Date   

Re: Problems with names: Cryllic versus Latin letters #general

Sally Bruckheimer <sallybru@...>
 

Since each language has its own pattern of sound and letter (and even that
varies with time), it is difficult to say that there is any 'best' answer
for your question. I, J, Y are all pretty interchangeable in old European
records - what do you like? A German 'w' sounds like an English 'v', as
does a Polish 'f', so your Jankowski, Yankowski, Jankovski, and -sky
variations are all the same, as you know.

Germany dropped the initial C, changing it to K. It is not a matter or
translation but transliteration to decide how to represent what is written
in one language in another. A German 'w' sounds like an English 'v', as
does a Polish 'f', so which would you prefer?

There is no simple database of equivalences as each language is different.
In Polish, a letter 'c' sounds like 'tz' in English. But not a German 'c'
of course. And English itself is notorious for varying sounds for varying
spellings.

And then there is the umlaut and other diacritical marks which will cause
you all sorts of problems if you let them.

You could use the English sound/letter representation as much as possible -
or anything else - as long as you are consistent - for ease of searching.
Or, the best 'archivally' would be to keep the spelling of each individual
record and give up the search capability.

Sally Bruckheimer (with an umlaut in German, also spelled Brueckheimer in
the US by some).
Chatham, NJ


MILLER & LANDAU Families from Riga #general

Mike Berger <smberg@...>
 

Recent discussion with my father-in-law, Benjamin Miller, born 1908 in
Philadelphia, and now living in a retirement home in Los Angeles,
produced the following family information which might lead to
connections for my spouse, Sandra Miller Berger.

Benjamin's father, Harris MILLER, came >from Riga, Latvia at the end of
the 19th century and settled in Philadelphia. He died about 1960.

Benjamin's spouse, Rita (Rebecca) LANDAU, also came >from Riga to
Philadelphia. Her father was Abraham LANDAU. Rita had eleven
siblings: Katie, Lena, Harry (?) - who lived in Atlantic City, NJ, and
eight more.

Harris and Rita were married in Philadelphia and had five children:
Benjamin, Helen (married name FOX), Frances (married name KORN) who
settled in California, Sarah (known as Laine) who married Harry ALBERTS,
and Bessie (Betty).

This is about all the details he could provide. Any family connections
would be most appreciated.
Please feel free to respond directly to us at smberg@....

Mike and Sandy Berger
Vienna, VA


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Problems with names: Cryllic versus Latin letters #general

Sally Bruckheimer <sallybru@...>
 

Since each language has its own pattern of sound and letter (and even that
varies with time), it is difficult to say that there is any 'best' answer
for your question. I, J, Y are all pretty interchangeable in old European
records - what do you like? A German 'w' sounds like an English 'v', as
does a Polish 'f', so your Jankowski, Yankowski, Jankovski, and -sky
variations are all the same, as you know.

Germany dropped the initial C, changing it to K. It is not a matter or
translation but transliteration to decide how to represent what is written
in one language in another. A German 'w' sounds like an English 'v', as
does a Polish 'f', so which would you prefer?

There is no simple database of equivalences as each language is different.
In Polish, a letter 'c' sounds like 'tz' in English. But not a German 'c'
of course. And English itself is notorious for varying sounds for varying
spellings.

And then there is the umlaut and other diacritical marks which will cause
you all sorts of problems if you let them.

You could use the English sound/letter representation as much as possible -
or anything else - as long as you are consistent - for ease of searching.
Or, the best 'archivally' would be to keep the spelling of each individual
record and give up the search capability.

Sally Bruckheimer (with an umlaut in German, also spelled Brueckheimer in
the US by some).
Chatham, NJ


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen MILLER & LANDAU Families from Riga #general

Mike Berger <smberg@...>
 

Recent discussion with my father-in-law, Benjamin Miller, born 1908 in
Philadelphia, and now living in a retirement home in Los Angeles,
produced the following family information which might lead to
connections for my spouse, Sandra Miller Berger.

Benjamin's father, Harris MILLER, came >from Riga, Latvia at the end of
the 19th century and settled in Philadelphia. He died about 1960.

Benjamin's spouse, Rita (Rebecca) LANDAU, also came >from Riga to
Philadelphia. Her father was Abraham LANDAU. Rita had eleven
siblings: Katie, Lena, Harry (?) - who lived in Atlantic City, NJ, and
eight more.

Harris and Rita were married in Philadelphia and had five children:
Benjamin, Helen (married name FOX), Frances (married name KORN) who
settled in California, Sarah (known as Laine) who married Harry ALBERTS,
and Bessie (Betty).

This is about all the details he could provide. Any family connections
would be most appreciated.
Please feel free to respond directly to us at smberg@....

Mike and Sandy Berger
Vienna, VA


bouncing e-mails ??? #galicia

Carol W. Skydell <cskydell@...>
 

Folks,
When a message you send to another researcher listed in the JGFF or FTJP,
fails to be delivered, please report the bounce to
<lostNfound@...>. In your message, provide your own full
name and JGID, and the name and JGID of the person with the bounced e-mail.

Under the leadership of Saul Goldstone we have a considerable group of
volunteers who contact people in their local area who have changed their
e-mail addresses but have neglected to notify JewishGen. The ability to
connect with another researcher who may have a connection to your own
research is vital and the reason we established the lostNfound help desk.

If you are willing to devote some time to helping in this effort, please
contact Saul at
<sgoldstone@...> and provide him with your home address and
specify the towns to which you are willing to make phone calls. These can
be as wide an area as you like. Please consider joining in the effort to
find all researchers who are lost.

Many thanks for helping with this.
Carol

Carol W. Skydell, Vice President
JewishGen Special Projects


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia bouncing e-mails ??? #galicia

Carol W. Skydell <cskydell@...>
 

Folks,
When a message you send to another researcher listed in the JGFF or FTJP,
fails to be delivered, please report the bounce to
<lostNfound@...>. In your message, provide your own full
name and JGID, and the name and JGID of the person with the bounced e-mail.

Under the leadership of Saul Goldstone we have a considerable group of
volunteers who contact people in their local area who have changed their
e-mail addresses but have neglected to notify JewishGen. The ability to
connect with another researcher who may have a connection to your own
research is vital and the reason we established the lostNfound help desk.

If you are willing to devote some time to helping in this effort, please
contact Saul at
<sgoldstone@...> and provide him with your home address and
specify the towns to which you are willing to make phone calls. These can
be as wide an area as you like. Please consider joining in the effort to
find all researchers who are lost.

Many thanks for helping with this.
Carol

Carol W. Skydell, Vice President
JewishGen Special Projects


Re: Ulica Lupova street #poland

Tilford Bartman <bartmant@...>
 

Great stories >from Paul Azaroff. Of course some of them are very easy
to believe and I think you can be quite certain are true. Others would
be difficult if not impossible to confirm. Lipowa Street and the clock
tower building are all still there but somewhat transformed >from what
was there before the war and of course devoid of Jews. The clock tower
building now houses the Museum Podlaskie Bialystoku, and inside they
have a small but interesting "Jewish" exhibit. I gave a presentation
there a couple of years ago that was very well received.

I find the story about Zemenhoff quite believable. The one about Trotsky
I find a bit more far fetched .

The victims of the synagogue fire on June 27th, 1941 were referred to as
the "Freitogdige". I have a page on my website devoted to the Bialystok
Great Synagogue. It's at this link,
http://www.zabludow.com/bialystokgreatsynagogue.html
Last time I was in Poland I found a remarkable photo taken >from a German
recognizance plane of Bialystok on that day. It clearly shows the
synagogue and the surrounding neighborhood burning. I think it's quite a
unique photo. It's on my website. The Shabbesdikes were actually not
connected to the synagogue fire. They are connected to a German Aktion
that happened on Saturday July 12th 1941. It's referred to as the "Black
Sabbath" and the victims are known as the "Shabbesdige". This refers to
5,000 men and boys rounded up and taken to Petrashe on the outskirts of
the City. The Germans told the Jews that these men were being taken for
labor, and that if they wanted to see them again that had to pay a
ransom. A large ransom was paid but the men never returned. Many people
could not give up hope and concocted many stories of how they were
probably still alive. In this way the Germans got the Bialystoker Jews
to easily give up the valuables that they otherwise would have tried
very hard to hold on to. Later it turned out that the men were never
used for slave labor but more or less murdered right away at Petashe
field. There are a lot of horribly sad stories about the families of the
Shabbesdige and how they couldn't bring themselves to believe that the
men were all murdered.

Tilford Bartman, www.zabludow.com


Paul Azaroff wrote:

My mother's maiden name was Kruglak. Her first name was Fradel. She
lived with her sisters, Perel and Sonya on (39?) Lupova street. There
is a building with this address on Lupova street but it was built after
WW II. I'm sorry to say that I only listened with half an ear to the
wonderful tales my mother and her sisters would tell of life in Bialystok.
So I'm on a hunt for more details. Perhaps one of the members of
Jewish Gen/Bialystok can fill in some gaps.

The following are bits and pieces of talk that I heard as a child none
of which I can prove but the memory of these talks remains vividly fixed
in my mind. I heard them again and again.

My grandfather Meyer Kruglak came >from Sokolka. My grandparents were
married there and then moved to Bialystok. I believe my grandmother
(nee Dvaireh Glickman) was originally >from Bialystok.

As a child l heard the following stories. Mind you my family was not
given to hyperbole or to exaggerations so I believe a kernel of truth
exists in the following facts:

Our family is descended >from the Vilna Gaon. My aunt Pearl told me this
over sixty years ago. She said that as a child she was taken to Vilna
to the Gaon's graveside/ She was then told that she was a fifth great
granddaughter of the Vilna Gaon (as they said it Vilneh Goyn). I have
tried to trace the family tree back to him but cannot make a definite
connection.

My grandfather was a friend of Professor Zamenhof of Esperanto fame.
I know that my grandfather (whom I never met and who died during WW II)
was something of a Maskil and spoke several languages and was interested
in linguistics. Whether he knew professor Zamenhof personally is
unprovable.

Trotsky's daughter found refuge during W.W. I in my grandparent's home
for several days and if I recall correctly that Trotsky himself came
to their home at sometime for a short visit. Two of my uncles were
active in the Bund and might have had some contact with Trotsky.

My uncles Avrom and Chaim were among those killed on the infamous
Shabbes in June when the men of Bialystok were burned alive in the
Great Synagogue and their widows were known afterwards as the
Shabbesdikes. They had children but I only know the name of one of
my first cousins and his name was Berel Kruglak. This I learned
from cousins in Israel who escaped to the forests and who became
Partisans and later moved to Israel. One of them lived in Kiryat
Bialystok which I visited just after it was built in 1951/2.
I recall Sylvia Sydney coming there to visit while I was visiting
my cousins.

That my great grandmother made it a life long act of Tzedakah to
raise money for one stained glass window in the new Synagogue at
the turn of the 19/20th centuries. I did see the memorial sign to
the Great Synagogue that is on the front of the building that stands
where the old synagogue stood.

My mom said that on Shabbes she and her friends would walk around the
great clock tower (its still there). The girls would walk in one
directon (holding hands) and the boys in the other direction and they
would flirt in this manner with one another. She also said that when
there was a fire in town the bells in the tower would ring and that
she would leap >from her bed to go and see the fire. She always loved
fires and even in New York she would run to see a fire being put out.
The clock tower/fire tower was indeed just around the block >from her
address on Lupova street and well within the sound of the fire bells.

Does anyone know of these stories or have similar family stories?
There are many more such stories and bits of trivia that I recall.
I would love to have some verification about any of the above facts to
include in a m/s that I'm putting together for my own eyniklach.

Paul Azaroff


BialyGen: Bialystok Region #Bialystok #Poland Re: Ulica Lupova street #poland

Tilford Bartman <bartmant@...>
 

Great stories >from Paul Azaroff. Of course some of them are very easy
to believe and I think you can be quite certain are true. Others would
be difficult if not impossible to confirm. Lipowa Street and the clock
tower building are all still there but somewhat transformed >from what
was there before the war and of course devoid of Jews. The clock tower
building now houses the Museum Podlaskie Bialystoku, and inside they
have a small but interesting "Jewish" exhibit. I gave a presentation
there a couple of years ago that was very well received.

I find the story about Zemenhoff quite believable. The one about Trotsky
I find a bit more far fetched .

The victims of the synagogue fire on June 27th, 1941 were referred to as
the "Freitogdige". I have a page on my website devoted to the Bialystok
Great Synagogue. It's at this link,
http://www.zabludow.com/bialystokgreatsynagogue.html
Last time I was in Poland I found a remarkable photo taken >from a German
recognizance plane of Bialystok on that day. It clearly shows the
synagogue and the surrounding neighborhood burning. I think it's quite a
unique photo. It's on my website. The Shabbesdikes were actually not
connected to the synagogue fire. They are connected to a German Aktion
that happened on Saturday July 12th 1941. It's referred to as the "Black
Sabbath" and the victims are known as the "Shabbesdige". This refers to
5,000 men and boys rounded up and taken to Petrashe on the outskirts of
the City. The Germans told the Jews that these men were being taken for
labor, and that if they wanted to see them again that had to pay a
ransom. A large ransom was paid but the men never returned. Many people
could not give up hope and concocted many stories of how they were
probably still alive. In this way the Germans got the Bialystoker Jews
to easily give up the valuables that they otherwise would have tried
very hard to hold on to. Later it turned out that the men were never
used for slave labor but more or less murdered right away at Petashe
field. There are a lot of horribly sad stories about the families of the
Shabbesdige and how they couldn't bring themselves to believe that the
men were all murdered.

Tilford Bartman, www.zabludow.com


Paul Azaroff wrote:

My mother's maiden name was Kruglak. Her first name was Fradel. She
lived with her sisters, Perel and Sonya on (39?) Lupova street. There
is a building with this address on Lupova street but it was built after
WW II. I'm sorry to say that I only listened with half an ear to the
wonderful tales my mother and her sisters would tell of life in Bialystok.
So I'm on a hunt for more details. Perhaps one of the members of
Jewish Gen/Bialystok can fill in some gaps.

The following are bits and pieces of talk that I heard as a child none
of which I can prove but the memory of these talks remains vividly fixed
in my mind. I heard them again and again.

My grandfather Meyer Kruglak came >from Sokolka. My grandparents were
married there and then moved to Bialystok. I believe my grandmother
(nee Dvaireh Glickman) was originally >from Bialystok.

As a child l heard the following stories. Mind you my family was not
given to hyperbole or to exaggerations so I believe a kernel of truth
exists in the following facts:

Our family is descended >from the Vilna Gaon. My aunt Pearl told me this
over sixty years ago. She said that as a child she was taken to Vilna
to the Gaon's graveside/ She was then told that she was a fifth great
granddaughter of the Vilna Gaon (as they said it Vilneh Goyn). I have
tried to trace the family tree back to him but cannot make a definite
connection.

My grandfather was a friend of Professor Zamenhof of Esperanto fame.
I know that my grandfather (whom I never met and who died during WW II)
was something of a Maskil and spoke several languages and was interested
in linguistics. Whether he knew professor Zamenhof personally is
unprovable.

Trotsky's daughter found refuge during W.W. I in my grandparent's home
for several days and if I recall correctly that Trotsky himself came
to their home at sometime for a short visit. Two of my uncles were
active in the Bund and might have had some contact with Trotsky.

My uncles Avrom and Chaim were among those killed on the infamous
Shabbes in June when the men of Bialystok were burned alive in the
Great Synagogue and their widows were known afterwards as the
Shabbesdikes. They had children but I only know the name of one of
my first cousins and his name was Berel Kruglak. This I learned
from cousins in Israel who escaped to the forests and who became
Partisans and later moved to Israel. One of them lived in Kiryat
Bialystok which I visited just after it was built in 1951/2.
I recall Sylvia Sydney coming there to visit while I was visiting
my cousins.

That my great grandmother made it a life long act of Tzedakah to
raise money for one stained glass window in the new Synagogue at
the turn of the 19/20th centuries. I did see the memorial sign to
the Great Synagogue that is on the front of the building that stands
where the old synagogue stood.

My mom said that on Shabbes she and her friends would walk around the
great clock tower (its still there). The girls would walk in one
directon (holding hands) and the boys in the other direction and they
would flirt in this manner with one another. She also said that when
there was a fire in town the bells in the tower would ring and that
she would leap >from her bed to go and see the fire. She always loved
fires and even in New York she would run to see a fire being put out.
The clock tower/fire tower was indeed just around the block >from her
address on Lupova street and well within the sound of the fire bells.

Does anyone know of these stories or have similar family stories?
There are many more such stories and bits of trivia that I recall.
I would love to have some verification about any of the above facts to
include in a m/s that I'm putting together for my own eyniklach.

Paul Azaroff


Re: Recent Postings from Elizabeth Jackson and Paul Azaroff #poland

Bialystoker
 

In her recent posting, Elizabeth Jackson mentions the Miller Leather
factory in Zabludow, which was first mentioned by Tilford Bartman. Paul
Azaroff talks about the memories of Bialystok he recalls >from listening
to his mother and her siblings. All these memories and the connections
they produce with others is part of the reason why BIALYGen exists. I
encourage all of you to post your memories, either first hand ones or
those >from your parents and grandparents, so these shared memories come
to life in all our minds.

Elizabeth Jackson mentioned that some of her family lived at 17 or 19
Polna. My mother and her family lived at 27 Polna until they immigrated
to the US in 1923. When I was in Israel last summer and visiting with
members of the Organization of Former Jewish Residents of Bialystok, one
member told me he had lived at 24 Polna just before the War. Paul
Azaroff mentioned that his family lived at 39 Lipowa. My great Uncle and
family lived at 6 Nowy Swiat, just off Lipowa.

These address connections may or may not be real, but as someone who
dedicates myself to recreating the history of my family, I feel somehow
connected to these other people, whose families may have lived,
worshipped, celebrated, and suffered with my family.

I would like to see BIALYGen build a webpage, and maybe a resultant
database, of our the addresses where our families lived in Bialystok and
other towns in the BIALYGen region.

Please submit your family information to the mailing list, or privately
to me, and I will create a webpage to display the information. Please
provide the address -- street name and number (if available), the names
of the people who lived at this address, and the year (or years) living
there. I will start.

Polna 27; David PERLIS, Chana GERSHOWITZ, and children Leyzer, Leib, and
Necha; 1920-23

Nowy Swiat 6; Moshe PERLIS, Michla SHAPIRA, and children Chaim, Feivel,
and Chaika; ca. 1930

Mazowiecka 7; Chaim Szkolnik, Fania GERSHOWITZ, and children Yehudit and
Dorit; 1923-1933

Other ideas to expand our website are encouraged. Share them with all of
us.

Mark Halpern
BIALYGen Coordinator
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/bialygen/homepage.htm


Batalevich, the policeman #poland

Ilene Murray <ilenemurray@...>
 

Dear BialyGenners,

My great-grandmother, Chaya Leah GELBERG ZEITLIN, was born in Bialystok,
c. 1867. Her father, Pincus Chanoch Gelberg, was a baker. Her mother,
Pincus's second wife, was Ester Riva CZACZKOWSKA.

Chaya Leah, her husband, Baruch (Barnet) ZEITLIN, and three of their
children left Bialystok in the early 1890s and settled in New York.
After her husband's death in 1916, Chaya Leah lived with her daughter
and son-in-law, Malka Feige (Fay) Zeitlin and Avram Ze'ev (William)
WEISBERG and their daughter, my mother, Jeanne.

My mother remembers her grandmother very well. One of the stories she
told over and over was that of a very mean, hostile policeman named
Batalevich (sp?). Whenever Chaya Leah got angry, she would hiss in
Yiddish, "a curse on Batalevich." My mom recalls that she thought that
"Batalevich" was a curse word for most of her childhood.

Does anyone have any information on this man or his role in the lives of
the Jewish community in Bialystok at the end of the 19th century?

Ilene Kanfer Murray
St. Louis, Missouri

Researching GELBERG, CZACZKOWSKI/A, ZEITLIN, and FIDLER in Bialystok


BialyGen: Bialystok Region #Bialystok #Poland Re: Recent Postings from Elizabeth Jackson and Paul Azaroff #poland

Bialystoker
 

In her recent posting, Elizabeth Jackson mentions the Miller Leather
factory in Zabludow, which was first mentioned by Tilford Bartman. Paul
Azaroff talks about the memories of Bialystok he recalls >from listening
to his mother and her siblings. All these memories and the connections
they produce with others is part of the reason why BIALYGen exists. I
encourage all of you to post your memories, either first hand ones or
those >from your parents and grandparents, so these shared memories come
to life in all our minds.

Elizabeth Jackson mentioned that some of her family lived at 17 or 19
Polna. My mother and her family lived at 27 Polna until they immigrated
to the US in 1923. When I was in Israel last summer and visiting with
members of the Organization of Former Jewish Residents of Bialystok, one
member told me he had lived at 24 Polna just before the War. Paul
Azaroff mentioned that his family lived at 39 Lipowa. My great Uncle and
family lived at 6 Nowy Swiat, just off Lipowa.

These address connections may or may not be real, but as someone who
dedicates myself to recreating the history of my family, I feel somehow
connected to these other people, whose families may have lived,
worshipped, celebrated, and suffered with my family.

I would like to see BIALYGen build a webpage, and maybe a resultant
database, of our the addresses where our families lived in Bialystok and
other towns in the BIALYGen region.

Please submit your family information to the mailing list, or privately
to me, and I will create a webpage to display the information. Please
provide the address -- street name and number (if available), the names
of the people who lived at this address, and the year (or years) living
there. I will start.

Polna 27; David PERLIS, Chana GERSHOWITZ, and children Leyzer, Leib, and
Necha; 1920-23

Nowy Swiat 6; Moshe PERLIS, Michla SHAPIRA, and children Chaim, Feivel,
and Chaika; ca. 1930

Mazowiecka 7; Chaim Szkolnik, Fania GERSHOWITZ, and children Yehudit and
Dorit; 1923-1933

Other ideas to expand our website are encouraged. Share them with all of
us.

Mark Halpern
BIALYGen Coordinator
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/bialygen/homepage.htm


BialyGen: Bialystok Region #Bialystok #Poland Batalevich, the policeman #poland

Ilene Murray <ilenemurray@...>
 

Dear BialyGenners,

My great-grandmother, Chaya Leah GELBERG ZEITLIN, was born in Bialystok,
c. 1867. Her father, Pincus Chanoch Gelberg, was a baker. Her mother,
Pincus's second wife, was Ester Riva CZACZKOWSKA.

Chaya Leah, her husband, Baruch (Barnet) ZEITLIN, and three of their
children left Bialystok in the early 1890s and settled in New York.
After her husband's death in 1916, Chaya Leah lived with her daughter
and son-in-law, Malka Feige (Fay) Zeitlin and Avram Ze'ev (William)
WEISBERG and their daughter, my mother, Jeanne.

My mother remembers her grandmother very well. One of the stories she
told over and over was that of a very mean, hostile policeman named
Batalevich (sp?). Whenever Chaya Leah got angry, she would hiss in
Yiddish, "a curse on Batalevich." My mom recalls that she thought that
"Batalevich" was a curse word for most of her childhood.

Does anyone have any information on this man or his role in the lives of
the Jewish community in Bialystok at the end of the 19th century?

Ilene Kanfer Murray
St. Louis, Missouri

Researching GELBERG, CZACZKOWSKI/A, ZEITLIN, and FIDLER in Bialystok


Re: looking for YACOBOVSKI #poland

Bialystoker
 

A group of BIALYGenners visited Kiriat Bialystok, a section of Yehud,
this past summer after the Jerusalem Conference was concluded. As I
recall, this community, established by Bialystokers in the US for
survivors >from Bialystok, was always called Kiriat Bialystok.

On Ada Holtzman's Bialystok Memorial website at
http://www.zchor.org/bialystok/bialystok.htm, there is a section about
Kiriat Bialystok which lists contact information as follows:

The Hall of Bialystok
17 Tennenbaum St.
Kiriat Bialystok
Yehud 56210
ISRAEL
Telephone: 00-972-3-5360037
The Organization of Former Jewish Residents of Bialystok and its
Surroundings in Israel (The Israeli Landsmanschaft "Vaad")
Zeev Balglej - Chairman - Telephone: 00-972-3-5360651
Chana (Lin) Kizelstein - Archivist - Telephone: 00-972-3-5360195

We met these lovely people and I am sure they will be willing to try and
help you.

Mark Halpern
BIALYGen Coordinator

----- Original Message -----
Dear One and All:

I am looking for a YACOVBOSKI family that was once >from Bialystok.
All I know is that in the 1950s they lived in Israel in SHIKUN
Bialystok
(I am told today is it Yehud.). I tried going through the Israeli
telephone book and calling up different Yacoboski families but I
didn't
find the right one.

Can YOU help me??

All the best,

Jay Lenefsky
hotdog@...


BialyGen: Bialystok Region #Bialystok #Poland Re: looking for YACOBOVSKI #poland

Bialystoker
 

A group of BIALYGenners visited Kiriat Bialystok, a section of Yehud,
this past summer after the Jerusalem Conference was concluded. As I
recall, this community, established by Bialystokers in the US for
survivors >from Bialystok, was always called Kiriat Bialystok.

On Ada Holtzman's Bialystok Memorial website at
http://www.zchor.org/bialystok/bialystok.htm, there is a section about
Kiriat Bialystok which lists contact information as follows:

The Hall of Bialystok
17 Tennenbaum St.
Kiriat Bialystok
Yehud 56210
ISRAEL
Telephone: 00-972-3-5360037
The Organization of Former Jewish Residents of Bialystok and its
Surroundings in Israel (The Israeli Landsmanschaft "Vaad")
Zeev Balglej - Chairman - Telephone: 00-972-3-5360651
Chana (Lin) Kizelstein - Archivist - Telephone: 00-972-3-5360195

We met these lovely people and I am sure they will be willing to try and
help you.

Mark Halpern
BIALYGen Coordinator

----- Original Message -----
Dear One and All:

I am looking for a YACOVBOSKI family that was once >from Bialystok.
All I know is that in the 1950s they lived in Israel in SHIKUN
Bialystok
(I am told today is it Yehud.). I tried going through the Israeli
telephone book and calling up different Yacoboski families but I
didn't
find the right one.

Can YOU help me??

All the best,

Jay Lenefsky
hotdog@...


FINKELSTEINs from Shchedrin #belarus

Karen Zale
 

Dear Schedrinners,
We are trying to locate the parent names of Nachum b.
about 1864 and Shmerel b. about 1867 FINKELSTEIN and
if there were more siblings. I have the family tree
of Nachum FINKELSTEIN >from Montreal, Canada, married
to Esther Rose Denburg. Our grandmother Sima
FINKELSTEIN SORKIN came to the USA in 1916, her father
was Shmerel FINKELSTEIN. One of our cousins met with
Harry Katz in Florida. We have not gotten in touch
with any Schedrinners >from Pittsburgh. In my mothers
papers I found a letter >from the Consulate General of
the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics dated June
1941, it stated there were no birth or marriage
certificates for Shchedrin in the Soviet Union. If
anyone has information of the FINKELSTEIN family
please reply privately to me.

Karen Zale
Plano, TX
kbzpzq@...

ZALEFSKY/SALEWSKI - Shereshero,Belarus; FINKELSTEIN - Shchedrin, Belarus;
SORKIN - Rogochovi, Belarus; KAPLAN - near Odessa;
GREENBERG (GRUNSTEIN)- near Warsaw; GOLDENBERG - Austria;
KELLERMAN - Austria/Germany; JOSHKOWITZ - Germany;
EHRENFREUND - Tarnow, Galicia;






__________________________________
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Belarus SIG #Belarus FINKELSTEINs from Shchedrin #belarus

Karen Zale
 

Dear Schedrinners,
We are trying to locate the parent names of Nachum b.
about 1864 and Shmerel b. about 1867 FINKELSTEIN and
if there were more siblings. I have the family tree
of Nachum FINKELSTEIN >from Montreal, Canada, married
to Esther Rose Denburg. Our grandmother Sima
FINKELSTEIN SORKIN came to the USA in 1916, her father
was Shmerel FINKELSTEIN. One of our cousins met with
Harry Katz in Florida. We have not gotten in touch
with any Schedrinners >from Pittsburgh. In my mothers
papers I found a letter >from the Consulate General of
the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics dated June
1941, it stated there were no birth or marriage
certificates for Shchedrin in the Soviet Union. If
anyone has information of the FINKELSTEIN family
please reply privately to me.

Karen Zale
Plano, TX
kbzpzq@...

ZALEFSKY/SALEWSKI - Shereshero,Belarus; FINKELSTEIN - Shchedrin, Belarus;
SORKIN - Rogochovi, Belarus; KAPLAN - near Odessa;
GREENBERG (GRUNSTEIN)- near Warsaw; GOLDENBERG - Austria;
KELLERMAN - Austria/Germany; JOSHKOWITZ - Germany;
EHRENFREUND - Tarnow, Galicia;






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Stockholm 1948 #lodz #poland

Kasman <family@...>
 

Although this message does not have a direct Lodz connection, it might
nonetheless be of interest to researchers.
I am posting 2 photos which will be of interest to those, or relatives of
those, who lived in Sweden post-WWII.
The photos were taken at the wedding of Yitzchak KOWALSKI in July 1948 in
Stockholm. I don't know his wife's name, but my mother's notes indicate
that Mr. KOWALSKI had a twin sister. Also, notes on back of the large-group
photo indicate that the Jewish community of Stockholm was at the wedding.
My late mother, then Jennie GOLOMB, had been born in Vilna; following the
War years, she lived in Stockholm >from 1947 to 1949 when she came to live in
Canada.
I know no one in the photo aside >from my mother.
Please let me know if you know the KOWALSKIs or any other wedding guest(s)!

The pictures are files VM5547 & 5548.
http://data.jewishgen.org/viewmate/toview.html

Judy (nee KERNKRAUT) KASMAN
Toronto family@...


Lodz Area Research Group #Lodz #Poland Stockholm 1948 #lodz #poland

Kasman <family@...>
 

Although this message does not have a direct Lodz connection, it might
nonetheless be of interest to researchers.
I am posting 2 photos which will be of interest to those, or relatives of
those, who lived in Sweden post-WWII.
The photos were taken at the wedding of Yitzchak KOWALSKI in July 1948 in
Stockholm. I don't know his wife's name, but my mother's notes indicate
that Mr. KOWALSKI had a twin sister. Also, notes on back of the large-group
photo indicate that the Jewish community of Stockholm was at the wedding.
My late mother, then Jennie GOLOMB, had been born in Vilna; following the
War years, she lived in Stockholm >from 1947 to 1949 when she came to live in
Canada.
I know no one in the photo aside >from my mother.
Please let me know if you know the KOWALSKIs or any other wedding guest(s)!

The pictures are files VM5547 & 5548.
http://data.jewishgen.org/viewmate/toview.html

Judy (nee KERNKRAUT) KASMAN
Toronto family@...


P of T Submitters for HAMBURGER-FRANKENTAL Lodz Ghetto #lodz #poland

Edna Hoover
 

Searching for Family of Sukher Mordkhe "Max" BAUMGARTEN
b.1903, Leczyca, Lodz d.1990 Brooklyn, NY

Mother-Liebe Braine FRANKENTAL b.1878 Leczyca, Lodz Deported fr. Lodz
Ghetto 1942
Father-Menahem ben Yehudah Leib BAUMGARTEN b. 1876 Leczyca, Lodz
Maternal Grandmother-Sara HAMBURGER b. 1857 Lodz
Maternal Grandfather-Shapse FRANKENTAL m. 1871 Lodz
Brothers-
Leib "Leon" BAUMGARTEN, Lodz, Polish Army, shot to death?
Leizer-Loser Hersz BAUMGARTEN b.1905 Deported fr. Antwerp 1942
w. wife Mariem Hinde FUHRER-REINHOLD & children, Nesanel Wolf b. 1930 and
Anna b. 1936
Szymon Icchok BAUMGARTEN b.1915 Deported fr. Lodz Ghetto d.1945 Dachau

Please help me locate the following P of T submitters in Israel:
(Feel free to forward this e-maiL message...)

- Yissakhar FRANKENTAL ( nephew- camp survivor Apr 15, 1999 )
Ha-Rav Kook 46 B'nei Brak

For Khaim FRANKENTAL b.1890 Lodz
Parents- Avraham FRANKENTAL & Beila Bluma
Married Lea BORNSHTEIN b. 1900
Aleksander, Lodz
Occupation-seamstress
Children-
Avraham FRANKENTAL b.1920
Maksimilian FRANKENTAL b. 1922

- Dalia Prital (FRANKENTAL) ( granddaughter-in-law, Yossef-Husband 3/4/02,
9/4/02 )
Rehov OSTROVSKY 20, Ra'anana Meikod 2 43372 Tel 09-7453908

- Gedalia FRANKENTAL ( son 4/1/57 )

For Dvorah-Dwora Dina
b. 1889 Aleksandrov, Lodz
Parents-
Uri & Khana Rivka
Married Yekhiel Meir FRANKENTAL
Warsaw Ghetto?
Family Occupation- Stocking Factory
Children-

- Masha SABITZKI-SAWICKI (daughter Mar 14, 1956)
Derekh ha-Shalom 4

For Deborah BORNSHTEIN # 292459?
b. Piotrkowice, Pinczow, Kielce 1878
Parents-
Avraham BORNSHTEIN & Tova
Married- Moshe FRANKENTAL
Children-3

- Lola LEVKOWICZ-LEFKOWITZ ( daughter 12/7/93 )
Tel 711-787 32 Yaffa 1 Jerusalem

For Shlomo-Szlama HAMBURGER b. Aug 1, 1875
Brzeziny, Lodz
Parents-
Hirsh HAMBURGER & Ester
Married-Gita Rakhel SHULZ b. Feb 27, 1877 #58115
Children-
Sara b.1901 Lodz m. Shmuel KNASTER #58130
Fiszel HAMBURGER b.1905 Lodz
Genia b.1908 Lodz m. Julian KATZ
Grandchild-
Celina KATZ

The following names are listed In Pinhas Ha-Nitzolim 1:

Sucher FRANKENTAL b.1918 Resided Lodz
Liberated >from Dachau, p. 103

Lola FRANKENTAL b.1927 Resided Pabianice
Liberated >from Salzwedel Camp 33, p. 283

Only known BAUMGARTEN relatives who survived the war were:

Yoel FRANKENTAL, father of Bnei Brak mayor, Yissachar FRANKENTAL in Israel.
Yitshak Tsvi ben Avraham Mehune FRANK, his son Dr. Hyman FRANK and daughter
Dora FRANK in Brooklyn.
Shmil PILICER, in Brooklyn.

There's a family wedding photo inscribed-

"Meine Liebe, Ein ondenkung fun uns,
Lola, J. 23 / X 1946"
This makes the puzzle even more complicated.

Thanks for your help!

"Edna Hoover"
Brooklyn NY
JGFF Researcher # 66736
ednahoover@...


Lodz Area Research Group #Lodz #Poland P of T Submitters for HAMBURGER-FRANKENTAL Lodz Ghetto #lodz #poland

Edna Hoover
 

Searching for Family of Sukher Mordkhe "Max" BAUMGARTEN
b.1903, Leczyca, Lodz d.1990 Brooklyn, NY

Mother-Liebe Braine FRANKENTAL b.1878 Leczyca, Lodz Deported fr. Lodz
Ghetto 1942
Father-Menahem ben Yehudah Leib BAUMGARTEN b. 1876 Leczyca, Lodz
Maternal Grandmother-Sara HAMBURGER b. 1857 Lodz
Maternal Grandfather-Shapse FRANKENTAL m. 1871 Lodz
Brothers-
Leib "Leon" BAUMGARTEN, Lodz, Polish Army, shot to death?
Leizer-Loser Hersz BAUMGARTEN b.1905 Deported fr. Antwerp 1942
w. wife Mariem Hinde FUHRER-REINHOLD & children, Nesanel Wolf b. 1930 and
Anna b. 1936
Szymon Icchok BAUMGARTEN b.1915 Deported fr. Lodz Ghetto d.1945 Dachau

Please help me locate the following P of T submitters in Israel:
(Feel free to forward this e-maiL message...)

- Yissakhar FRANKENTAL ( nephew- camp survivor Apr 15, 1999 )
Ha-Rav Kook 46 B'nei Brak

For Khaim FRANKENTAL b.1890 Lodz
Parents- Avraham FRANKENTAL & Beila Bluma
Married Lea BORNSHTEIN b. 1900
Aleksander, Lodz
Occupation-seamstress
Children-
Avraham FRANKENTAL b.1920
Maksimilian FRANKENTAL b. 1922

- Dalia Prital (FRANKENTAL) ( granddaughter-in-law, Yossef-Husband 3/4/02,
9/4/02 )
Rehov OSTROVSKY 20, Ra'anana Meikod 2 43372 Tel 09-7453908

- Gedalia FRANKENTAL ( son 4/1/57 )

For Dvorah-Dwora Dina
b. 1889 Aleksandrov, Lodz
Parents-
Uri & Khana Rivka
Married Yekhiel Meir FRANKENTAL
Warsaw Ghetto?
Family Occupation- Stocking Factory
Children-

- Masha SABITZKI-SAWICKI (daughter Mar 14, 1956)
Derekh ha-Shalom 4

For Deborah BORNSHTEIN # 292459?
b. Piotrkowice, Pinczow, Kielce 1878
Parents-
Avraham BORNSHTEIN & Tova
Married- Moshe FRANKENTAL
Children-3

- Lola LEVKOWICZ-LEFKOWITZ ( daughter 12/7/93 )
Tel 711-787 32 Yaffa 1 Jerusalem

For Shlomo-Szlama HAMBURGER b. Aug 1, 1875
Brzeziny, Lodz
Parents-
Hirsh HAMBURGER & Ester
Married-Gita Rakhel SHULZ b. Feb 27, 1877 #58115
Children-
Sara b.1901 Lodz m. Shmuel KNASTER #58130
Fiszel HAMBURGER b.1905 Lodz
Genia b.1908 Lodz m. Julian KATZ
Grandchild-
Celina KATZ

The following names are listed In Pinhas Ha-Nitzolim 1:

Sucher FRANKENTAL b.1918 Resided Lodz
Liberated >from Dachau, p. 103

Lola FRANKENTAL b.1927 Resided Pabianice
Liberated >from Salzwedel Camp 33, p. 283

Only known BAUMGARTEN relatives who survived the war were:

Yoel FRANKENTAL, father of Bnei Brak mayor, Yissachar FRANKENTAL in Israel.
Yitshak Tsvi ben Avraham Mehune FRANK, his son Dr. Hyman FRANK and daughter
Dora FRANK in Brooklyn.
Shmil PILICER, in Brooklyn.

There's a family wedding photo inscribed-

"Meine Liebe, Ein ondenkung fun uns,
Lola, J. 23 / X 1946"
This makes the puzzle even more complicated.

Thanks for your help!

"Edna Hoover"
Brooklyn NY
JGFF Researcher # 66736
ednahoover@...