Date   

average marriage age in central (Russian) Poland #general

sbloom@...
 

Hi,

I haven't done a precise calculation, but by going through lots of 19th
century (first) marriages >from central Poland (Lodz and Warsaw vicinities)
from my family, it looks as if average age was 19/20 with perhaps the
brides being a tad younger. But I think its important to note that I
believe that the bride's age was often ramped up by a couple of years,
especially if she was well under 18 (I know this by comparing the bride's
birth record with the stated age of the bride at the marriage). I'm not
sure if this was purposeful, or whether if the bride looked as if she had
been through puberty, they just said "ok, you must be 18" [or some other
appropriate age]. Perhaps others could add some insights >from their own
records, or note whether other nations or other parts of Poland differed.

Steve Bloom
Farmville, VA

email: sbloom@email.hsc.edu


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen average marriage age in central (Russian) Poland #general

sbloom@...
 

Hi,

I haven't done a precise calculation, but by going through lots of 19th
century (first) marriages >from central Poland (Lodz and Warsaw vicinities)
from my family, it looks as if average age was 19/20 with perhaps the
brides being a tad younger. But I think its important to note that I
believe that the bride's age was often ramped up by a couple of years,
especially if she was well under 18 (I know this by comparing the bride's
birth record with the stated age of the bride at the marriage). I'm not
sure if this was purposeful, or whether if the bride looked as if she had
been through puberty, they just said "ok, you must be 18" [or some other
appropriate age]. Perhaps others could add some insights >from their own
records, or note whether other nations or other parts of Poland differed.

Steve Bloom
Farmville, VA

email: sbloom@email.hsc.edu


STALLER in Philadelphia #general

Judy Wolkovitch <judywolk@...>
 

This is a "needle in a haystack" request revisited. I have a photograph of
a family member, a descendent of the Alperovich family of Lithuania. There
is a signature on the back. The first name is Jean and the surname looks
like STALLER. Two or three single ALPEROVICH sisters went >from Lithuania to
Philadelphia in the late 1890's and I believe that Jean is the daughter of
one of them. The 1930 census has a Jean and Pauline Staller but I do not
recognise the name Pauline.

Does anyone know of the STALLER family?

Many thanks,

Judy Wolkovitch
Los Angeles


Edinburgh June-July 1914 #general

Paula Eisenstein Baker
 

Looking for advice >from Edinburgh (or other) Jewishgenners.

A concert of Jewish music (probably for symphony orchestra) is described
as having been given in Edinburgh during the summer of 1914 (the letter
that mentions the concert is dated July 14, 1914).

What newspapers would I look in for advertisements, announcements, and
possibly a review? Was there an English-language Jewish paper in
Edinburgh then? a Yiddish-language paper? Lacking that, which paper
would have carried news about the arts? (In Russia/Ukraine, ads appeared
in the regular daily paper in the local language as well as in Yiddish
papers.)

Many thanks. Private replies, please, unless you think the information
would be useful to the readership.

Paula Eisenstein Baker
Houston, TX
<eisenbak@stthom.edu>


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen STALLER in Philadelphia #general

Judy Wolkovitch <judywolk@...>
 

This is a "needle in a haystack" request revisited. I have a photograph of
a family member, a descendent of the Alperovich family of Lithuania. There
is a signature on the back. The first name is Jean and the surname looks
like STALLER. Two or three single ALPEROVICH sisters went >from Lithuania to
Philadelphia in the late 1890's and I believe that Jean is the daughter of
one of them. The 1930 census has a Jean and Pauline Staller but I do not
recognise the name Pauline.

Does anyone know of the STALLER family?

Many thanks,

Judy Wolkovitch
Los Angeles


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Edinburgh June-July 1914 #general

Paula Eisenstein Baker
 

Looking for advice >from Edinburgh (or other) Jewishgenners.

A concert of Jewish music (probably for symphony orchestra) is described
as having been given in Edinburgh during the summer of 1914 (the letter
that mentions the concert is dated July 14, 1914).

What newspapers would I look in for advertisements, announcements, and
possibly a review? Was there an English-language Jewish paper in
Edinburgh then? a Yiddish-language paper? Lacking that, which paper
would have carried news about the arts? (In Russia/Ukraine, ads appeared
in the regular daily paper in the local language as well as in Yiddish
papers.)

Many thanks. Private replies, please, unless you think the information
would be useful to the readership.

Paula Eisenstein Baker
Houston, TX
<eisenbak@stthom.edu>


HECHTMAN family #general

David Priever
 

Dear Fellow Jewishgenners,

I am looking for a Helen (or Helene) HECHTMAN, born in 1941 to Judith (nee
DINSTEIN) and Joseph HECHTMAN. Joseph died (or lived) in Long Beach,
California in 1991 and Judith died in Brooklyn, NY in 1949. I am very
interested in the HECHTMAN branch of the family.

I have no idea of the married name of Helen/Helene.

Sincerely,

David J. Priever
brooklyn1960@hotmail.com


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen HECHTMAN family #general

David Priever
 

Dear Fellow Jewishgenners,

I am looking for a Helen (or Helene) HECHTMAN, born in 1941 to Judith (nee
DINSTEIN) and Joseph HECHTMAN. Joseph died (or lived) in Long Beach,
California in 1991 and Judith died in Brooklyn, NY in 1949. I am very
interested in the HECHTMAN branch of the family.

I have no idea of the married name of Helen/Helene.

Sincerely,

David J. Priever
brooklyn1960@hotmail.com


Searching for recent New York City death date #general

Arthur Meyers <marciarthur@...>
 

Greetings,

My first cousin living in NYC was a recluse. I was told that she recently
has passed away. Her name was Tillie Indianer but I believed she changed it
to Diane Bernhard. I would like to know her death date and possibly get her
death certificate - any suggestions?
Please answer privately,
Thank you,
Marcia Indianer Meyers
Connecticut
marciarthur@msn.com


Pjhiladelphia City Directory- Lookup #general

Avrohom Krauss <krauss@...>
 

Would someone who has access to Phila.City Directories be willing to to do
me a lookup for the years 1903-1918. Please respond privately. Thank you.

Avrohom Krauss
Telz-Stone Israel


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Searching for recent New York City death date #general

Arthur Meyers <marciarthur@...>
 

Greetings,

My first cousin living in NYC was a recluse. I was told that she recently
has passed away. Her name was Tillie Indianer but I believed she changed it
to Diane Bernhard. I would like to know her death date and possibly get her
death certificate - any suggestions?
Please answer privately,
Thank you,
Marcia Indianer Meyers
Connecticut
marciarthur@msn.com


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Pjhiladelphia City Directory- Lookup #general

Avrohom Krauss <krauss@...>
 

Would someone who has access to Phila.City Directories be willing to to do
me a lookup for the years 1903-1918. Please respond privately. Thank you.

Avrohom Krauss
Telz-Stone Israel


Re: Emigration Dates on US Census and City Directories #general

Lisa Lepore <llepore@...>
 

From: "Guy M." <guyam@adelphia.net>

Could someone offer an opinion as to why my ancestors would give different
dates of emigration on different censuses? Most of my Jewish ancestors were
in the US by 1900. Looking at the four, US Censuses (1900 -1930) an
individual would often have listed 3 or 4 different dates of emigration,
sometimes, 10 years apart. I am trying to figure out what led to this.
Would it be safe to guess that the date given in 1900 was closer to the
actual date?

Also I found that my FREED ancestors' names were spelled 8 different ways in
the Buffalo, NY city directories. (Freed, Freede, Fred, Frede, Freid,
Freide, Fried and Friede) Does anyone know how the names were collected for
the directories?
There is no way to know who gave that information to the census taker.
If the enumerator came around during the work day, the adults, or at least
the head of household, would not have been at home [unless he was
unemployed or not at work that day per the census information] The
information could have been given by the spouse, a child, a neighbor, an
elderly relative........

They may have lied intentionally for some personal benefit - the
residency requirement for becoming a citizen comes to mind. They
may have wanted to disassociate themselves >from some event that
happened in the year they really immigrated.

They may have had a distrust of government officials, and did not want
to answer truthfully.

They may not have understood the question, and perhaps gave the year
they became a citizen rather than the year they arrived.

They may not have known the date they arrived.

Then there was the language barrier - whatever year they said may have
been misunderstood by the enumerator, or he could have just written it
down incorrectly.

I think it is logical to assume the date given in the first census
might be more correct as it was closer to the date they arrived, so less
likely to be forgotten. If I were looking for passenger arrivals, I'd
probably use this date as a starting point. If I didn't find anything, I
would start with date of the earliest document you have for them, and
work back >from there.

As far as the directories are concerned, spelling was kind of vague.
The person who collected that information probably just wrote down
the name the way he thought it should be spelled, based on how it
sounded.

Lisa
Mendon, MA


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Emigration Dates on US Census and City Directories #general

Lisa Lepore <llepore@...>
 

From: "Guy M." <guyam@adelphia.net>

Could someone offer an opinion as to why my ancestors would give different
dates of emigration on different censuses? Most of my Jewish ancestors were
in the US by 1900. Looking at the four, US Censuses (1900 -1930) an
individual would often have listed 3 or 4 different dates of emigration,
sometimes, 10 years apart. I am trying to figure out what led to this.
Would it be safe to guess that the date given in 1900 was closer to the
actual date?

Also I found that my FREED ancestors' names were spelled 8 different ways in
the Buffalo, NY city directories. (Freed, Freede, Fred, Frede, Freid,
Freide, Fried and Friede) Does anyone know how the names were collected for
the directories?
There is no way to know who gave that information to the census taker.
If the enumerator came around during the work day, the adults, or at least
the head of household, would not have been at home [unless he was
unemployed or not at work that day per the census information] The
information could have been given by the spouse, a child, a neighbor, an
elderly relative........

They may have lied intentionally for some personal benefit - the
residency requirement for becoming a citizen comes to mind. They
may have wanted to disassociate themselves >from some event that
happened in the year they really immigrated.

They may have had a distrust of government officials, and did not want
to answer truthfully.

They may not have understood the question, and perhaps gave the year
they became a citizen rather than the year they arrived.

They may not have known the date they arrived.

Then there was the language barrier - whatever year they said may have
been misunderstood by the enumerator, or he could have just written it
down incorrectly.

I think it is logical to assume the date given in the first census
might be more correct as it was closer to the date they arrived, so less
likely to be forgotten. If I were looking for passenger arrivals, I'd
probably use this date as a starting point. If I didn't find anything, I
would start with date of the earliest document you have for them, and
work back >from there.

As far as the directories are concerned, spelling was kind of vague.
The person who collected that information probably just wrote down
the name the way he thought it should be spelled, based on how it
sounded.

Lisa
Mendon, MA


Viewmates, help to read #general

Fred Zimmak <Fred.Zimmak@...>
 

Dear Genners,

I have two viewmates where I can not read the marked part:

http://data.jewishgen.org/ViewMate/ALL/viewmateview.asp?key=6235

http://data.jewishgen.org/ViewMate/ALL/viewmateview.asp?key=6236

Please respond privatly.

Fred Zimmak / Sweden, Stockholm


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Viewmates, help to read #general

Fred Zimmak <Fred.Zimmak@...>
 

Dear Genners,

I have two viewmates where I can not read the marked part:

http://data.jewishgen.org/ViewMate/ALL/viewmateview.asp?key=6235

http://data.jewishgen.org/ViewMate/ALL/viewmateview.asp?key=6236

Please respond privatly.

Fred Zimmak / Sweden, Stockholm


Jewish genealogy #general

Celia Male <celiamale@...>
 

Judith Romney Wegner was musing on the interest in
genealogy since biblical times [Numbers 1:18 with
references to censuses, pedigrees, the occurrence of
the word "begat" etc]. She ended by saying: So now we
have an answer for those who tease us about wasting so
much time on this activity; we can quote a good
biblical precedent for pursuing our "yihus." We can
tell them that our ancestors had already "been there,
done that" before they ever got to the Promised Land!

I am unclear, without much further research, of the
chronology of these biblical events vis-a-vis the
pharaonic dynasties, but I was lucky enough to be one
of the select few to visit the Eastern Desert of Egypt
to study pre-dynastic petroglyphs. I even have a
triangulation point in the desert identified by my
initials! At the end of the trip, I visited the famous
quarry of Wadi Hammamet on the tarmac road en route to
Quseir on the Red Sea.

This has fabulous inscriptions on the walls chiseled
in by all the foremen who worked there - it is in
effect a family tree of the foremen, which has never
disintegrated - the rock and weather conditions have
preserved it perfectly. The same families were in
charge of the quarries for many generations.

The quarry was worked for thousands of years as it has
some of the best quality stone, used for obelisks and
sarcophagi all over the Nile Valley and Upper Egypt.

If our forebears ever worked in/near these quarries as
slaves or crossed the Red Sea near this point [the
route was used since prehistoric times as attested by
petroglyphs] to reach the Promised Land, they could
not have missed this family tree. There may have been
many more similar family trees in Egypt carved into
rocks, or written on papyrus, which have by now
disappeared. This family tree is particularly
inaccessible, being high up on vertical stone walls.

Who taught whom? That is the question we do not have
an answer to, but perhaps genealogy is programmed into
the human brain and psyche - a deep-seated
psychological need?

Yes, indeed, we would have much to talk about were we
ever to meet these early ancient Egyptian genealogists
of Wadi Hammamet. No hard disc failures for them. They
made sure that their family tree would survive for
ever.

I envy them.

Celia Male [UK]


NY naturalisation #general

Albert Braunstein <sbr@...>
 

I have learnt that Abraham ERDSTEIN applied for naturalisation in New York
in the Southern region (Manhattan + Bronx)
The date of his certificate was 8/2/1928 when he was 59 years old.
The petition number is 134543
How would I go about obtaining his naturalisation records?


Albert Braunstein
Melbourne, Australia


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Jewish genealogy #general

Celia Male <celiamale@...>
 

Judith Romney Wegner was musing on the interest in
genealogy since biblical times [Numbers 1:18 with
references to censuses, pedigrees, the occurrence of
the word "begat" etc]. She ended by saying: So now we
have an answer for those who tease us about wasting so
much time on this activity; we can quote a good
biblical precedent for pursuing our "yihus." We can
tell them that our ancestors had already "been there,
done that" before they ever got to the Promised Land!

I am unclear, without much further research, of the
chronology of these biblical events vis-a-vis the
pharaonic dynasties, but I was lucky enough to be one
of the select few to visit the Eastern Desert of Egypt
to study pre-dynastic petroglyphs. I even have a
triangulation point in the desert identified by my
initials! At the end of the trip, I visited the famous
quarry of Wadi Hammamet on the tarmac road en route to
Quseir on the Red Sea.

This has fabulous inscriptions on the walls chiseled
in by all the foremen who worked there - it is in
effect a family tree of the foremen, which has never
disintegrated - the rock and weather conditions have
preserved it perfectly. The same families were in
charge of the quarries for many generations.

The quarry was worked for thousands of years as it has
some of the best quality stone, used for obelisks and
sarcophagi all over the Nile Valley and Upper Egypt.

If our forebears ever worked in/near these quarries as
slaves or crossed the Red Sea near this point [the
route was used since prehistoric times as attested by
petroglyphs] to reach the Promised Land, they could
not have missed this family tree. There may have been
many more similar family trees in Egypt carved into
rocks, or written on papyrus, which have by now
disappeared. This family tree is particularly
inaccessible, being high up on vertical stone walls.

Who taught whom? That is the question we do not have
an answer to, but perhaps genealogy is programmed into
the human brain and psyche - a deep-seated
psychological need?

Yes, indeed, we would have much to talk about were we
ever to meet these early ancient Egyptian genealogists
of Wadi Hammamet. No hard disc failures for them. They
made sure that their family tree would survive for
ever.

I envy them.

Celia Male [UK]


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen NY naturalisation #general

Albert Braunstein <sbr@...>
 

I have learnt that Abraham ERDSTEIN applied for naturalisation in New York
in the Southern region (Manhattan + Bronx)
The date of his certificate was 8/2/1928 when he was 59 years old.
The petition number is 134543
How would I go about obtaining his naturalisation records?


Albert Braunstein
Melbourne, Australia