Date   
Re: Seeking: OKS, GUZ or GAS in Argentina #general

Rob Weisskirch <rob_weisskirch@...>
 

You might want to check the burials in Buenos Aires. All three surnames appear.
Keep in mind that it was very common for indviduals to adopt Spanish names (may be
similar to their Hebrew/Yiddish name).

http://www.amia.org.ar/difuntos.asp

Rob Weisskirch
Marina, CA

WEISSKIRCH, Berlin, Wisnicz, Poland, Argentina; SCHON, Berlin, Wisnicz,Pol.,
Argentina; FAERMAN, Kapresht, Moldova, Argentina; HERZOG, Komjatice & Surnany,
Slovakia; DEREMBAUM, Telenescht & Kapresht, Moldova; OXRUD, Moldova, Argentina;
ROTH, GROSS, HORN, Surany, Slovakia; SPIRA, Wisnicz, Pol.,

I am looking for any information on Haim Zeev (Velvel) OKS >from Kremenets.
I am looking for any information on this man or his descendents. He was born
around 1910 and emigrated to Argentina in the 1930s. He was actively involved
with other Kremenetzers in Argentina.

I am also looking for information on Shlomo and /or Reuven GUZ (or GAS) of Kovel
born around 1900 and emigrated to Argentina in the early 1920s.

Thank you for any help you can provide
Susan Sobel

Re: Member of Polish Diet between the World Wars #general

Stan Goodman <SPAM_FOILER@...>
 

On Wed, 16 Mar 2005 03:00:40 UTC, IsraelP@... (IsraelP) opined:

We are trying to identify a family member who served in the Polish Diet between
the world wars. His name was WAJNRYB, but we don't have a given name.

Is such information available someplace? (What happened to him is extra
credit.)

Israel Pickholtz
Israel...

If "diet" in this case means "parliament", it is called the "Sejm". Most
parliaments take great pride in their history (in some cases, even deservedly so).
The Sejm has to have records of its membership of former years. It isn't beyond
imagination that it even knows the fate of some of them, or perhaps that it even
has biographies of them.


Stan Goodman, Qiryat Tiv'on, Israel

Searching:
NEACHOWICZ/NOACHOWICZ, NEJMAN/NAJMAN, SURALSKI: >from Lomza Gubernia
ISMACH: >from Lomza Gubernia, Galicia, and Ukraina
HERTANU, ABRAMOVICI, LAUER: >from Dorohoi District, Romania
GRISARU, VATARU: >from Iasi, Dorohoi, and Mileanca, Romania

See my interactive family tree (requires Java 1.1.6 or better). the URL is:
http://www.hashkedim.com

For reasons connected with anti-spam/junk security, the return address is not
valid. To communicate with me, please visit my website (see the URL above -- no
Java required for this purpose) and fill in the email form there.

Re: Genealogy and Mixed Marriage #general

Dick Plotz
 

Ann Rabinowitz wrote earlier this month:

I was researching Colonial Jewish families and used Rabbi Malcolm H. Stern's
book "First American Jewish Families" as a resource. Unfortunately, Rabbi Stern
did not believe in the inclusion of non-Jewish descendants and therefore left
them out.

While I understood his reason for this and respect it, it was annoying as I was
unable to connect a number of people to their appropriate family trees.
Some of these non-Jews had descendants who eventually married Jews once again as
it so happens in our multi-ethnic society and they wanted to know about that
earlier ancestry.

I hope that those who feel as Rabbi Stern did realize that while your tree is
your own business to construct as you wish, limiting it to Jews only withholds
your heritage >from those who may want to share it despite the fact that they may
not be halachicly Jewish.
While I agree with Ann's conclusions, she is probably wrong in her assumptions
about Rabbi Stern's motivations. "First American Jewish Families" does indeed
include many non-Jewish branches, sometimes extending down to living descendants.
If Rabbi Stern failed to extend as high a proportion of non-Jewish lines as of
Jewish lines -- I am not sure whether this is actually the case -- it was most
likely because of lack of time to carry his research as far as he would have
liked, and perhaps also because Jewish descendants may have been more eager to
respond to questions about their early American ancestors than non-Jewish
descendants were to respond to questions about their Jewish ancestors.

Of course Rabbi Stern is no longer available to resolve this debate.

Dick Plotz
Providence RI USA

JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Seeking: OKS, GUZ or GAS in Argentina #general

Rob Weisskirch <rob_weisskirch@...>
 

You might want to check the burials in Buenos Aires. All three surnames appear.
Keep in mind that it was very common for indviduals to adopt Spanish names (may be
similar to their Hebrew/Yiddish name).

http://www.amia.org.ar/difuntos.asp

Rob Weisskirch
Marina, CA

WEISSKIRCH, Berlin, Wisnicz, Poland, Argentina; SCHON, Berlin, Wisnicz,Pol.,
Argentina; FAERMAN, Kapresht, Moldova, Argentina; HERZOG, Komjatice & Surnany,
Slovakia; DEREMBAUM, Telenescht & Kapresht, Moldova; OXRUD, Moldova, Argentina;
ROTH, GROSS, HORN, Surany, Slovakia; SPIRA, Wisnicz, Pol.,

I am looking for any information on Haim Zeev (Velvel) OKS >from Kremenets.
I am looking for any information on this man or his descendents. He was born
around 1910 and emigrated to Argentina in the 1930s. He was actively involved
with other Kremenetzers in Argentina.

I am also looking for information on Shlomo and /or Reuven GUZ (or GAS) of Kovel
born around 1900 and emigrated to Argentina in the early 1920s.

Thank you for any help you can provide
Susan Sobel

JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Member of Polish Diet between the World Wars #general

Stan Goodman <SPAM_FOILER@...>
 

On Wed, 16 Mar 2005 03:00:40 UTC, IsraelP@... (IsraelP) opined:

We are trying to identify a family member who served in the Polish Diet between
the world wars. His name was WAJNRYB, but we don't have a given name.

Is such information available someplace? (What happened to him is extra
credit.)

Israel Pickholtz
Israel...

If "diet" in this case means "parliament", it is called the "Sejm". Most
parliaments take great pride in their history (in some cases, even deservedly so).
The Sejm has to have records of its membership of former years. It isn't beyond
imagination that it even knows the fate of some of them, or perhaps that it even
has biographies of them.


Stan Goodman, Qiryat Tiv'on, Israel

Searching:
NEACHOWICZ/NOACHOWICZ, NEJMAN/NAJMAN, SURALSKI: >from Lomza Gubernia
ISMACH: >from Lomza Gubernia, Galicia, and Ukraina
HERTANU, ABRAMOVICI, LAUER: >from Dorohoi District, Romania
GRISARU, VATARU: >from Iasi, Dorohoi, and Mileanca, Romania

See my interactive family tree (requires Java 1.1.6 or better). the URL is:
http://www.hashkedim.com

For reasons connected with anti-spam/junk security, the return address is not
valid. To communicate with me, please visit my website (see the URL above -- no
Java required for this purpose) and fill in the email form there.

JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Genealogy and Mixed Marriage #general

Dick Plotz
 

Ann Rabinowitz wrote earlier this month:

I was researching Colonial Jewish families and used Rabbi Malcolm H. Stern's
book "First American Jewish Families" as a resource. Unfortunately, Rabbi Stern
did not believe in the inclusion of non-Jewish descendants and therefore left
them out.

While I understood his reason for this and respect it, it was annoying as I was
unable to connect a number of people to their appropriate family trees.
Some of these non-Jews had descendants who eventually married Jews once again as
it so happens in our multi-ethnic society and they wanted to know about that
earlier ancestry.

I hope that those who feel as Rabbi Stern did realize that while your tree is
your own business to construct as you wish, limiting it to Jews only withholds
your heritage >from those who may want to share it despite the fact that they may
not be halachicly Jewish.
While I agree with Ann's conclusions, she is probably wrong in her assumptions
about Rabbi Stern's motivations. "First American Jewish Families" does indeed
include many non-Jewish branches, sometimes extending down to living descendants.
If Rabbi Stern failed to extend as high a proportion of non-Jewish lines as of
Jewish lines -- I am not sure whether this is actually the case -- it was most
likely because of lack of time to carry his research as far as he would have
liked, and perhaps also because Jewish descendants may have been more eager to
respond to questions about their early American ancestors than non-Jewish
descendants were to respond to questions about their Jewish ancestors.

Of course Rabbi Stern is no longer available to resolve this debate.

Dick Plotz
Providence RI USA

Re: Trenton, NJ - Likely Cemetery #general

Paul M Lieberman <paulmlieberman@...>
 

Here's info on a pretty obscure cemetery for Jews in Trenton. I don't know the
name of this cemetery, but many of my Hungarian relatives who lived in Trenton
were buried there 1910-1925. It has both Jewish and Christian sections, and is, as
far as I know, not strictly Hungarian.

Take The New Jersey Turnpike to I-195 west toward Trenton, then I-295 north just 2
exits (exit 61AB). Take Arena Drive under the interstate, and continue about 1
mile. After it merges onto S. Olden Ave, turn left onto Cedar Lane, and then left
at Clover Ave. to find the entrance to the cemetary. There's a memorial company
there: Bracoloni Custom Memorials, 1044 Cedar Ln, Trenton, NJ 08610.
The Memorial company's phone number is (609) 393-9519.

- Paul M Lieberman

Philadelphia Cemeteries #general

Leonie Flack <mail@...>
 

I would like to thank all the 'genners' who responded so quickly to my request for
help on Philadelphia cemeteries. I have started the process of contacting some of
the cemeteries suggested and hope it won't be too long before I find his burial
place which may then lead me on to further research. It's nice to know that
there is so much help out there.

Leonie Flack
mail@...
London, UK

JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Trenton, NJ - Likely Cemetery #general

Paul M Lieberman <paulmlieberman@...>
 

Here's info on a pretty obscure cemetery for Jews in Trenton. I don't know the
name of this cemetery, but many of my Hungarian relatives who lived in Trenton
were buried there 1910-1925. It has both Jewish and Christian sections, and is, as
far as I know, not strictly Hungarian.

Take The New Jersey Turnpike to I-195 west toward Trenton, then I-295 north just 2
exits (exit 61AB). Take Arena Drive under the interstate, and continue about 1
mile. After it merges onto S. Olden Ave, turn left onto Cedar Lane, and then left
at Clover Ave. to find the entrance to the cemetary. There's a memorial company
there: Bracoloni Custom Memorials, 1044 Cedar Ln, Trenton, NJ 08610.
The Memorial company's phone number is (609) 393-9519.

- Paul M Lieberman

JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Philadelphia Cemeteries #general

Leonie Flack <mail@...>
 

I would like to thank all the 'genners' who responded so quickly to my request for
help on Philadelphia cemeteries. I have started the process of contacting some of
the cemeteries suggested and hope it won't be too long before I find his burial
place which may then lead me on to further research. It's nice to know that
there is so much help out there.

Leonie Flack
mail@...
London, UK

Re: Rabbinical/Tribe Question (ADLER, HALPERN, ALBER) #general

Sally Bruckheimer <sallybru@...>
 

1. No. Just because a person is a rabbi, that does not make him a Cohen and vice
versa. Anyone of any tribe can and could be a rabbi (for Orthodox you can
exclude women). The Cohanim were priests in the temple and Leviim their
assistants; that does not give them 'rights' to be rabbi's or exclude anyone; one
has nothing to do with the other.

2. See 1.

3. Unless you can prove that all Alber's or all Adler's or whatever were related,
you cannot claim all of them in your family. Adler, eagle in German, may have
come >from a house sign - many house signs in many different towns before house
numbers. And anyone could have changed the family name >from whatever to Adler or
Alber or whatever else they chose.

Sally Bruckheimer
Chatham, NJ

"I have 3 questions:

1. Should I assume that if the Beider Poland Book lists a last name as
"Rabbinic", (examples of some names: ADLER, HALPERN, ALBER), that the members of
these family were >from the Kohanim tribe?

2. In the 18th and 19th centuries, were there Rabbi who were Levy's and
Israelites? Or just Kohanim?

3. Should I, also, assume that there were Rabbi in the ADLER, HALPERN, and ALBER
families that I am researching (18th and 19th century) or not necessarily?"

Re: Boston Jewish Advocate #general

Lisa Lepore <llepore@...>
 

Hi Bea -

The following site has a list of all the Boston newspapers on microfilm at the
Boston Public library.

http://www.bpl.org/research/microtext/BostonNewspapers.pdf

The Jewish Advocate was a weekly paper - the films start in 1905.

You might want to take a look at the the library's website to check on their hours
and availability of the films before you go.

Lisa Lepore

Can some one tell me where I can get to research the Boston Jewish Advocate
wedding announcements.
Bea Swart

Re: Boston Jewish Advocate #general

Alan <aNOhsSPAMsha@...>
 

Can some one tell me where I can get to research the Boston Jewish Advocate
wedding announcements.
Bea Swart
You can do this online at http://www.thejewishadvocate.com/

Alan Shuchat, Newton, Mass.
aNOhsSPAMsha@... (remove NO SPAM)

SHUCHAT (Talnoye, Simferopol, Sevastopol, Odessa, Balta (Abazovka), Tavrig,
Pogrebishche)
VINOKUR (Talnoye), KURIS (Mogilev-Podolskiy, Ataki, Berdichev)
SILVERMAN (Soroki, Kremenets), BIRNBAUM (Kamenets-Podolskiy)
KITAIGORODSKI (Zvenigorodka)

Re: Subject: Help with Word Processing in Hebrew #general

Yehuda Berman <ybberman@...>
 

Putting the vowels into a Hebrew text is a lot of work, which is why most Hebrew
texts (except poetry, prayer, and books for young children) skip the vowels.
However, my Hebrew-language handbook for using WORD in OFFICE 2000 lists two ways
of putting in the vowels:

Method 1: Put on the NUM LOCK, press ALT and, using the numbers at the right-hand
side of the keyboard, simultaneously press the following series of numbers for
each vowel, as follows: 0192 = shva, 0193 = hataf segol, 0194 = hataf patah,
0195 = hataf kamatz, 0196 = hirik, 0197 = tzirei, 0198 = segol, 0199 = patah,
0200 = kamatz, 0201 = holam, 0203 = kubutz, 0204 = shuruk or dagesh, 0209 = dot on
the right side of the letter shin, 0210 = dot on the left side of the letter sin.
Method 1 is easiest when you put in vowels at the same time as consonants.

Method 2: Put on CAPS LOCK, then hold down SHIFT and simultaneously press on the
numbers appearing across the top of the keyboard, as follows: ~ = shva,
1 = hataf segol, 2 = hataf patah, 3 = hataf kamatz, 4 = hirik, 5 = tzirei,
6 = segol, 7 = patah, 8 = kamatz, - = holam, \ = kubutz, 0204 = shuruk or dagesh,
0 = dot on the right side of the letter “shin”, 9 = dot on the left side of the
letter “sin”.
Method 2 is easiest when you have already typed in the consonants and want to add
vowels.

Good luck,
Yehuda Berman
Efrat, Israel

<Is there a good program for writing Hebrew within word processors like Microsoft
word or WordPerfect? Everything that I have tried has not worked easily. I need
something that will put the vowels in the correct place.
Kenneth L. Packer>

JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Rabbinical/Tribe Question (ADLER, HALPERN, ALBER) #general

Sally Bruckheimer <sallybru@...>
 

1. No. Just because a person is a rabbi, that does not make him a Cohen and vice
versa. Anyone of any tribe can and could be a rabbi (for Orthodox you can
exclude women). The Cohanim were priests in the temple and Leviim their
assistants; that does not give them 'rights' to be rabbi's or exclude anyone; one
has nothing to do with the other.

2. See 1.

3. Unless you can prove that all Alber's or all Adler's or whatever were related,
you cannot claim all of them in your family. Adler, eagle in German, may have
come >from a house sign - many house signs in many different towns before house
numbers. And anyone could have changed the family name >from whatever to Adler or
Alber or whatever else they chose.

Sally Bruckheimer
Chatham, NJ

"I have 3 questions:

1. Should I assume that if the Beider Poland Book lists a last name as
"Rabbinic", (examples of some names: ADLER, HALPERN, ALBER), that the members of
these family were >from the Kohanim tribe?

2. In the 18th and 19th centuries, were there Rabbi who were Levy's and
Israelites? Or just Kohanim?

3. Should I, also, assume that there were Rabbi in the ADLER, HALPERN, and ALBER
families that I am researching (18th and 19th century) or not necessarily?"

JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Boston Jewish Advocate #general

Lisa Lepore <llepore@...>
 

Hi Bea -

The following site has a list of all the Boston newspapers on microfilm at the
Boston Public library.

http://www.bpl.org/research/microtext/BostonNewspapers.pdf

The Jewish Advocate was a weekly paper - the films start in 1905.

You might want to take a look at the the library's website to check on their hours
and availability of the films before you go.

Lisa Lepore

Can some one tell me where I can get to research the Boston Jewish Advocate
wedding announcements.
Bea Swart

JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Boston Jewish Advocate #general

Alan <aNOhsSPAMsha@...>
 

Can some one tell me where I can get to research the Boston Jewish Advocate
wedding announcements.
Bea Swart
You can do this online at http://www.thejewishadvocate.com/

Alan Shuchat, Newton, Mass.
aNOhsSPAMsha@... (remove NO SPAM)

SHUCHAT (Talnoye, Simferopol, Sevastopol, Odessa, Balta (Abazovka), Tavrig,
Pogrebishche)
VINOKUR (Talnoye), KURIS (Mogilev-Podolskiy, Ataki, Berdichev)
SILVERMAN (Soroki, Kremenets), BIRNBAUM (Kamenets-Podolskiy)
KITAIGORODSKI (Zvenigorodka)

JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen RE: Subject: Help with Word Processing in Hebrew #general

Yehuda Berman <ybberman@...>
 

Putting the vowels into a Hebrew text is a lot of work, which is why most Hebrew
texts (except poetry, prayer, and books for young children) skip the vowels.
However, my Hebrew-language handbook for using WORD in OFFICE 2000 lists two ways
of putting in the vowels:

Method 1: Put on the NUM LOCK, press ALT and, using the numbers at the right-hand
side of the keyboard, simultaneously press the following series of numbers for
each vowel, as follows: 0192 = shva, 0193 = hataf segol, 0194 = hataf patah,
0195 = hataf kamatz, 0196 = hirik, 0197 = tzirei, 0198 = segol, 0199 = patah,
0200 = kamatz, 0201 = holam, 0203 = kubutz, 0204 = shuruk or dagesh, 0209 = dot on
the right side of the letter shin, 0210 = dot on the left side of the letter sin.
Method 1 is easiest when you put in vowels at the same time as consonants.

Method 2: Put on CAPS LOCK, then hold down SHIFT and simultaneously press on the
numbers appearing across the top of the keyboard, as follows: ~ = shva,
1 = hataf segol, 2 = hataf patah, 3 = hataf kamatz, 4 = hirik, 5 = tzirei,
6 = segol, 7 = patah, 8 = kamatz, - = holam, \ = kubutz, 0204 = shuruk or dagesh,
0 = dot on the right side of the letter “shin”, 9 = dot on the left side of the
letter “sin”.
Method 2 is easiest when you have already typed in the consonants and want to add
vowels.

Good luck,
Yehuda Berman
Efrat, Israel

<Is there a good program for writing Hebrew within word processors like Microsoft
word or WordPerfect? Everything that I have tried has not worked easily. I need
something that will put the vowels in the correct place.
Kenneth L. Packer>

Re: LINCOLN and Jewish Ancestry - Another Angle? #general

Schelly Dardashti <dardasht@...>
 

Another possibility was mentioned in a recent message concerning Jewish genes and
Jewish ancestry appearing in a DNA forum. The author of the message was
referencing Stern's "First Jewish Families." and stated that she was abbreviating
a long reference:

"(p.119) In America by 1767, Moses Hyams of Poland marries Judith Isaacs of
Germany. Their lineage continues through a Solomon and a Ricardo onward to Polock,
Nordhaus, Bensadon, to Alexander, Denison, Morris, Connaly, Tucker, Tillman onward
to a Dr. Isaac Ambrose who marries the daughter of John Blair Smith, who has a
daughter who marries Robert S. Todd of Lexington, Kentucky, whose daughter Mary
Todd marries Abraham Lincoln."

The same author listed the Jewish ancestry of numerous non-Jewish individuals, all
referenced to Stern's book.

I do not have Stern's book or I would have checked the reference.
I'm sure a number of JewishGen participants can access the book.
It may possibly provide the flip side to the Post's story.
Just a somewhat curious note to this discussion.

Best wishes,
Schelly Talalay Dardashti
Tel Aviv
schelly@...

Re: Abe LINCOLN Update-Mordechai #general

Sally Bruckheimer <sallybru@...>
 

Early English settlers in the US used a lot of biblical names. Every 'Old
Testament' name, it seems, was used. These names are still popular with the
fairly isolated 'hillbilly'/Appalachian communities. I know a woman who's
ancestors came >from West Virginia in the 1700's' she thinks they were Jewish
because one was named Reuben Israel. Like Mordechai, that is not proof of
religion or ethnic origin. Anyone might have any name - Moises Alou is not
Jewish, just because he is named Moses either.

Sally Bruckheimer
Chatham, NJ

"And, speaking empirically, have any of you ever heard of man named "Mordechai"
who was not Jewish? There seems to be no dispute among scholars that this really
was Lincoln's great-grandfather's name."