Date   

Re: Surname origins #general

Stan Goodman <SPAM_FOILER@...>
 

On Wed, 8 Jun 2005 07:57:58 UTC, windselle3@verizon.net (windselle) opined:

Hi. I have a question I'm hoping someone might have an answer to, but before
I ask, I need to thank everyone who responded to my request for help
concerning the situation with family and the woman caller >from Israel. I
still am no further than I was as far as learning anything, but even still,
the polite and friendly assistance here was more than I could've asked for
and I thank everyone for it.

This question may pertain to my previous one, but really at this point it's
more curiosity than anything. Is there a way to tell the origins of a
surname? The reason I ask is that I've been able to trace my father's
surname to the late 1700's and that's as far as it's gone. Furthermore, any
search results I get on this surname, either through searching on my own or
seeing other people's messages on other boards about this same surname..
everything comes to a screeching halt in the mid 1600s at the earliest, in
their families and my own. My feeling is that it has to be derived >from some
other name.

Now I've heard a French version of this name, other English versions, Jewish
versions.. but how would one find out exactly where it started, and is it
possible? This is really more a quest to find out how surnames came into
being in the first place, although I do have some understanding of it as far
as naming someone "Brewer" because he brewed ale, and the like. Even in
biblical times though, there are instances of surnames.

My thinking is that it's got to be nigh impossible to discover one's own
roots if it involves various surname changes over the course of hundreds of
years, isn't it? At the very least it has to be immensely difficult. At this
point I have given up on searching out my father's ancestry as it just seem
to come to a screeching halt and there is no way of knowing that I know of,
if there was a surname change. It really does seem as though someone at some
point decided to adopt this surname and didn't inform a soul. This is likely
a ridicious question and yet it puzzles me just the same. How does one find
out the actual origins of their surname, and is it possible?

Rebecca Anne Darlow
It's unfortunate that you haven't told us what the surname is that you are
interested in; someone here might have been able to tell you something about
it.

But your question seems to be founded upon a belief that people,
specifically Jews, have always had fixed surnames, which is incorrect. The
example of Biblical surnames is misleading: one has no assurance that an
apparent surname (I can think of some >from the Second Temple era, but not
from First Temple or earlier) is in fact a permanent label that persisted
over generations, rather than a tag carried by a single individual in a
single generation. The fact is, as has been discussed in this group many
times, that most Jews of Western Europe had fixed surnames only by
Napoleonic decree, and in Eastern Europe only shortly thereafter. I have
been told, though I can't cite proof, that some in Romania actually made it
into the twentieth century without a persistent surname.

For comparison, I know Beduin Arabs here in Israel that don't have surnames
even now, which is unimportant to the authorities because everyone in this
country has an ID number that serves the same purpose as far as the State is
concerned.

--
Stan Goodman, Qiryat Tiv'on, Israel

Searching:
NEACHOWICZ/NOACHOWICZ, NEJMAN/NAJMAN, SURALSKI: >from Lomza Gubernia
ISMACH: >from Lomza Gubernia, Galicia, and Ukraina
HERTANU, ABRAMOVICI, LAUER: >from Dorohoi District, Romania
GRISARU, VATARU: >from Iasi, Dorohoi, and Mileanca, Romania

See my interactive family tree (requires Java 1.1.6 or better). the URL is:
http://www.hashkedim.com

For reasons connected with anti-spam/junk security, the return address is
not valid. To communicate with me, please visit my website (see the URL
above -- no Java required for this purpose) and fill in the email form
there.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Surname origins #general

Stan Goodman <SPAM_FOILER@...>
 

On Wed, 8 Jun 2005 07:57:58 UTC, windselle3@verizon.net (windselle) opined:

Hi. I have a question I'm hoping someone might have an answer to, but before
I ask, I need to thank everyone who responded to my request for help
concerning the situation with family and the woman caller >from Israel. I
still am no further than I was as far as learning anything, but even still,
the polite and friendly assistance here was more than I could've asked for
and I thank everyone for it.

This question may pertain to my previous one, but really at this point it's
more curiosity than anything. Is there a way to tell the origins of a
surname? The reason I ask is that I've been able to trace my father's
surname to the late 1700's and that's as far as it's gone. Furthermore, any
search results I get on this surname, either through searching on my own or
seeing other people's messages on other boards about this same surname..
everything comes to a screeching halt in the mid 1600s at the earliest, in
their families and my own. My feeling is that it has to be derived >from some
other name.

Now I've heard a French version of this name, other English versions, Jewish
versions.. but how would one find out exactly where it started, and is it
possible? This is really more a quest to find out how surnames came into
being in the first place, although I do have some understanding of it as far
as naming someone "Brewer" because he brewed ale, and the like. Even in
biblical times though, there are instances of surnames.

My thinking is that it's got to be nigh impossible to discover one's own
roots if it involves various surname changes over the course of hundreds of
years, isn't it? At the very least it has to be immensely difficult. At this
point I have given up on searching out my father's ancestry as it just seem
to come to a screeching halt and there is no way of knowing that I know of,
if there was a surname change. It really does seem as though someone at some
point decided to adopt this surname and didn't inform a soul. This is likely
a ridicious question and yet it puzzles me just the same. How does one find
out the actual origins of their surname, and is it possible?

Rebecca Anne Darlow
It's unfortunate that you haven't told us what the surname is that you are
interested in; someone here might have been able to tell you something about
it.

But your question seems to be founded upon a belief that people,
specifically Jews, have always had fixed surnames, which is incorrect. The
example of Biblical surnames is misleading: one has no assurance that an
apparent surname (I can think of some >from the Second Temple era, but not
from First Temple or earlier) is in fact a permanent label that persisted
over generations, rather than a tag carried by a single individual in a
single generation. The fact is, as has been discussed in this group many
times, that most Jews of Western Europe had fixed surnames only by
Napoleonic decree, and in Eastern Europe only shortly thereafter. I have
been told, though I can't cite proof, that some in Romania actually made it
into the twentieth century without a persistent surname.

For comparison, I know Beduin Arabs here in Israel that don't have surnames
even now, which is unimportant to the authorities because everyone in this
country has an ID number that serves the same purpose as far as the State is
concerned.

--
Stan Goodman, Qiryat Tiv'on, Israel

Searching:
NEACHOWICZ/NOACHOWICZ, NEJMAN/NAJMAN, SURALSKI: >from Lomza Gubernia
ISMACH: >from Lomza Gubernia, Galicia, and Ukraina
HERTANU, ABRAMOVICI, LAUER: >from Dorohoi District, Romania
GRISARU, VATARU: >from Iasi, Dorohoi, and Mileanca, Romania

See my interactive family tree (requires Java 1.1.6 or better). the URL is:
http://www.hashkedim.com

For reasons connected with anti-spam/junk security, the return address is
not valid. To communicate with me, please visit my website (see the URL
above -- no Java required for this purpose) and fill in the email form
there.


Re: STROMWASSEROWNA #general

Stan Goodman <SPAM_FOILER@...>
 

On Wed, 8 Jun 2005 07:53:48 UTC, a.sharon@shaw.ca (Alexander Sharon) opined:

"ben.forman" wrote

Polish is an unique language in pinpointing an exact
famlly relations and is
probably a great help in building one's genealogical tree:
I hate to be nit picky, but I know that arabic for one
also has these differentiations in maternal/paternal
family relationships
I am sure they are. I've read that some cannibals have consider eaten by
them people as the priviliged members of their family. They have invented
special names for those relations.
I am not sure what this paragraph is meant to convey.

So on a vaguely related note can anyone tell me what the
word is for the relationship between inlaws e.g. my mother
to my wifes mother, I know there's a yiddish word but I
can't remember it. Presumably it is Polish in
origin rather than Aramaic.
The word is mekhutanim.
To answer the question more precisely:

a) The word is neither Aramaic nor Polish, per the guesses by the
questioner, but Hebrew;
b) The third letter of the word is not a KHAF, but a H.ET, so that a better
and more accurate transliteration is "meh.utanim" (whatever you want to do
with the dot after the "h", the "kh" is definitely wrong;
c) As the questioner asked specifically about the relationship between two
women, the gender is wrong, and they are "meh.utanot".


Stan Goodman, Qiryat Tiv'on, Israel

Searching:
NEACHOWICZ/NOACHOWICZ, NEJMAN/NAJMAN, SURALSKI: >from Lomza Gubernia
ISMACH: >from Lomza Gubernia, Galicia, and Ukraina
HERTANU, ABRAMOVICI, LAUER: >from Dorohoi District, Romania
GRISARU, VATARU: >from Iasi, Dorohoi, and Mileanca, Romania

See my interactive family tree (requires Java 1.1.6 or better). the URL is:
http://www.hashkedim.com

For reasons connected with anti-spam/junk security, the return address is
not valid. To communicate with me, please visit my website (see the URL
above -- no Java required for this purpose) and fill in the email form
there.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: STROMWASSEROWNA #general

Stan Goodman <SPAM_FOILER@...>
 

On Wed, 8 Jun 2005 07:53:48 UTC, a.sharon@shaw.ca (Alexander Sharon) opined:

"ben.forman" wrote

Polish is an unique language in pinpointing an exact
famlly relations and is
probably a great help in building one's genealogical tree:
I hate to be nit picky, but I know that arabic for one
also has these differentiations in maternal/paternal
family relationships
I am sure they are. I've read that some cannibals have consider eaten by
them people as the priviliged members of their family. They have invented
special names for those relations.
I am not sure what this paragraph is meant to convey.

So on a vaguely related note can anyone tell me what the
word is for the relationship between inlaws e.g. my mother
to my wifes mother, I know there's a yiddish word but I
can't remember it. Presumably it is Polish in
origin rather than Aramaic.
The word is mekhutanim.
To answer the question more precisely:

a) The word is neither Aramaic nor Polish, per the guesses by the
questioner, but Hebrew;
b) The third letter of the word is not a KHAF, but a H.ET, so that a better
and more accurate transliteration is "meh.utanim" (whatever you want to do
with the dot after the "h", the "kh" is definitely wrong;
c) As the questioner asked specifically about the relationship between two
women, the gender is wrong, and they are "meh.utanot".


Stan Goodman, Qiryat Tiv'on, Israel

Searching:
NEACHOWICZ/NOACHOWICZ, NEJMAN/NAJMAN, SURALSKI: >from Lomza Gubernia
ISMACH: >from Lomza Gubernia, Galicia, and Ukraina
HERTANU, ABRAMOVICI, LAUER: >from Dorohoi District, Romania
GRISARU, VATARU: >from Iasi, Dorohoi, and Mileanca, Romania

See my interactive family tree (requires Java 1.1.6 or better). the URL is:
http://www.hashkedim.com

For reasons connected with anti-spam/junk security, the return address is
not valid. To communicate with me, please visit my website (see the URL
above -- no Java required for this purpose) and fill in the email form
there.


Re: Madison Ave, NYC in 1902 #general

Burt Hecht <burt1933@...>
 

I would recommend finding a copy of a New York (Manhattan) City directory
for that year to find your relative. Since there are alphabetical listings
and business listing - with advertisements - you might get a picture of the
actual building. My guess is that during that year the hospital was a
thriving institution in the East Harlem neighborhood.


Date: Wed, 08 Jun 2005 01:00:27 -0500
I have found a 1902 street address for a family
member. It is 1480 Madison Ave. This is across
the street from, and one block north, of the
present Mt Sinai Medical Center. Would this have
been a residential area in 1902?
Most certainly this was mixed residential and commercial uptown.

If so, how expensive?
That's certainly relative. If one shopped Gristede's - expensive; if one
visited the open air markets - less expensive.
Or could this be a business address?

If you are interested in a wonderful novel by one of America's great
writers, I'll suggest Henry Roth's "Mercy of a Rude Stream" - which provides
a retroview of the neighborhood in Manhattan. Good luck.

By the way, North Dakota, What city?


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Madison Ave, NYC in 1902 #general

Burt Hecht <burt1933@...>
 

I would recommend finding a copy of a New York (Manhattan) City directory
for that year to find your relative. Since there are alphabetical listings
and business listing - with advertisements - you might get a picture of the
actual building. My guess is that during that year the hospital was a
thriving institution in the East Harlem neighborhood.


Date: Wed, 08 Jun 2005 01:00:27 -0500
I have found a 1902 street address for a family
member. It is 1480 Madison Ave. This is across
the street from, and one block north, of the
present Mt Sinai Medical Center. Would this have
been a residential area in 1902?
Most certainly this was mixed residential and commercial uptown.

If so, how expensive?
That's certainly relative. If one shopped Gristede's - expensive; if one
visited the open air markets - less expensive.
Or could this be a business address?

If you are interested in a wonderful novel by one of America's great
writers, I'll suggest Henry Roth's "Mercy of a Rude Stream" - which provides
a retroview of the neighborhood in Manhattan. Good luck.

By the way, North Dakota, What city?


Re: Some Tips: Finding people in Ellis Island Database #general

Linda Altman <familysearch@...>
 

This brings up a good point, Earlier English and American cursive upper case
"S" resembles a current day cursive upper case "L". If you look at a
signifigant number of records >from the 1700's through the early 1900's you
will see the cursive handwriting differs signifigantly >from how we write
today. Try switching upper case "L" and "S" around and you may find some of
those elusive people! The search engines for the major genealogy sites do
not take this into account.

Linda Altman
familysearch@bellsouth.net

----- Original Message -----
.... I found my grandmother Esther Silberstein under L as
Lilberstein....... >
Paul Silverstone


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Some Tips: Finding people in Ellis Island Database #general

Linda Altman <familysearch@...>
 

This brings up a good point, Earlier English and American cursive upper case
"S" resembles a current day cursive upper case "L". If you look at a
signifigant number of records >from the 1700's through the early 1900's you
will see the cursive handwriting differs signifigantly >from how we write
today. Try switching upper case "L" and "S" around and you may find some of
those elusive people! The search engines for the major genealogy sites do
not take this into account.

Linda Altman
familysearch@bellsouth.net

----- Original Message -----
.... I found my grandmother Esther Silberstein under L as
Lilberstein....... >
Paul Silverstone


Jewish family name origins #general

ben.forman <ben.forman@...>
 

Genners

Just found this quite interesting article

http://www.bh.org.il/Names/jfamilynames.asp

All the best

Ben Forman


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Jewish family name origins #general

ben.forman <ben.forman@...>
 

Genners

Just found this quite interesting article

http://www.bh.org.il/Names/jfamilynames.asp

All the best

Ben Forman


MASH, LION and KENNEDY - are they Jewish? #general

Celia Male <celiamale@...>
 

My friend Felix Gundacker >from Vienna has helpfully
sent us a list of Jewish KENEDI and variants as well
as LION listed on his Vienna databank. When it comes
to detailed postings on Viennese, Bohemian and
Moravian Jewish families I restrict myself to the
Austria-Czech SIG which specializes in this geographic
area. Anyone interested should definitely join our
SIG!

see http://www.jewishgen.org/austriaczech/

However, just to continue the discussion here as it
may be of general interest.

There was a famous Bankhaus Kenedi at Schwarzenberg
Platz 4, Vienna. It had been founded in 1909 as
Czuczka Groag & Co and was taken over by the Hungarian
Otto KENEDI in 1920. The bank was aryanised in 1938
and the Director Otto KENEDI died in the same year. I
will investigate this at a later stage. A Vienna death
in 1938 is always suspicious, as there were tragically
so many suicides. There are also many listings in the
early Vienna phone books of KENEDI and its variants.

re LION: Yes, of course they were Jewish but without
going into many details, here are two interesting
examples. The mother of the famous Viktor FRANKL was
Elsa LION {8 Feb 1879, Prague - 1944 Auschwitz}. Her
parents, who came >from an old-established Prague
family, were Jakob and Regina LION.

See http://psy.rin.ru/eng/article/179-101.html
where the final sentence is:

"{Frankl's} impact on psychology and psychiatry will
be felt for centuries to come."

Viktor Frankl {Vienna 26 March 1905 - 2 Sept 1997}
married in 1942 and in September 1942 he, his wife,
parents and brother were sent to Theresienstadt, where
his father died of starvation. His mother and brother
were killed at Auschwitz in 1944. His wife died at
Bergen-Belsen in 1945. Only his sister Stella
survived, having managed to emigrate to Australia a
short while earlier.

Many of his LION relatives were murdered and anyone
who visits his beautifully-tended grave in Vienna will
find a shrine with interesting stones left by
admirers >from all over the world. Many LION are
inscribed on his grave, as holocaust victims. I always
make a point of visiting it, as it is very near my
gt-grandparents' grave.

FRANKL Viktor Dr. age 92 died 02.09.1997
ZENTRALFRIEDHOF, Vienna Gate I Group 76B Row 23 no 27

He is buried together with his grandmother and an
uncle: Lion Erwin age 61 died 20.08.1931; Lion Regine
age 71 died 07.02.1917

[nr the WW1 War Memorial for Jewish Soldiers]

And >from my own family circle: here is an interesting
snippet. Samuel Michel {1696-1763, Pressburg} had a
son called Low Simon {1741 Pressburg - 1814 London}.
He settled in London and under the name Lyon de Symons
was one of the founders of the Western Synagogue [see
Cecil Roth 1933: Records of the Western Synagogue].

In the UK, he became a LYON and many famous
Anglo-Jewish families are descended >from Lob and his
family. He even entertained Mozart on one of his trips
to London! In other countries, Lob Simon may have
become a LION!

As for Mash, I will think about it. It sounds as if it
is derived >from a Polish name

Celia Male [UK]


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen MASH, LION and KENNEDY - are they Jewish? #general

Celia Male <celiamale@...>
 

My friend Felix Gundacker >from Vienna has helpfully
sent us a list of Jewish KENEDI and variants as well
as LION listed on his Vienna databank. When it comes
to detailed postings on Viennese, Bohemian and
Moravian Jewish families I restrict myself to the
Austria-Czech SIG which specializes in this geographic
area. Anyone interested should definitely join our
SIG!

see http://www.jewishgen.org/austriaczech/

However, just to continue the discussion here as it
may be of general interest.

There was a famous Bankhaus Kenedi at Schwarzenberg
Platz 4, Vienna. It had been founded in 1909 as
Czuczka Groag & Co and was taken over by the Hungarian
Otto KENEDI in 1920. The bank was aryanised in 1938
and the Director Otto KENEDI died in the same year. I
will investigate this at a later stage. A Vienna death
in 1938 is always suspicious, as there were tragically
so many suicides. There are also many listings in the
early Vienna phone books of KENEDI and its variants.

re LION: Yes, of course they were Jewish but without
going into many details, here are two interesting
examples. The mother of the famous Viktor FRANKL was
Elsa LION {8 Feb 1879, Prague - 1944 Auschwitz}. Her
parents, who came >from an old-established Prague
family, were Jakob and Regina LION.

See http://psy.rin.ru/eng/article/179-101.html
where the final sentence is:

"{Frankl's} impact on psychology and psychiatry will
be felt for centuries to come."

Viktor Frankl {Vienna 26 March 1905 - 2 Sept 1997}
married in 1942 and in September 1942 he, his wife,
parents and brother were sent to Theresienstadt, where
his father died of starvation. His mother and brother
were killed at Auschwitz in 1944. His wife died at
Bergen-Belsen in 1945. Only his sister Stella
survived, having managed to emigrate to Australia a
short while earlier.

Many of his LION relatives were murdered and anyone
who visits his beautifully-tended grave in Vienna will
find a shrine with interesting stones left by
admirers >from all over the world. Many LION are
inscribed on his grave, as holocaust victims. I always
make a point of visiting it, as it is very near my
gt-grandparents' grave.

FRANKL Viktor Dr. age 92 died 02.09.1997
ZENTRALFRIEDHOF, Vienna Gate I Group 76B Row 23 no 27

He is buried together with his grandmother and an
uncle: Lion Erwin age 61 died 20.08.1931; Lion Regine
age 71 died 07.02.1917

[nr the WW1 War Memorial for Jewish Soldiers]

And >from my own family circle: here is an interesting
snippet. Samuel Michel {1696-1763, Pressburg} had a
son called Low Simon {1741 Pressburg - 1814 London}.
He settled in London and under the name Lyon de Symons
was one of the founders of the Western Synagogue [see
Cecil Roth 1933: Records of the Western Synagogue].

In the UK, he became a LYON and many famous
Anglo-Jewish families are descended >from Lob and his
family. He even entertained Mozart on one of his trips
to London! In other countries, Lob Simon may have
become a LION!

As for Mash, I will think about it. It sounds as if it
is derived >from a Polish name

Celia Male [UK]


Searching Perez DAGAN = Paul KORNWEITZ, Vienna-->Israel #general

Manuela Wyler <m.wyler@...>
 

Dear Genners,
Could someone help me finding in Israel the Trace of Perez DAGAN
formerly Paul KORNWEITZ born in Vienna in 1914, emigrated in Palestine
from Holland in 1939. Paul/Perez visited his parents in 1950 in Belgium
he was the only survivor of three brothers. I have a copy of his visa,
his address was in Holon. His parents died in 1951 and 1952 in Belgium.
Paul was married to Isabelle RUBINSTEIN. If anyone has an idea on how
to trace his descendants, I would be very grateful.

Please answer privately.
Manuela Wyler, Lyon France
m.wyler@wanadoo.fr


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Searching Perez DAGAN = Paul KORNWEITZ, Vienna-->Israel #general

Manuela Wyler <m.wyler@...>
 

Dear Genners,
Could someone help me finding in Israel the Trace of Perez DAGAN
formerly Paul KORNWEITZ born in Vienna in 1914, emigrated in Palestine
from Holland in 1939. Paul/Perez visited his parents in 1950 in Belgium
he was the only survivor of three brothers. I have a copy of his visa,
his address was in Holon. His parents died in 1951 and 1952 in Belgium.
Paul was married to Isabelle RUBINSTEIN. If anyone has an idea on how
to trace his descendants, I would be very grateful.

Please answer privately.
Manuela Wyler, Lyon France
m.wyler@wanadoo.fr


NY Times article: Intelligence & Diseases May Be Linked in Ashkenazic Genes #germany

Marcus Poulin <nanophotonic@...>
 

http://www.nytimes.com/2005/06/03/science/03gene.html?

I thought I would forward this along though some of the researchers
cited in the article discount the scientific validity of the study findings.

Marcus Poulin nanophotonic@comcast.net Berlin, Germany


German SIG #Germany NY Times article: Intelligence & Diseases May Be Linked in Ashkenazic Genes #germany

Marcus Poulin <nanophotonic@...>
 

http://www.nytimes.com/2005/06/03/science/03gene.html?

I thought I would forward this along though some of the researchers
cited in the article discount the scientific validity of the study findings.

Marcus Poulin nanophotonic@comcast.net Berlin, Germany


Volunteers needed in Las Vegas! #france

Rosanne Leeson <rdleeson@...>
 

Dear fellow FrenchSIGgers,

Once agan I am appealing for a least a couple of you to step forward to
help out at the FrenchSIG table at the SIG fair in Las Vegas. So far
only one person has done so!
We have 338 members as of today, and while I do realize that probably
only a few of you will be coming to Las Vegas, Pierre and I, and the one
volunteer, would greatly appreciate some more help! In fact, I
Co-Coordinate 2 SIGs, so will have to divide my time.

The Fair will take place on Wed. July 13, >from 9-5. While you may be
interested in some of the sessions on that day, an hour or so, to work
around those sessions, would be an enormous help!

Please respond to me,
Rosanne Leeson
Co-Coordinator
FrenchSIG


French SIG #France Volunteers needed in Las Vegas! #france

Rosanne Leeson <rdleeson@...>
 

Dear fellow FrenchSIGgers,

Once agan I am appealing for a least a couple of you to step forward to
help out at the FrenchSIG table at the SIG fair in Las Vegas. So far
only one person has done so!
We have 338 members as of today, and while I do realize that probably
only a few of you will be coming to Las Vegas, Pierre and I, and the one
volunteer, would greatly appreciate some more help! In fact, I
Co-Coordinate 2 SIGs, so will have to divide my time.

The Fair will take place on Wed. July 13, >from 9-5. While you may be
interested in some of the sessions on that day, an hour or so, to work
around those sessions, would be an enormous help!

Please respond to me,
Rosanne Leeson
Co-Coordinator
FrenchSIG


Book Cite: New Tourists' Guide to Jewish Salzburg... #austria-czech

Rosanne Leeson <rdleeson@...>
 

Dear SIG members,

The Salzburg Festival was founded by Max Reinhardt and owed its post
World War II revival in large part to Jewish artists. Stefan Zweig
lived in the city, until he was driven out--the history of the
Jewish population of Salzburg is long and varied. Investigation
shows that Jews first came to the city in Roman times and Jewish
traders settled in Salzburg around 1200.and formed a first Jewish
community. About twenty years later a second community formed that
lasted until the burning of the entire Jewish population in 1404.
The next settlement lasted >from 1418 to 1498. In the last third of
the nineteenth century a fourth Jewish settlement was created that
grew rapidly and included leading businessmen. In 1938 the
Nationalsocialists declared Salzburg "judenrein" ["cleansed of
Jews"]. Today about a hundred Jews live in Salzburg.

I have recently learned of a brand new book, a "Tourist's guide to
Jewish Salzburg". At present it is only available in German, but an
English translation is being planned. I have no monetary interest
in this publication, but thought that it might be of interest to
members of the this SIG. Here are the details, if you are interested:

"Ein Führer durch das jüdische Salzburg" von Stan Nadel
ca. 160 Seiten, 13,5 x 21 cm, gebunden
ca. EUR 25,- / Sfr 42,50, WG 1552
[3-902144-93-9], 2005

It is being published by Jung und Jung Verlag in Salzburg. For more
information and orders see www.jungundjung.at or email office@jungundjung.at
or go to a well-known online book-ordering site at its German link.

Best wisehs,
Rosanne Leeson


Austria-Czech SIG #Austria-Czech Book Cite: New Tourists' Guide to Jewish Salzburg... #austria-czech

Rosanne Leeson <rdleeson@...>
 

Dear SIG members,

The Salzburg Festival was founded by Max Reinhardt and owed its post
World War II revival in large part to Jewish artists. Stefan Zweig
lived in the city, until he was driven out--the history of the
Jewish population of Salzburg is long and varied. Investigation
shows that Jews first came to the city in Roman times and Jewish
traders settled in Salzburg around 1200.and formed a first Jewish
community. About twenty years later a second community formed that
lasted until the burning of the entire Jewish population in 1404.
The next settlement lasted >from 1418 to 1498. In the last third of
the nineteenth century a fourth Jewish settlement was created that
grew rapidly and included leading businessmen. In 1938 the
Nationalsocialists declared Salzburg "judenrein" ["cleansed of
Jews"]. Today about a hundred Jews live in Salzburg.

I have recently learned of a brand new book, a "Tourist's guide to
Jewish Salzburg". At present it is only available in German, but an
English translation is being planned. I have no monetary interest
in this publication, but thought that it might be of interest to
members of the this SIG. Here are the details, if you are interested:

"Ein Führer durch das jüdische Salzburg" von Stan Nadel
ca. 160 Seiten, 13,5 x 21 cm, gebunden
ca. EUR 25,- / Sfr 42,50, WG 1552
[3-902144-93-9], 2005

It is being published by Jung und Jung Verlag in Salzburg. For more
information and orders see www.jungundjung.at or email office@jungundjung.at
or go to a well-known online book-ordering site at its German link.

Best wisehs,
Rosanne Leeson