Date   

ROSENBAUM descendants of R'Naftali KATZ ("Smichas Chachamim") #general

Yonatan Ben-Ari
 

My greatgrandfather's grandfather, a certain Yisrael (ROSENBAUM) of Ostrov was
(supposedly) a descendant of the Mahara"l and the Maharsha"l through Reb Naftali
KATZ (a.k.a "The Smichas Chachomim"). The above Yisrael , a student of the "Apta"
rav came to Eretz Yisrael during the first half of the 19th cent. to Tzfat.
According to family lore he moved >from Tzfat to Tveria and then possibly to
Jerusalem.

In a book called "Mazkeret Legedolei Ostrov " he mentions two R' Yisrael of Ostrov
and comments that they may have been the same person. The book doesn't mention the
family name ROSENBAUM, but some researchers in our family believe that was his
name. Eventually his children took the family name, SCHECHTER, according to their
profession. One of the better known SCHECHTERs of this family is Harav Yaacov Meir
SCHECHTER one of the leading Rabbis of the Breslev chassidut.

In the book "Tveria" published in the 1970s there is a list of families who lived
at any time in Tveria without any indication when they lived there. The name
ROSENBOIM appears there.

Are there any descendants of Reb Yisrael of Ostrov who would like to make
connection with me so that we can coordinate our data on our family roots?

Yoni Ben-Ari, Jerusalem

MODERATOR: Private responses, please


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen ROSENBAUM descendants of R'Naftali KATZ ("Smichas Chachamim") #general

Yonatan Ben-Ari
 

My greatgrandfather's grandfather, a certain Yisrael (ROSENBAUM) of Ostrov was
(supposedly) a descendant of the Mahara"l and the Maharsha"l through Reb Naftali
KATZ (a.k.a "The Smichas Chachomim"). The above Yisrael , a student of the "Apta"
rav came to Eretz Yisrael during the first half of the 19th cent. to Tzfat.
According to family lore he moved >from Tzfat to Tveria and then possibly to
Jerusalem.

In a book called "Mazkeret Legedolei Ostrov " he mentions two R' Yisrael of Ostrov
and comments that they may have been the same person. The book doesn't mention the
family name ROSENBAUM, but some researchers in our family believe that was his
name. Eventually his children took the family name, SCHECHTER, according to their
profession. One of the better known SCHECHTERs of this family is Harav Yaacov Meir
SCHECHTER one of the leading Rabbis of the Breslev chassidut.

In the book "Tveria" published in the 1970s there is a list of families who lived
at any time in Tveria without any indication when they lived there. The name
ROSENBOIM appears there.

Are there any descendants of Reb Yisrael of Ostrov who would like to make
connection with me so that we can coordinate our data on our family roots?

Yoni Ben-Ari, Jerusalem

MODERATOR: Private responses, please


Issue 135 of Genealo-J has just been published #france

Georges Graner
 

/Genealo-J, /publication of the Jewish Genealogical Society of France,
Issue 135, Fall 2018, has just been published. This issue is almost
completely devoted to North-African and Sephardic Jewish communities.

When she was a child, Brigitte Benkemoun's grandmother used to tell
about her uncle Albert Achache who left Algeria for France mainland and
made a fortune in Nice but, denounced by his partner, a “M. Roux”, was
deported and killed in Auschwitz. When Benkemoun stood in front of the
wall of names at the Holocaust Memorial in Paris, she understood that
the story was more intricate than the legend. She decided to reconstruct
Albert’s entire life >from Tlemcen, where he was born in 1888, to
Auschwitz. She found that Albert’s name was Achache-Roux, as he was
adopted in 1933 by Justin Roux, a wealthy jeweler with no children. This
Justin Roux had previously adopted a Gaston Roux who /might/ have been
the denouncer.

Before the French protectorate of Tunisia was established in 1881, the
country had no official metrical registers. An active group of members
of our Society has retrieved many religious, consular or commercial
sources to compensate for this lack of registers. Links have existed for
centuries between Tunis and the Jewish community of Leghorn (today
Livorno), Italy. Gilles Boulu exploited all these new sources, in
Tunisia or in Leghorn, to extend the genealogy of the Mendes Ossuna or
Ossona family. In Leghorn, two registers, written in Portuguese, reach
the year 1668. The author found there the /ketuboth/ of Moise Mendes
Ossuna born circa 1640, who was the first one of the Ossuna family to
leave Leghorn for Tunis. His father Abram, born 1610-20 might have been
the first one of his family to come >from the Iberic peninsula where he
would have lived previously as a /converso /(crypto-Jew). Boulu can now
cite at least 12 generations of this family up to people presently
alive. Note that Osuna is a Spanish town in the province of Seville.

David Encaoua belongs to the Al-Naqua (and various other spellings)
lineage. The oldest known members of this family are Yehouda and Shmuel
Al-Naqua who lived in Toledo, Spain, and were hanged about 1200. Encoua
details the lives of four illustrious members of this family. Israel ben
Yossef Al-Naqua, burned alive in 1391 in Toledo, wrote numerous
liturgical, poetical and philosophical works. His son, Ephraim ben
Israel Al Naqua, who wrote influential philosophical works, born in
Toledo 1359 left Spain for Tlemcen, Algeria, where he died in 1442.
Several centuries later, Abraham Ankawa (born Sale 1812 - died Mascara
1890) spent most of his life in Morocco, but also travelled in Algeria
and in Leghorn. He was an expert on Jewish jurisprudence. Raphael
Encaoua (Sale 1838 - Sale 1935) became the first president of the
Rabbinical High Court of Morocco during the French protectorate.

Alexander Beider attacks the problem of the origin of the North African
Jews, namely those living there before the migration of the Portuguese
and Spanish Jews. Many authors have written that Berber tribes converted
to Judaism before the Arabic invasion. Beider refutes this theory
primarily using onomastic arguments. He finds that a Berber origin is
valid for one only given name and several dozen of Jewish surnames >from
Morocco, as well as a few surnames in eastern Algeria. These names
appeared in the Jewish communities that used a Berber idiom as their
vernacular language. Nothing indicates that they already existed in the
Middle Ages. Beider claims that the theory of the Berber origin of these
Jews is purely speculative. The question of their origin is still open.

Pierre-Andre Meyer writes a short paper in memory of two of the last
soldiers of World War I, Roger Cahen and Roger Weill, both were born in
1896. Roger Cahen died on July 6, 2003, at age 106. Roger Weill died on
June 6, 2006, one month before his 110th birthday. Only six soldiers of
World War I survived him. Meyer traces the genealogies of Cahen and of
Weill back to Alsace.

Georges Graner
georges.graner@wanadoo.fr
www.genealoj.org


French SIG #France Issue 135 of Genealo-J has just been published #france

Georges Graner
 

/Genealo-J, /publication of the Jewish Genealogical Society of France,
Issue 135, Fall 2018, has just been published. This issue is almost
completely devoted to North-African and Sephardic Jewish communities.

When she was a child, Brigitte Benkemoun's grandmother used to tell
about her uncle Albert Achache who left Algeria for France mainland and
made a fortune in Nice but, denounced by his partner, a “M. Roux”, was
deported and killed in Auschwitz. When Benkemoun stood in front of the
wall of names at the Holocaust Memorial in Paris, she understood that
the story was more intricate than the legend. She decided to reconstruct
Albert’s entire life >from Tlemcen, where he was born in 1888, to
Auschwitz. She found that Albert’s name was Achache-Roux, as he was
adopted in 1933 by Justin Roux, a wealthy jeweler with no children. This
Justin Roux had previously adopted a Gaston Roux who /might/ have been
the denouncer.

Before the French protectorate of Tunisia was established in 1881, the
country had no official metrical registers. An active group of members
of our Society has retrieved many religious, consular or commercial
sources to compensate for this lack of registers. Links have existed for
centuries between Tunis and the Jewish community of Leghorn (today
Livorno), Italy. Gilles Boulu exploited all these new sources, in
Tunisia or in Leghorn, to extend the genealogy of the Mendes Ossuna or
Ossona family. In Leghorn, two registers, written in Portuguese, reach
the year 1668. The author found there the /ketuboth/ of Moise Mendes
Ossuna born circa 1640, who was the first one of the Ossuna family to
leave Leghorn for Tunis. His father Abram, born 1610-20 might have been
the first one of his family to come >from the Iberic peninsula where he
would have lived previously as a /converso /(crypto-Jew). Boulu can now
cite at least 12 generations of this family up to people presently
alive. Note that Osuna is a Spanish town in the province of Seville.

David Encaoua belongs to the Al-Naqua (and various other spellings)
lineage. The oldest known members of this family are Yehouda and Shmuel
Al-Naqua who lived in Toledo, Spain, and were hanged about 1200. Encoua
details the lives of four illustrious members of this family. Israel ben
Yossef Al-Naqua, burned alive in 1391 in Toledo, wrote numerous
liturgical, poetical and philosophical works. His son, Ephraim ben
Israel Al Naqua, who wrote influential philosophical works, born in
Toledo 1359 left Spain for Tlemcen, Algeria, where he died in 1442.
Several centuries later, Abraham Ankawa (born Sale 1812 - died Mascara
1890) spent most of his life in Morocco, but also travelled in Algeria
and in Leghorn. He was an expert on Jewish jurisprudence. Raphael
Encaoua (Sale 1838 - Sale 1935) became the first president of the
Rabbinical High Court of Morocco during the French protectorate.

Alexander Beider attacks the problem of the origin of the North African
Jews, namely those living there before the migration of the Portuguese
and Spanish Jews. Many authors have written that Berber tribes converted
to Judaism before the Arabic invasion. Beider refutes this theory
primarily using onomastic arguments. He finds that a Berber origin is
valid for one only given name and several dozen of Jewish surnames >from
Morocco, as well as a few surnames in eastern Algeria. These names
appeared in the Jewish communities that used a Berber idiom as their
vernacular language. Nothing indicates that they already existed in the
Middle Ages. Beider claims that the theory of the Berber origin of these
Jews is purely speculative. The question of their origin is still open.

Pierre-Andre Meyer writes a short paper in memory of two of the last
soldiers of World War I, Roger Cahen and Roger Weill, both were born in
1896. Roger Cahen died on July 6, 2003, at age 106. Roger Weill died on
June 6, 2006, one month before his 110th birthday. Only six soldiers of
World War I survived him. Meyer traces the genealogies of Cahen and of
Weill back to Alsace.

Georges Graner
georges.graner@wanadoo.fr
www.genealoj.org


Was g grandmother's maiden name KENIG or WALDHORN? #general

Ellen Gottfried
 

My great grandmother used both last names, and I can't determine which
is correct. The documents I refer to are the only written records about her.
Entry of Marriage London bride Annie WALDERIN daughter of Louis WALDERIN 1898
Child's Birth Certificate Connecticut mother Annie WALDHORN 1902
Envelope of letter >from her son to Annie addressed to Anna KENIG 1940
Death Certificate Connecticut deceased Anna KENIG 1945

The ship records say that Annie is going to her brother Aaron KENIG.
Please help.
Ellen GOTTFRIED Plainview, New York


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Was g grandmother's maiden name KENIG or WALDHORN? #general

Ellen Gottfried
 

My great grandmother used both last names, and I can't determine which
is correct. The documents I refer to are the only written records about her.
Entry of Marriage London bride Annie WALDERIN daughter of Louis WALDERIN 1898
Child's Birth Certificate Connecticut mother Annie WALDHORN 1902
Envelope of letter >from her son to Annie addressed to Anna KENIG 1940
Death Certificate Connecticut deceased Anna KENIG 1945

The ship records say that Annie is going to her brother Aaron KENIG.
Please help.
Ellen GOTTFRIED Plainview, New York


Re: Nagrocki from Vilkija and question about immigration #lithuania

Andrea Nicki <nicandr4@...>
 

Hi I have another question related to my grandfather John Nagrocki who came
to the US in 1913 >from Vilkija at the age of 15. His parents never visited
him in the US. Was this common in Lithuania at this time, that the
children immigrated to the US while the parents stayed behind?

Thanks, Andrea

On Sun, Sep 30, 2018 at 6:08 AM Andrea Nicki nicandr4@aol.com wrote:

Hi, I'm trying to find out more information about my grandfather
John Nagrocki who was born in Vilkija, Lithuanian in 1898 and
arrived in NY in 1913. It's hard finding information about his
parents. He had a brother, Jurgis (husband of Rose Karnovsky)
and a sister Josephine (wife of John Gailus) who arrived in IL.

He may have had other siblings. I am wondering if there are
any other people out there who have my relatives in their trees.
It seems he was part Jewish as I have some European Jewish
ethnicity. I'm also interested in learning more about his family
name Nagrocki, also spelled Nagrodzki.

Thanks, Andrea Nicki


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania Re: Nagrocki from Vilkija and question about immigration #lithuania

Andrea Nicki <nicandr4@...>
 

Hi I have another question related to my grandfather John Nagrocki who came
to the US in 1913 >from Vilkija at the age of 15. His parents never visited
him in the US. Was this common in Lithuania at this time, that the
children immigrated to the US while the parents stayed behind?

Thanks, Andrea

On Sun, Sep 30, 2018 at 6:08 AM Andrea Nicki nicandr4@aol.com wrote:

Hi, I'm trying to find out more information about my grandfather
John Nagrocki who was born in Vilkija, Lithuanian in 1898 and
arrived in NY in 1913. It's hard finding information about his
parents. He had a brother, Jurgis (husband of Rose Karnovsky)
and a sister Josephine (wife of John Gailus) who arrived in IL.

He may have had other siblings. I am wondering if there are
any other people out there who have my relatives in their trees.
It seems he was part Jewish as I have some European Jewish
ethnicity. I'm also interested in learning more about his family
name Nagrocki, also spelled Nagrodzki.

Thanks, Andrea Nicki


ViewMate Translation Request - Russian #lithuania

Pat Fuller
 

His - I have posted a death record in Russian for which I need a
translation. It is on ViewMate at the following address:

https://www.jewishgen.org/ViewMate/viewmateview.asp?key=69681

Please respond via the form provided on the ViewMate image page.

Thank you very much.

Pat Redman Fuller
Simi Valley, California, USA

RESEARCHING: FAINBOIM Basarabeasca Moldova; KAPLITS Ukmerge Lithuania;
LEVITAN Kaliningrad Russia; LIPPMAN Taurage Lithuania; MUSS Ukmerge
Lithuania; NATHANSON Taurage Lithuania; RACHBUCH Husi Romania; ROITMAN
Carpineni Moldova; SHKOLNIK Hincesti Moldova


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania ViewMate Translation Request - Russian #lithuania

Pat Fuller
 

His - I have posted a death record in Russian for which I need a
translation. It is on ViewMate at the following address:

https://www.jewishgen.org/ViewMate/viewmateview.asp?key=69681

Please respond via the form provided on the ViewMate image page.

Thank you very much.

Pat Redman Fuller
Simi Valley, California, USA

RESEARCHING: FAINBOIM Basarabeasca Moldova; KAPLITS Ukmerge Lithuania;
LEVITAN Kaliningrad Russia; LIPPMAN Taurage Lithuania; MUSS Ukmerge
Lithuania; NATHANSON Taurage Lithuania; RACHBUCH Husi Romania; ROITMAN
Carpineni Moldova; SHKOLNIK Hincesti Moldova


Re: 1897 All-Russia census #lithuania

Russ Maurer
 

Michael Kaplan asked about the "Other names" column in the 1897
Russian census, referring to the Excel spreadsheet available to
qualified donors to LitvakSIG. In general, this column is supposed to
contain a copy of any surnames embedded elsewhere in a record in a
non-surname column (e.g., in a comment). The purpose is to make the
surname searchable as a surname data type in an online database. See
https://www.jewishgen.org/databases/$Transcription.html

Note that the 1897 Russian census of Lithuanian Jews is included in
the JewishGen Lithuania database, not the LitvakSIG All-Lithuania
Database. Information about the 1897 census is at
https://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Lithuania/LithCensus1897.htm

However, the other names column was not used in this way by the
indexers of the 1897 Russian census. Many of the names in this column
do not appear elsewhere in the same record. Without checking the
original record it is impossible to be certain but it seems to me that
most of the entries are accounted for as either 1.) the surname of the
property owner; 2.) the surname of another individual in the same
household, including servants; or 3.) the surname of an in-law or
other relative who may be in a different household, probably under the
same roof.

At this time, original images are not online. They may be requested
from the Lithuanian State Historical Archive, or viewed on microfiche
at the Family History Library in Salt Lake City..

Russ Maurer
Coordinator, Records Acquisition & Translation
LitvakSIG


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania Re: 1897 All-Russia census #lithuania

Russ Maurer
 

Michael Kaplan asked about the "Other names" column in the 1897
Russian census, referring to the Excel spreadsheet available to
qualified donors to LitvakSIG. In general, this column is supposed to
contain a copy of any surnames embedded elsewhere in a record in a
non-surname column (e.g., in a comment). The purpose is to make the
surname searchable as a surname data type in an online database. See
https://www.jewishgen.org/databases/$Transcription.html

Note that the 1897 Russian census of Lithuanian Jews is included in
the JewishGen Lithuania database, not the LitvakSIG All-Lithuania
Database. Information about the 1897 census is at
https://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Lithuania/LithCensus1897.htm

However, the other names column was not used in this way by the
indexers of the 1897 Russian census. Many of the names in this column
do not appear elsewhere in the same record. Without checking the
original record it is impossible to be certain but it seems to me that
most of the entries are accounted for as either 1.) the surname of the
property owner; 2.) the surname of another individual in the same
household, including servants; or 3.) the surname of an in-law or
other relative who may be in a different household, probably under the
same roof.

At this time, original images are not online. They may be requested
from the Lithuanian State Historical Archive, or viewed on microfiche
at the Family History Library in Salt Lake City..

Russ Maurer
Coordinator, Records Acquisition & Translation
LitvakSIG


Indexing of Memel / Klaipeda vital records now complete #lithuania

Russ Maurer
 

Over the last couple of years, the Klaipeda District Research
Group has made a concerted effort to complete the indexing
of available vital records for the city of Memel (now Klaipeda).
This effort has concluded successfully with the final files just
posted on our district site. While there are some gaps in the
records, we have marriages and deaths >from about 1875 to
1939, and births up to 1917 (later years of births are still
private). The last pieces to come in were the records after
1915. We posted those deaths this spring (507 records), and
just posted the marriages (139) and births (9). As usual, each
of these posted files will be available only to Klaipeda DRG
donors for the first 18 months, and then will be added to the
All-Lithuania Database for general access. Separate surname
lists for the post-1915 records and the records up to 1915 may
be viewed on the Klaipeda page of the LitvakSIG website,
https://www.litvaksig.org/research/district-research/klaipeda-district-research-group.
The surname lists include names of any parents, spouses, or
witnesses mentioned in the records.

We thank our intrepid researcher, Ignas Slajus, who spent hours
looking through thousands of pages of post-1915 civil
registrations to find and photograph the Jewish ones, and we
thank our volunteer translator, Alistair Stewart, for his contribution.

Russ Maurer
Coordinator, Klaipeda District Research Group


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania Indexing of Memel / Klaipeda vital records now complete #lithuania

Russ Maurer
 

Over the last couple of years, the Klaipeda District Research
Group has made a concerted effort to complete the indexing
of available vital records for the city of Memel (now Klaipeda).
This effort has concluded successfully with the final files just
posted on our district site. While there are some gaps in the
records, we have marriages and deaths >from about 1875 to
1939, and births up to 1917 (later years of births are still
private). The last pieces to come in were the records after
1915. We posted those deaths this spring (507 records), and
just posted the marriages (139) and births (9). As usual, each
of these posted files will be available only to Klaipeda DRG
donors for the first 18 months, and then will be added to the
All-Lithuania Database for general access. Separate surname
lists for the post-1915 records and the records up to 1915 may
be viewed on the Klaipeda page of the LitvakSIG website,
https://www.litvaksig.org/research/district-research/klaipeda-district-research-group.
The surname lists include names of any parents, spouses, or
witnesses mentioned in the records.

We thank our intrepid researcher, Ignas Slajus, who spent hours
looking through thousands of pages of post-1915 civil
registrations to find and photograph the Jewish ones, and we
thank our volunteer translator, Alistair Stewart, for his contribution.

Russ Maurer
Coordinator, Klaipeda District Research Group


my grandmother's first husband #poland

lizdmiller@...
 

Hello,

I never asked my grandmother about her late first husband with whom
she had my mother's two half siblings who were born in Poland.
Her 1912 passport was recently translated for me. Gena Ides,
daughter of Haim Tobijash Borenshtein was born on 1/13 February 1888.
Her passport was issued by Gora-Kalvaniya gmina administration -
Grojec County Warszawa province - 1912 June 13 to Genya Ides
Borenshtein. At that time, she was a widow with 2 children
whose permanent address is listed as Possad and Gnma Gora-Kalvariya.

I was under the impression that she was born in Grojec and the
spelling of her maiden surname is spelled Borensztejn. My mother
told me grandma's name had been Chana Yetta ( changed to Anni(e) in
America. She came to America to marry her second husband, my
grandfather, Shiya (Samuel) Hiller.

Can anyone please help me locate the record of her first marriage.

Most sincerely,

Liz Ruderman Miller
Pismo Beach, California


JRI Poland #Poland my grandmother's first husband #poland

lizdmiller@...
 

Hello,

I never asked my grandmother about her late first husband with whom
she had my mother's two half siblings who were born in Poland.
Her 1912 passport was recently translated for me. Gena Ides,
daughter of Haim Tobijash Borenshtein was born on 1/13 February 1888.
Her passport was issued by Gora-Kalvaniya gmina administration -
Grojec County Warszawa province - 1912 June 13 to Genya Ides
Borenshtein. At that time, she was a widow with 2 children
whose permanent address is listed as Possad and Gnma Gora-Kalvariya.

I was under the impression that she was born in Grojec and the
spelling of her maiden surname is spelled Borensztejn. My mother
told me grandma's name had been Chana Yetta ( changed to Anni(e) in
America. She came to America to marry her second husband, my
grandfather, Shiya (Samuel) Hiller.

Can anyone please help me locate the record of her first marriage.

Most sincerely,

Liz Ruderman Miller
Pismo Beach, California


Indexing of Memel / Klaipeda (Lithuania) vital records now complete #general

Russ Maurer
 

Over the last couple of years, the Klaipeda district research group of LitvakSIG
has made a concerted effort to complete the indexing of available vital records
for the city of Memel(now Klaipeda). This effort has concluded successfully with
the final files just posted on our district site. While there are some gaps in the
records, we have marriages and deaths >from about 1875 to 1939, and births up to
1917 (later years of births are still private). The last pieces to come in were
the records after 1915. We posted those deaths this spring (507 records), and just
posted the marriages (139) and births (9). As usual, each of these posted files
will be available only to Klaipeda DRG donors for the first 18 months, and then
will be added to the All-Lithuania Database for general access. The pre-1915
marriages and births, which were posted earlier, have already gone to the ALD.
Separate surname lists for the post-1915 records and the records up to 1915 may be
viewed on the Klaipeda page of the LitvakSIG website,
https://www.litvaksig.org/research/district-research/klaipeda-district-research-group.
(MODERATOR: https://tinyurl.com/y8cdt7o2 )
The surname lists include names of any parents, spouses, or witnesses mentioned in
the records. Questions about making a qualifying contribution to gain immediate
access to all of the index files can be directed to me.

We thank our intrepid researcher, Ignas Slajus, who spent hours looking through
thousands of pages of post-1915 civil registrations to find and photograph the
Jewish ones, and we thank our volunteer translator, Alistair Stewart, for his
contribution.

Russ Maurer
Coordinator, Klaipeda District Research Group


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Indexing of Memel / Klaipeda (Lithuania) vital records now complete #general

Russ Maurer
 

Over the last couple of years, the Klaipeda district research group of LitvakSIG
has made a concerted effort to complete the indexing of available vital records
for the city of Memel(now Klaipeda). This effort has concluded successfully with
the final files just posted on our district site. While there are some gaps in the
records, we have marriages and deaths >from about 1875 to 1939, and births up to
1917 (later years of births are still private). The last pieces to come in were
the records after 1915. We posted those deaths this spring (507 records), and just
posted the marriages (139) and births (9). As usual, each of these posted files
will be available only to Klaipeda DRG donors for the first 18 months, and then
will be added to the All-Lithuania Database for general access. The pre-1915
marriages and births, which were posted earlier, have already gone to the ALD.
Separate surname lists for the post-1915 records and the records up to 1915 may be
viewed on the Klaipeda page of the LitvakSIG website,
https://www.litvaksig.org/research/district-research/klaipeda-district-research-group.
(MODERATOR: https://tinyurl.com/y8cdt7o2 )
The surname lists include names of any parents, spouses, or witnesses mentioned in
the records. Questions about making a qualifying contribution to gain immediate
access to all of the index files can be directed to me.

We thank our intrepid researcher, Ignas Slajus, who spent hours looking through
thousands of pages of post-1915 civil registrations to find and photograph the
Jewish ones, and we thank our volunteer translator, Alistair Stewart, for his
contribution.

Russ Maurer
Coordinator, Klaipeda District Research Group


Help with BERKNER Family from Bialystok/Grodno/Russia #belarus

Anne Mosteller <anne.c.mosteller@...>
 

Hello-
My great-grandmother was born in Bailystok/Bielostok in 1896,
according to a passport document she filled out. Her full name, as I
know it, was Maria Sergavna BERKNER She married an American with the
last name Mosteller in 1920 and went to America shortly after that.
Based on an ancestry.com record, the only names potentially associated
with her parents are Tamari BERKNER and Helena Saperstein.
Unfortunately, I have found nothing searching for Maria herself or her
parents and really want to know more about them! I know almost nothing
beyond what I've shared. If there are any leads you could help me
with, I'm interested!

Thank you,
Anne Mosteller
United States
MODERATOR NOTE: Please reply privately


Belarus SIG #Belarus Help with BERKNER Family from Bialystok/Grodno/Russia #belarus

Anne Mosteller <anne.c.mosteller@...>
 

Hello-
My great-grandmother was born in Bailystok/Bielostok in 1896,
according to a passport document she filled out. Her full name, as I
know it, was Maria Sergavna BERKNER She married an American with the
last name Mosteller in 1920 and went to America shortly after that.
Based on an ancestry.com record, the only names potentially associated
with her parents are Tamari BERKNER and Helena Saperstein.
Unfortunately, I have found nothing searching for Maria herself or her
parents and really want to know more about them! I know almost nothing
beyond what I've shared. If there are any leads you could help me
with, I'm interested!

Thank you,
Anne Mosteller
United States
MODERATOR NOTE: Please reply privately

36581 - 36600 of 659827