Date   

polish words on birth certificate #galicia

Susana Mamber Englender
 

Can sameone tell me please, what the words "kumow lub swiadkow" means?
I try on the Poltran dictionary but it is not working.
My e. mail is
Susana05@gmail.com

Thank you, and Shalom
Susana Mamber Englender
Israel


Acquisition Survey - Shtetlinks Civil Records #galicia

Alan Weiser <alanboy@...>
 

Under a Gesher Galicia research grant I have had a Ukrainian
researcher review the contents of 11 categories of Kolomea civil
records located in the State Archives at Ivano-Frankivsk, Ukraine.
Each category has many sets of records. The research grant does not
provide sufficient funds to acquire all of the records. I need to set
priorities for the acquisition of these records as funds become
available. I need your help in setting such priorities.

You do not have to have an interest in Kolomea to participate in this
survey. I would like to have your opinion based on the value to
genealogy research as to the acquisition priority ranking I should
give to each category.
Later I will survey to see how sets of records within a category
should be ranked for acquisition.

Please respond to me directly. In your response just list the letters
in the sequence >from highest to lowest ranking.

Here are the categories listed in no particular order:

A. Kahal/Jewish Community 1895-1939
B. Police.KGB Files 1916-1917
C. School Records 1897-1939
D. Tax List 1917, 1932-1939
E. Occupation Lists 1917-1941
F. Notary Records 1807-1938
G. Local Government 1868-1939
H. Immigration 1919-1939
I. Voter Lists 1923, 1935, 1939
J. Army Recruits 1917
K. Holocaust 1940-1945

Alan Weiser, Coordinator
Kolomea Research Group & Web Site
alanboy@starpower.net
Silver Spring


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia polish words on birth certificate #galicia

Susana Mamber Englender
 

Can sameone tell me please, what the words "kumow lub swiadkow" means?
I try on the Poltran dictionary but it is not working.
My e. mail is
Susana05@gmail.com

Thank you, and Shalom
Susana Mamber Englender
Israel


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia Acquisition Survey - Shtetlinks Civil Records #galicia

Alan Weiser <alanboy@...>
 

Under a Gesher Galicia research grant I have had a Ukrainian
researcher review the contents of 11 categories of Kolomea civil
records located in the State Archives at Ivano-Frankivsk, Ukraine.
Each category has many sets of records. The research grant does not
provide sufficient funds to acquire all of the records. I need to set
priorities for the acquisition of these records as funds become
available. I need your help in setting such priorities.

You do not have to have an interest in Kolomea to participate in this
survey. I would like to have your opinion based on the value to
genealogy research as to the acquisition priority ranking I should
give to each category.
Later I will survey to see how sets of records within a category
should be ranked for acquisition.

Please respond to me directly. In your response just list the letters
in the sequence >from highest to lowest ranking.

Here are the categories listed in no particular order:

A. Kahal/Jewish Community 1895-1939
B. Police.KGB Files 1916-1917
C. School Records 1897-1939
D. Tax List 1917, 1932-1939
E. Occupation Lists 1917-1941
F. Notary Records 1807-1938
G. Local Government 1868-1939
H. Immigration 1919-1939
I. Voter Lists 1923, 1935, 1939
J. Army Recruits 1917
K. Holocaust 1940-1945

Alan Weiser, Coordinator
Kolomea Research Group & Web Site
alanboy@starpower.net
Silver Spring


Galician cousins in Imperial Russia #galicia

Lancy
 

I suggest not to take for granted that most of the people >from "Rosja" were
from Wolhynia. In the Easternmost part of Galicia, specifically the Tarnopol
region, very many Russian immigrants were >from Russian Podolia and >from
Bessarabia. Others listed as coming >from Russia were >from shtetlach on the
border that changed hands >from time to time.

Lancy Spalter
Kfar Tavor, Israel

----- Original Message -----

By entering in JRI-P or All Poland database:

http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Poland/

word "Rosja" (Russia in Polish) as the town name (exact spelling), one can
see that there are 391 records for towns in Tarnopol region containing
Russia as the parents town name (birthplace). Since in many instances
father's or mother's town name is not listed at all, I assume that there
were probably more Russian born parents.

By analyzing further Russian town names it is also evident that the
majority
of the 'foreign' born parents were >from the neighboring Imperial Russia
Province of Wolhynia.

Wolhynia (also known as Volin in English) was historically part of Poland
till the end of 18 century when Russia took over this territory during
Poland partitioning. Western part of Wolhynia (and the western part of
Polesie - Belarus) became again part of the independent Poland following
Polish-Soviet war of 1919-1920.

For the general orientation please refer to 1921 Poland map at:

http://www.pgsa.org/images/pol1921_disp.gif

Wolhynia (or is it was officially known Wolynskie Wojewodztwo) was one of
interwar Poland larger provinces (over 30 thousand sq km area with close
to
1,5 million inhabitants, re: 1921 national census).

Population of the province included : 74.2% Ukrainians, 11.6% Poles and
11.5% Jews. Please note that Jewish population was equal in numbers to
Polish.

Only about 12% of all residents were living in towns in this agricultural
province. Jewish people were mostly town resident and as numbers show
below
have constituted a major portions of all towns.

Ten towns of Wolhynia and their total and Jewish (shown as % of total)
population figures:

Rowne (provincial capital) - 57,288 (38%)
Luck - 29,082 (70.2%)
Wlodzimierz - 21,465 (43%)
Kowel - 20,818 (62%)
Krzemieniec- 16,068 (41.2%)
Ostrog- 12,975 (61.6%)
Dubno - 9,146 (58%)
Horochow - 4,421(54%)
Luboml - 3,328 (94%)
Kostopol - 2,990 (40%)
----------------------------------

Your comments will be appreciated.

Alexander Sharon
Calgary Ab,


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia Galician cousins in Imperial Russia #galicia

Lancy
 

I suggest not to take for granted that most of the people >from "Rosja" were
from Wolhynia. In the Easternmost part of Galicia, specifically the Tarnopol
region, very many Russian immigrants were >from Russian Podolia and >from
Bessarabia. Others listed as coming >from Russia were >from shtetlach on the
border that changed hands >from time to time.

Lancy Spalter
Kfar Tavor, Israel

----- Original Message -----

By entering in JRI-P or All Poland database:

http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Poland/

word "Rosja" (Russia in Polish) as the town name (exact spelling), one can
see that there are 391 records for towns in Tarnopol region containing
Russia as the parents town name (birthplace). Since in many instances
father's or mother's town name is not listed at all, I assume that there
were probably more Russian born parents.

By analyzing further Russian town names it is also evident that the
majority
of the 'foreign' born parents were >from the neighboring Imperial Russia
Province of Wolhynia.

Wolhynia (also known as Volin in English) was historically part of Poland
till the end of 18 century when Russia took over this territory during
Poland partitioning. Western part of Wolhynia (and the western part of
Polesie - Belarus) became again part of the independent Poland following
Polish-Soviet war of 1919-1920.

For the general orientation please refer to 1921 Poland map at:

http://www.pgsa.org/images/pol1921_disp.gif

Wolhynia (or is it was officially known Wolynskie Wojewodztwo) was one of
interwar Poland larger provinces (over 30 thousand sq km area with close
to
1,5 million inhabitants, re: 1921 national census).

Population of the province included : 74.2% Ukrainians, 11.6% Poles and
11.5% Jews. Please note that Jewish population was equal in numbers to
Polish.

Only about 12% of all residents were living in towns in this agricultural
province. Jewish people were mostly town resident and as numbers show
below
have constituted a major portions of all towns.

Ten towns of Wolhynia and their total and Jewish (shown as % of total)
population figures:

Rowne (provincial capital) - 57,288 (38%)
Luck - 29,082 (70.2%)
Wlodzimierz - 21,465 (43%)
Kowel - 20,818 (62%)
Krzemieniec- 16,068 (41.2%)
Ostrog- 12,975 (61.6%)
Dubno - 9,146 (58%)
Horochow - 4,421(54%)
Luboml - 3,328 (94%)
Kostopol - 2,990 (40%)
----------------------------------

Your comments will be appreciated.

Alexander Sharon
Calgary Ab,


Galicia luncheon #galicia

Joyce Field
 

When I registered for the Las Vegas conference, I purchased a ticket
for the Galicia luncheon. Now that the date has been changed, I find
I cannot attend as I will be leaving las Vegas in the morning, but
the luncheon tickets cannot be refunded. So if anyone has not yet
purchased a ticket and needs one, please contact me privately. I
would be most appreciative.

Joyce Field
W. Lafayette, IN

--


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia Galicia luncheon #galicia

Joyce Field
 

When I registered for the Las Vegas conference, I purchased a ticket
for the Galicia luncheon. Now that the date has been changed, I find
I cannot attend as I will be leaving las Vegas in the morning, but
the luncheon tickets cannot be refunded. So if anyone has not yet
purchased a ticket and needs one, please contact me privately. I
would be most appreciative.

Joyce Field
W. Lafayette, IN

--


Permission for marriage #ukraine

Errol Schneegurt
 

I sent a question in a few weeks back as to why a person, in this case my
great-grandfather who worked for the Postal Service in Lviv, required
permission >from the Post Office to get married. I did not get a firm answer to this
question so I did a web search to try and find out why this permission was
needed.

I found that after the partition of Poland a ruling was passed in lands held
by Austria that a Rabbi could not wed those that did not have permeant
earnings. I would therefor assume that this would hold true in civil marriages as
well since the recorded marriage was several years after the religious
marriage.
Errol Schneegurt LI NY
ESLVIV@AOL.COM


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine Permission for marriage #ukraine

Errol Schneegurt
 

I sent a question in a few weeks back as to why a person, in this case my
great-grandfather who worked for the Postal Service in Lviv, required
permission >from the Post Office to get married. I did not get a firm answer to this
question so I did a web search to try and find out why this permission was
needed.

I found that after the partition of Poland a ruling was passed in lands held
by Austria that a Rabbi could not wed those that did not have permeant
earnings. I would therefor assume that this would hold true in civil marriages as
well since the recorded marriage was several years after the religious
marriage.
Errol Schneegurt LI NY
ESLVIV@AOL.COM


Permission for marriage #general

Errol Schneegurt
 

I sent a question in a few weeks back as to why a person, in this case my
great-grandfather who worked for the Postal Service in Lviv, required
permission >from the Post Office to get married. I did not get a firm answer
to this question so I did a web search to try and find out why this
permission was needed.

I found that after the partition of Poland a ruling was passed in lands
held by Austria that a Rabbi could not wed those that did not have permeant
earnings. I would therefor assume that this would hold true in civil
marriages as well since the recorded marriage was several years after the
religious marriage.
Errol Schneegurt LI NY
ESLVIV@AOL.COM


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Permission for marriage #general

Errol Schneegurt
 

I sent a question in a few weeks back as to why a person, in this case my
great-grandfather who worked for the Postal Service in Lviv, required
permission >from the Post Office to get married. I did not get a firm answer
to this question so I did a web search to try and find out why this
permission was needed.

I found that after the partition of Poland a ruling was passed in lands
held by Austria that a Rabbi could not wed those that did not have permeant
earnings. I would therefor assume that this would hold true in civil
marriages as well since the recorded marriage was several years after the
religious marriage.
Errol Schneegurt LI NY
ESLVIV@AOL.COM


Re: LEVISOHN> LEWISOHN> LEVISON> Germany> Georgia> Glynn> Chatham> #general

Roger Lustig <julierog@...>
 

Dear Carolyn:

Elbing is in West Prussia, and has been part of Poland since the Treaty
of Versailles (1919). In Polish, it's called Elblag.

If you do a little searching at www.jewishgen.org, you'll find, among
other things:
--19 Elblag researchers, including two who are working on similar names
--someone who adopted the name LEWYNSOHN in Elblag in 1812.

Then hop over to www.jri-poland.org and check out what records there are
and what work's being done. There may be more sources listed at the
Polish State Archives site: http://www.archiwa.gov.pl/?CIDA=43 in the
PRADZIAD database.

As for the spelling: anything goes. I've seen the same name spelled two
ways in the same *entry* in a vital records register, and as many as ten
ways within one register.

You'll need to consider the following variants to LEVISOHN:
--W for V
--SON for SOHN
--Y for I
--N inserted before S
--OE (or O-umlaut) for E

That's 32 possibilities right there. D-M Soundex reduces the number to 2.

People changed their names, and (certainly in Prussia/Germany) spelling
wasn't all that standardized in those days. The notion of "correct
spelling" will only hold you back.

Good luck!
Roger Lustig Princeton, NJ
researching Upper Silesia and keeping an eye on West Prussia

clea wrote:

Robert LEVISON, b abt 1851, immigrated >from Elbing1872, his brother Sigmund
a few years later. My baby book spells the name Lewisohn and a cousin I
located says it would have been Levisohn. My father was second generation,
his third. Can anyone tell me which would be correct or if it could be
either? Also, if anyone knows where to search for records >from Elbing? I
found very few references in discussion archives to Elbing. Thank you.


Re: Sam SUNEL from Lithuania #general

Harvey <harvey@...>
 

I reckon that: "the state of Cozna, Lith." is Kovno province (gebirne).

Harvey L Kaplan
Glasgow, Scotland


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: LEVISOHN> LEWISOHN> LEVISON> Germany> Georgia> Glynn> Chatham> #general

Roger Lustig <julierog@...>
 

Dear Carolyn:

Elbing is in West Prussia, and has been part of Poland since the Treaty
of Versailles (1919). In Polish, it's called Elblag.

If you do a little searching at www.jewishgen.org, you'll find, among
other things:
--19 Elblag researchers, including two who are working on similar names
--someone who adopted the name LEWYNSOHN in Elblag in 1812.

Then hop over to www.jri-poland.org and check out what records there are
and what work's being done. There may be more sources listed at the
Polish State Archives site: http://www.archiwa.gov.pl/?CIDA=43 in the
PRADZIAD database.

As for the spelling: anything goes. I've seen the same name spelled two
ways in the same *entry* in a vital records register, and as many as ten
ways within one register.

You'll need to consider the following variants to LEVISOHN:
--W for V
--SON for SOHN
--Y for I
--N inserted before S
--OE (or O-umlaut) for E

That's 32 possibilities right there. D-M Soundex reduces the number to 2.

People changed their names, and (certainly in Prussia/Germany) spelling
wasn't all that standardized in those days. The notion of "correct
spelling" will only hold you back.

Good luck!
Roger Lustig Princeton, NJ
researching Upper Silesia and keeping an eye on West Prussia

clea wrote:

Robert LEVISON, b abt 1851, immigrated >from Elbing1872, his brother Sigmund
a few years later. My baby book spells the name Lewisohn and a cousin I
located says it would have been Levisohn. My father was second generation,
his third. Can anyone tell me which would be correct or if it could be
either? Also, if anyone knows where to search for records >from Elbing? I
found very few references in discussion archives to Elbing. Thank you.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Sam SUNEL from Lithuania #general

Harvey <harvey@...>
 

I reckon that: "the state of Cozna, Lith." is Kovno province (gebirne).

Harvey L Kaplan
Glasgow, Scotland


Re: Chodorova #general

Sally Bruckheimer <sallybru@...>
 

Your posting isn't clear. You state that records mention 2 different towns
where your ancestor lived? Was born? Was married? You need to see what the
actual information is- the specific wording of the heading can make a big
difference. He might have been born in one town, then moved with his family
somewhere else, married some third place, and lived in other towns before he
died. Or one could be an actual small town where he lived, the other might
be the 'big city' nearby which he said sometimes because he lived in a
'suburb' or outlying town around it. Or one might be the district name and
another the actual town or the nearby 'big city'.

And 'How do I use it" is also unclear. How do you use it for what? In a
genealogy program you might say he was born in X according to his birth
record and later, in whatever record, it says he lived in Y. Then his death
record was found in Z.

My gr grandfather, I was told, was >from Augustow, Poland. Augustow is a
biggish city, in NE Poland today, but I haven't found any indication that he
actually lived there. It was the name of the district at one time as well.
I think his parents were probably from, and he was probably born in, Belarus
(on today's map) and moved to Augustow district in the 1830's. His mother
was living in Raczki, near Augustow city, according to a book of residents
which survived. So, I have to mention all those places before I start to
worry about him emigrating to the US.

As for research, you have to use all the places to see if you can get any
indication that he lived in or near the towns mentioned.

Sally Bruckheimer
Chatham, NJ

PS. I am 'Born in Buffalo, NY, educated in Ohio, married in Amherst, NY,
lived in lots of places before coming to Chatham, NJ. Where next?'

"A kasheh! Or two!

My great-grandfather, David FASS/FASZ is sometimes listed in
Tyczyn, Poland, Rzeszow, Poland and sometimes in Chodorova. He is
buried in The Chodorova Society Plot in NYC.

Which address do I use for him, Tyczyn or Chodorova? Are any
interchangeable?

Also, My great-grandfather Tzvi HIRSCH has two towns listed;
Verkhnedvinsk and Polostsk, Belarus. How do I handle that?"


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Chodorova #general

Sally Bruckheimer <sallybru@...>
 

Your posting isn't clear. You state that records mention 2 different towns
where your ancestor lived? Was born? Was married? You need to see what the
actual information is- the specific wording of the heading can make a big
difference. He might have been born in one town, then moved with his family
somewhere else, married some third place, and lived in other towns before he
died. Or one could be an actual small town where he lived, the other might
be the 'big city' nearby which he said sometimes because he lived in a
'suburb' or outlying town around it. Or one might be the district name and
another the actual town or the nearby 'big city'.

And 'How do I use it" is also unclear. How do you use it for what? In a
genealogy program you might say he was born in X according to his birth
record and later, in whatever record, it says he lived in Y. Then his death
record was found in Z.

My gr grandfather, I was told, was >from Augustow, Poland. Augustow is a
biggish city, in NE Poland today, but I haven't found any indication that he
actually lived there. It was the name of the district at one time as well.
I think his parents were probably from, and he was probably born in, Belarus
(on today's map) and moved to Augustow district in the 1830's. His mother
was living in Raczki, near Augustow city, according to a book of residents
which survived. So, I have to mention all those places before I start to
worry about him emigrating to the US.

As for research, you have to use all the places to see if you can get any
indication that he lived in or near the towns mentioned.

Sally Bruckheimer
Chatham, NJ

PS. I am 'Born in Buffalo, NY, educated in Ohio, married in Amherst, NY,
lived in lots of places before coming to Chatham, NJ. Where next?'

"A kasheh! Or two!

My great-grandfather, David FASS/FASZ is sometimes listed in
Tyczyn, Poland, Rzeszow, Poland and sometimes in Chodorova. He is
buried in The Chodorova Society Plot in NYC.

Which address do I use for him, Tyczyn or Chodorova? Are any
interchangeable?

Also, My great-grandfather Tzvi HIRSCH has two towns listed;
Verkhnedvinsk and Polostsk, Belarus. How do I handle that?"


New on PBS.org - Sugihara: Conspiracy of Kindness Online #general

Eric Ward <eric@...>
 

My name is Eric Ward, and I am working with PBS and PBS.org
to help them announce the launch of a new web site called
Sugihara: Conspiracy of Kindness. This is the permanent
companion site for the film which airs on Holocaust
Remembrance Day, Thursday, May 5, on PBS.
The site is located at http://www.pbs.org/sugihara

The web site shares details of the little-known story of
Sugihara and his family and the fascinating relationship
between the Jews and the Japanese in the 1930s and 40s.
The history of World War II tells many remarkable tales
of courage, but none is more compelling or inspirational
than Sugihara's. At great personal risk and with no hope
of reward, this modest diplomat defied orders >from Tokyo
and spent up to 16 hours a day signing visas for refugees
trying to escape the Nazi onslaught. The site includes a
timeline of Sugihara's life, video previews, exclusive
interviews, and lesson plans for teachers.

Thank you for your time,

Eric Ward
(On behalf of PBS and PBS.org)


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen New on PBS.org - Sugihara: Conspiracy of Kindness Online #general

Eric Ward <eric@...>
 

My name is Eric Ward, and I am working with PBS and PBS.org
to help them announce the launch of a new web site called
Sugihara: Conspiracy of Kindness. This is the permanent
companion site for the film which airs on Holocaust
Remembrance Day, Thursday, May 5, on PBS.
The site is located at http://www.pbs.org/sugihara

The web site shares details of the little-known story of
Sugihara and his family and the fascinating relationship
between the Jews and the Japanese in the 1930s and 40s.
The history of World War II tells many remarkable tales
of courage, but none is more compelling or inspirational
than Sugihara's. At great personal risk and with no hope
of reward, this modest diplomat defied orders >from Tokyo
and spent up to 16 hours a day signing visas for refugees
trying to escape the Nazi onslaught. The site includes a
timeline of Sugihara's life, video previews, exclusive
interviews, and lesson plans for teachers.

Thank you for your time,

Eric Ward
(On behalf of PBS and PBS.org)