Date   

Mielec in recent Holocaust memoirs #galicia

Renee Steinig <rsteinig@...>
 

An article in the April 29, 2005 issue of The Jewish Week, a NYC
metropolitan area Jewish newspaper, reviews two recent Holocaust memoirs
that involve the town of Mielec, about 70 miles east of Krakow:

Irene Eber,_The Choice_

Eber and her family were expelled >from Germany in 1938 and moved back to
Mielec, her father's hometown. In 1942, the family was forced to march "with
thousands of the town's Jews, first to an airplane hangar just outside of
town and then to a series of camps and ghettoes. Eber eventually escaped...
and returned to Mielec in 1943. After being chased by the Polish woman who
held her family's money and jewels, Eber found shelter with another family
and spent almost two years hidden in a chicken coop." Eber, who went on to
become a professor of East Asian studies at Hebrew University, revisited
Mielec in 1980 and reflects on that visit in her book.

Joseph Tenenbaum, _Legacy and Redemption: A Life Renewed_

Tenenbaum, who grew up elsewhere in Poland (Dzialoszyce), was sent to Mielec
in 1944 to work in an aircraft factory. He notes in his book that his camp
was one kilometer away >from "an altar for human sacrifices" in the woods,
where many prisoners were murdered.

Sandee Brawarsky, the reviewer, also writes that both sides of her family
have roots there and that her father had his bar mitzvah at Congregation
Anshe Mielitz, on East 4th Street and Avenue D in Manhattan.

Read the full review at

www.thejewishweek.com/news/newscontent.php3?artid=10806

Renee

Renee Stern Steinig
Dix Hills (Long Island), New York, USA
RSteinig@suffolk.lib.ny.us


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia Mielec in recent Holocaust memoirs #galicia

Renee Steinig <rsteinig@...>
 

An article in the April 29, 2005 issue of The Jewish Week, a NYC
metropolitan area Jewish newspaper, reviews two recent Holocaust memoirs
that involve the town of Mielec, about 70 miles east of Krakow:

Irene Eber,_The Choice_

Eber and her family were expelled >from Germany in 1938 and moved back to
Mielec, her father's hometown. In 1942, the family was forced to march "with
thousands of the town's Jews, first to an airplane hangar just outside of
town and then to a series of camps and ghettoes. Eber eventually escaped...
and returned to Mielec in 1943. After being chased by the Polish woman who
held her family's money and jewels, Eber found shelter with another family
and spent almost two years hidden in a chicken coop." Eber, who went on to
become a professor of East Asian studies at Hebrew University, revisited
Mielec in 1980 and reflects on that visit in her book.

Joseph Tenenbaum, _Legacy and Redemption: A Life Renewed_

Tenenbaum, who grew up elsewhere in Poland (Dzialoszyce), was sent to Mielec
in 1944 to work in an aircraft factory. He notes in his book that his camp
was one kilometer away >from "an altar for human sacrifices" in the woods,
where many prisoners were murdered.

Sandee Brawarsky, the reviewer, also writes that both sides of her family
have roots there and that her father had his bar mitzvah at Congregation
Anshe Mielitz, on East 4th Street and Avenue D in Manhattan.

Read the full review at

www.thejewishweek.com/news/newscontent.php3?artid=10806

Renee

Renee Stern Steinig
Dix Hills (Long Island), New York, USA
RSteinig@suffolk.lib.ny.us


Re: galicia digest: May 01, 2005 #galicia

George Mazur <mazur_jerzy@...>
 

Hi,

I have posted here once and I received a lot of messages but being in Poland
I had some problems with health and I could not do any additional
genealogical research. I am going to spend in Poland next two months
(May 11th-July 8th), so if someone needs reasonable help in the
Warsaw/Krakow/Przemysl/Lublin area please email me. I am a PhD candidate in
the Department of Near Eastern and Judaic Studies at Brandeis University in
Boston. I am also Polish and I know archives there. I am originally >from
Brzesko (Galicia).

Best,

Jerzy Mazur
Brandeis University

[MODERATOR'S NOTE: This one-time announcement of a commercial
offering is being published because it may be of general interest to our list.]


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia RE: galicia digest: May 01, 2005 #galicia

George Mazur <mazur_jerzy@...>
 

Hi,

I have posted here once and I received a lot of messages but being in Poland
I had some problems with health and I could not do any additional
genealogical research. I am going to spend in Poland next two months
(May 11th-July 8th), so if someone needs reasonable help in the
Warsaw/Krakow/Przemysl/Lublin area please email me. I am a PhD candidate in
the Department of Near Eastern and Judaic Studies at Brandeis University in
Boston. I am also Polish and I know archives there. I am originally >from
Brzesko (Galicia).

Best,

Jerzy Mazur
Brandeis University

[MODERATOR'S NOTE: This one-time announcement of a commercial
offering is being published because it may be of general interest to our list.]


Galician cousins in Imperial Russia #galicia

Alexander Sharon
 

Dear Galitzyaners,

The summary of the vital records stored in JRI-P (Jewish Records
Indexing-Poland) AGAD project is very detailed. In addition to the standard
information about surname and name, year of birth, death or marriage it also
often lists mother maiden name and mother and/or father town names of origin
which provides further data for the family research

While searching for the records in Galicia I was surprised to see I bit
unusual pattern.

By entering in JRI-P or All Poland database:

http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Poland/

word "Rosja" (Russia in Polish) as the town name (exact spelling), one can
see that there are 391 records for towns in Tarnopol region containing
Russia as the parents town name (birthplace). Since in many instances
father's or mother's town name is not listed at all, I assume that there
were probably more Russian born parents.

By analyzing further Russian town names it is also evident that the majority
of the 'foreign' born parents were >from the neighboring Imperial Russia
Province of Wolhynia.

Wolhynia (also known as Volin in English) was historically part of Poland
till the end of 18 century when Russia took over this territory during
Poland partitioning. Western part of Wolhynia (and the western part of
Polesie - Belarus) became again part of the independent Poland following
Polish-Soviet war of 1919-1920.

For the general orientation please refer to 1921 Poland map at:

http://www.pgsa.org/images/pol1921_disp.gif

Wolhynia (or is it was officially known Wolynskie Wojewodztwo) was one of
interwar Poland larger provinces (over 30 thousand sq km area with close to
1,5 million inhabitants, re: 1921 national census).

Population of the province included : 74.2% Ukrainians, 11.6% Poles and
11.5% Jews. Please note that Jewish population was equal in numbers to
Polish.

Only about 12% of all residents were living in towns in this agricultural
province. Jewish people were mostly town resident and as numbers show below
have constituted a major portions of all towns.

Ten towns of Wolhynia and their total and Jewish (shown as % of total)
population figures:

Rowne (provincial capital) - 57,288 (38%)
Luck - 29,082 (70.2%)
Wlodzimierz - 21,465 (43%)
Kowel - 20,818 (62%)
Krzemieniec- 16,068 (41.2%)
Ostrog- 12,975 (61.6%)
Dubno - 9,146 (58%)
Horochow - 4,421(54%)
Luboml - 3,328 (94%)
Kostopol - 2,990 (40%)
----------------------------------

During the interwar period Wolhynia Jews became integrated with Jewish
communities in the rest of Poland - especially with the neighboring
Galitzyaners. There was no higher education institution in Wolhynia and
young people have attended Krakow and Lwow universities and many marriages
have been noted between the Volyniaks and Galitzyaners.

Jews >from the eastern part of Ukraine have always regarded Volyniaks as
being part of Polish Galicia due to its geographical closeness to the region
and the cultural and families affiliations. It should also noted that during
Imperial Russia rule over Galicia, that the landowners were very same Polish
magnate families whose names can be located elsewhere in Eastern Galicia.

I have been looking forward to read translations of the Volhynia Yzkor
Books. All landsmanshaft folks associated with ten Volhynian towns listed
above have published their Sefer Yzkor. To my best knowledge till today only
Krzemieniec and Horochow Yzkor books have been translated, and >from the
Kovel Yzkor Book only Necrology have been extracted.

In Shtetlinks category there are two Wolyhnian positions: Rowne, which
appears to be in the first stages of development and Podvolochisk (Polish:
Podwoloczyska) which was physically located on Austrian site (Galicia) of
the border.

I have been suggesting for some time to incorporate genealogical research of
Wolhynia within the Gesher Galicia or to establish cooperation between GG
and Ukraine SIGs to get things moving.

Your comments will be appreciated.

Alexander Sharon
Calgary Ab,


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia Galician cousins in Imperial Russia #galicia

Alexander Sharon
 

Dear Galitzyaners,

The summary of the vital records stored in JRI-P (Jewish Records
Indexing-Poland) AGAD project is very detailed. In addition to the standard
information about surname and name, year of birth, death or marriage it also
often lists mother maiden name and mother and/or father town names of origin
which provides further data for the family research

While searching for the records in Galicia I was surprised to see I bit
unusual pattern.

By entering in JRI-P or All Poland database:

http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Poland/

word "Rosja" (Russia in Polish) as the town name (exact spelling), one can
see that there are 391 records for towns in Tarnopol region containing
Russia as the parents town name (birthplace). Since in many instances
father's or mother's town name is not listed at all, I assume that there
were probably more Russian born parents.

By analyzing further Russian town names it is also evident that the majority
of the 'foreign' born parents were >from the neighboring Imperial Russia
Province of Wolhynia.

Wolhynia (also known as Volin in English) was historically part of Poland
till the end of 18 century when Russia took over this territory during
Poland partitioning. Western part of Wolhynia (and the western part of
Polesie - Belarus) became again part of the independent Poland following
Polish-Soviet war of 1919-1920.

For the general orientation please refer to 1921 Poland map at:

http://www.pgsa.org/images/pol1921_disp.gif

Wolhynia (or is it was officially known Wolynskie Wojewodztwo) was one of
interwar Poland larger provinces (over 30 thousand sq km area with close to
1,5 million inhabitants, re: 1921 national census).

Population of the province included : 74.2% Ukrainians, 11.6% Poles and
11.5% Jews. Please note that Jewish population was equal in numbers to
Polish.

Only about 12% of all residents were living in towns in this agricultural
province. Jewish people were mostly town resident and as numbers show below
have constituted a major portions of all towns.

Ten towns of Wolhynia and their total and Jewish (shown as % of total)
population figures:

Rowne (provincial capital) - 57,288 (38%)
Luck - 29,082 (70.2%)
Wlodzimierz - 21,465 (43%)
Kowel - 20,818 (62%)
Krzemieniec- 16,068 (41.2%)
Ostrog- 12,975 (61.6%)
Dubno - 9,146 (58%)
Horochow - 4,421(54%)
Luboml - 3,328 (94%)
Kostopol - 2,990 (40%)
----------------------------------

During the interwar period Wolhynia Jews became integrated with Jewish
communities in the rest of Poland - especially with the neighboring
Galitzyaners. There was no higher education institution in Wolhynia and
young people have attended Krakow and Lwow universities and many marriages
have been noted between the Volyniaks and Galitzyaners.

Jews >from the eastern part of Ukraine have always regarded Volyniaks as
being part of Polish Galicia due to its geographical closeness to the region
and the cultural and families affiliations. It should also noted that during
Imperial Russia rule over Galicia, that the landowners were very same Polish
magnate families whose names can be located elsewhere in Eastern Galicia.

I have been looking forward to read translations of the Volhynia Yzkor
Books. All landsmanshaft folks associated with ten Volhynian towns listed
above have published their Sefer Yzkor. To my best knowledge till today only
Krzemieniec and Horochow Yzkor books have been translated, and >from the
Kovel Yzkor Book only Necrology have been extracted.

In Shtetlinks category there are two Wolyhnian positions: Rowne, which
appears to be in the first stages of development and Podvolochisk (Polish:
Podwoloczyska) which was physically located on Austrian site (Galicia) of
the border.

I have been suggesting for some time to incorporate genealogical research of
Wolhynia within the Gesher Galicia or to establish cooperation between GG
and Ukraine SIGs to get things moving.

Your comments will be appreciated.

Alexander Sharon
Calgary Ab,


Re: The Name Yvonne #general

Robert Israel <israel@...>
 

In article <1115118603.42775c0ba52e5@web.mail.umich.edu>,
<jscohen@umich.edu> wrote:

I am looking for the origins of the name Yvonne. Is it a common
Jewish name or is there a Jewish male or female equivalent?
Thanks for your help.
It's not particularly Jewish, although I have known several Jews
with that name. Yvonne is the feminine version of the French name
Yvon, which is a form of Yves.

The popularity of the name Yvonne, I suspect, owes something to
the actresses Yvonne Arnaud and Yvonne De Carlo.

Robert Israel
israel@math.ubc.ca
Vancouver, BC, Canada


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: The Name Yvonne #general

Robert Israel <israel@...>
 

In article <1115118603.42775c0ba52e5@web.mail.umich.edu>,
<jscohen@umich.edu> wrote:

I am looking for the origins of the name Yvonne. Is it a common
Jewish name or is there a Jewish male or female equivalent?
Thanks for your help.
It's not particularly Jewish, although I have known several Jews
with that name. Yvonne is the feminine version of the French name
Yvon, which is a form of Yves.

The popularity of the name Yvonne, I suspect, owes something to
the actresses Yvonne Arnaud and Yvonne De Carlo.

Robert Israel
israel@math.ubc.ca
Vancouver, BC, Canada


Re: ABERBACH or AUERBACH????? #general

MBernet@...
 

In a message dated 5/1/2005 9:37:30 P.M. Eastern Standard Time,
NJ55TURTLE@aol.com writes:

Having not found this ABERBACH family using the spelling >from the ship's
manifest, could it have been misspelled and the correct spelling is AUERBACH
or one of its variants?

If you have this ABERBACH/AUERBACH family in your tree, or even
the other three families, would you contact me privately. >

==The Auerbachs take their name originally >from one or another German town
named Auerbach. In other countries the spellings were occasionally changed to
Averbach, Aberbach, etc. I think that Avrach (which means "young man" in
either Hebrew or Aramaic) is sometimes another variant of Auerbach.

Michael Bernet, New York


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: ABERBACH or AUERBACH????? #general

MBernet@...
 

In a message dated 5/1/2005 9:37:30 P.M. Eastern Standard Time,
NJ55TURTLE@aol.com writes:

Having not found this ABERBACH family using the spelling >from the ship's
manifest, could it have been misspelled and the correct spelling is AUERBACH
or one of its variants?

If you have this ABERBACH/AUERBACH family in your tree, or even
the other three families, would you contact me privately. >

==The Auerbachs take their name originally >from one or another German town
named Auerbach. In other countries the spellings were occasionally changed to
Averbach, Aberbach, etc. I think that Avrach (which means "young man" in
either Hebrew or Aramaic) is sometimes another variant of Auerbach.

Michael Bernet, New York


The Jews of Blattna - a ghost town in 1793 - wiped out in WW2. #austria-czech

Celia Male <celiamale@...>
 

I have to confess that I am going "bananas about
Blattna". Why should that be? I had never thought
about Blattna before.

Joe Lonstein [I have his permission to quote] asked me
to trace his family >from Blattna in the 1793 census.
Family members [POLLAK and NEUMANN] had married, lived
and died there in the mid 1800s and some had moved
onto Vienna. Were they already there in 1793?

I waded in enthusiastically and yes, Blattna is listed
in the Prachiner Kreis, Okr. Strakonice.

Read about the town and its imposing castle here:
http://tinyurl.com/772r5

The Herrschaft is called Blattna [Blatna] - and the
location is Blattna Schloss. 3 unnamed Jewish
families are listed as Schutzjuden in this Herrschaft.
Yet I cannot find Blattna in the census. It has
disappeared.

Could it have been forgotten by the current compilers
or has the original census of this little settlement
disappeared? I have looked and looked but cannot find
it. Nor does there seem to be a mention to this
mystery in the introduction to Vol III of the 1793
census transcription.

The other possibility is that the three families moved
out and are living in other areas of Bohemia. I have
searched all the 16 indices and they are not there.

They could be "living it up" in Prague, but as this
volume is not yet published I cannot confirm this
either. Alternatively, thay may have moved to Moravia
or to another country; if so, I doubt we will ever
find out. There are three clues:

Salamon FISCHEL, the third son of Jakob FISCHEL of Gut
Tscimmeltz, Prachiner Kreis is listed in the
Tschimmeltz census as being a Knecht [servant] in
Blattna. Does that mean he has been left behind to
lead a lonely existence as the only Jew in Blattna to
look after the empty properties and feed the pets?

The second clue could be the change of ownership of
the castle and its English park around about the time
of the 1793 census [see url about the history of
Blattna]

The last clue is in Hugo Gold's "The Jews of Bohemia",
there is an chapter about Blattna, by Fachlehrer - Jan
KARA. Unfortunately, it is in Czech.

Obviously by the 20th century there were Jews living
in Blattna and the "town" even had a rabbi Isidor
BECK, 1895-1911. There is a Salomon NEUMANN mentioned
in 1911-1926 - perhaps a relative of Joe's?

The Jewish population appeared to peak at 107 in 1890
and dipped to 83 in 1900 [as I do not read Czech this
may refer to families not individuals].

KARA lists very few names in the 1600s and early
1700s. Tantalizingly, he discusses an Abraham VOTICKY
in 1793 and there is some mention of a house. As I am
interested in all early WOTTITZ and related names* I
wonder if his can be one of the families that have
abandoned Blattna? Could he be one of my forebears?

If there is anyone who has access to this Hugo Gold
volume and reads Czech - I would be grateful for an
explanation of the ghost town of Blattna in 1793.

But back to the present - tragically there are over 50
holocaust victims with Blattna connections on Yad
Vashem: http://www.yadvashem.org/

One family SABATH was virtually wiped out. Their
mother was Resi NEUMANN: Wilma HIRSCH nee SABATH was
born in Blattna on 16.6.1879 to Moritz SABATH and Resi
[nee NEUMANN]. She was married to Hugo HIRSCH. She
lived in Vienna and was murdered in Auschwitz. The
testimony is interesting - she was the niece of
Congressman Sabath**. Sadly, Wilma may be a link for
Joe. Her brothers were David [8.10.1890], a
"Viehhandler" [livestock dealer] in Leningrad and
Samuel [5.6.1889], a physician in Poland and sisters
Paula NEUMANN [2.10.1880] and Helene SABATH
[3.4.1893].

The testimonials were given in 1969 by their Aunt Else
SEIDMANN of NY. Unfortunately they are not linked on
the site and I have sent in a correction.

Then here is a definite holocaust link to Joe's family
from Blattna and Vienna: Theresa SCHEREK nee NEUMANN
[25.6.1882] - mother Eleanor POLLAK-NEUMANN
[1846-1932], father Moses NEUMANN [1844-1886], with a
testimonial >from her daughter in the US. Joe has
written about Eleanor and Moritz [Moses] in his
posting of 31 Jan 2005 [see our message archives];
they are his gt-gt grandparents.

I started this posting by saying I was going "bananas
about Blattna" but now as I sign off, the truth is I
am in mourning for this tragic little town and all its
victims. We remember them all here today.

Celia Male [UK]

* my maternal gt-grandfather was Gustav WOTTITZ
[1.5.1841 Pressburg - 13.12. 1919 Vienna], buried in
Doblingerfriedhof - his parents were Leopold WOTTITZ
[born ca 1810] married to Charlotte LOWY, both from
Pressburg and presumed to be buried there.

** Adolph Joachim SABATH, a Democratic Congressman
Illinois; born Zabori, Bohemia, 4.4.1866; attended
school in Zabori, emigrated to the U.S in 1881 and
settled in Chicago; died Bethesda, 6.11.1952.
Supported foundation of the Czechoslovak Republic in
1918 - see:

http://www.graveyards.com/foresthome/sabath.html


Austria-Czech SIG #Austria-Czech The Jews of Blattna - a ghost town in 1793 - wiped out in WW2. #austria-czech

Celia Male <celiamale@...>
 

I have to confess that I am going "bananas about
Blattna". Why should that be? I had never thought
about Blattna before.

Joe Lonstein [I have his permission to quote] asked me
to trace his family >from Blattna in the 1793 census.
Family members [POLLAK and NEUMANN] had married, lived
and died there in the mid 1800s and some had moved
onto Vienna. Were they already there in 1793?

I waded in enthusiastically and yes, Blattna is listed
in the Prachiner Kreis, Okr. Strakonice.

Read about the town and its imposing castle here:
http://tinyurl.com/772r5

The Herrschaft is called Blattna [Blatna] - and the
location is Blattna Schloss. 3 unnamed Jewish
families are listed as Schutzjuden in this Herrschaft.
Yet I cannot find Blattna in the census. It has
disappeared.

Could it have been forgotten by the current compilers
or has the original census of this little settlement
disappeared? I have looked and looked but cannot find
it. Nor does there seem to be a mention to this
mystery in the introduction to Vol III of the 1793
census transcription.

The other possibility is that the three families moved
out and are living in other areas of Bohemia. I have
searched all the 16 indices and they are not there.

They could be "living it up" in Prague, but as this
volume is not yet published I cannot confirm this
either. Alternatively, thay may have moved to Moravia
or to another country; if so, I doubt we will ever
find out. There are three clues:

Salamon FISCHEL, the third son of Jakob FISCHEL of Gut
Tscimmeltz, Prachiner Kreis is listed in the
Tschimmeltz census as being a Knecht [servant] in
Blattna. Does that mean he has been left behind to
lead a lonely existence as the only Jew in Blattna to
look after the empty properties and feed the pets?

The second clue could be the change of ownership of
the castle and its English park around about the time
of the 1793 census [see url about the history of
Blattna]

The last clue is in Hugo Gold's "The Jews of Bohemia",
there is an chapter about Blattna, by Fachlehrer - Jan
KARA. Unfortunately, it is in Czech.

Obviously by the 20th century there were Jews living
in Blattna and the "town" even had a rabbi Isidor
BECK, 1895-1911. There is a Salomon NEUMANN mentioned
in 1911-1926 - perhaps a relative of Joe's?

The Jewish population appeared to peak at 107 in 1890
and dipped to 83 in 1900 [as I do not read Czech this
may refer to families not individuals].

KARA lists very few names in the 1600s and early
1700s. Tantalizingly, he discusses an Abraham VOTICKY
in 1793 and there is some mention of a house. As I am
interested in all early WOTTITZ and related names* I
wonder if his can be one of the families that have
abandoned Blattna? Could he be one of my forebears?

If there is anyone who has access to this Hugo Gold
volume and reads Czech - I would be grateful for an
explanation of the ghost town of Blattna in 1793.

But back to the present - tragically there are over 50
holocaust victims with Blattna connections on Yad
Vashem: http://www.yadvashem.org/

One family SABATH was virtually wiped out. Their
mother was Resi NEUMANN: Wilma HIRSCH nee SABATH was
born in Blattna on 16.6.1879 to Moritz SABATH and Resi
[nee NEUMANN]. She was married to Hugo HIRSCH. She
lived in Vienna and was murdered in Auschwitz. The
testimony is interesting - she was the niece of
Congressman Sabath**. Sadly, Wilma may be a link for
Joe. Her brothers were David [8.10.1890], a
"Viehhandler" [livestock dealer] in Leningrad and
Samuel [5.6.1889], a physician in Poland and sisters
Paula NEUMANN [2.10.1880] and Helene SABATH
[3.4.1893].

The testimonials were given in 1969 by their Aunt Else
SEIDMANN of NY. Unfortunately they are not linked on
the site and I have sent in a correction.

Then here is a definite holocaust link to Joe's family
from Blattna and Vienna: Theresa SCHEREK nee NEUMANN
[25.6.1882] - mother Eleanor POLLAK-NEUMANN
[1846-1932], father Moses NEUMANN [1844-1886], with a
testimonial >from her daughter in the US. Joe has
written about Eleanor and Moritz [Moses] in his
posting of 31 Jan 2005 [see our message archives];
they are his gt-gt grandparents.

I started this posting by saying I was going "bananas
about Blattna" but now as I sign off, the truth is I
am in mourning for this tragic little town and all its
victims. We remember them all here today.

Celia Male [UK]

* my maternal gt-grandfather was Gustav WOTTITZ
[1.5.1841 Pressburg - 13.12. 1919 Vienna], buried in
Doblingerfriedhof - his parents were Leopold WOTTITZ
[born ca 1810] married to Charlotte LOWY, both from
Pressburg and presumed to be buried there.

** Adolph Joachim SABATH, a Democratic Congressman
Illinois; born Zabori, Bohemia, 4.4.1866; attended
school in Zabori, emigrated to the U.S in 1881 and
settled in Chicago; died Bethesda, 6.11.1952.
Supported foundation of the Czechoslovak Republic in
1918 - see:

http://www.graveyards.com/foresthome/sabath.html


SIG Welcome message to new subscribers #austria-czech

Sharla Levine <austriaczech@...>
 

I has recently come to our attention that new subscribers to our SIG have not been
receiving our welcome message, possibly going back to the date we changed the SIG
name >from Bohemia-Moravia to Austria-Czech. The problem has been fixed, so new
members joining will receive the message properly, but in the interim, I have no
idea how many people did not receive it (only two people contacted me asking
about it). So, just to ensure that people who have joined in recent months have
a copy, I am pasting the text of the Welcome message below. As a matter of fact,
the message has been revised periodically, so it would be a good idea for all
our members to have a look at the message and save it for future reference.

Sharla Levine
Austria-Czech SIG Coordinator

WELCOME to the Austria-Czech SIG

Thank you for your interest in the Austria-Czech SIG, and welcome
aboard! We hope you will SAVE this document for future reference
about our group, and about how to manage your subscription to this
mailing list.

The purpose of our group is to serve as a clearinghouse for Jewish
genealogical and historical information relating to Jewish communities
in the areas formerly known as Bohemia and Moravia (most of this area
is today the Czech Republic) and Austria (especially Vienna, where so
many Bohemian and Moravian Jews migrated in the 19th century). For Slovakian
and Hungarian genealogy, please subscribe to the Hungarian-SIG. For Galician
genealogy, please subscribe to the Galicia-SIG. For German genealogy,
please subscribe to the German-Jewish-SIG.

Sharing of research resources and advice are the focus of our
discussion group. We would also like to gather information about
life in Bohemia, Moravia, and Austria and make it available on-line to those
who are interested. We are collecting information of genealogical
and historical interest, including but not limited to photographs,
business and residential directories, census lists, property owners'
lists, tax rolls, original manuscripts, and translations >from Yizkor
Books.

For all of you researching Austria, Bohemia and Moravia (Czech Republic),
please visit the Austria-Czech Special Interest Group web site at
http://www.jewishgen.org/austriaczech. The page is updated regularly and
contains lots of resources including:

Getting Started With Czech-Jewish Genealogy
http://www.jewishgen.org/austriaczech/czechguide.html

Beginner's Guide to Austrian-Jewish Genealogy
http://www.jewishgen.org/austriaczech/ausguide.htm

GemeindeView
The beginnings of a web-based encyclopedia commemorating all of the Jewish
communities that once existed in the Bohemia-Moravia region.
http://www.jewishgen.org/austriaczech/gemeinde.htm

For questions about how to submit materials for our website or
GemeindeView project, please contact our webmaster at austriaczechsig@yahoo.com.

For administrative questions about the mailing list, please contact the group's
coordinator, Sharla Levine, at austriaczech@comcast.net

For messages of general interest to the entire group, or questions
you have regarding resources or your own research, please address
your messages to:
austriaczech@lyris.jewishgen.org

We expect that you will follow the guidelines for posting to any
JewishGen hosted list, basically
o Provide a meaningful subject line.
o Don't ramble off the topic.
o Sign your article (full name please, city/state/province/country
as appropriate)
o Submit your messages using Plain Text only, not HTML or other
text format.

Before posting to the group, please read the Rules and Guidelines of the
JewishGen Discussion Group, found at
http://www.jewishgen.org/infofiles/rules.htm

In joining this private mailing list, you acknowledge that you will not
copy any messages posted and send them off to other lists to which you may
be subscribed. Each subscriber has the right to expect their privacy will
be observed by other members and that e-mail address and shared
information or comments posted to this mailing list will not turn up in
other forums.

To make any changes in the format in which you receive this mailing list
or to un-subscribe, please do so at the Mailing List Management Center
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To inform JewishGen of a change in your e-mail address, please visit
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To solve any other problem, please visit the JewishGen Support Center
first, before writing to any support desk:
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen/Support.htm

We are happy to welcome you and look forward to your contributions of
ideas, time, and monetary assistance for research projects. We also
wish to bring your attention to the fact that we are hosted through the
generosity of JewishGen, Inc a 501 (c) (3) Texas corporation. Donations
to JewishGen are tax deductible for U.S. citizens and deeply
appreciated by the organization. JewishGen is the leading internet site
for researching Jewish ancestry and as a public service makes its
programs and projects available to all users free of charge. If you
believe as we do that the information brought to you is important and
necessary in order to preserve our history and culture, please visit
http://www.jewishgen.org/jewishgen-erosity/contribute.html and join with
those who support this effort to the best of their financial ability.

----------------

This Special Interest Group Mailing List is hosted by JewishGen, Inc.
Providing a group project with a listserv does not imply endorsement,
approval or recommendation by JewishGen or its agents.
----------------


Austria-Czech SIG #Austria-Czech SIG Welcome message to new subscribers #austria-czech

Sharla Levine <austriaczech@...>
 

I has recently come to our attention that new subscribers to our SIG have not been
receiving our welcome message, possibly going back to the date we changed the SIG
name >from Bohemia-Moravia to Austria-Czech. The problem has been fixed, so new
members joining will receive the message properly, but in the interim, I have no
idea how many people did not receive it (only two people contacted me asking
about it). So, just to ensure that people who have joined in recent months have
a copy, I am pasting the text of the Welcome message below. As a matter of fact,
the message has been revised periodically, so it would be a good idea for all
our members to have a look at the message and save it for future reference.

Sharla Levine
Austria-Czech SIG Coordinator

WELCOME to the Austria-Czech SIG

Thank you for your interest in the Austria-Czech SIG, and welcome
aboard! We hope you will SAVE this document for future reference
about our group, and about how to manage your subscription to this
mailing list.

The purpose of our group is to serve as a clearinghouse for Jewish
genealogical and historical information relating to Jewish communities
in the areas formerly known as Bohemia and Moravia (most of this area
is today the Czech Republic) and Austria (especially Vienna, where so
many Bohemian and Moravian Jews migrated in the 19th century). For Slovakian
and Hungarian genealogy, please subscribe to the Hungarian-SIG. For Galician
genealogy, please subscribe to the Galicia-SIG. For German genealogy,
please subscribe to the German-Jewish-SIG.

Sharing of research resources and advice are the focus of our
discussion group. We would also like to gather information about
life in Bohemia, Moravia, and Austria and make it available on-line to those
who are interested. We are collecting information of genealogical
and historical interest, including but not limited to photographs,
business and residential directories, census lists, property owners'
lists, tax rolls, original manuscripts, and translations >from Yizkor
Books.

For all of you researching Austria, Bohemia and Moravia (Czech Republic),
please visit the Austria-Czech Special Interest Group web site at
http://www.jewishgen.org/austriaczech. The page is updated regularly and
contains lots of resources including:

Getting Started With Czech-Jewish Genealogy
http://www.jewishgen.org/austriaczech/czechguide.html

Beginner's Guide to Austrian-Jewish Genealogy
http://www.jewishgen.org/austriaczech/ausguide.htm

GemeindeView
The beginnings of a web-based encyclopedia commemorating all of the Jewish
communities that once existed in the Bohemia-Moravia region.
http://www.jewishgen.org/austriaczech/gemeinde.htm

For questions about how to submit materials for our website or
GemeindeView project, please contact our webmaster at austriaczechsig@yahoo.com.

For administrative questions about the mailing list, please contact the group's
coordinator, Sharla Levine, at austriaczech@comcast.net

For messages of general interest to the entire group, or questions
you have regarding resources or your own research, please address
your messages to:
austriaczech@lyris.jewishgen.org

We expect that you will follow the guidelines for posting to any
JewishGen hosted list, basically
o Provide a meaningful subject line.
o Don't ramble off the topic.
o Sign your article (full name please, city/state/province/country
as appropriate)
o Submit your messages using Plain Text only, not HTML or other
text format.

Before posting to the group, please read the Rules and Guidelines of the
JewishGen Discussion Group, found at
http://www.jewishgen.org/infofiles/rules.htm

In joining this private mailing list, you acknowledge that you will not
copy any messages posted and send them off to other lists to which you may
be subscribed. Each subscriber has the right to expect their privacy will
be observed by other members and that e-mail address and shared
information or comments posted to this mailing list will not turn up in
other forums.

To make any changes in the format in which you receive this mailing list
or to un-subscribe, please do so at the Mailing List Management Center
http://www.jewishgen.org/listserv

To inform JewishGen of a change in your e-mail address, please visit
http://data.jewishgen.org/wconnect/wc.dll?jg~jgsys~jgidview

To solve any other problem, please visit the JewishGen Support Center
first, before writing to any support desk:
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen/Support.htm

We are happy to welcome you and look forward to your contributions of
ideas, time, and monetary assistance for research projects. We also
wish to bring your attention to the fact that we are hosted through the
generosity of JewishGen, Inc a 501 (c) (3) Texas corporation. Donations
to JewishGen are tax deductible for U.S. citizens and deeply
appreciated by the organization. JewishGen is the leading internet site
for researching Jewish ancestry and as a public service makes its
programs and projects available to all users free of charge. If you
believe as we do that the information brought to you is important and
necessary in order to preserve our history and culture, please visit
http://www.jewishgen.org/jewishgen-erosity/contribute.html and join with
those who support this effort to the best of their financial ability.

----------------

This Special Interest Group Mailing List is hosted by JewishGen, Inc.
Providing a group project with a listserv does not imply endorsement,
approval or recommendation by JewishGen or its agents.
----------------


Bohemia/Moravia and Familiantengesetz #austria-czech

samorai <samorai@...>
 

The question seems to be whether there are Familianten lists in Moravia of
the same type that are available in the Bohemian province. All the evidence
points to the conclusion that there "should" be such lists. This evidence is
both circumstantial and direct (but based on secondary sources). Both
elements make for a powerful case for their existence.

1. The circumstantial evidence begins with the 1724 census of the Jewish
population in the Bohemian Lands. The Bohemian Lands or the Bohemian Kingdom
includes both Bohemia and Moravia. This appears to be the solid basis for
the family decrees [familiantengesetz] issued by the central authorities
[King Ferdinand VI and ] in 1725 and 1726. A census simply records
various kinds of facts. Decrees are directives of the Government regarding
its policy in a specific matter.

I may be mistaken, but I found no reference in Dr. Haas' presentation
entitled "Statistical Observation on the Jewish Population of Moravia in the
Past and Present" in Hugo Gold's book to the 1724 census. If I am correct,
this seems an odd omission. The decrees could not possibly have been so
explicit without the census which provided the numbers regarding Jewish
restrictions of various sorts. That the census did take place throughout the
12 or 13 districts (kreis) of the Bohemian realm (that is, Bohemia and
Moravia) is clear >from Ruth Kestenberg-Gladstein's summary and illustrative
presentation of the raw material. She lists the districts so there is no
mistaking that it covers our two provinces.

2. The decrees of 1725-26 also apply to both provinces. We can site a number
of secondary sources for this but one is enough here. William O. McCagg,
Jr., in A History of Habsburg Jews 1670-1918, (Bloomington: Indiana UP,
1989), writes as follows: "In 1726, Kaiser Karl VI decided to limit the Jews
of the Bohemian Crown. He declared that alongside some 10,00 Jews in Prague,
30-40,000 would be allowed to live in rural Bohemia, and some 20-25,000 in
Moravia., but no more. He defined these numbers in terms of families . . . .
We will leave the numbers debate aside. The question is to what extent the
decrees were put into effect. And this raises a prior question which is not
at all clear in my mind - were the LISTS a separate census or a derivative
of the 1724 census? In any case, somebody had to make up these lists and
that somebody were LOCAL officials, usually with a great deal of autonomy.
The central Habsburg Government was very weak. Thus, local discretion
determined whether the information would be gathered and to what extent or
how the decrees would be implemented.

Lovely light could have been shed on the exact size and dynamic changes in
the Jewish population if we had the tax rosters for the Jewish communities
or a central roster of the "eda" [Jewish Community], but alas we don't.
Despite the restrictions on the size of the Jewish families and the right to
marry of the first son only, our current sources state that the Jewish
population swelled in the 1730s and 1740s. So apparently there were ways to
get around the decrees. When the 10,000-14,000 estimated Jews were expelled
from Prague in 1745, they had temporary respite in the Bohemian countryside.
At the last hour, the decree calling for the expulsion of all Jews >from the
Kingdom was annulled, and the Prague Jews returned after only six months,
probably all of them in the homes of fellow Jews. A decade later a fire
swept through the ghetto and it was this that broke the will to stay in the
urban centre for many of Prague's Jews. But the countryside, with ups and
downs, appeared to flourish. I'll close with another quote >from McCagg:
Bohemia and Moravia had even in the eighteenth century been the industrial
heartland of the Habsburg realm, this in part because of the natural wealth
of these provinces, in part because of their favourable position vis-a-vis
the West."

Our researchers in Prague should be able to tell us a little more about what
is available. Are there local collections of estate owners still untouched?
The genealogical wheels grind slowly.

Paul King
Jerusalem


Austria-Czech SIG #Austria-Czech Bohemia/Moravia and Familiantengesetz #austria-czech

samorai <samorai@...>
 

The question seems to be whether there are Familianten lists in Moravia of
the same type that are available in the Bohemian province. All the evidence
points to the conclusion that there "should" be such lists. This evidence is
both circumstantial and direct (but based on secondary sources). Both
elements make for a powerful case for their existence.

1. The circumstantial evidence begins with the 1724 census of the Jewish
population in the Bohemian Lands. The Bohemian Lands or the Bohemian Kingdom
includes both Bohemia and Moravia. This appears to be the solid basis for
the family decrees [familiantengesetz] issued by the central authorities
[King Ferdinand VI and ] in 1725 and 1726. A census simply records
various kinds of facts. Decrees are directives of the Government regarding
its policy in a specific matter.

I may be mistaken, but I found no reference in Dr. Haas' presentation
entitled "Statistical Observation on the Jewish Population of Moravia in the
Past and Present" in Hugo Gold's book to the 1724 census. If I am correct,
this seems an odd omission. The decrees could not possibly have been so
explicit without the census which provided the numbers regarding Jewish
restrictions of various sorts. That the census did take place throughout the
12 or 13 districts (kreis) of the Bohemian realm (that is, Bohemia and
Moravia) is clear >from Ruth Kestenberg-Gladstein's summary and illustrative
presentation of the raw material. She lists the districts so there is no
mistaking that it covers our two provinces.

2. The decrees of 1725-26 also apply to both provinces. We can site a number
of secondary sources for this but one is enough here. William O. McCagg,
Jr., in A History of Habsburg Jews 1670-1918, (Bloomington: Indiana UP,
1989), writes as follows: "In 1726, Kaiser Karl VI decided to limit the Jews
of the Bohemian Crown. He declared that alongside some 10,00 Jews in Prague,
30-40,000 would be allowed to live in rural Bohemia, and some 20-25,000 in
Moravia., but no more. He defined these numbers in terms of families . . . .
We will leave the numbers debate aside. The question is to what extent the
decrees were put into effect. And this raises a prior question which is not
at all clear in my mind - were the LISTS a separate census or a derivative
of the 1724 census? In any case, somebody had to make up these lists and
that somebody were LOCAL officials, usually with a great deal of autonomy.
The central Habsburg Government was very weak. Thus, local discretion
determined whether the information would be gathered and to what extent or
how the decrees would be implemented.

Lovely light could have been shed on the exact size and dynamic changes in
the Jewish population if we had the tax rosters for the Jewish communities
or a central roster of the "eda" [Jewish Community], but alas we don't.
Despite the restrictions on the size of the Jewish families and the right to
marry of the first son only, our current sources state that the Jewish
population swelled in the 1730s and 1740s. So apparently there were ways to
get around the decrees. When the 10,000-14,000 estimated Jews were expelled
from Prague in 1745, they had temporary respite in the Bohemian countryside.
At the last hour, the decree calling for the expulsion of all Jews >from the
Kingdom was annulled, and the Prague Jews returned after only six months,
probably all of them in the homes of fellow Jews. A decade later a fire
swept through the ghetto and it was this that broke the will to stay in the
urban centre for many of Prague's Jews. But the countryside, with ups and
downs, appeared to flourish. I'll close with another quote >from McCagg:
Bohemia and Moravia had even in the eighteenth century been the industrial
heartland of the Habsburg realm, this in part because of the natural wealth
of these provinces, in part because of their favourable position vis-a-vis
the West."

Our researchers in Prague should be able to tell us a little more about what
is available. Are there local collections of estate owners still untouched?
The genealogical wheels grind slowly.

Paul King
Jerusalem


Landsmannshaft/Burial Socities Outside NY #general

Gary Gershfield <gmgkpc@...>
 

I am interested to know if there are ways to research burial societies and
landsmannshaft in other geographic areas and cities other than the New
York/New Jersey region.

Relatives of an ancestral town may have emigrated to cities across the
United States or Canada,and locating burial societies could
possibly result in discovering additional family history.
Thank you.
Sincerely,
Gary Gershfield
Forest Hills,NY


Possible good news re NY research #general

Joan Parker <joanparker@...>
 

Dear Genners:

Gary Mokotoff gave permission to share this. It was published in
"Nu? What's New?" The Internet magazine of Jewish Genealogy.


New York Law May Make Vital Records More Accessible

There is a trend in the United States and elsewhere toward limiting access
to vital records under the guise of reducing identity theft and combating
terrorism. New York Assembly Bill 7209 is moving in the opposite direction.
The bill would reduce the current cost to obtain vital records for
genealogical purposes by half, and for applicants who show current
membership in a genealogical society, review of vital records will be
at no charge.

A summary comment of the bill makes the statement that "the fear that
has been voiced that vital records could provide information which
could lead to identity theft is unfounded. In a recent survey of 500
victims of identity theft, not one was due to information gleaned >from
vital records."

Additional information can be found at
http://assembly.state.ny.us/leg/?bn=A07209.

Joan Parker, Immediate Past President
JGS of Greater Miami, Inc.
joanparker@intergate.com
Searching: GOLDBERG, GOODSTEIN, BERGER-Plock, Poland/Russia and
Brooklyn, NY; PINKUS, WINOGRAD, ROSEN-Brest, Litovsk; Grodno,
Russia maybe Odessa, Ukraine, Bronx and Brooklyn, NY;
GELFAND, YEHUDIS, KATZ-Minsk, Bronx, NY, Miami
and Miami Beach, FL.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Landsmannshaft/Burial Socities Outside NY #general

Gary Gershfield <gmgkpc@...>
 

I am interested to know if there are ways to research burial societies and
landsmannshaft in other geographic areas and cities other than the New
York/New Jersey region.

Relatives of an ancestral town may have emigrated to cities across the
United States or Canada,and locating burial societies could
possibly result in discovering additional family history.
Thank you.
Sincerely,
Gary Gershfield
Forest Hills,NY


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Possible good news re NY research #general

Joan Parker <joanparker@...>
 

Dear Genners:

Gary Mokotoff gave permission to share this. It was published in
"Nu? What's New?" The Internet magazine of Jewish Genealogy.


New York Law May Make Vital Records More Accessible

There is a trend in the United States and elsewhere toward limiting access
to vital records under the guise of reducing identity theft and combating
terrorism. New York Assembly Bill 7209 is moving in the opposite direction.
The bill would reduce the current cost to obtain vital records for
genealogical purposes by half, and for applicants who show current
membership in a genealogical society, review of vital records will be
at no charge.

A summary comment of the bill makes the statement that "the fear that
has been voiced that vital records could provide information which
could lead to identity theft is unfounded. In a recent survey of 500
victims of identity theft, not one was due to information gleaned >from
vital records."

Additional information can be found at
http://assembly.state.ny.us/leg/?bn=A07209.

Joan Parker, Immediate Past President
JGS of Greater Miami, Inc.
joanparker@intergate.com
Searching: GOLDBERG, GOODSTEIN, BERGER-Plock, Poland/Russia and
Brooklyn, NY; PINKUS, WINOGRAD, ROSEN-Brest, Litovsk; Grodno,
Russia maybe Odessa, Ukraine, Bronx and Brooklyn, NY;
GELFAND, YEHUDIS, KATZ-Minsk, Bronx, NY, Miami
and Miami Beach, FL.