger sisters who were also of school age.
He was so embarrassed that he set out to learn English as fast as
possible and before June had moved on several grades . He was in the 5th
grade either by June or the following September --he didn't turn 12 until
the middle of that following semester, but I don't remember the exact timing
he told me.
Since in those days grades were promoted in semester increments in NY,
(for example, you could be promoted >from 1A to 2A in the winter break,
and then again sometime later >from 3B to 4A --just examples) it was possible
by the end of High School to have "skipped 1, 2 or more semesters. Thus
my Dad graduated High School at least "on time", and my mother, living in
upstate NY, graduated at 16 when most kids were 18.
* * *
This would be exactly what would happen. In those days, school was
sink-or-swim English. Older adults might attend night school to learn
English (or, my ggf learned by reading the paper, similar to how many people
today learn English--or in my part of the country--Tucson--Spanish--by
watching TV.)
There was almost no consideration for immigrants in those days. Social
services were provided through the settlement houses, but for children young
enough to be in school, it was--just go. Many children loved it, spent long
hours at the libraries and took books out--the idea of a free library was
like gold to many Jewish immigrants, as well as some others--and were young
enough to be flexible and learn a new language.
Grade level was determined by ability, not age. My grandfather wound up
spending his youth and teen years traveling back and forth between Hungary
and the US. He never learned enough in either language or country to
progress. He told a story about being maybe 15 and placed in a second grade
classroom in Pennsylvania--including having to sit on tiny chairs. He had
only the most rudimentary education although he was eventually successful in
business.
* * *
My mother came >from the Ukraine in 1913. She was placed in a classroom
with first graders, one of whom would translate what the teacher said. At
that time there were many immigrants >from Russia, Poland and Italy in that
school. My mother completed through the eighth grade and then went to work.
Her English was so good (she spoke it with a Boston accent) that on
reentering the United States following a trip through Canada, the Border
Patrol passed her without asking for papers, but my brother-in-law, who
was >from Brooklyn, had to present his credentials. Go figure.
* * *
Based on my father's experience in both Argentina and Palestine in the
1920's - she [the girl] would have been placed with very young children, and
moved along as her English improved.
* * *
I had a great-aunt who came to the US as an 11 year old... she
was put into a class with younger children until she was able to
have enough language to be promoted. She talked about how unhappy she
was...but she did it.
* * *
Write to the school district in Massachusetts and ask about the policy at
the time. Also request the girl's school records (you will need a death
certificate probably). [Good suggestion!]

************************************************************

Thanks very much to everyone who also posted responses to the digest.

Olga Zabludoff
Washington, DC


Telz Yeshiva #lithuania

Saul Issroff <saul@...>
 

I have received a copy of 'A Record of Tragedy. The Destruction of Telshe
Yeshiva' ed. Rabbi Eliezer Sorotzkin, NY and Cleveland, 5713 (1952). This
consists of a record of the martyrs of Telz Yeshiva who were killed in the
Shoa, in Hebrew and English, has name, brithplace, date of Yahrzheit.

Is anyone aware of a database of these entries? alternately does anyone have
a way of scanning and OCR when there are two languages involved and L-R,
R-L?

Saul Issroff


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania Telz Yeshiva #lithuania

Saul Issroff <saul@...>
 

I have received a copy of 'A Record of Tragedy. The Destruction of Telshe
Yeshiva' ed. Rabbi Eliezer Sorotzkin, NY and Cleveland, 5713 (1952). This
consists of a record of the martyrs of Telz Yeshiva who were killed in the
Shoa, in Hebrew and English, has name, brithplace, date of Yahrzheit.

Is anyone aware of a database of these entries? alternately does anyone have
a way of scanning and OCR when there are two languages involved and L-R,
R-L?

Saul Issroff