Date   

Re: Jewish Naming #hungary

Gábor Hirsch <g_hirsch@...>
 

I was named after my deceased grandfathers Jizhak Jehuda ben **** and I
think it was not unusual.

Best regards
Gabor Hirsch

P.S. Please notice, I intend to change provider, please use in the future my
address g_hirsch@..., thank you

Dear Siggers,

I hope someone here may be able to help understand an intriguing issue
about Ashkenazi Jewish naming that is a puzzle to me. I noticed that
many of my ancestors have two Hebrew names. For example I have an
ancestor whose first name was Yehuda Leib (some times also Yehuda Arie)
and another whose first name was Menachem Yosef, and so on. Can someone
explain the logic behind this naming system? Can one deduce any useful
genealogy information out of the two names? I know that in many cases
Ashkenazi children were named after a deceased relative, usually a
grandfather or another family member. Does it also apply to the two
names system?

I have only one name and I was born in Israel. Most of the people I know
in Israel have only one name and only few have two. My brother has two
names after both our grandfathers, but he is an exception and goes only
by one of the names.

Thank you,

Isaac Katz
Beit-Hanaina
Israel


Re: Jewish Naming #hungary

Ida & Joseph Schwarcz
 

Sometimes a child would be named for only one ancestor who had two names,
e.g. Yehuda Leyb = Yehuda Aryeah. Sometimes a child would be named for two
ancestors, one on each side. There are other possibilities. My father had
two grandfathers named Barukh. One was Barukh Tsevi and one was Barukh
Eliezer. At the time he was born, Barukh Eliezer was still alive, so he was
named Tsevi=Hirsh, for the dead grandfather and the name Moshe was added for
a young man in his shtetl who had been killed by pogromchiks and had no
survivers. Thus when called to the Torah he was Tsevi Moshe and in the
family he was Hirsh Moshe, and to his friends he was Moyshele.
Ida Selavan Schwarcz
Arad, Israel

Dr. Joseph M. Schwarcz
Dr. Ida Selavan Schwarcz

-----Original Message-----
From: Katz, Itzik [mailto:Itzik.Katz@...]
Sent: Thursday, May 05, 2005 5:41 AM
To: H-SIG
Subject: [h-sig] Jewish Naming


Dear Siggers,

I hope someone here may be able to help understand an intriguing issue
about Ashkenazi Jewish naming that is a puzzle to me. I noticed that
many of my ancestors have two Hebrew names. For example I have an
ancestor whose first name was Yehuda Leib (some times also Yehuda Arie)
and another whose first name was Menachem Yosef, and so on. Can someone
explain the logic behind this naming system? Can one deduce any useful
genealogy information out of the two names? I know that in many cases
Ashkenazi children were named after a deceased relative, usually a
grandfather or another family member. Does it also apply to the two
names system?

I have only one name and I was born in Israel. Most of the people I know
in Israel have only one name and only few have two. My brother has two
names after both our grandfathers, but he is an exception and goes only
by one of the names.

Thank you,

Isaac Katz
Beit-Hanaina
Israel


*Re: Double name #hungary

Tom Venetianer <tom.vene@...>
 

Attila,

Yehudah Leib is a mixed form of the Hebrew (biblical) name Judah and the Yiddish name Leib or Low or Loew or Lew . All Yiddish forms mean the same thing, namely a "lion".

As in "Dov Ber" (both meaning bear) and "Hirsch Zvi" (both meaning deer), Judah and Leib were connected because of their relationship to the word "lion".

The connection between Judah and lion derives >from the Bible. The symbol of the tribe of Judah was a lion since it is written in the Genesis, as our patriarch Jacob speaks about his son: "Judah is a lion's whelp (...) he stretches out like a lion..."

Therefore, it became common to name children as Yehudah Leib. Arye is often found preceding Leib, thus the form "Arye Leib", instead of Yehuda, as Arye means "lion" in Hebrew.

On JewishGen's site you will find a large amount of information about this and many other double or composed Jewish names.

Tom

At 01:00 -0500 08.05.2005, H-SIG digest wrote:
Subject: Double name
From: AttilaRona@...
Date: Wed, 4 May 2005 21:16:59 EDT
X-Message-Number: 8

Could you tell me what is the meaning and significance of the double name
Jehuda Leib?
Attila Rona
--
-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-
Tom Venetianer <mailto:tom.vene@...>
Sao Paulo - Brazil


Hungary SIG #Hungary Re: Jewish Naming #hungary

Gábor Hirsch <g_hirsch@...>
 

I was named after my deceased grandfathers Jizhak Jehuda ben **** and I
think it was not unusual.

Best regards
Gabor Hirsch

P.S. Please notice, I intend to change provider, please use in the future my
address g_hirsch@..., thank you

Dear Siggers,

I hope someone here may be able to help understand an intriguing issue
about Ashkenazi Jewish naming that is a puzzle to me. I noticed that
many of my ancestors have two Hebrew names. For example I have an
ancestor whose first name was Yehuda Leib (some times also Yehuda Arie)
and another whose first name was Menachem Yosef, and so on. Can someone
explain the logic behind this naming system? Can one deduce any useful
genealogy information out of the two names? I know that in many cases
Ashkenazi children were named after a deceased relative, usually a
grandfather or another family member. Does it also apply to the two
names system?

I have only one name and I was born in Israel. Most of the people I know
in Israel have only one name and only few have two. My brother has two
names after both our grandfathers, but he is an exception and goes only
by one of the names.

Thank you,

Isaac Katz
Beit-Hanaina
Israel


Hungary SIG #Hungary RE: Jewish Naming #hungary

Ida & Joseph Schwarcz
 

Sometimes a child would be named for only one ancestor who had two names,
e.g. Yehuda Leyb = Yehuda Aryeah. Sometimes a child would be named for two
ancestors, one on each side. There are other possibilities. My father had
two grandfathers named Barukh. One was Barukh Tsevi and one was Barukh
Eliezer. At the time he was born, Barukh Eliezer was still alive, so he was
named Tsevi=Hirsh, for the dead grandfather and the name Moshe was added for
a young man in his shtetl who had been killed by pogromchiks and had no
survivers. Thus when called to the Torah he was Tsevi Moshe and in the
family he was Hirsh Moshe, and to his friends he was Moyshele.
Ida Selavan Schwarcz
Arad, Israel

Dr. Joseph M. Schwarcz
Dr. Ida Selavan Schwarcz

-----Original Message-----
From: Katz, Itzik [mailto:Itzik.Katz@...]
Sent: Thursday, May 05, 2005 5:41 AM
To: H-SIG
Subject: [h-sig] Jewish Naming


Dear Siggers,

I hope someone here may be able to help understand an intriguing issue
about Ashkenazi Jewish naming that is a puzzle to me. I noticed that
many of my ancestors have two Hebrew names. For example I have an
ancestor whose first name was Yehuda Leib (some times also Yehuda Arie)
and another whose first name was Menachem Yosef, and so on. Can someone
explain the logic behind this naming system? Can one deduce any useful
genealogy information out of the two names? I know that in many cases
Ashkenazi children were named after a deceased relative, usually a
grandfather or another family member. Does it also apply to the two
names system?

I have only one name and I was born in Israel. Most of the people I know
in Israel have only one name and only few have two. My brother has two
names after both our grandfathers, but he is an exception and goes only
by one of the names.

Thank you,

Isaac Katz
Beit-Hanaina
Israel


Hungary SIG #Hungary *Re: Double name #hungary

Tom Venetianer <tom.vene@...>
 

Attila,

Yehudah Leib is a mixed form of the Hebrew (biblical) name Judah and the Yiddish name Leib or Low or Loew or Lew . All Yiddish forms mean the same thing, namely a "lion".

As in "Dov Ber" (both meaning bear) and "Hirsch Zvi" (both meaning deer), Judah and Leib were connected because of their relationship to the word "lion".

The connection between Judah and lion derives >from the Bible. The symbol of the tribe of Judah was a lion since it is written in the Genesis, as our patriarch Jacob speaks about his son: "Judah is a lion's whelp (...) he stretches out like a lion..."

Therefore, it became common to name children as Yehudah Leib. Arye is often found preceding Leib, thus the form "Arye Leib", instead of Yehuda, as Arye means "lion" in Hebrew.

On JewishGen's site you will find a large amount of information about this and many other double or composed Jewish names.

Tom

At 01:00 -0500 08.05.2005, H-SIG digest wrote:
Subject: Double name
From: AttilaRona@...
Date: Wed, 4 May 2005 21:16:59 EDT
X-Message-Number: 8

Could you tell me what is the meaning and significance of the double name
Jehuda Leib?
Attila Rona
--
-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-
Tom Venetianer <mailto:tom.vene@...>
Sao Paulo - Brazil


Disappearing records #hungary

Israel P
 

About eighteen months ago, I first saw the 1869 census record for my wife's
grandfather (b. 1867) with his parents and two brothers, in Vidrany.

The parents are Abraham and Ester BAUM.

I revisited that site several times, but not recently. Last night, I wanted
to show it to my mother-in-law, but these records did not show up in AHD under
1869 census. Is searched both by Baum and by Vidrany?

Have records disappeared >from the AHD, or what?

Israel Pickholtz


Hungary SIG #Hungary Disappearing records #hungary

Israel P
 

About eighteen months ago, I first saw the 1869 census record for my wife's
grandfather (b. 1867) with his parents and two brothers, in Vidrany.

The parents are Abraham and Ester BAUM.

I revisited that site several times, but not recently. Last night, I wanted
to show it to my mother-in-law, but these records did not show up in AHD under
1869 census. Is searched both by Baum and by Vidrany?

Have records disappeared >from the AHD, or what?

Israel Pickholtz


Re: Iloc Jewish records #hungary

moishe@langsam.com <moishe@...>
 

Hi,

I am sorry for my omission. You are correct, this city is
in Croatia. Do you know of any more detail?

Moishe Miller
moishe@...
Brooklyn, NY
On Wed, 4 May 2005 00:19:19 -0700 (PDT)
Robert Neu <roneu1@...> wrote:
It would be helpful to know where Ilok is/was and if
it is the only spelling or variation of the name.

The only "Ilok" that appears in the ShtetlSeeker is in
Croatia, and the only record for that location at the
FHL is an 1857 Census.(That does not mean that there
is no other record, if the records were kept in a
different towm.)

Robert Neu


--- "moishe@..." <moishe@...> wrote:
Dear Group,

I found out that my ggp were Moshe WEINSTOCK and
Raizel
STERN and that they married in Iloc in 1892. Do you
know if
its possible to find a marriage record or other
vital
records?

Moishe Miller
moishe@...
Brooklyn, NY


Hungary SIG #Hungary Re: Iloc Jewish records #hungary

moishe@langsam.com <moishe@...>
 

Hi,

I am sorry for my omission. You are correct, this city is
in Croatia. Do you know of any more detail?

Moishe Miller
moishe@...
Brooklyn, NY
On Wed, 4 May 2005 00:19:19 -0700 (PDT)
Robert Neu <roneu1@...> wrote:
It would be helpful to know where Ilok is/was and if
it is the only spelling or variation of the name.

The only "Ilok" that appears in the ShtetlSeeker is in
Croatia, and the only record for that location at the
FHL is an 1857 Census.(That does not mean that there
is no other record, if the records were kept in a
different towm.)

Robert Neu


--- "moishe@..." <moishe@...> wrote:
Dear Group,

I found out that my ggp were Moshe WEINSTOCK and
Raizel
STERN and that they married in Iloc in 1892. Do you
know if
its possible to find a marriage record or other
vital
records?

Moishe Miller
moishe@...
Brooklyn, NY


Re: Courland Jews #latvia

Arlene Beare <arl@...>
 

Jews migrated >from Prussia to Courland in the 16th century. Their language
was German and their dress Germanic. The documents for Courland are mainly
in German. In the 18thC a lot of skilful Jewish workers and artisans also
migrated to Courland >from Germany. There was also a migration into Latvia
in the 1870's and these Jews came >from Belarus,Ukraine, Poland and
Lithuania. Kovno Gubernia bordered Courland and a large number of
Lithuanians migrated to Courland.

Arlene Beare
London UK

Original message
1. Kurland jews

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Kurland jews
From: lazer@...
Date: Sat, 7 May 2005 17:51:36 -0700
X-Message-Number: 1

You may find generalizations hazardous. For instance,
the Kurland Jews of which I know lived in Kreitzberg (Krustpils),
at the south of the territory. They had previously lived in
Belarus, and followed the Lubovicher Rebbe. So I doubt they
were subject to much German influence.

Bert

Herbert I. Lazerow
lazer@...
i am trying to find out more about the living and working of jews in
Kurland in the 19th century. there is one question i find hard to
answer, maybe someone can help: in what way did the jewry in Kurland
differ >from jews in other parts of eastern europe especially >from the
ones living within the Pale of Settlemen?. I understand they spoke
German (and not Jiddish) as their first language and were influenced by
the German nobility in Kurland.>


Latvia SIG #Latvia Re: Courland Jews #latvia

Arlene Beare <arl@...>
 

Jews migrated >from Prussia to Courland in the 16th century. Their language
was German and their dress Germanic. The documents for Courland are mainly
in German. In the 18thC a lot of skilful Jewish workers and artisans also
migrated to Courland >from Germany. There was also a migration into Latvia
in the 1870's and these Jews came >from Belarus,Ukraine, Poland and
Lithuania. Kovno Gubernia bordered Courland and a large number of
Lithuanians migrated to Courland.

Arlene Beare
London UK

Original message
1. Kurland jews

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Kurland jews
From: lazer@...
Date: Sat, 7 May 2005 17:51:36 -0700
X-Message-Number: 1

You may find generalizations hazardous. For instance,
the Kurland Jews of which I know lived in Kreitzberg (Krustpils),
at the south of the territory. They had previously lived in
Belarus, and followed the Lubovicher Rebbe. So I doubt they
were subject to much German influence.

Bert

Herbert I. Lazerow
lazer@...
i am trying to find out more about the living and working of jews in
Kurland in the 19th century. there is one question i find hard to
answer, maybe someone can help: in what way did the jewry in Kurland
differ >from jews in other parts of eastern europe especially >from the
ones living within the Pale of Settlemen?. I understand they spoke
German (and not Jiddish) as their first language and were influenced by
the German nobility in Kurland.>


Subate #latvia

mgetz@...
 

I would like to add to our resources a record of families with roots or
connections to Subate. Details of Subate itself are on the our website
www.jewishgen.org/latvia

The site will be enhanced by this information. Additionally we could ensure
that Holocaust victims of a family are on record at Yad Vashem. Thirdly we
could begin to prepare a Yizkor book.

Please contact me directly if you are able to assist - mailto:mgetz@...

Mike Getz


Latvia SIG #Latvia Subate #latvia

mgetz@...
 

I would like to add to our resources a record of families with roots or
connections to Subate. Details of Subate itself are on the our website
www.jewishgen.org/latvia

The site will be enhanced by this information. Additionally we could ensure
that Holocaust victims of a family are on record at Yad Vashem. Thirdly we
could begin to prepare a Yizkor book.

Please contact me directly if you are able to assist - mailto:mgetz@...

Mike Getz


Re: Kurland jews #latvia

Martha Lev-Zion <martha@...>
 

I quote >from PINKAS HAKEHILOT LATVIA v'ESTONIA, p 223:

"The Kreuzburg community was among the first in Latgale... It would
appear that the Jews got here >from neighbouring Courland. " In the
second paragraph of this article, the fact that Kreuzburg was in
Latgale is mentioned three separate times.

Perhaps in more modern times it was joined to Jekabpils - but I am
more familiar with earlier times.

Martha Lev-Zion

On 10 May 2005, at 15:03, Gal wrote:


Krustpils was joined to Jekabpils, which is in Kurzeme

Yitzhak Gal

----- Original Message -----
From: "Martha Lev-Zion" <martha@...>
Bert, I think you'll find that Krustapils was in Latgale and not in
Courland.


Latvia SIG #Latvia Re: Kurland jews #latvia

Martha Lev-Zion <martha@...>
 

I quote >from PINKAS HAKEHILOT LATVIA v'ESTONIA, p 223:

"The Kreuzburg community was among the first in Latgale... It would
appear that the Jews got here >from neighbouring Courland. " In the
second paragraph of this article, the fact that Kreuzburg was in
Latgale is mentioned three separate times.

Perhaps in more modern times it was joined to Jekabpils - but I am
more familiar with earlier times.

Martha Lev-Zion

On 10 May 2005, at 15:03, Gal wrote:


Krustpils was joined to Jekabpils, which is in Kurzeme

Yitzhak Gal

----- Original Message -----
From: "Martha Lev-Zion" <martha@...>
Bert, I think you'll find that Krustapils was in Latgale and not in
Courland.


Re: Joffe #latvia

Dinberg Donna <donna.dinberg@...>
 

Robin,

I have tried going through the Latvian Archives for
information on my grandfather but they say they cannot find
anything.
Since you now have additional information, you should contact the Latvia
State Historical Archive again to see if the new info will help find
archival traces of the family not found previously. Even though they may
not find records specific to your grandfather, now that you have your
great-grandparents' names and a birth date and place, the archivists may be
able to find traces of your great-grandparents.

Good luck.

(This message, of course, expresses my own opinions and not those of my
employer.)

Donna Dinberg
Librarian, JGS of Ottawa
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
donna.dinberg@...


Latvia SIG #Latvia RE: Joffe #latvia

Dinberg Donna <donna.dinberg@...>
 

Robin,

I have tried going through the Latvian Archives for
information on my grandfather but they say they cannot find
anything.
Since you now have additional information, you should contact the Latvia
State Historical Archive again to see if the new info will help find
archival traces of the family not found previously. Even though they may
not find records specific to your grandfather, now that you have your
great-grandparents' names and a birth date and place, the archivists may be
able to find traces of your great-grandparents.

Good luck.

(This message, of course, expresses my own opinions and not those of my
employer.)

Donna Dinberg
Librarian, JGS of Ottawa
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
donna.dinberg@...


Rabbi Tsvi Hirsch LEMPERT/LAMPERT #rabbinic

Alexander Woodle <awoodle@...>
 

Dear SIG members,

I am looking for any information on the above named man who was
originally >from what is now Belarus. He married probably in 1850s
in Novogrudok. His son Nathan LAMPORT was born there in 1854.

Rabbi LEMPERT/LAMPERT is buried at Mount of Olives Cemetery in Jerusalem. I
do not know when he arrived in Palestine, but his son Nathan was buried next
to him in 1929.

Any information on the LAMPERT/LEMPERTs in Palestine or >from the "old
country" would be appreciated.

Thank you in advance.

Alex Woodle
Groton, MA
USA


Rabbinic Genealogy SIG #Rabbinic Rabbi Tsvi Hirsch LEMPERT/LAMPERT #rabbinic

Alexander Woodle <awoodle@...>
 

Dear SIG members,

I am looking for any information on the above named man who was
originally >from what is now Belarus. He married probably in 1850s
in Novogrudok. His son Nathan LAMPORT was born there in 1854.

Rabbi LEMPERT/LAMPERT is buried at Mount of Olives Cemetery in Jerusalem. I
do not know when he arrived in Palestine, but his son Nathan was buried next
to him in 1929.

Any information on the LAMPERT/LEMPERTs in Palestine or >from the "old
country" would be appreciated.

Thank you in advance.

Alex Woodle
Groton, MA
USA