Date   

TIMONER #general

David Edelman <pappapeach@...>
 

Dear Group;
Do any of you know any TIMONER? I do not see this name listed in the
Family Finder, so I am hoping someone might happen to know of this
family. Murray Timoner, born late 1920's New York, son of Benjamin and
Rose, is my father's cousin.
If this sounds at all familiar to anyone, I will be very happy to hear
from you, privetly of course.
Thank you very much,
David Edelman,
San Francisco.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen TIMONER #general

David Edelman <pappapeach@...>
 

Dear Group;
Do any of you know any TIMONER? I do not see this name listed in the
Family Finder, so I am hoping someone might happen to know of this
family. Murray Timoner, born late 1920's New York, son of Benjamin and
Rose, is my father's cousin.
If this sounds at all familiar to anyone, I will be very happy to hear
from you, privetly of course.
Thank you very much,
David Edelman,
San Francisco.


Re: The Name Yvonne #general

hennynow
 

In response to Julius Cohen's query, "I am looking for the origins of the
name Yvonne. Is it a common Jewish name or is there a Jewish male or
female equivalent?"

It is a common "French" name. Yvonne is the feminine form of the name Yves
or Yvon. These first names were common in Bretagne - or, in English,
Brittany - the northwestern part of France. The people of Bretagne had
their own language. If memory serves me right, Yves and Yvonne are the
equivalent of the French names Jean and Jeanne.

My favorite doll in Belgium, when I was a four year old, in 1928, was named
Yvonne.

Henny

Henriette Moëd Roth
Los Angeles, California
hennynow@pacbell.net


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: The Name Yvonne #general

hennynow
 

In response to Julius Cohen's query, "I am looking for the origins of the
name Yvonne. Is it a common Jewish name or is there a Jewish male or
female equivalent?"

It is a common "French" name. Yvonne is the feminine form of the name Yves
or Yvon. These first names were common in Bretagne - or, in English,
Brittany - the northwestern part of France. The people of Bretagne had
their own language. If memory serves me right, Yves and Yvonne are the
equivalent of the French names Jean and Jeanne.

My favorite doll in Belgium, when I was a four year old, in 1928, was named
Yvonne.

Henny

Henriette Moëd Roth
Los Angeles, California
hennynow@pacbell.net


Meeting of JGSGB (Boston) #general

Thomas F. Weiss
 

Jewish Genealogical Society of Greater Boston

presents

A Most Extraordinary Situation:
Genealogical Adventures in Poland

Yale Reisner

Thursday May 19, 2005
7:00-9:30 PM
Temple Reyim, Newton

Direct >from Warsaw, Yale Reisner will present dramatic,
moving, and sometimes amusing accounts of the work of the
Ronald S. Lauder Foundation Genealogy Project as it helps
Jews of Polish origin and Poles of Jewish origin rediscover
and sort out their often twisted and complex backgrounds. He
will tell of child survivors and their offspring, of family
ties lost and found, and of new potential sources of
information.

Yale Reisner directs the Ronald S. Lauder Foundation
Genealogical Project of the Jewish Historical Institute of
Poland. Since 1994, he has been assisting individuals and
families in uncovering their family history. The Lauder
Foundation is a non-profit Jewish educational foundation.
Mr. Reisner holds degrees in Central European Regional
Studies >from Columbia College and the Fletcher School of Law
and Diplomacy and has been affiliated with Hebrew
University, the Jewish Theological Seminary of America,
Villanova University, the YIVO Institute for Jewish
Research, and the U.S. National Archives.

Temple Reyim, 1860 Washington Street (Route 16), Newton, is
near Newton-Wellesley Hospital and the Woodland stop on the
Riverside Green Line, as well as a short ride >from Route 128
at Exit 21.

Admission is free for members, $5 for non-members.
Refreshments will be served.
_____

Upcoming program:

June 12, 2005, 1:30-4:30 PM
JGSGB Annual Meeting and Program

at Hebrew College, in conjunction with the American Jewish
Historical Society

The Straus Family: How Social History Enhances Genealogy
Joan Adler, Director of the Straus Family Historical Society

--
Tom Weiss
Newton, MA
USA
tfweiss@mit.edu


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Meeting of JGSGB (Boston) #general

Thomas F. Weiss
 

Jewish Genealogical Society of Greater Boston

presents

A Most Extraordinary Situation:
Genealogical Adventures in Poland

Yale Reisner

Thursday May 19, 2005
7:00-9:30 PM
Temple Reyim, Newton

Direct >from Warsaw, Yale Reisner will present dramatic,
moving, and sometimes amusing accounts of the work of the
Ronald S. Lauder Foundation Genealogy Project as it helps
Jews of Polish origin and Poles of Jewish origin rediscover
and sort out their often twisted and complex backgrounds. He
will tell of child survivors and their offspring, of family
ties lost and found, and of new potential sources of
information.

Yale Reisner directs the Ronald S. Lauder Foundation
Genealogical Project of the Jewish Historical Institute of
Poland. Since 1994, he has been assisting individuals and
families in uncovering their family history. The Lauder
Foundation is a non-profit Jewish educational foundation.
Mr. Reisner holds degrees in Central European Regional
Studies >from Columbia College and the Fletcher School of Law
and Diplomacy and has been affiliated with Hebrew
University, the Jewish Theological Seminary of America,
Villanova University, the YIVO Institute for Jewish
Research, and the U.S. National Archives.

Temple Reyim, 1860 Washington Street (Route 16), Newton, is
near Newton-Wellesley Hospital and the Woodland stop on the
Riverside Green Line, as well as a short ride >from Route 128
at Exit 21.

Admission is free for members, $5 for non-members.
Refreshments will be served.
_____

Upcoming program:

June 12, 2005, 1:30-4:30 PM
JGSGB Annual Meeting and Program

at Hebrew College, in conjunction with the American Jewish
Historical Society

The Straus Family: How Social History Enhances Genealogy
Joan Adler, Director of the Straus Family Historical Society

--
Tom Weiss
Newton, MA
USA
tfweiss@mit.edu


JGS Pittsburgh May Meeting #general

Rae M. Barent <RaeBarent@...>
 

JGS Pittsburgh May Meeting
Date: Monday, May 16, 2005
Time: 7:30 P.M.
Place: Rudolph Family Holocaust Ctr. Of United Jewish Federation
JCC Building
5738 Darlington Rd.
Pittsburgh, PA 15217

The subject of our next meeting will be Jewish Genealogy Research in
Poland. As those who previewed the Centennia software demonstrated at
our last meeting noted, the borders of Poland shifted often. At one
point the country ceased to exist. But throughout these changes,
Poland was home to the largest Jewish community in the world for
over 300 years and many of our ancestors came >from this area. We can't
all make the trip back to explore the shtetls of Poland,
but we are fortunate that Bob Zavos was able to serve as
our surrogate. For our next meeting, Bob will talk about his recent
trip to Poland which included a visit to Warsaw and the Jewish
Historical Institute, and to the Jewish Cemetery which is
the largest Jewish cemetery in Europe and one of the few that is
almost totally intact. Bob was also able to conduct research at the
Polish State Archives and finished his Polish experience with a trip to
Suwalki province.

While this program will be of great interest to our members with Polish
roots, I urge you all to attend as it promises to be both stimulating
and rewarding. Come early for coffee, cake and conversation.

Rae M. Barent
Programming


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen JGS Pittsburgh May Meeting #general

Rae M. Barent <RaeBarent@...>
 

JGS Pittsburgh May Meeting
Date: Monday, May 16, 2005
Time: 7:30 P.M.
Place: Rudolph Family Holocaust Ctr. Of United Jewish Federation
JCC Building
5738 Darlington Rd.
Pittsburgh, PA 15217

The subject of our next meeting will be Jewish Genealogy Research in
Poland. As those who previewed the Centennia software demonstrated at
our last meeting noted, the borders of Poland shifted often. At one
point the country ceased to exist. But throughout these changes,
Poland was home to the largest Jewish community in the world for
over 300 years and many of our ancestors came >from this area. We can't
all make the trip back to explore the shtetls of Poland,
but we are fortunate that Bob Zavos was able to serve as
our surrogate. For our next meeting, Bob will talk about his recent
trip to Poland which included a visit to Warsaw and the Jewish
Historical Institute, and to the Jewish Cemetery which is
the largest Jewish cemetery in Europe and one of the few that is
almost totally intact. Bob was also able to conduct research at the
Polish State Archives and finished his Polish experience with a trip to
Suwalki province.

While this program will be of great interest to our members with Polish
roots, I urge you all to attend as it promises to be both stimulating
and rewarding. Come early for coffee, cake and conversation.

Rae M. Barent
Programming


Re: Struma #romania

Prof. G. L. Esterson <jerry@...>
 

Annette Bagle posted as follows:

Is anyone able to direct me to a web site which I thought was the Struma
Foundation but which I now cannot find my way back to. It contained
contact details for David Stoliar, a survivor of the SS Struma sinking
who was the boyfriend at that time of one of the victims, Ilse Lothringer.
Perhaps the web site of which you have written is the one where the
passengers of the SS Struma are listed:

< http://www.jewishgen.org/romsig/New/StrumahList.html >

Professor G. L. Esterson, Ra'anana, Israel


Romania SIG #Romania Re: Struma #romania

Prof. G. L. Esterson <jerry@...>
 

Annette Bagle posted as follows:

Is anyone able to direct me to a web site which I thought was the Struma
Foundation but which I now cannot find my way back to. It contained
contact details for David Stoliar, a survivor of the SS Struma sinking
who was the boyfriend at that time of one of the victims, Ilse Lothringer.
Perhaps the web site of which you have written is the one where the
passengers of the SS Struma are listed:

< http://www.jewishgen.org/romsig/New/StrumahList.html >

Professor G. L. Esterson, Ra'anana, Israel


THE TIMES DIGITAL Newspaper ARCHIVE Online #unitedkingdom

Caroline <cfb@...>
 

Hi,
I used the TIMES DIGITAL NEWSPAPER online archive for the week's free trial
and found realms of articles which were a huge help and revelation to me.
However, I'm now trying to find out how to access it via subscription or at
a local library and it doesn't seem possible.

Libraries don't yet have a searchable digital version, only microfilms with
indexes, so you can't do word or phrase searches. The Times online website,
only has the previous 10 years archive available, not back to 1780. Gale,
the company which made it available for a week, only seems to deal with
major companies, not private individuals - although I'm still hoping they
might respond to e-mails to them.

Does anyone have any other suggestions - it's really the earlier archives
that I'm after and in a searchable form - not indexed.

With many thanks,
Caroline Faunce-Brown
cfb@pobox.com
Searching: ADLER and VERGOTTINI


JCR-UK SIG #UnitedKingdom THE TIMES DIGITAL Newspaper ARCHIVE Online #unitedkingdom

Caroline <cfb@...>
 

Hi,
I used the TIMES DIGITAL NEWSPAPER online archive for the week's free trial
and found realms of articles which were a huge help and revelation to me.
However, I'm now trying to find out how to access it via subscription or at
a local library and it doesn't seem possible.

Libraries don't yet have a searchable digital version, only microfilms with
indexes, so you can't do word or phrase searches. The Times online website,
only has the previous 10 years archive available, not back to 1780. Gale,
the company which made it available for a week, only seems to deal with
major companies, not private individuals - although I'm still hoping they
might respond to e-mails to them.

Does anyone have any other suggestions - it's really the earlier archives
that I'm after and in a searchable form - not indexed.

With many thanks,
Caroline Faunce-Brown
cfb@pobox.com
Searching: ADLER and VERGOTTINI


Re: Permission for marriage #galicia

megan cytron <m@...>
 

Perhaps a strange question...

Does anyone know if someone who was born on Russian soil--but emigrated
during a brief period when Poland covered this territory--would be
considered a Polish citizen by the present-day Polish government? My
grandfather lived in what is the present-day Ukraine, but emigrated to the
US with a Polish passport (which we still have in our possession) in 1921.

Thanks,

Megan Cytron
Madrid, SPAIN
m-list@alpha60.com


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine RE: Permission for marriage #ukraine

megan cytron <m@...>
 

Perhaps a strange question...

Does anyone know if someone who was born on Russian soil--but emigrated
during a brief period when Poland covered this territory--would be
considered a Polish citizen by the present-day Polish government? My
grandfather lived in what is the present-day Ukraine, but emigrated to the
US with a Polish passport (which we still have in our possession) in 1921.

Thanks,

Megan Cytron
Madrid, SPAIN
m-list@alpha60.com


polish words on birth certificate #galicia

Susana Mamber Englender
 

Can sameone tell me please, what the words "kumow lub swiadkow" means?
I try on the Poltran dictionary but it is not working.
My e. mail is
Susana05@gmail.com

Thank you, and Shalom
Susana Mamber Englender
Israel


Acquisition Survey - Shtetlinks Civil Records #galicia

Alan Weiser <alanboy@...>
 

Under a Gesher Galicia research grant I have had a Ukrainian
researcher review the contents of 11 categories of Kolomea civil
records located in the State Archives at Ivano-Frankivsk, Ukraine.
Each category has many sets of records. The research grant does not
provide sufficient funds to acquire all of the records. I need to set
priorities for the acquisition of these records as funds become
available. I need your help in setting such priorities.

You do not have to have an interest in Kolomea to participate in this
survey. I would like to have your opinion based on the value to
genealogy research as to the acquisition priority ranking I should
give to each category.
Later I will survey to see how sets of records within a category
should be ranked for acquisition.

Please respond to me directly. In your response just list the letters
in the sequence >from highest to lowest ranking.

Here are the categories listed in no particular order:

A. Kahal/Jewish Community 1895-1939
B. Police.KGB Files 1916-1917
C. School Records 1897-1939
D. Tax List 1917, 1932-1939
E. Occupation Lists 1917-1941
F. Notary Records 1807-1938
G. Local Government 1868-1939
H. Immigration 1919-1939
I. Voter Lists 1923, 1935, 1939
J. Army Recruits 1917
K. Holocaust 1940-1945

Alan Weiser, Coordinator
Kolomea Research Group & Web Site
alanboy@starpower.net
Silver Spring


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia polish words on birth certificate #galicia

Susana Mamber Englender
 

Can sameone tell me please, what the words "kumow lub swiadkow" means?
I try on the Poltran dictionary but it is not working.
My e. mail is
Susana05@gmail.com

Thank you, and Shalom
Susana Mamber Englender
Israel


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia Acquisition Survey - Shtetlinks Civil Records #galicia

Alan Weiser <alanboy@...>
 

Under a Gesher Galicia research grant I have had a Ukrainian
researcher review the contents of 11 categories of Kolomea civil
records located in the State Archives at Ivano-Frankivsk, Ukraine.
Each category has many sets of records. The research grant does not
provide sufficient funds to acquire all of the records. I need to set
priorities for the acquisition of these records as funds become
available. I need your help in setting such priorities.

You do not have to have an interest in Kolomea to participate in this
survey. I would like to have your opinion based on the value to
genealogy research as to the acquisition priority ranking I should
give to each category.
Later I will survey to see how sets of records within a category
should be ranked for acquisition.

Please respond to me directly. In your response just list the letters
in the sequence >from highest to lowest ranking.

Here are the categories listed in no particular order:

A. Kahal/Jewish Community 1895-1939
B. Police.KGB Files 1916-1917
C. School Records 1897-1939
D. Tax List 1917, 1932-1939
E. Occupation Lists 1917-1941
F. Notary Records 1807-1938
G. Local Government 1868-1939
H. Immigration 1919-1939
I. Voter Lists 1923, 1935, 1939
J. Army Recruits 1917
K. Holocaust 1940-1945

Alan Weiser, Coordinator
Kolomea Research Group & Web Site
alanboy@starpower.net
Silver Spring


Galician cousins in Imperial Russia #galicia

Lancy
 

I suggest not to take for granted that most of the people >from "Rosja" were
from Wolhynia. In the Easternmost part of Galicia, specifically the Tarnopol
region, very many Russian immigrants were >from Russian Podolia and >from
Bessarabia. Others listed as coming >from Russia were >from shtetlach on the
border that changed hands >from time to time.

Lancy Spalter
Kfar Tavor, Israel

----- Original Message -----

By entering in JRI-P or All Poland database:

http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Poland/

word "Rosja" (Russia in Polish) as the town name (exact spelling), one can
see that there are 391 records for towns in Tarnopol region containing
Russia as the parents town name (birthplace). Since in many instances
father's or mother's town name is not listed at all, I assume that there
were probably more Russian born parents.

By analyzing further Russian town names it is also evident that the
majority
of the 'foreign' born parents were >from the neighboring Imperial Russia
Province of Wolhynia.

Wolhynia (also known as Volin in English) was historically part of Poland
till the end of 18 century when Russia took over this territory during
Poland partitioning. Western part of Wolhynia (and the western part of
Polesie - Belarus) became again part of the independent Poland following
Polish-Soviet war of 1919-1920.

For the general orientation please refer to 1921 Poland map at:

http://www.pgsa.org/images/pol1921_disp.gif

Wolhynia (or is it was officially known Wolynskie Wojewodztwo) was one of
interwar Poland larger provinces (over 30 thousand sq km area with close
to
1,5 million inhabitants, re: 1921 national census).

Population of the province included : 74.2% Ukrainians, 11.6% Poles and
11.5% Jews. Please note that Jewish population was equal in numbers to
Polish.

Only about 12% of all residents were living in towns in this agricultural
province. Jewish people were mostly town resident and as numbers show
below
have constituted a major portions of all towns.

Ten towns of Wolhynia and their total and Jewish (shown as % of total)
population figures:

Rowne (provincial capital) - 57,288 (38%)
Luck - 29,082 (70.2%)
Wlodzimierz - 21,465 (43%)
Kowel - 20,818 (62%)
Krzemieniec- 16,068 (41.2%)
Ostrog- 12,975 (61.6%)
Dubno - 9,146 (58%)
Horochow - 4,421(54%)
Luboml - 3,328 (94%)
Kostopol - 2,990 (40%)
----------------------------------

Your comments will be appreciated.

Alexander Sharon
Calgary Ab,


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia Galician cousins in Imperial Russia #galicia

Lancy
 

I suggest not to take for granted that most of the people >from "Rosja" were
from Wolhynia. In the Easternmost part of Galicia, specifically the Tarnopol
region, very many Russian immigrants were >from Russian Podolia and >from
Bessarabia. Others listed as coming >from Russia were >from shtetlach on the
border that changed hands >from time to time.

Lancy Spalter
Kfar Tavor, Israel

----- Original Message -----

By entering in JRI-P or All Poland database:

http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Poland/

word "Rosja" (Russia in Polish) as the town name (exact spelling), one can
see that there are 391 records for towns in Tarnopol region containing
Russia as the parents town name (birthplace). Since in many instances
father's or mother's town name is not listed at all, I assume that there
were probably more Russian born parents.

By analyzing further Russian town names it is also evident that the
majority
of the 'foreign' born parents were >from the neighboring Imperial Russia
Province of Wolhynia.

Wolhynia (also known as Volin in English) was historically part of Poland
till the end of 18 century when Russia took over this territory during
Poland partitioning. Western part of Wolhynia (and the western part of
Polesie - Belarus) became again part of the independent Poland following
Polish-Soviet war of 1919-1920.

For the general orientation please refer to 1921 Poland map at:

http://www.pgsa.org/images/pol1921_disp.gif

Wolhynia (or is it was officially known Wolynskie Wojewodztwo) was one of
interwar Poland larger provinces (over 30 thousand sq km area with close
to
1,5 million inhabitants, re: 1921 national census).

Population of the province included : 74.2% Ukrainians, 11.6% Poles and
11.5% Jews. Please note that Jewish population was equal in numbers to
Polish.

Only about 12% of all residents were living in towns in this agricultural
province. Jewish people were mostly town resident and as numbers show
below
have constituted a major portions of all towns.

Ten towns of Wolhynia and their total and Jewish (shown as % of total)
population figures:

Rowne (provincial capital) - 57,288 (38%)
Luck - 29,082 (70.2%)
Wlodzimierz - 21,465 (43%)
Kowel - 20,818 (62%)
Krzemieniec- 16,068 (41.2%)
Ostrog- 12,975 (61.6%)
Dubno - 9,146 (58%)
Horochow - 4,421(54%)
Luboml - 3,328 (94%)
Kostopol - 2,990 (40%)
----------------------------------

Your comments will be appreciated.

Alexander Sharon
Calgary Ab,