Date   

pulde family #lithuania

Mike Klass <peapod@...>
 

Can anyone put me in with relatives of nathan or abe pulde who
came >from the subate, latva area. also i am looking for family of minnie
davis, who died in peoria.ill in 1965.

thank you mike klass

MODERATOR'S NOTE: Please respond privately.


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania pulde family #lithuania

Mike Klass <peapod@...>
 

Can anyone put me in with relatives of nathan or abe pulde who
came >from the subate, latva area. also i am looking for family of minnie
davis, who died in peoria.ill in 1965.

thank you mike klass

MODERATOR'S NOTE: Please respond privately.


Yizkor Book Project for April 2005 #austria-czech

Joyce Field
 

Because of the Pesach holiday, April 2005 was a "short" month and our production
reflects that. One new book and 14 updated books went online. All translations
can be accessed at http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/translations.html
and the current additions have been flagged to make the search easier.

I would like to remind all new researchers that you can find whether a yizkor
book has been written about a particular town at the Yizkor Book Database,
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/database.html. You can search the Necrology
Index at http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/yizkor/
Our index to this database says the following:

"The JewishGen Yizkor Book Necrology Database indexes the names of persons in
the necrologies -- the lists of Holocaust martyrs -- published in the Yizkor
Books appearing on the JewishGen Yizkor Book Translation Project. This database
is only an index of names; it directs researchers back to the Yizkor Book itself,
where more complete information may be available.

This database allows the surnames to be searched via soundex. Because most of
these names were transliterated >from Hebrew and Yiddish, the spellings of the
surnames may not be as you are used to seeing them in Latin-alphabet sources."

This database currently contains over 165,000 entries >from the necrologies of
177 different yizkor books. Remember that not all yizkor books have necrologies.

New book:

"With a rifle in my hand and Eretz Israel in my heart" by Dov Levin,
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/dovlevin1/dovlevin1.html

Updated books:

-Belchatow, Poland, http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Belchatow/Belchatow.html
-Belchatow, Poland,
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Belchatow_ann/Belchatow_ann.html
-Bolekhov, Ukraine
-Brest, Belarus, volume 2
-Bukowina book
-Chelm, Poland
-Czestochowa, Poland,
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Czestochowa1/Czestochowa1.html
-Holocaust in Belarus
-Jewish Music in Poland between the World Wars
-Maramures Region
-Novogrudok, Belarus
-Nowy Sacz, Poland
-Radomsko, Poland
-Shumskoye, Ukraine

As always, we wish to thank all the donors of material and the project
coordinators for their donations of translations and their precious time.
Nothing can be accomplished without your interest in the Yizkor Book Project.
We are always interested in new material and look forward to hearing >from
researchers wanting to start a new translation project.

Joyce Field
Yizkor Book Project
JewishGen V.P., Data Acquisition
jfield@...


3. How Eastern European Jews got German names #ukraine

Marc M. Cohen <marc-cohen25@...>
 

In the April 27 posting, Yekkey offers several explanations of the
origin of German names among Eastern European Jews.

Two of them ring true for my family.

1. One maternal ggf changed his name >from Chomitz to Rosenthal when
he arrived in America (the apocrophal "at Ellis Island") precisely
because he wanted people to think he was a sophisticated German Jew,
not a greener >from Russia.

2. Another branch of my mother's family apparently fled the
Rhineland during the crusades, and ended up in Bessarabia, where the
name was Kantorji, a Romanicized variation of Cantor or Cantrowitz.

They also used the surname name Barak, which according to Beider's
Dictionary of Jewish surnames in the Russian empire is an acronym
for BAr RAbbenu Kalonymus. The Kalonymus family were a rabbinic
dynasty in the Rhineland >from about the 8th to 13th centuries, until
the Erfurt massacre of 1221, when Rabbi Shmuel "heHazzan" ben
Kalonymus was murdered by crusaders, along with two dozen others.

3. My father's paternal ggf's name was Rosenberg, and although they
left Dunayevtsy (Dinovitz), Russia for Romania in the early to mid
19th century, there is no doubt they were Askenazim >from Mittel
Europa.

Hope this helps,

Marc

Marc M. Cohen, Palo Alto, California
marc74@...

Researching:
COHEN, DINOVITZER, GOLDENBERG >from Dunayevtsy, Ukraine.
BARAK, KANTORJI >from Khotin, Bessarabia; Chernovsty and Storozynetz, Bukovina.
FACTOR, KORNITZKY, CHOMITZ OR HAMETZ >from Kiev, Ukraine.
CHOMITZ, HAMETZ >from Stepantsy, Ukraine or Ioninna/Jannina, Greece.
COHEN, ROSENBERG, SCHLEICHER, GOLDENBERG >from Tirgu Frumos, Romania
WEININGER, RIBNER, HEISRIGGER, HEITNER, HESS, SCHEFLER >from
Chernovtsy, Costinetz, or Storozynetz, Bukovina.


Austria-Czech SIG #Austria-Czech Yizkor Book Project for April 2005 #austria-czech

Joyce Field
 

Because of the Pesach holiday, April 2005 was a "short" month and our production
reflects that. One new book and 14 updated books went online. All translations
can be accessed at http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/translations.html
and the current additions have been flagged to make the search easier.

I would like to remind all new researchers that you can find whether a yizkor
book has been written about a particular town at the Yizkor Book Database,
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/database.html. You can search the Necrology
Index at http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/yizkor/
Our index to this database says the following:

"The JewishGen Yizkor Book Necrology Database indexes the names of persons in
the necrologies -- the lists of Holocaust martyrs -- published in the Yizkor
Books appearing on the JewishGen Yizkor Book Translation Project. This database
is only an index of names; it directs researchers back to the Yizkor Book itself,
where more complete information may be available.

This database allows the surnames to be searched via soundex. Because most of
these names were transliterated >from Hebrew and Yiddish, the spellings of the
surnames may not be as you are used to seeing them in Latin-alphabet sources."

This database currently contains over 165,000 entries >from the necrologies of
177 different yizkor books. Remember that not all yizkor books have necrologies.

New book:

"With a rifle in my hand and Eretz Israel in my heart" by Dov Levin,
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/dovlevin1/dovlevin1.html

Updated books:

-Belchatow, Poland, http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Belchatow/Belchatow.html
-Belchatow, Poland,
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Belchatow_ann/Belchatow_ann.html
-Bolekhov, Ukraine
-Brest, Belarus, volume 2
-Bukowina book
-Chelm, Poland
-Czestochowa, Poland,
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Czestochowa1/Czestochowa1.html
-Holocaust in Belarus
-Jewish Music in Poland between the World Wars
-Maramures Region
-Novogrudok, Belarus
-Nowy Sacz, Poland
-Radomsko, Poland
-Shumskoye, Ukraine

As always, we wish to thank all the donors of material and the project
coordinators for their donations of translations and their precious time.
Nothing can be accomplished without your interest in the Yizkor Book Project.
We are always interested in new material and look forward to hearing >from
researchers wanting to start a new translation project.

Joyce Field
Yizkor Book Project
JewishGen V.P., Data Acquisition
jfield@...


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine 3. How Eastern European Jews got German names #ukraine

Marc M. Cohen <marc-cohen25@...>
 

In the April 27 posting, Yekkey offers several explanations of the
origin of German names among Eastern European Jews.

Two of them ring true for my family.

1. One maternal ggf changed his name >from Chomitz to Rosenthal when
he arrived in America (the apocrophal "at Ellis Island") precisely
because he wanted people to think he was a sophisticated German Jew,
not a greener >from Russia.

2. Another branch of my mother's family apparently fled the
Rhineland during the crusades, and ended up in Bessarabia, where the
name was Kantorji, a Romanicized variation of Cantor or Cantrowitz.

They also used the surname name Barak, which according to Beider's
Dictionary of Jewish surnames in the Russian empire is an acronym
for BAr RAbbenu Kalonymus. The Kalonymus family were a rabbinic
dynasty in the Rhineland >from about the 8th to 13th centuries, until
the Erfurt massacre of 1221, when Rabbi Shmuel "heHazzan" ben
Kalonymus was murdered by crusaders, along with two dozen others.

3. My father's paternal ggf's name was Rosenberg, and although they
left Dunayevtsy (Dinovitz), Russia for Romania in the early to mid
19th century, there is no doubt they were Askenazim >from Mittel
Europa.

Hope this helps,

Marc

Marc M. Cohen, Palo Alto, California
marc74@...

Researching:
COHEN, DINOVITZER, GOLDENBERG >from Dunayevtsy, Ukraine.
BARAK, KANTORJI >from Khotin, Bessarabia; Chernovsty and Storozynetz, Bukovina.
FACTOR, KORNITZKY, CHOMITZ OR HAMETZ >from Kiev, Ukraine.
CHOMITZ, HAMETZ >from Stepantsy, Ukraine or Ioninna/Jannina, Greece.
COHEN, ROSENBERG, SCHLEICHER, GOLDENBERG >from Tirgu Frumos, Romania
WEININGER, RIBNER, HEISRIGGER, HEITNER, HESS, SCHEFLER >from
Chernovtsy, Costinetz, or Storozynetz, Bukovina.


Belarus digest: April 29, 2005 - death while aboard ship #belarus

Jeffrey S. Entin <entin@...>
 

In answer to Stephen Denker's post about deaths aboard ship during
Transatlantic crossings and not finding their names at Ellis Island - they
were buried at sea!

My family had that misforutune with a six year old son who died en route.
His mother (my great grandmother) was bringing him >from Minsk to New York to
re-unite the family, his father having immigrated to the US three years
prior. Imagine my great grandfather at Castle Garden waiting and his wife
embarks with no child. And this after having lost the twin son in his
infancy back in Belarus.

I guess there are a lot of these horrible stories in our ancestors' history.

Jeffrey S. Entin
Fall River, MA

Researching: ENTIN, Minsk; BERLYAVSKY, Ukraine; PERCIKOVICH, LIPSCHITZ,
SCHILANSKY, BUBELSKY, KABATCHNICK, LEVIN, Lithuania


Belarus SIG #Belarus Belarus digest: April 29, 2005 - death while aboard ship #belarus

Jeffrey S. Entin <entin@...>
 

In answer to Stephen Denker's post about deaths aboard ship during
Transatlantic crossings and not finding their names at Ellis Island - they
were buried at sea!

My family had that misforutune with a six year old son who died en route.
His mother (my great grandmother) was bringing him >from Minsk to New York to
re-unite the family, his father having immigrated to the US three years
prior. Imagine my great grandfather at Castle Garden waiting and his wife
embarks with no child. And this after having lost the twin son in his
infancy back in Belarus.

I guess there are a lot of these horrible stories in our ancestors' history.

Jeffrey S. Entin
Fall River, MA

Researching: ENTIN, Minsk; BERLYAVSKY, Ukraine; PERCIKOVICH, LIPSCHITZ,
SCHILANSKY, BUBELSKY, KABATCHNICK, LEVIN, Lithuania


Yizkor Book Project for April 2005 #france

Joyce Field
 

Because of the Pesach holiday, April 2005 was a "short" month and our
production reflects that. One new book and 14 updated books went
online. All translations can be accessed at
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/translations.html and the current
additions have been flagged to make the search easier.

I would like to remind all new researchers that you can find whether
a yizkor book has been written about a particular town at the Yizkor
Book Database, http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/database.html. You
can search the Necrology Index at
http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/yizkor/. Our index to this
database says the following:


"The JewishGen Yizkor Book Necrology Database indexes the names of
persons in the necrologies -- the lists of Holocaust martyrs --
published in the Yizkor Books appearing on the JewishGen Yizkor Book
Translation Project. This database is only an index of names; it
directs researchers back to the Yizkor Book itself, where more
complete information may be available.

This database allows the surnames to be searched via soundex.
Because most of these names were transliterated >from Hebrew and
Yiddish, the spellings of the surnames may not be as you are used to
seeing them in Latin-alphabet sources."

This database currently contains over 165,000 entries >from the
necrologies of 177 different yizkor books. Remember that not all
yizkor books have necrologies.

New book:

"With a rifle in my hand and Eretz Israel in my heart" by Dov Levin,
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/dovlevin1/dovlevin1.html.

Updated books:

-Belchatow, Poland, http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Belchatow/Belchatow.html
-Belchatow, Poland,
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Belchatow_ann/Belchatow_ann.html
-Bolekhov, Ukraine
-Brest, Belarus, volume 2
-Bukowina book
-Chelm, Poland
-Czestochowa, Poland,
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Czestochowa1/Czestochowa1.html
-Holocaust in Belarus
-Jewish Music in Poland between the World Wars
-Maramures Region
-Novogrudok, Belarus
-Nowy Sacz, Poland
-Radomsko, Poland
-Shumskoye, Ukraine

As always, we wish to thank all the donors of material and the
project coordinators for their donations of translations and their
precious time. Nothing can be accomplished without your interest in
the Yizkor Book Project. We are always interested in new material
and look forward to hearing >from researchers wanting to start a new
translation project.

Joyce Field
Yizkor Book Project
JewishGen V.P., Data Acquisition
jfield@...


Yizkor Book Project for April 2005 #romania

Joyce Field
 

Because of the Pesach holiday, April 2005 was a "short" month and our
production reflects that. One new book and 14 updated books went
online. All translations can be accessed at
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/translations.html and the current
additions have been flagged to make the search easier.

I would like to remind all new researchers that you can find whether
a yizkor book has been written about a particular town at the Yizkor
Book Database, http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/database.html. You
can search the Necrology Index at
http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/yizkor/. Our index to this
database says the following:


"The JewishGen Yizkor Book Necrology Database indexes the names of
persons in the necrologies -- the lists of Holocaust martyrs --
published in the Yizkor Books appearing on the JewishGen Yizkor Book
Translation Project. This database is only an index of names; it
directs researchers back to the Yizkor Book itself, where more
complete information may be available.

This database allows the surnames to be searched via soundex.
Because most of these names were transliterated >from Hebrew and
Yiddish, the spellings of the surnames may not be as you are used to
seeing them in Latin-alphabet sources."

This database currently contains over 165,000 entries >from the
necrologies of 177 different yizkor books. Remember that not all
yizkor books have necrologies.

New book:

"With a rifle in my hand and Eretz Israel in my heart" by Dov Levin,
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/dovlevin1/dovlevin1.html.

Updated books:

-Belchatow, Poland, http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Belchatow/Belchatow.html
-Belchatow, Poland,
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Belchatow_ann/Belchatow_ann.html
-Bolekhov, Ukraine
-Brest, Belarus, volume 2
-Bukowina book
-Chelm, Poland
-Czestochowa, Poland,
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Czestochowa1/Czestochowa1.html
-Holocaust in Belarus
-Jewish Music in Poland between the World Wars
-Maramures Region
-Novogrudok, Belarus
-Nowy Sacz, Poland
-Radomsko, Poland
-Shumskoye, Ukraine

As always, we wish to thank all the donors of material and the
project coordinators for their donations of translations and their
precious time. Nothing can be accomplished without your interest in
the Yizkor Book Project. We are always interested in new material
and look forward to hearing >from researchers wanting to start a new
translation project.

Joyce Field
Yizkor Book Project
JewishGen V.P., Data Acquisition
jfield@...


French SIG #France Yizkor Book Project for April 2005 #france

Joyce Field
 

Because of the Pesach holiday, April 2005 was a "short" month and our
production reflects that. One new book and 14 updated books went
online. All translations can be accessed at
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/translations.html and the current
additions have been flagged to make the search easier.

I would like to remind all new researchers that you can find whether
a yizkor book has been written about a particular town at the Yizkor
Book Database, http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/database.html. You
can search the Necrology Index at
http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/yizkor/. Our index to this
database says the following:


"The JewishGen Yizkor Book Necrology Database indexes the names of
persons in the necrologies -- the lists of Holocaust martyrs --
published in the Yizkor Books appearing on the JewishGen Yizkor Book
Translation Project. This database is only an index of names; it
directs researchers back to the Yizkor Book itself, where more
complete information may be available.

This database allows the surnames to be searched via soundex.
Because most of these names were transliterated >from Hebrew and
Yiddish, the spellings of the surnames may not be as you are used to
seeing them in Latin-alphabet sources."

This database currently contains over 165,000 entries >from the
necrologies of 177 different yizkor books. Remember that not all
yizkor books have necrologies.

New book:

"With a rifle in my hand and Eretz Israel in my heart" by Dov Levin,
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/dovlevin1/dovlevin1.html.

Updated books:

-Belchatow, Poland, http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Belchatow/Belchatow.html
-Belchatow, Poland,
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Belchatow_ann/Belchatow_ann.html
-Bolekhov, Ukraine
-Brest, Belarus, volume 2
-Bukowina book
-Chelm, Poland
-Czestochowa, Poland,
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Czestochowa1/Czestochowa1.html
-Holocaust in Belarus
-Jewish Music in Poland between the World Wars
-Maramures Region
-Novogrudok, Belarus
-Nowy Sacz, Poland
-Radomsko, Poland
-Shumskoye, Ukraine

As always, we wish to thank all the donors of material and the
project coordinators for their donations of translations and their
precious time. Nothing can be accomplished without your interest in
the Yizkor Book Project. We are always interested in new material
and look forward to hearing >from researchers wanting to start a new
translation project.

Joyce Field
Yizkor Book Project
JewishGen V.P., Data Acquisition
jfield@...


Romania SIG #Romania Yizkor Book Project for April 2005 #romania

Joyce Field
 

Because of the Pesach holiday, April 2005 was a "short" month and our
production reflects that. One new book and 14 updated books went
online. All translations can be accessed at
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/translations.html and the current
additions have been flagged to make the search easier.

I would like to remind all new researchers that you can find whether
a yizkor book has been written about a particular town at the Yizkor
Book Database, http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/database.html. You
can search the Necrology Index at
http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/yizkor/. Our index to this
database says the following:


"The JewishGen Yizkor Book Necrology Database indexes the names of
persons in the necrologies -- the lists of Holocaust martyrs --
published in the Yizkor Books appearing on the JewishGen Yizkor Book
Translation Project. This database is only an index of names; it
directs researchers back to the Yizkor Book itself, where more
complete information may be available.

This database allows the surnames to be searched via soundex.
Because most of these names were transliterated >from Hebrew and
Yiddish, the spellings of the surnames may not be as you are used to
seeing them in Latin-alphabet sources."

This database currently contains over 165,000 entries >from the
necrologies of 177 different yizkor books. Remember that not all
yizkor books have necrologies.

New book:

"With a rifle in my hand and Eretz Israel in my heart" by Dov Levin,
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/dovlevin1/dovlevin1.html.

Updated books:

-Belchatow, Poland, http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Belchatow/Belchatow.html
-Belchatow, Poland,
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Belchatow_ann/Belchatow_ann.html
-Bolekhov, Ukraine
-Brest, Belarus, volume 2
-Bukowina book
-Chelm, Poland
-Czestochowa, Poland,
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Czestochowa1/Czestochowa1.html
-Holocaust in Belarus
-Jewish Music in Poland between the World Wars
-Maramures Region
-Novogrudok, Belarus
-Nowy Sacz, Poland
-Radomsko, Poland
-Shumskoye, Ukraine

As always, we wish to thank all the donors of material and the
project coordinators for their donations of translations and their
precious time. Nothing can be accomplished without your interest in
the Yizkor Book Project. We are always interested in new material
and look forward to hearing >from researchers wanting to start a new
translation project.

Joyce Field
Yizkor Book Project
JewishGen V.P., Data Acquisition
jfield@...


Esther BASIOR #france

Shelley K. Pollero
 

Dear All,

I have known for quite a while that a possible relative, Icchok BASIOR, born
1907, had been deported >from France in 1942. (Klarsfeld)

It was only when the Pages of Testimony went online that I learned that he
had been married and that his wife had survived. His wife, Esther BASIOR,
submitted a P of T for him on 2 Dec 1991. At the time she was living in
Vincennes. I have the address >from the P of T.

In addition, >from the Memorial de la Shoah, I found Ichok BASIOR, same
birthdate, tailor, living in Paris at the time of his deportation.

Esther also provided his parents' names, Hersz and Hinda, which linked him
to my family.

Does anyone have any information about Esther BASIOR, their children, or her
family? If she is still alive, she would be in her 90s.

Please contact me privately. Merci.

Sincerely,

Shelley

--
Shelley K. Pollero
Severna Park, Maryland
rkpollero@...


French SIG #France Esther BASIOR #france

Shelley K. Pollero
 

Dear All,

I have known for quite a while that a possible relative, Icchok BASIOR, born
1907, had been deported >from France in 1942. (Klarsfeld)

It was only when the Pages of Testimony went online that I learned that he
had been married and that his wife had survived. His wife, Esther BASIOR,
submitted a P of T for him on 2 Dec 1991. At the time she was living in
Vincennes. I have the address >from the P of T.

In addition, >from the Memorial de la Shoah, I found Ichok BASIOR, same
birthdate, tailor, living in Paris at the time of his deportation.

Esther also provided his parents' names, Hersz and Hinda, which linked him
to my family.

Does anyone have any information about Esther BASIOR, their children, or her
family? If she is still alive, she would be in her 90s.

Please contact me privately. Merci.

Sincerely,

Shelley

--
Shelley K. Pollero
Severna Park, Maryland
rkpollero@...


Re: Austrian Cattle dealers #austria-czech

Celia Male <celiamale@...>
 

Robert Fraser asks: Was it common for Jews in >from Podivin, and Zistersdorf,
also in North-eastern Austria, near the CZ border in the mid to late 1800s to be
cattle dealers? If so, was it because of their relative education and financial
skills, which the farmers and peasants might not have had?

======================================================

In the reply below the URLs are long - copy and paste them all into your browser.

A: In the 1793 Jewish census of Bohemia, there are references to Viehhandler and
Rosshandler [Cattle/livestock and horse dealers]. Thus, in Stadtl Maschau {Mastov},
Saatzer Kreis {Zatecky Kraj} - out of 9 families, we have four Viehhandler,
BERNARD, HERSCHL, LEWE and HELLER. I am sure there are many references to
Viehhandler in the Moravian censuses too.

B: >from this book we now know that there were early Jewish livestock dealers in
Switzerland too: Judische Und Christliche Viehhandler in Der Schweiz,
1780-1930 by Robert Uri Kaufmann.

C: Cattle-droving {Ochsentreiber} was a Jewish occupation >from medieval times in
Europe. I doubt this had anything to do with education; perhaps more closely
related to [biblical?] tradition, history, family links, restriction in other
forms of occupation and skills in trading and dealing with currency.

D: These restrictions are borne out by this paragraph relating to Jews in Diez
[Germany] dated 17.1.1770:

http://www.rhein-lahn-info.de/geschichte/goelzenleuchter/diez.html

Den Schutzjuden auf dem Lande wird nur allein der Viehhandel, und was hierzu
gehörig, gestattet...

i.e. those Schutzjuden living in the country are only permitted to deal with
livestock and related matters.

E: Here we can read about the size of these operations in Russia, Poland,
Lithuania and Italy:

http://www.jewishencyclopedia.com/view.jsp?artid=159&letter=O

"The first published reference to the Jews of Ostrog is dated 1532, and deals
with the imposition of customs duties on horned cattle brought >from Wallachia by
Jewish drovers of Ostrog and other towns. ....... Isachka, an Ostrog Jew, bought
1,500 oxen in Wallachia. In 1536 a number of Ostrog Jews were accused ..... of
having driven several thousand head of cattle from... "

and in other Jewish Encyclopedia references: in Russia ... in 1532 "the local Jews
carried on extensive business operations as cattle-drovers, and one of them,
Michael of Vinnitsa [Vinitza], paid customs duties on a single drove of 2,000
head of sheep and cattle."

and in Lecce, Italy: ... "no special records concerning the Jews until the
fifteenth century. They occupied themselves at one time with dyeing, cattle-
raising, and money-lending...."

The latter is of interest with the reference to my last posting on the Nathan
ALTMANN, in which I wrote about Rosoli liqueur. If you followed up the German
story, you will have read that Rosoli was produced by cattle drovers >from Italy.
I wonder whether they were in fact Jews who had come into contact with the Jews
of Ronsperg and passed on their secret recipes to the Altmann brothers!

F: Vienna was one of the most important cities in Europe and had large cattle
markets. The gt-grandfather of one of my fourth-cousins, was an Ochsentreiber
from Zurawno, which was then part of Austrian Galicia {now, Zhuravno, Ukraine}.
He is buried in Wahringerfriedhof, Vienna: STOLPER Gerson age 56 20.08.1868
12 124 Many of the Zurawno men buried in Wahring were also designated as
"Ochsentreiber".

His grandson Gustav {born Vienna 25.7.1888 - died NY 27.12.1947} [cf Gershon
with Gustav] became a leading economist and wrote in English: History of the
German Economy, 1870-1940 [Harcourt Brace ca 1940]. This was translated into
German by his wife, Antonie [Toni] nee KASSOWITZ. The book was updated and
retranslated into English in the 1970s [Swarthmore Economics, Michigan]. A more
recent edition is available [see Ref 1].

Gustav STOLPER was very friendly with Theodor Heuss [elected German Bundes-
President, 1949]. We have a rapid transition >from Galician Ochsentreiber in the
1830s to an eminent grandson barely a hundred years later [Ref 2].

Conclusion: Cattle, and all the occupations connected with them, were definitely
connected with the Jews of Central Europe and the Habsburg Empire. It is therefore
not at all surprising that Robert Fraser has EISINGER Viehhandler on his family
tree.

Celia Male [UK]

References:

1. Stolper, Gustav. German economy: 1870 to the present: by Gustav Stolper, Karl
Hauser, Knut Borchardt Translated by Toni Stolper. [New ed.] Karl Hauser & Knut
Borchardt. York: Joseph Rowntree Foundation, 2003.

2. "{Herbert} Hoover's chief assistant, the German Weimar liberal, Gustav STOLPER,
in January 1947 put the question offending Germany ........... A partisan of
partition ....... it was STOLPER who drafted the eventual Hoover Report which
recommended putting Germany on its feet by stimulating German exports and thus
terminating the need for emergency aid."
http://www.theglobalsite.ac.uk/atlanticrulingclass/6.htm


Austria-Czech SIG #Austria-Czech Re: Austrian Cattle dealers #austria-czech

Celia Male <celiamale@...>
 

Robert Fraser asks: Was it common for Jews in >from Podivin, and Zistersdorf,
also in North-eastern Austria, near the CZ border in the mid to late 1800s to be
cattle dealers? If so, was it because of their relative education and financial
skills, which the farmers and peasants might not have had?

======================================================

In the reply below the URLs are long - copy and paste them all into your browser.

A: In the 1793 Jewish census of Bohemia, there are references to Viehhandler and
Rosshandler [Cattle/livestock and horse dealers]. Thus, in Stadtl Maschau {Mastov},
Saatzer Kreis {Zatecky Kraj} - out of 9 families, we have four Viehhandler,
BERNARD, HERSCHL, LEWE and HELLER. I am sure there are many references to
Viehhandler in the Moravian censuses too.

B: >from this book we now know that there were early Jewish livestock dealers in
Switzerland too: Judische Und Christliche Viehhandler in Der Schweiz,
1780-1930 by Robert Uri Kaufmann.

C: Cattle-droving {Ochsentreiber} was a Jewish occupation >from medieval times in
Europe. I doubt this had anything to do with education; perhaps more closely
related to [biblical?] tradition, history, family links, restriction in other
forms of occupation and skills in trading and dealing with currency.

D: These restrictions are borne out by this paragraph relating to Jews in Diez
[Germany] dated 17.1.1770:

http://www.rhein-lahn-info.de/geschichte/goelzenleuchter/diez.html

Den Schutzjuden auf dem Lande wird nur allein der Viehhandel, und was hierzu
gehörig, gestattet...

i.e. those Schutzjuden living in the country are only permitted to deal with
livestock and related matters.

E: Here we can read about the size of these operations in Russia, Poland,
Lithuania and Italy:

http://www.jewishencyclopedia.com/view.jsp?artid=159&letter=O

"The first published reference to the Jews of Ostrog is dated 1532, and deals
with the imposition of customs duties on horned cattle brought >from Wallachia by
Jewish drovers of Ostrog and other towns. ....... Isachka, an Ostrog Jew, bought
1,500 oxen in Wallachia. In 1536 a number of Ostrog Jews were accused ..... of
having driven several thousand head of cattle from... "

and in other Jewish Encyclopedia references: in Russia ... in 1532 "the local Jews
carried on extensive business operations as cattle-drovers, and one of them,
Michael of Vinnitsa [Vinitza], paid customs duties on a single drove of 2,000
head of sheep and cattle."

and in Lecce, Italy: ... "no special records concerning the Jews until the
fifteenth century. They occupied themselves at one time with dyeing, cattle-
raising, and money-lending...."

The latter is of interest with the reference to my last posting on the Nathan
ALTMANN, in which I wrote about Rosoli liqueur. If you followed up the German
story, you will have read that Rosoli was produced by cattle drovers >from Italy.
I wonder whether they were in fact Jews who had come into contact with the Jews
of Ronsperg and passed on their secret recipes to the Altmann brothers!

F: Vienna was one of the most important cities in Europe and had large cattle
markets. The gt-grandfather of one of my fourth-cousins, was an Ochsentreiber
from Zurawno, which was then part of Austrian Galicia {now, Zhuravno, Ukraine}.
He is buried in Wahringerfriedhof, Vienna: STOLPER Gerson age 56 20.08.1868
12 124 Many of the Zurawno men buried in Wahring were also designated as
"Ochsentreiber".

His grandson Gustav {born Vienna 25.7.1888 - died NY 27.12.1947} [cf Gershon
with Gustav] became a leading economist and wrote in English: History of the
German Economy, 1870-1940 [Harcourt Brace ca 1940]. This was translated into
German by his wife, Antonie [Toni] nee KASSOWITZ. The book was updated and
retranslated into English in the 1970s [Swarthmore Economics, Michigan]. A more
recent edition is available [see Ref 1].

Gustav STOLPER was very friendly with Theodor Heuss [elected German Bundes-
President, 1949]. We have a rapid transition >from Galician Ochsentreiber in the
1830s to an eminent grandson barely a hundred years later [Ref 2].

Conclusion: Cattle, and all the occupations connected with them, were definitely
connected with the Jews of Central Europe and the Habsburg Empire. It is therefore
not at all surprising that Robert Fraser has EISINGER Viehhandler on his family
tree.

Celia Male [UK]

References:

1. Stolper, Gustav. German economy: 1870 to the present: by Gustav Stolper, Karl
Hauser, Knut Borchardt Translated by Toni Stolper. [New ed.] Karl Hauser & Knut
Borchardt. York: Joseph Rowntree Foundation, 2003.

2. "{Herbert} Hoover's chief assistant, the German Weimar liberal, Gustav STOLPER,
in January 1947 put the question offending Germany ........... A partisan of
partition ....... it was STOLPER who drafted the eventual Hoover Report which
recommended putting Germany on its feet by stimulating German exports and thus
terminating the need for emergency aid."
http://www.theglobalsite.ac.uk/atlanticrulingclass/6.htm


SKLARSKY #latinamerica

Bonsobel@...
 

Hello Fellow Genners,

I am looking for decendants of Riva KLEIMAN SKLARSKY (my grandmother's
sister) who emigrated to Argentina with her husband in the early 1920's or late
teens. The rest of her family came to the United States in 1922 >from Stavische,
Ukraine. Any information would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks,
Bonnie Dinnerman Sobelson
Atlanta, GA
Bonsobel@...


Latin America #LatinAmerica SKLARSKY #latinamerica

Bonsobel@...
 

Hello Fellow Genners,

I am looking for decendants of Riva KLEIMAN SKLARSKY (my grandmother's
sister) who emigrated to Argentina with her husband in the early 1920's or late
teens. The rest of her family came to the United States in 1922 >from Stavische,
Ukraine. Any information would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks,
Bonnie Dinnerman Sobelson
Atlanta, GA
Bonsobel@...


Keeping A Piece of the Afikomen #galicia

Murray <eyedoc1@...>
 

As I recall my father used to "hide" a small piece of the Afikoman to become part
of the search for Chametz the following year. The trick was to remember a year
later where the matza had been placed.

Murray S. Sperber <eyedoc1@...>
Los Angeles, CA


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia Keeping A Piece of the Afikomen #galicia

Murray <eyedoc1@...>
 

As I recall my father used to "hide" a small piece of the Afikoman to become part
of the search for Chametz the following year. The trick was to remember a year
later where the matza had been placed.

Murray S. Sperber <eyedoc1@...>
Los Angeles, CA