Date   

Times Digital Archive #unitedkingdom

Naomi Cream
 

I have recently discovered that members of Richmond upon Thames Library
(London) can get online access to the 'Full searchable digital archive of
The Times newspaper >from 1785 to 1985' >from home. The website says they are
in the process of setting it up, but it seems to be working now.

Naomi Cream

I have tried asking for a list of all subscription holders in the UK, but
was told that they are not at liberty to provide this information. However,
they seem happy enough to provide local info. to enquirers. Their contact
details are:

Sales Advisor EMEA
Thomson Learning
High Holborn House
50-51 Bedford Row
London WC1R 4LR
Tel: +44 (0)20 7067 2665
Fax: +44 (0)20 7067 2600
www.thomsonlearning.co.uk


JCR-UK SIG #UnitedKingdom Times Digital Archive #unitedkingdom

Naomi Cream
 

I have recently discovered that members of Richmond upon Thames Library
(London) can get online access to the 'Full searchable digital archive of
The Times newspaper >from 1785 to 1985' >from home. The website says they are
in the process of setting it up, but it seems to be working now.

Naomi Cream

I have tried asking for a list of all subscription holders in the UK, but
was told that they are not at liberty to provide this information. However,
they seem happy enough to provide local info. to enquirers. Their contact
details are:

Sales Advisor EMEA
Thomson Learning
High Holborn House
50-51 Bedford Row
London WC1R 4LR
Tel: +44 (0)20 7067 2665
Fax: +44 (0)20 7067 2600
www.thomsonlearning.co.uk


Yizkor Book Project Report for May 2005 #rabbinic

Joyce Field
 

We are pleased to report that seven new entries
and 11 updates have been added to the Yizkor Book
Project translations page at
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/translations.html.

New entries:

-Akmene, Lithuania: Pinkas HaKehillot Lita
-Alsedziai, Lithuania: Pinkas HaKehillot Lita
-Janow Podlaski, Pinkas HaKehillot Poland, volume 7
-Lomazy, Poland: Pinkas HaKehillot Poland, volume 7
-Poreba Koceby: Pinkas HaKehillot Poland, volume 6
-Poreba Srednia : Pinkas HaKehillot Poland, volume 6
-Turek, Poland: Pinkas HaKehillot Poland, volume 1

Updates:

-Brest, Belarus: Encyclopedia of the Jewish Diaspora, volume 2
-Chelm, Poland
-Czestochowa, Poland:
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Czestochowa/Czestochowa.html
-Czestochowa, Poland:
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Czestochowa1/Czestochowa1.html
-Dabrowa Gornicza, Poland
-Dynow, Poland
-Holocaust in Belarus
-Maramures Region: Kretsnif: Craciunesti (Kar`csonfalva, Kretsnif),
Romania
-Novogrudok, Belarus
-Pochayev, Ukraine
-Staszow, Poland

If you cannot find an online translation of a yizkor book that you
are interested in, check the database at
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/database.html
to see if there is a yizkor book for that town. If there is,
consider becoming the coordinator for the yizkor book translation.
Nothing gets done without the efforts of volunteers who want to
memorialize their ancestral towns.

Joyce Field
jfield@jewishgen.org


Rabbinic Genealogy SIG #Rabbinic Yizkor Book Project Report for May 2005 #rabbinic

Joyce Field
 

We are pleased to report that seven new entries
and 11 updates have been added to the Yizkor Book
Project translations page at
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/translations.html.

New entries:

-Akmene, Lithuania: Pinkas HaKehillot Lita
-Alsedziai, Lithuania: Pinkas HaKehillot Lita
-Janow Podlaski, Pinkas HaKehillot Poland, volume 7
-Lomazy, Poland: Pinkas HaKehillot Poland, volume 7
-Poreba Koceby: Pinkas HaKehillot Poland, volume 6
-Poreba Srednia : Pinkas HaKehillot Poland, volume 6
-Turek, Poland: Pinkas HaKehillot Poland, volume 1

Updates:

-Brest, Belarus: Encyclopedia of the Jewish Diaspora, volume 2
-Chelm, Poland
-Czestochowa, Poland:
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Czestochowa/Czestochowa.html
-Czestochowa, Poland:
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Czestochowa1/Czestochowa1.html
-Dabrowa Gornicza, Poland
-Dynow, Poland
-Holocaust in Belarus
-Maramures Region: Kretsnif: Craciunesti (Kar`csonfalva, Kretsnif),
Romania
-Novogrudok, Belarus
-Pochayev, Ukraine
-Staszow, Poland

If you cannot find an online translation of a yizkor book that you
are interested in, check the database at
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/database.html
to see if there is a yizkor book for that town. If there is,
consider becoming the coordinator for the yizkor book translation.
Nothing gets done without the efforts of volunteers who want to
memorialize their ancestral towns.

Joyce Field
jfield@jewishgen.org


Re: Unusual Hebrew words on tombstone - esteemed virgin? #general

Judith Romney Wegner
 

Harold Greenberg wrote:

The use of the word "virgin" goes back a long way. At the Beit
She'arim necropolis in Israel, one sarcophagus has written on it
".... Atio the daughter of Rabbi Gamliel son of Nehemia who died a
virgin at the age of twenty two years .......".
This is >from around the year 300 of the common era.
Dear Harold,

There's nothing very surprising in the appearance of the word betulah
on the tombstone of an unmarried girl (though it is surprising that,
in 300 CE this young lady had reached the age of 22 without being
married off!). What was unusual on the tombstone we were discussing
is the use of the adjective h.ashuvah to qualify the noun betulah.
(Note: I've decided to start including the underdot right next to h
to distinguish the letter h.et >from the letter heh.) I'm still
hoping someone can tell us what may have accounted for this "betulah
h.ashuvah."

The word betulah is actually biblical, and occurs close to 100 times
throughout the Bible -- although one place where it does not appear
is in Isaiah 7:14. (That's the famous verse that used to be
mis-translated as: "And a virgin shall conceive..." until modern
New Testament scholarship acknowledged that this was a
mis-translation of the actual Hebrew word that appears there and
corrected it in recent translations like the New Revised Standard
Version. The word in Isaiah 7:14 is not betulah but 'almah, which
actually connotes a "young woman of childbearing age"). For
instance, in the book of Ruth, the heroine, who is already widowed in
chapter 1, is likewise described as an 'almah -- and by definition a
widow is no virgin!

Judith Romney Wegner
jrw@brown.edu


Re: The origins of my KATZ family #general

Barry Finkel <b19141@...>
 

"Marlene" <mlbishow@mindspring.com> wrote, in part:

Since early on in my genealogical research, I was told that KATZ meant cohen
tzadik (righteous cohen). My grandfather, Shimon KATZ, fiercely denied that
he was a cohen, as did his cousins, all descendents of Aaron KATZ (b. circa
1840). IIn fact, every time there is a life cycle event in my family, thsi
question arises.

So the question that I puzzle is what was the origin of this familiy's
name -did they just "foget" that they were cohen.
I have a relative who changed his name >from ABRAMOVITCH to COHEN.
I have no idea if he was a priestly Cohen. It is a name change that
does not make sense if he was not a priestly Cohen.
--Barry Finkel
Chicago, IL, USA


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Unusual Hebrew words on tombstone - esteemed virgin? #general

Judith Romney Wegner
 

Harold Greenberg wrote:

The use of the word "virgin" goes back a long way. At the Beit
She'arim necropolis in Israel, one sarcophagus has written on it
".... Atio the daughter of Rabbi Gamliel son of Nehemia who died a
virgin at the age of twenty two years .......".
This is >from around the year 300 of the common era.
Dear Harold,

There's nothing very surprising in the appearance of the word betulah
on the tombstone of an unmarried girl (though it is surprising that,
in 300 CE this young lady had reached the age of 22 without being
married off!). What was unusual on the tombstone we were discussing
is the use of the adjective h.ashuvah to qualify the noun betulah.
(Note: I've decided to start including the underdot right next to h
to distinguish the letter h.et >from the letter heh.) I'm still
hoping someone can tell us what may have accounted for this "betulah
h.ashuvah."

The word betulah is actually biblical, and occurs close to 100 times
throughout the Bible -- although one place where it does not appear
is in Isaiah 7:14. (That's the famous verse that used to be
mis-translated as: "And a virgin shall conceive..." until modern
New Testament scholarship acknowledged that this was a
mis-translation of the actual Hebrew word that appears there and
corrected it in recent translations like the New Revised Standard
Version. The word in Isaiah 7:14 is not betulah but 'almah, which
actually connotes a "young woman of childbearing age"). For
instance, in the book of Ruth, the heroine, who is already widowed in
chapter 1, is likewise described as an 'almah -- and by definition a
widow is no virgin!

Judith Romney Wegner
jrw@brown.edu


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: The origins of my KATZ family #general

Barry Finkel <b19141@...>
 

"Marlene" <mlbishow@mindspring.com> wrote, in part:

Since early on in my genealogical research, I was told that KATZ meant cohen
tzadik (righteous cohen). My grandfather, Shimon KATZ, fiercely denied that
he was a cohen, as did his cousins, all descendents of Aaron KATZ (b. circa
1840). IIn fact, every time there is a life cycle event in my family, thsi
question arises.

So the question that I puzzle is what was the origin of this familiy's
name -did they just "foget" that they were cohen.
I have a relative who changed his name >from ABRAMOVITCH to COHEN.
I have no idea if he was a priestly Cohen. It is a name change that
does not make sense if he was not a priestly Cohen.
--Barry Finkel
Chicago, IL, USA


Given names and dates on the ALD #lithuania

marlene finkelstein
 

I have searched the ALD for my ggf ,Tsvi Bloch (1855-1934), without success.
I have received a copy of his death record in Kurshan >from the archives in
Vilna so I am certain of the name & dates. To my disappointment, the rabbi
did not note my ggf's father's name on the record.There were almost 2500
entries for the surname Bloch but not one entry for the Hebrew name Tsvi or
the Yiddish name Hirsh. Should I be considering entries for Girsh Bloch
though none seem to match the correct year of birth? Since the records on
the ALD are >from the time that Lithuania was part of the Russian Empire I
am assuming the answer to this question is yes but would appreciate
confirmation and advise.

Marlene Finkelstein
New Jersey


Re: Kinnuim - FAYVUSH #lithuania

Kovitz, Sonia <Sonia.Kovitz@...>
 

Per Beider's _Dictionary of Ashkenazic Given Names_ : Fayvush is an
ancient Jewish name whose origin was the Latin vivus (living, alive), a
loan translation (calque) >from Hebrew chaim (life). Later the name
Fayvush was erroneously considered to be a derivation >from Phoebus, god
of the sun--consequently Fayvish became the kinnui not only for the
Biblical Hebrew name Uri (light) but for the Aramaic name Shraga
(candle) in the Rabbinic period. Folk legends along with true and false
etymologies gave rise to these interwoven associations between Hebrew
name and kinnui.

Sonia Kovitz

Could one of our Litvak experts help me. Looking through the
All-Lithuania
Database for my family town (Zagare) I saw the given name Fayvush.
Can this be a kinnui for Yechezkiel?


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania Given names and dates on the ALD #lithuania

marlene finkelstein
 

I have searched the ALD for my ggf ,Tsvi Bloch (1855-1934), without success.
I have received a copy of his death record in Kurshan >from the archives in
Vilna so I am certain of the name & dates. To my disappointment, the rabbi
did not note my ggf's father's name on the record.There were almost 2500
entries for the surname Bloch but not one entry for the Hebrew name Tsvi or
the Yiddish name Hirsh. Should I be considering entries for Girsh Bloch
though none seem to match the correct year of birth? Since the records on
the ALD are >from the time that Lithuania was part of the Russian Empire I
am assuming the answer to this question is yes but would appreciate
confirmation and advise.

Marlene Finkelstein
New Jersey


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania RE: Kinnuim - FAYVUSH #lithuania

Kovitz, Sonia <Sonia.Kovitz@...>
 

Per Beider's _Dictionary of Ashkenazic Given Names_ : Fayvush is an
ancient Jewish name whose origin was the Latin vivus (living, alive), a
loan translation (calque) >from Hebrew chaim (life). Later the name
Fayvush was erroneously considered to be a derivation >from Phoebus, god
of the sun--consequently Fayvish became the kinnui not only for the
Biblical Hebrew name Uri (light) but for the Aramaic name Shraga
(candle) in the Rabbinic period. Folk legends along with true and false
etymologies gave rise to these interwoven associations between Hebrew
name and kinnui.

Sonia Kovitz

Could one of our Litvak experts help me. Looking through the
All-Lithuania
Database for my family town (Zagare) I saw the given name Fayvush.
Can this be a kinnui for Yechezkiel?


Kinnuim #lithuania

Altersolomon@...
 

I'd like to thank Gerry Esterson for his erudite and informative reply
to my question about Kinnuim. I hadn't realised that Hilchot Gittin
books as well as other Rabbinical sources relate given names to their
Hebrew ones. The discussion in his reference
http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/GivenNames was also very helpful.

It seems >from Professor Esterson's reply that as there was a Germanic
influence in the Zagare area (which bordered Courland) then Fayvush could
have been a kinnu for Yechezkiel in that area, though what the Germanic
linguistic relationship is between these two names was not made clear,
bearing in mind Chaim Freedman's explanation of Fayvush's association
with Shraga.

With many thanks
Alter Solomon


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania Kinnuim #lithuania

Altersolomon@...
 

I'd like to thank Gerry Esterson for his erudite and informative reply
to my question about Kinnuim. I hadn't realised that Hilchot Gittin
books as well as other Rabbinical sources relate given names to their
Hebrew ones. The discussion in his reference
http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/GivenNames was also very helpful.

It seems >from Professor Esterson's reply that as there was a Germanic
influence in the Zagare area (which bordered Courland) then Fayvush could
have been a kinnu for Yechezkiel in that area, though what the Germanic
linguistic relationship is between these two names was not made clear,
bearing in mind Chaim Freedman's explanation of Fayvush's association
with Shraga.

With many thanks
Alter Solomon


Names #lithuania

Muriel <uclamema@...>
 

I don't know what "kinnuim" means so maybe I am asking the wrong
question in the wrong place. If so, I apologize.

Can anyone help me with my gf, Jacob Rassner's name?

I found the following on the Hamburg passenger list, on the cemetary
info sheet, and on his headstone: Joehiel -Yechel bub Yekesiel - Yekhiel
ben Reb Yekumiel?

Could any of these names indicate an area (I don't know where in Russia
he was born)?

Could Rassner - Rasner be a regional name?

I'd appreciate any help. Thank you.
Muriel Schloss
UCLAMEma@cox.net


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania Names #lithuania

Muriel <uclamema@...>
 

I don't know what "kinnuim" means so maybe I am asking the wrong
question in the wrong place. If so, I apologize.

Can anyone help me with my gf, Jacob Rassner's name?

I found the following on the Hamburg passenger list, on the cemetary
info sheet, and on his headstone: Joehiel -Yechel bub Yekesiel - Yekhiel
ben Reb Yekumiel?

Could any of these names indicate an area (I don't know where in Russia
he was born)?

Could Rassner - Rasner be a regional name?

I'd appreciate any help. Thank you.
Muriel Schloss
UCLAMEma@cox.net


Marcel Mindrescu #romania

Gayle Schlissel Riley <key2pst@...>
 

Before I hire Marcel for research in Romania I would like to know if
others have used him. So privately respond to me about your experiences
good or bad. He has approached and said he lives close to Iasi and can
find things for me.

Gayle >from San Gabriel


Romania SIG #Romania Marcel Mindrescu #romania

Gayle Schlissel Riley <key2pst@...>
 

Before I hire Marcel for research in Romania I would like to know if
others have used him. So privately respond to me about your experiences
good or bad. He has approached and said he lives close to Iasi and can
find things for me.

Gayle >from San Gabriel


Re: World War I Draft Registration Age - United States #general

Sally Bruckheimer <sallybru@...>
 

Our ancestors at the beginning of the 20th century did not know when they
were born in most cases. If they had any birthdate at all, it was on the
Hebrew calendar - and nobody transposed that into the Gregorian. So people
guessed. If they were near the 'old age' limit on the draft, they might say
old enough to be exempt. If they were young and patriotic, they might say
they were old enough to join up; or if they didn't want to go, they were
younger.

Social security was the same way. Those without birth records (most
immigrants and many born in states without civil registration when they were
born) were somewhat free to make up a birthdate. If old and poor, they
might make themselves old enough to collect retirement. Census records were
checked to see what was said to the clerk.

But in most cases both were just an estimate. And I wouldn't 'trust'
anything but a primary source, a birth record. Other records are
'approximate'.

Sally Bruckheimer
Chatham, NJ


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: World War I Draft Registration Age - United States #general

Sally Bruckheimer <sallybru@...>
 

Our ancestors at the beginning of the 20th century did not know when they
were born in most cases. If they had any birthdate at all, it was on the
Hebrew calendar - and nobody transposed that into the Gregorian. So people
guessed. If they were near the 'old age' limit on the draft, they might say
old enough to be exempt. If they were young and patriotic, they might say
they were old enough to join up; or if they didn't want to go, they were
younger.

Social security was the same way. Those without birth records (most
immigrants and many born in states without civil registration when they were
born) were somewhat free to make up a birthdate. If old and poor, they
might make themselves old enough to collect retirement. Census records were
checked to see what was said to the clerk.

But in most cases both were just an estimate. And I wouldn't 'trust'
anything but a primary source, a birth record. Other records are
'approximate'.

Sally Bruckheimer
Chatham, NJ