Date   

Re: h-sig digest: June 06, 2005 #hungary

Robert Neu
 

That's what is listed on the FHL film for the city of
Temesvar.

Robert

--- vkahn@kmort.com wrote:

Judy,

What is the source for your information that there
were only 6 Jewish
households enumerated in the 1848 Jewish Census of
Temesvar? The
on-line version of the 1901-06 Jewish Encyclopedia
has the following
info about Temesvar:

The earliest Jewish census at Temesvar was taken
in 1739, when there
were 139 Ashkenazim and 81 Sephardim (46 families
altogether). In 1755
there were 23 Jewish families in the city; 53 in
1772; 76 in 1776; and
72 in 1781. In 1840 the Jewish population of the
city was about 1,200,
of whom 750 lived in the citadel, 340 in the city,
and about 50 in the
suburbs. In 1858 the number was 2,202; in
1890,4,870; and in 1901,
5,788 (including Jewish soldiers, 5,916). The
total population of
Temesvar is 53,033.
Go to http://www.jewishencyclopedia.com/index.jsp
and click on T to
find the full entry.

Keep in mind that the Hungarian State Archives has
census records that
the FHL has not filmed.

Vivian Kahn, Oakland, CA

On Jun 6, 2005, at 11:00 PM, H-SIG digest wrote:

Subject: Temesvar 1848
From: Jbacskai@aol.com
Date: Mon, 6 Jun 2005 03:07:50 EDT
X-Message-Number: 1

On June 1, 2005 Peter I Hidas wrote:
Temesvar was an important Jewish community from
the 17th century. In
1910 6728 Jews lived there. Total pop.: 72,555.
The Jews migrated
here
from the Balkans and were Sephardic. In 1840 the
Jewish pop. was 960,
by 1880 it grew to 4196.
Peter,
Why does the 1848 Jewish Census list only 6
households? Could nearly
1000
have been overlooked or was there a reason why
they were intentionally
left
out? Granted, there were some more Jews in
Temesvar who were Turkish
subjects,
but they were given only short term, temporary
permits to stay. As far
as I can
tell, that's the only indication (according to
correspondence
attached to
the census) for a larger number of Jews in
Temesvar in1848.

Judy Bacskai
Kensington, CA


Hungary SIG #Hungary Re:h-sig digest: June 06, 2005 #hungary

Robert Neu
 

That's what is listed on the FHL film for the city of
Temesvar.

Robert

--- vkahn@kmort.com wrote:

Judy,

What is the source for your information that there
were only 6 Jewish
households enumerated in the 1848 Jewish Census of
Temesvar? The
on-line version of the 1901-06 Jewish Encyclopedia
has the following
info about Temesvar:

The earliest Jewish census at Temesvar was taken
in 1739, when there
were 139 Ashkenazim and 81 Sephardim (46 families
altogether). In 1755
there were 23 Jewish families in the city; 53 in
1772; 76 in 1776; and
72 in 1781. In 1840 the Jewish population of the
city was about 1,200,
of whom 750 lived in the citadel, 340 in the city,
and about 50 in the
suburbs. In 1858 the number was 2,202; in
1890,4,870; and in 1901,
5,788 (including Jewish soldiers, 5,916). The
total population of
Temesvar is 53,033.
Go to http://www.jewishencyclopedia.com/index.jsp
and click on T to
find the full entry.

Keep in mind that the Hungarian State Archives has
census records that
the FHL has not filmed.

Vivian Kahn, Oakland, CA

On Jun 6, 2005, at 11:00 PM, H-SIG digest wrote:

Subject: Temesvar 1848
From: Jbacskai@aol.com
Date: Mon, 6 Jun 2005 03:07:50 EDT
X-Message-Number: 1

On June 1, 2005 Peter I Hidas wrote:
Temesvar was an important Jewish community from
the 17th century. In
1910 6728 Jews lived there. Total pop.: 72,555.
The Jews migrated
here
from the Balkans and were Sephardic. In 1840 the
Jewish pop. was 960,
by 1880 it grew to 4196.
Peter,
Why does the 1848 Jewish Census list only 6
households? Could nearly
1000
have been overlooked or was there a reason why
they were intentionally
left
out? Granted, there were some more Jews in
Temesvar who were Turkish
subjects,
but they were given only short term, temporary
permits to stay. As far
as I can
tell, that's the only indication (according to
correspondence
attached to
the census) for a larger number of Jews in
Temesvar in1848.

Judy Bacskai
Kensington, CA


Hungarian-Slovak Rail Travel #hungary

Vivian Kahn
 

I'm planning to travel by rail during my upcoming trip to Hungary and
Slovakia. Eastern European rail passes cost $230 1st Class/$162 2nd
class for five days of travel in Hungary, Slovakia, Czech Republic etc.
if purchased >from the US. Is this less expensive than the cost of rail
tickets purchased in Hungary and Slovakia? Please respond off-list.

Vivian Kahn, Oakland, CA

Researching (partial list):

GRUNVALD/Bratislava, Michalovce, Humenne, Slov.
KOHN/Ung megye, Hung.
MARKUS/Sepsiszentgyorgy, Hung. (Sfante Gheorghu, Rom)
MOSKOVITS/MOSKOWITZ/MOSS, Ostrov (Kisozstro), Sobrance, Bunkocz, Kosice
(Kassa),Ungvar, Michalovce, Presov, NYC, Cleveland
NEUMANN/Sobrance, Michalovce, Kosice (Kassa), Sabinov
(Kis-Szeben), Vranov (Varanno), Kriszti (Kereszt), Slov.
POLACSEK/ROZENBERG/Sobrance
SIMKO/Kosice
VERO/Debrecen, Nyirbator


Hungary SIG #Hungary Hungarian-Slovak Rail Travel #hungary

Vivian Kahn
 

I'm planning to travel by rail during my upcoming trip to Hungary and
Slovakia. Eastern European rail passes cost $230 1st Class/$162 2nd
class for five days of travel in Hungary, Slovakia, Czech Republic etc.
if purchased >from the US. Is this less expensive than the cost of rail
tickets purchased in Hungary and Slovakia? Please respond off-list.

Vivian Kahn, Oakland, CA

Researching (partial list):

GRUNVALD/Bratislava, Michalovce, Humenne, Slov.
KOHN/Ung megye, Hung.
MARKUS/Sepsiszentgyorgy, Hung. (Sfante Gheorghu, Rom)
MOSKOVITS/MOSKOWITZ/MOSS, Ostrov (Kisozstro), Sobrance, Bunkocz, Kosice
(Kassa),Ungvar, Michalovce, Presov, NYC, Cleveland
NEUMANN/Sobrance, Michalovce, Kosice (Kassa), Sabinov
(Kis-Szeben), Vranov (Varanno), Kriszti (Kereszt), Slov.
POLACSEK/ROZENBERG/Sobrance
SIMKO/Kosice
VERO/Debrecen, Nyirbator


South Prussian Land Records 1793 -94 #poland

Geoff Kaiser <geoff_kaiser@...>
 

Dear Researchers,

I have recently come across a website that has extensive listings of names
from 1793 - 94 Land records for South Prussia.
I can not testify that it contains Jewish records, however, I have seen
names that certainly would suggest such. I hope others can find this of
value

The address is: www.genealogy.drefs.net/introduction.htm

Regards

Geoff Kaiser
Melbourne
AUSTRALIA


JRI Poland #Poland South Prussian Land Records 1793 -94 #poland

Geoff Kaiser <geoff_kaiser@...>
 

Dear Researchers,

I have recently come across a website that has extensive listings of names
from 1793 - 94 Land records for South Prussia.
I can not testify that it contains Jewish records, however, I have seen
names that certainly would suggest such. I hope others can find this of
value

The address is: www.genealogy.drefs.net/introduction.htm

Regards

Geoff Kaiser
Melbourne
AUSTRALIA


Henry Minczeles #lithuania

Lev Raphael <levraphael@...>
 

Has anyone read this book?

Vilna Wilno Vilnius : La Jérusalem de Lituanie
de Henri Minczeles

Is it illustrated?

Thanks,
Lev Raphael


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania Henry Minczeles #lithuania

Lev Raphael <levraphael@...>
 

Has anyone read this book?

Vilna Wilno Vilnius : La Jérusalem de Lituanie
de Henri Minczeles

Is it illustrated?

Thanks,
Lev Raphael


Searching: HORETZKY and BRAININ #germany

oedekerk@...
 

Dear Genners,
I am new to this site and would be appreciative if someone could answer the
following two questions:

1. Roots, history, and origin of any family member of the last name
HORETZKY (please only this spelling!).

2. Meaning and origin of the last name BRAININ.

Thank you for each clue and contribution.

Best regards, Bo Brainin Germany oedekerk@gmx.net


German SIG #Germany Searching: HORETZKY and BRAININ #germany

oedekerk@...
 

Dear Genners,
I am new to this site and would be appreciative if someone could answer the
following two questions:

1. Roots, history, and origin of any family member of the last name
HORETZKY (please only this spelling!).

2. Meaning and origin of the last name BRAININ.

Thank you for each clue and contribution.

Best regards, Bo Brainin Germany oedekerk@gmx.net


re; Stromwasserowna #poland

Celia Male <celiamale@...>
 

Robert Strumwasser of Sharon, MA who is engaged in
one-surname-research on the surname STROMWASSER
(sometimes SZTROMWASSER) recently came across a woman
whose name is given as Eliza STROMWASSEROWNA. She was
from Zbarazh in eastern Galicia and was studying
in Krakow. He wonders what exactly this suffix
signifies.

I must state clearly that I am not an expert on
Stromwasser, family names or Russian and/or
Polish/Czech suffixes, but have checked them out on
Google and we have had some detailed answers on the
jri-pl and the General Discussion Group, which I found
enlightening.

I do know however that many Galicians settled in
Bohemia and Moravia in the 1800s and 1900s. These
women would have had suffixes "ova" at the end of
their family names.

There are two STROMWASSEROVA listed on Yad Vashem as
dying in Theresienstadt. I presume they came from
Czech-speaking areas and may have been Galician in
origin. I wonder if Robert has noted them in his
research? No further details are given. They may be
mother and daughter. There is sadly no testimony:

Stromwasserova Antonie dob 1905
Stromwasserova Medea dob 1928

If you google - ova czech suffix - you will see some
interesting disussion on the suffix.

Even the Germans used a suffix for women, which you
may come across in early documents: namely "in".

In Switzerland, this "in" suffix was still used in the
late 19th century. In Germany, Austria and the Czech
lands it was discarded in the early 19th century.


Celia Male [UK]


JRI Poland #Poland re; Stromwasserowna #poland

Celia Male <celiamale@...>
 

Robert Strumwasser of Sharon, MA who is engaged in
one-surname-research on the surname STROMWASSER
(sometimes SZTROMWASSER) recently came across a woman
whose name is given as Eliza STROMWASSEROWNA. She was
from Zbarazh in eastern Galicia and was studying
in Krakow. He wonders what exactly this suffix
signifies.

I must state clearly that I am not an expert on
Stromwasser, family names or Russian and/or
Polish/Czech suffixes, but have checked them out on
Google and we have had some detailed answers on the
jri-pl and the General Discussion Group, which I found
enlightening.

I do know however that many Galicians settled in
Bohemia and Moravia in the 1800s and 1900s. These
women would have had suffixes "ova" at the end of
their family names.

There are two STROMWASSEROVA listed on Yad Vashem as
dying in Theresienstadt. I presume they came from
Czech-speaking areas and may have been Galician in
origin. I wonder if Robert has noted them in his
research? No further details are given. They may be
mother and daughter. There is sadly no testimony:

Stromwasserova Antonie dob 1905
Stromwasserova Medea dob 1928

If you google - ova czech suffix - you will see some
interesting disussion on the suffix.

Even the Germans used a suffix for women, which you
may come across in early documents: namely "in".

In Switzerland, this "in" suffix was still used in the
late 19th century. In Germany, Austria and the Czech
lands it was discarded in the early 19th century.


Celia Male [UK]


BOOK CITE - A new traveller's guide to Jewish Salzburg, Austria #germany

Rosanne Leeson <rdleeson@...>
 

The Salzburg Festival was founded by Max Reinhardt and owed its post
world war II revival in large part to Jewish artists. Stefan Zweig
lived in the city, until he was driven out--the history of the
Jewish population of Salzburg is long and varied. Investigation
shows that Jews first came to the city in Roman times and Jewish
traders settled in Salzburg around 1200.and formed a first Jewish
community. About twenty years later a second community formed that
lasted until the burning of the entire Jewish population in 1404.
The next settlement lasted >from 1418 to 1498. In the last third of
the nineteenth century a fourth Jewish settlement was created that
grew rapidly and included leading businessmen. In 1938 the
Nationalsocialists declared Salzburg "judenrein" ["cleansed of
Jews"]. Today about a hundred Jews live in Salzburg.

I have recently learned of a brand new book, a "Tourist's guide to
Jewish Salzburg". At present it is only available in German, but an
English translation is being planned. I have no monetary interest
in this publication, but thought that it might be of interest to
members of the this GerSIG. Here are the details, if you are interested:

"Ein Führer durch das jüdische Salzburg" von Stan Nadel
ca. 160 Seiten, 13,5 x 21 cm, gebunden
ca. EUR 25,- / Sfr 42,50, WG 1552
[3-902144-93-9], 2005

It is being published by Jung und Jung Verlag in Salzburg. For more
information and orders see www.jungundjung.at or email
office@jungundjung.at or go to a well-known online book-ordering
site at its German link.

Rosanne Leeson Silicon Valley California <rdleeson@sbcglobal.net>


German SIG #Germany BOOK CITE - A new traveller's guide to Jewish Salzburg, Austria #germany

Rosanne Leeson <rdleeson@...>
 

The Salzburg Festival was founded by Max Reinhardt and owed its post
world war II revival in large part to Jewish artists. Stefan Zweig
lived in the city, until he was driven out--the history of the
Jewish population of Salzburg is long and varied. Investigation
shows that Jews first came to the city in Roman times and Jewish
traders settled in Salzburg around 1200.and formed a first Jewish
community. About twenty years later a second community formed that
lasted until the burning of the entire Jewish population in 1404.
The next settlement lasted >from 1418 to 1498. In the last third of
the nineteenth century a fourth Jewish settlement was created that
grew rapidly and included leading businessmen. In 1938 the
Nationalsocialists declared Salzburg "judenrein" ["cleansed of
Jews"]. Today about a hundred Jews live in Salzburg.

I have recently learned of a brand new book, a "Tourist's guide to
Jewish Salzburg". At present it is only available in German, but an
English translation is being planned. I have no monetary interest
in this publication, but thought that it might be of interest to
members of the this GerSIG. Here are the details, if you are interested:

"Ein Führer durch das jüdische Salzburg" von Stan Nadel
ca. 160 Seiten, 13,5 x 21 cm, gebunden
ca. EUR 25,- / Sfr 42,50, WG 1552
[3-902144-93-9], 2005

It is being published by Jung und Jung Verlag in Salzburg. For more
information and orders see www.jungundjung.at or email
office@jungundjung.at or go to a well-known online book-ordering
site at its German link.

Rosanne Leeson Silicon Valley California <rdleeson@sbcglobal.net>


Re: List of departure ports? #general

Harry Dodsworth <af877@...>
 

Judy Baston (Jrbaston@aol.com) posted:
Is there somewhere a list of departure ports used by
emigrants >from Eastern Europe?

I have heard a tape recording made by another researcher's
grandmother in which she speaks (quite clearly) of boarding
a ship in a place she called "Andrerten." I'd like to see if
there is a departure port that might correspond with this
location name.
This is almost certainly Antwerp - Antwerpen in Flemish - a
commonly used port for emigration to North America.

--
Harry Dodsworth Ottawa Ontario Canada af877@freenet.carleton.ca


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: List of departure ports? #general

Harry Dodsworth <af877@...>
 

Judy Baston (Jrbaston@aol.com) posted:
Is there somewhere a list of departure ports used by
emigrants >from Eastern Europe?

I have heard a tape recording made by another researcher's
grandmother in which she speaks (quite clearly) of boarding
a ship in a place she called "Andrerten." I'd like to see if
there is a departure port that might correspond with this
location name.
This is almost certainly Antwerp - Antwerpen in Flemish - a
commonly used port for emigration to North America.

--
Harry Dodsworth Ottawa Ontario Canada af877@freenet.carleton.ca


SALOMON Wetzlar #germany

Gerrard Salomon <jerrysalomon@...>
 

Hi Gersigers; Since I see that so many inquiries find someone who can answer
I decided not to sit idly by any longer. I have tried to elicit some data from
the City offices of Wetzlar (Hessen)rearding the parents of Ruben SALOMON b. 1845
in Wetzlar d.1920 in ?

married three times: 1) Hanna SONNEBORN b. 1850, Breidenbach,d. 1874 ?
They had one child: Albert SALOMON b.1869 Wetzlar d. 1944 Bogota,Colombia, my
grandfather. Mar. 2)Flora SONNEBORN b.1845 Mar. 3)unknown.

They couldn't help, so I wrote to the Hessian state archives,(the correspondence
was in German both times)and they looked and came up emptyhanded. They
suggested a professional genealogist. Is there someone out there who might have
other sources? Thank you very much,

Gerrard Salomon, La Jolla CA <jerrysalomon@sbcglobal.net>


German SIG #Germany SALOMON Wetzlar #germany

Gerrard Salomon <jerrysalomon@...>
 

Hi Gersigers; Since I see that so many inquiries find someone who can answer
I decided not to sit idly by any longer. I have tried to elicit some data from
the City offices of Wetzlar (Hessen)rearding the parents of Ruben SALOMON b. 1845
in Wetzlar d.1920 in ?

married three times: 1) Hanna SONNEBORN b. 1850, Breidenbach,d. 1874 ?
They had one child: Albert SALOMON b.1869 Wetzlar d. 1944 Bogota,Colombia, my
grandfather. Mar. 2)Flora SONNEBORN b.1845 Mar. 3)unknown.

They couldn't help, so I wrote to the Hessian state archives,(the correspondence
was in German both times)and they looked and came up emptyhanded. They
suggested a professional genealogist. Is there someone out there who might have
other sources? Thank you very much,

Gerrard Salomon, La Jolla CA <jerrysalomon@sbcglobal.net>


Re: 1916 census of Jerusalem #general

Mathilde Tagger <tagger@...>
 

Hi Nick,

You wrote:
Apparently the Ottomans took censuses in 1905, 1911, 1912 and 1914.
In 1916, a census was taken by the American Aid Committee to enable
distribution of food and money to the Jewish population.

I have also found that the material >from the Ottoman Administration. Census
and Population (Nefus) Registers 1884-1917 (Record Group 39) can be read in
the Reading-Room of the State Archives.
www.isragen.org.il/ROS/ARCHIVES/archive-state-2.html
--------->
As I earlier write, the Ottoman censuses are kept by the Israel State Archives.
The problem with these censuses is that they are written in Osmanli script -
a kind of Arabic handwriting, and only some university scholars can read them.
People, fluent in Arabic, can decipher the handwriting with enormous
difficulties.

Shalom,
Mathilde Tagger
Jerusalem


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: 1916 census of Jerusalem #general

Mathilde Tagger <tagger@...>
 

Hi Nick,

You wrote:
Apparently the Ottomans took censuses in 1905, 1911, 1912 and 1914.
In 1916, a census was taken by the American Aid Committee to enable
distribution of food and money to the Jewish population.

I have also found that the material >from the Ottoman Administration. Census
and Population (Nefus) Registers 1884-1917 (Record Group 39) can be read in
the Reading-Room of the State Archives.
www.isragen.org.il/ROS/ARCHIVES/archive-state-2.html
--------->
As I earlier write, the Ottoman censuses are kept by the Israel State Archives.
The problem with these censuses is that they are written in Osmanli script -
a kind of Arabic handwriting, and only some university scholars can read them.
People, fluent in Arabic, can decipher the handwriting with enormous
difficulties.

Shalom,
Mathilde Tagger
Jerusalem