Date   

Falticeni Romania #romania

jeremy xido <jeuxjeux@...>
 

I am looking for information about a great grandmother >from Falticeni,
Romania who I only know as "BABA ROSA". Is this simply a familiar
family name? Like "Grandma Rose"? or might it be a full name? ROSA
being the surname?

thanks

Jeremy Xido
NYC/Barcelona


Romania SIG #Romania Falticeni Romania #romania

jeremy xido <jeuxjeux@...>
 

I am looking for information about a great grandmother >from Falticeni,
Romania who I only know as "BABA ROSA". Is this simply a familiar
family name? Like "Grandma Rose"? or might it be a full name? ROSA
being the surname?

thanks

Jeremy Xido
NYC/Barcelona


Yale Reisner talk #galicia

Thomas F. Weiss
 

Jewish Genealogical Society of Greater Boston

presents

A Most Extraordinary Situation:
Genealogical Adventures in Poland

Yale Reisner

Thursday May 19, 2005
7:00-9:30 PM
Temple Reyim, Newton

Direct >from Warsaw, Yale Reisner will present dramatic,
moving, and sometimes amusing accounts of the work of the
Ronald S. Lauder Foundation Genealogy Project as it helps
Jews of Polish origin and Poles of Jewish origin rediscover
and sort out their often twisted and complex backgrounds. He
will tell of child survivors and their offspring, of family
ties lost and found, and of new potential sources of
information.

Yale Reisner directs the Ronald S. Lauder Foundation
Genealogical Project of the Jewish Historical Institute of
Poland. Since 1994, he has been assisting individuals and
families in uncovering their family history. The Lauder
Foundation is a non-profit Jewish educational foundation.
Mr. Reisner holds degrees in Central European Regional
Studies >from Columbia College and the Fletcher School of Law
and Diplomacy and has been affiliated with Hebrew
University, the Jewish Theological Seminary of America,
Villanova University, the YIVO Institute for Jewish
Research, and the U.S. National Archives.

Temple Reyim, 1860 Washington Street (Route 16), Newton, is
near Newton-Wellesley Hospital and the Woodland stop on the
Riverside Green Line, as well as a short ride >from Route 128
at Exit 21.

Admission is free for members, $5 for non-members.
Refreshments will be served.
___________________________


--
Tom Weiss
Newton, MA
USA
tfweiss@mit.edu


TORTEN, Lvov/Podhajce-University of Lvov #galicia

Pamela Weisberger <pweisberger@...>
 

Does anyone have information about the surname TORTEN >from Galicia....or
specifically:

SARAH TORTEN who was born between 1895 and 1900 in Podhajce or Lwow.

She went to the University of Lwow around 1920 to 1928 and studied chemistry
(or pharmacy) and most likely obtained a doctorate degree. She had two
sisters who also went to the University of Lwow. Both graduated as M.D.s.

The older named ETHEL TORTEN was a student >from about 1916 till graduation.
In 1929 she moved to the USA and practiced medicine in New York for many
years.

The younger named CHAJA (Haya) graduated few years later and practiced
medicine in Podhajce till she was exterminated in the Holocaust. Her married
name was KRESSEL. Her husband and two children were killed in 1941. She
continued in her medical practice until 1944 and was killed on her way to
Tarnopol.

If this information (or surname and associated towns) sound familiar to
anyone please contact me privately.

If you know of any student records that still exist--or can be
accessed-->from the UNIVERSITY OF LVOV--and have had success in that line of
research, please share that information, as that would be a useful
genealogical resource for all.

Thank you!

Pamela Weisberger
Santa Monica, CA
pweisberger@hotmail.com


Falticeni - Crimean Jews - Sephardic Jews #romania

jeremy xido <jeuxjeux@...>
 

I am looking for information about a great grandfather >from Falticeni,
Romania whose name was Gershon DER KRIMMER. Is this an actual
surname, or does it mean that he was >from Crimea? Does anyone have
information about Crimean Jews in Romania? When they came and why
they came and who they were?

thanks

Jeremy Xido
NYC/Barcelona


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia Yale Reisner talk #galicia

Thomas F. Weiss
 

Jewish Genealogical Society of Greater Boston

presents

A Most Extraordinary Situation:
Genealogical Adventures in Poland

Yale Reisner

Thursday May 19, 2005
7:00-9:30 PM
Temple Reyim, Newton

Direct >from Warsaw, Yale Reisner will present dramatic,
moving, and sometimes amusing accounts of the work of the
Ronald S. Lauder Foundation Genealogy Project as it helps
Jews of Polish origin and Poles of Jewish origin rediscover
and sort out their often twisted and complex backgrounds. He
will tell of child survivors and their offspring, of family
ties lost and found, and of new potential sources of
information.

Yale Reisner directs the Ronald S. Lauder Foundation
Genealogical Project of the Jewish Historical Institute of
Poland. Since 1994, he has been assisting individuals and
families in uncovering their family history. The Lauder
Foundation is a non-profit Jewish educational foundation.
Mr. Reisner holds degrees in Central European Regional
Studies >from Columbia College and the Fletcher School of Law
and Diplomacy and has been affiliated with Hebrew
University, the Jewish Theological Seminary of America,
Villanova University, the YIVO Institute for Jewish
Research, and the U.S. National Archives.

Temple Reyim, 1860 Washington Street (Route 16), Newton, is
near Newton-Wellesley Hospital and the Woodland stop on the
Riverside Green Line, as well as a short ride >from Route 128
at Exit 21.

Admission is free for members, $5 for non-members.
Refreshments will be served.
___________________________


--
Tom Weiss
Newton, MA
USA
tfweiss@mit.edu


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia TORTEN, Lvov/Podhajce-University of Lvov #galicia

Pamela Weisberger <pweisberger@...>
 

Does anyone have information about the surname TORTEN >from Galicia....or
specifically:

SARAH TORTEN who was born between 1895 and 1900 in Podhajce or Lwow.

She went to the University of Lwow around 1920 to 1928 and studied chemistry
(or pharmacy) and most likely obtained a doctorate degree. She had two
sisters who also went to the University of Lwow. Both graduated as M.D.s.

The older named ETHEL TORTEN was a student >from about 1916 till graduation.
In 1929 she moved to the USA and practiced medicine in New York for many
years.

The younger named CHAJA (Haya) graduated few years later and practiced
medicine in Podhajce till she was exterminated in the Holocaust. Her married
name was KRESSEL. Her husband and two children were killed in 1941. She
continued in her medical practice until 1944 and was killed on her way to
Tarnopol.

If this information (or surname and associated towns) sound familiar to
anyone please contact me privately.

If you know of any student records that still exist--or can be
accessed-->from the UNIVERSITY OF LVOV--and have had success in that line of
research, please share that information, as that would be a useful
genealogical resource for all.

Thank you!

Pamela Weisberger
Santa Monica, CA
pweisberger@hotmail.com


Romania SIG #Romania Falticeni - Crimean Jews - Sephardic Jews #romania

jeremy xido <jeuxjeux@...>
 

I am looking for information about a great grandfather >from Falticeni,
Romania whose name was Gershon DER KRIMMER. Is this an actual
surname, or does it mean that he was >from Crimea? Does anyone have
information about Crimean Jews in Romania? When they came and why
they came and who they were?

thanks

Jeremy Xido
NYC/Barcelona


Re: Discussion about Galician Vital Records indexed by JRI-Poland #galicia

Mark Halpern
 

Some Galician researchers may be under the impression that the INDEX
entries contained in the JRI-Poland online database are EXTRACTS of the
entire record. The JRI-Poland online database contains indices of Jewish
vital records. As is explained in the "Introduction" of the JRI-Poland
website, "The JRI-Poland database is a research tool, a valuable FIRST
step in finding clues to locating family records >from among the millions
of Jewish vital records for hundreds of Polish towns."

In the case of Galician records, there are very few register books that
contained index pages. Most of the records >from Congress Poland (Russian
Poland) have been indexed >from Index pages created by vital record
registrars at year-end and then included in the register book. All the
AGAD records are indexed >from the original registers.

When JRI-Poland initiated the AGAD indexing project, we had to decide
the information to include in the index entry. Our objective was to
include enough information to allow the researcher to identify whether
the record in question was or could be the researcher's family while
trying to keep the cost of indexing as reasonable as possible. The AGAD
index entries include:

Year of Registration
Year of Event, if different >from Year of Registration
Surname and given name of the subject
Sex
Father's surname, given name, and town (if different >from town of
registration)
Mother's maiden name, given name and town (if different >from town of
registration)

There is definitely more information available in the actual record. The
amount of additional information depends upon the year of the record,
the type of record (birth, marriage, or death), and the town. JRI-Poland
has published examples of the headings of Galician documents with
English translations. These sample forms, in PDF format, can be
downloaded or viewed by going to http://www.jri-poland.org/jripltip.htm
and clicking on "A Guide to Headings of 19th Century Galician Jewish
Vital Record Forms (.PDF)."

In Galicia, as in many other jurisdictions, the birth record was used as
a permanent record for the individual. Legal changes of status for the
individual were subsequently noted. Notes were added to the birth record
to record legal events that affected this person including his/her
death, marriage, name change, divorce, and the civil marriage of his/her
parents.

Please do not expect every record to have these "change of status"
notes. My experience with these records indicate that records before
1877 have less incidence of these notes and that maybe one quarter to
one third of Galician birth record actually contain such notes.

Although researchers, including myself, would like to have complete
extracts of all records including the translation to their native
language, this would be an impossible task -- very time consuming and
expensive.

Hazel commented that her experience is that the "information on the
JRI-Poland index is not to be trusted." I can assure all Galician
researchers that the indices created for the AGAD project are of the
highest quality. Experienced Archivists, fluent in Polish and the German
gothic script used in these records, perform the indexing. The indexing
is performed to standards developed by JRI-Poland. The index files are
checked twice before they are added to the JRI-Poland online database.
The fact that there is more information in the record, when compared to
the index, is actually the point of an index.

Mark Halpern
JRI-Poland AGAD Archive Coordinator

[MODERATOR NOTE: This thread is now closed. Direct any further concerns you
have to JRI-Poland and Mark privately.]

----- Original Message -----

I have requested perhaps 10-12 Galician documents to this point
in time. This is not enough for a definitive statement, but I
have discovered that the information on the JRI-Poland index is
not to be trusted. I've found dates listed there which weren't
the date of birth but the registration dates. I've found
information in the document which wasn't included in the index.
At this point one must spend the money and buy the copy of the
actual record to know if more information is available which
isn't shown on the index. I assumed that this was the point of
the missing or incorrect information.

Hazel Sandow Boon
Hamilton, ON, Canada


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia Re: Discussion about Galician Vital Records indexed by JRI-Poland #galicia

Mark Halpern
 

Some Galician researchers may be under the impression that the INDEX
entries contained in the JRI-Poland online database are EXTRACTS of the
entire record. The JRI-Poland online database contains indices of Jewish
vital records. As is explained in the "Introduction" of the JRI-Poland
website, "The JRI-Poland database is a research tool, a valuable FIRST
step in finding clues to locating family records >from among the millions
of Jewish vital records for hundreds of Polish towns."

In the case of Galician records, there are very few register books that
contained index pages. Most of the records >from Congress Poland (Russian
Poland) have been indexed >from Index pages created by vital record
registrars at year-end and then included in the register book. All the
AGAD records are indexed >from the original registers.

When JRI-Poland initiated the AGAD indexing project, we had to decide
the information to include in the index entry. Our objective was to
include enough information to allow the researcher to identify whether
the record in question was or could be the researcher's family while
trying to keep the cost of indexing as reasonable as possible. The AGAD
index entries include:

Year of Registration
Year of Event, if different >from Year of Registration
Surname and given name of the subject
Sex
Father's surname, given name, and town (if different >from town of
registration)
Mother's maiden name, given name and town (if different >from town of
registration)

There is definitely more information available in the actual record. The
amount of additional information depends upon the year of the record,
the type of record (birth, marriage, or death), and the town. JRI-Poland
has published examples of the headings of Galician documents with
English translations. These sample forms, in PDF format, can be
downloaded or viewed by going to http://www.jri-poland.org/jripltip.htm
and clicking on "A Guide to Headings of 19th Century Galician Jewish
Vital Record Forms (.PDF)."

In Galicia, as in many other jurisdictions, the birth record was used as
a permanent record for the individual. Legal changes of status for the
individual were subsequently noted. Notes were added to the birth record
to record legal events that affected this person including his/her
death, marriage, name change, divorce, and the civil marriage of his/her
parents.

Please do not expect every record to have these "change of status"
notes. My experience with these records indicate that records before
1877 have less incidence of these notes and that maybe one quarter to
one third of Galician birth record actually contain such notes.

Although researchers, including myself, would like to have complete
extracts of all records including the translation to their native
language, this would be an impossible task -- very time consuming and
expensive.

Hazel commented that her experience is that the "information on the
JRI-Poland index is not to be trusted." I can assure all Galician
researchers that the indices created for the AGAD project are of the
highest quality. Experienced Archivists, fluent in Polish and the German
gothic script used in these records, perform the indexing. The indexing
is performed to standards developed by JRI-Poland. The index files are
checked twice before they are added to the JRI-Poland online database.
The fact that there is more information in the record, when compared to
the index, is actually the point of an index.

Mark Halpern
JRI-Poland AGAD Archive Coordinator

[MODERATOR NOTE: This thread is now closed. Direct any further concerns you
have to JRI-Poland and Mark privately.]

----- Original Message -----

I have requested perhaps 10-12 Galician documents to this point
in time. This is not enough for a definitive statement, but I
have discovered that the information on the JRI-Poland index is
not to be trusted. I've found dates listed there which weren't
the date of birth but the registration dates. I've found
information in the document which wasn't included in the index.
At this point one must spend the money and buy the copy of the
actual record to know if more information is available which
isn't shown on the index. I assumed that this was the point of
the missing or incorrect information.

Hazel Sandow Boon
Hamilton, ON, Canada


Jewish Genealogy Made Simple - May 17th - Arnie Schwarz at LA/FHC #general

Pamela Weisberger <pweisberger@...>
 

On Tuesday, MAY 17th, Jewish Genealogical Society of Los Angeles, member Arnie
Schwartz will be delivering a talk at the Los Angeles, California LDS Family
History Center, 10741 Santa Monica Boulevard, Los Angeles, CA 90025:

"Jewish Genealogy Made Simple"

from 1PM - 3PM - in the FHC Classroom. This is a free program. No RSVPs are
necessary.

Among the topics to be covered are:

. Where to start your genealogy research
. Ordering vital records
. Visiting relatives
. Creating a family address book
. Finding and visiting cemeteries where your relatives are interred
. Finding and copying old family photographs
. Obtaining copies of census records >from 1790 to 1930
. Obtaining copies >from the WWI Draft Registration Database
. Using the Social Security Death Index for deaths occurring after 1962
. Obtaining vital records >from Vancouver B.C. Canada via the internet
. How to read the Hebrew on Jewish tombstones
. How to convert Hebrew dates to Gregorian dates
. What are some common male & female Hebrew names used on tombstones
. What choices are there in genealogy software
. How to find family members' addresses and phone numbers using the internet
. Using the Ellis Island website to locate the ship manifest of your family
member's voyage
. Obtaining a photo of the ship that your ancestor traveled to North America on
. Using the Canadian archives in Ottawa
. How to use old coins and post cards to aid you in your genealogical detective
work
. Using a computer search engine to find out information on some of your family
members
. Twelve different web addresses to aid you in your genealogical research

Mr. Schwartz is a retired educator with the Los Angeles Unified School District,
having taught 30 years and a retired Naval Reserve Officer of 21 years. Since his
retirement, he has worked for Elkins Marine Training International as a presenter.
As such, Mr. Schwartz has presented his maritime workshops in the San Francisco
Bay Area, Cape Cod Massachusetts and Macae Brazil. Mr. Schwartz is also an
amateur genealogist and is member of the JGSLA>

For all of you just getting started in your genealogical research...or in need of
some new hints or tips, his talk may be just the thing you need to make some
breakthroughs. You can also do research in the Center's extensive mircofilm
collection prior to or after his program. We look forward to seeing you there!

For directions and additional info the Family History Center's website is:

http://www.lafhc.org

The Family History Center offers many classes for novices and beginners in every
aspect of genealogical research each month. May class information can be found
at:

http://www.lafhc.org/class.htm

Pamela Weisberger
1st V.P. Programs, JGSLA
Santa Monica, CA
pweisberger@hotmail.com


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Jewish Genealogy Made Simple - May 17th - Arnie Schwarz at LA/FHC #general

Pamela Weisberger <pweisberger@...>
 

On Tuesday, MAY 17th, Jewish Genealogical Society of Los Angeles, member Arnie
Schwartz will be delivering a talk at the Los Angeles, California LDS Family
History Center, 10741 Santa Monica Boulevard, Los Angeles, CA 90025:

"Jewish Genealogy Made Simple"

from 1PM - 3PM - in the FHC Classroom. This is a free program. No RSVPs are
necessary.

Among the topics to be covered are:

. Where to start your genealogy research
. Ordering vital records
. Visiting relatives
. Creating a family address book
. Finding and visiting cemeteries where your relatives are interred
. Finding and copying old family photographs
. Obtaining copies of census records >from 1790 to 1930
. Obtaining copies >from the WWI Draft Registration Database
. Using the Social Security Death Index for deaths occurring after 1962
. Obtaining vital records >from Vancouver B.C. Canada via the internet
. How to read the Hebrew on Jewish tombstones
. How to convert Hebrew dates to Gregorian dates
. What are some common male & female Hebrew names used on tombstones
. What choices are there in genealogy software
. How to find family members' addresses and phone numbers using the internet
. Using the Ellis Island website to locate the ship manifest of your family
member's voyage
. Obtaining a photo of the ship that your ancestor traveled to North America on
. Using the Canadian archives in Ottawa
. How to use old coins and post cards to aid you in your genealogical detective
work
. Using a computer search engine to find out information on some of your family
members
. Twelve different web addresses to aid you in your genealogical research

Mr. Schwartz is a retired educator with the Los Angeles Unified School District,
having taught 30 years and a retired Naval Reserve Officer of 21 years. Since his
retirement, he has worked for Elkins Marine Training International as a presenter.
As such, Mr. Schwartz has presented his maritime workshops in the San Francisco
Bay Area, Cape Cod Massachusetts and Macae Brazil. Mr. Schwartz is also an
amateur genealogist and is member of the JGSLA>

For all of you just getting started in your genealogical research...or in need of
some new hints or tips, his talk may be just the thing you need to make some
breakthroughs. You can also do research in the Center's extensive mircofilm
collection prior to or after his program. We look forward to seeing you there!

For directions and additional info the Family History Center's website is:

http://www.lafhc.org

The Family History Center offers many classes for novices and beginners in every
aspect of genealogical research each month. May class information can be found
at:

http://www.lafhc.org/class.htm

Pamela Weisberger
1st V.P. Programs, JGSLA
Santa Monica, CA
pweisberger@hotmail.com


Yale Reisner talk #poland

Thomas F. Weiss
 

Jewish Genealogical Society of Greater Boston

presents

A Most Extraordinary Situation:
Genealogical Adventures in Poland

Yale Reisner

Thursday May 19, 2005
7:00-9:30 PM
Temple Reyim, Newton

Direct >from Warsaw, Yale Reisner will present dramatic,
moving, and sometimes amusing accounts of the work of the
Ronald S. Lauder Foundation Genealogy Project as it helps
Jews of Polish origin and Poles of Jewish origin rediscover
and sort out their often twisted and complex backgrounds. He
will tell of child survivors and their offspring, of family
ties lost and found, and of new potential sources of
information.

Yale Reisner directs the Ronald S. Lauder Foundation
Genealogical Project of the Jewish Historical Institute of
Poland. Since 1994, he has been assisting individuals and
families in uncovering their family history. The Lauder
Foundation is a non-profit Jewish educational foundation.
Mr. Reisner holds degrees in Central European Regional
Studies >from Columbia College and the Fletcher School of Law
and Diplomacy and has been affiliated with Hebrew
University, the Jewish Theological Seminary of America,
Villanova University, the YIVO Institute for Jewish
Research, and the U.S. National Archives.

Temple Reyim, 1860 Washington Street (Route 16), Newton, is
near Newton-Wellesley Hospital and the Woodland stop on the
Riverside Green Line, as well as a short ride >from Route 128
at Exit 21.

Admission is free for members, $5 for non-members.
Refreshments will be served.
___________________________


Tom Weiss
Newton, MA
USA
tfweiss@mit.edu


JRI Poland #Poland Yale Reisner talk #poland

Thomas F. Weiss
 

Jewish Genealogical Society of Greater Boston

presents

A Most Extraordinary Situation:
Genealogical Adventures in Poland

Yale Reisner

Thursday May 19, 2005
7:00-9:30 PM
Temple Reyim, Newton

Direct >from Warsaw, Yale Reisner will present dramatic,
moving, and sometimes amusing accounts of the work of the
Ronald S. Lauder Foundation Genealogy Project as it helps
Jews of Polish origin and Poles of Jewish origin rediscover
and sort out their often twisted and complex backgrounds. He
will tell of child survivors and their offspring, of family
ties lost and found, and of new potential sources of
information.

Yale Reisner directs the Ronald S. Lauder Foundation
Genealogical Project of the Jewish Historical Institute of
Poland. Since 1994, he has been assisting individuals and
families in uncovering their family history. The Lauder
Foundation is a non-profit Jewish educational foundation.
Mr. Reisner holds degrees in Central European Regional
Studies >from Columbia College and the Fletcher School of Law
and Diplomacy and has been affiliated with Hebrew
University, the Jewish Theological Seminary of America,
Villanova University, the YIVO Institute for Jewish
Research, and the U.S. National Archives.

Temple Reyim, 1860 Washington Street (Route 16), Newton, is
near Newton-Wellesley Hospital and the Woodland stop on the
Riverside Green Line, as well as a short ride >from Route 128
at Exit 21.

Admission is free for members, $5 for non-members.
Refreshments will be served.
___________________________


Tom Weiss
Newton, MA
USA
tfweiss@mit.edu


TORTEN, Lvov/Podhajce-University of Lvov #poland

Pamela Weisberger <pweisberger@...>
 

Does anyone have information about the surname TORTEN >from Galicia....or
specifically:

SARAH TORTEN who was born between 1895 and 1900 in Podhajce or Lwow.

She went to the University of Lwow around 1920 to 1928 and studied
chemistry (or pharmacy) and most likely obtained a doctorate degree.
She had two sisters who also went to the University of Lwow. Both
graduated as M.D.s.

The older named ETHEL TORTEN was a student >from about 1916 till
graduation. In 1929 she moved to the USA and practiced medicine in
New York for many years.

The younger named CHAJA (Haya) graduated few years later and practiced
medicine in Podhajce till she was exterminated in the Holocaust. Her
married name was KRESSEL. Her husband and two children were killed in
1941. She continued in her medical practice until 1944 and was killed
on her way to Tarnopol.

I am researching on behalf of SARAH TORTEN's nephew, Michael Torten of
Israel, who is trying to discover his aunt's married name and her fate
and the fate of her children.

If this information (or surname and associated towns) sound familiar to
anyone please contact me privately. If you know of any student records
that still exist--or can be accessed-->from the University in Lvov--please
share that information, as that would be a useful genealogical resource
for all.

Thank you!

Pamela Weisberger
Santa Monica, CA
pweisberger@hotmail.com


JRI Poland #Poland TORTEN, Lvov/Podhajce-University of Lvov #poland

Pamela Weisberger <pweisberger@...>
 

Does anyone have information about the surname TORTEN >from Galicia....or
specifically:

SARAH TORTEN who was born between 1895 and 1900 in Podhajce or Lwow.

She went to the University of Lwow around 1920 to 1928 and studied
chemistry (or pharmacy) and most likely obtained a doctorate degree.
She had two sisters who also went to the University of Lwow. Both
graduated as M.D.s.

The older named ETHEL TORTEN was a student >from about 1916 till
graduation. In 1929 she moved to the USA and practiced medicine in
New York for many years.

The younger named CHAJA (Haya) graduated few years later and practiced
medicine in Podhajce till she was exterminated in the Holocaust. Her
married name was KRESSEL. Her husband and two children were killed in
1941. She continued in her medical practice until 1944 and was killed
on her way to Tarnopol.

I am researching on behalf of SARAH TORTEN's nephew, Michael Torten of
Israel, who is trying to discover his aunt's married name and her fate
and the fate of her children.

If this information (or surname and associated towns) sound familiar to
anyone please contact me privately. If you know of any student records
that still exist--or can be accessed-->from the University in Lvov--please
share that information, as that would be a useful genealogical resource
for all.

Thank you!

Pamela Weisberger
Santa Monica, CA
pweisberger@hotmail.com


Discussion about vital records #poland

Pamela Weisberger <pweisberger@...>
 

In recent messages to the Gesher Galicia Discussion Group, both Mark
Halpern and Alex Sharon make excellent points regarding the information
indexed by JRI-Poland archivists >from the AGAD vital records:

As Mark writes, they "... capture all the information that is requested as
part of the JRI-Poland template."

and as Alex writes:

"I am also not certain if AGAD personnel add any remarks (beside assigned to
them the standard spreadsheet columns) that may appear on the documents."

Both of these statements are true and make sense.

Although there ARE often extensive handwritten notes in the "comments"
section of these birth, marriage and death records, they are not normally
part of the Excel template, nor should they be. The time required for
translating what is often an entire paragraph, perhaps written in German
Gothic script (as in one of my ancestral records)--and microscopic Gothic
script at that!--would not be cost-effective...or even necessary as it
conveys information that falls beyond the basic requirements of an index.

The purpose of the index is to provide the simple "facts" of the vital
record--as they were originally written--which is why one should always
send for the actual copy so that one may discover other hidden gems
lurking in the margins of the record book.

In my case, there was information about how the family who worked on the
estate of a landowner was moved >from one town to another, and on what dates
(in Roman numerals).

In another, an infants' death record for my surname, listed under "NN" (for
no name/not named) and "stillbirth" actually showed in the comments section
that the child had lived for seven days, but had not lived long enough to
have a bris and receive a given name.

Other "comments" may provide a wealth of unexpected information for
researchers, including the name of the midwife and witnesses...and the only
way to know what exists is to see the actual record. Even if there is a
slight mispelling in how the archivist entered the information, seeing it
with your own eyes will enable you to correct the record for your own files.

Indexing >from difficult-to-read handwriting is an imprecise art--subject to
interpretation--and these indices should be used as a guide--but not
considered the final or absolute word.

Pamela Weisberger
Santa Monica, CA
pweisberger@hotmail.com


JRI Poland #Poland Discussion about vital records #poland

Pamela Weisberger <pweisberger@...>
 

In recent messages to the Gesher Galicia Discussion Group, both Mark
Halpern and Alex Sharon make excellent points regarding the information
indexed by JRI-Poland archivists >from the AGAD vital records:

As Mark writes, they "... capture all the information that is requested as
part of the JRI-Poland template."

and as Alex writes:

"I am also not certain if AGAD personnel add any remarks (beside assigned to
them the standard spreadsheet columns) that may appear on the documents."

Both of these statements are true and make sense.

Although there ARE often extensive handwritten notes in the "comments"
section of these birth, marriage and death records, they are not normally
part of the Excel template, nor should they be. The time required for
translating what is often an entire paragraph, perhaps written in German
Gothic script (as in one of my ancestral records)--and microscopic Gothic
script at that!--would not be cost-effective...or even necessary as it
conveys information that falls beyond the basic requirements of an index.

The purpose of the index is to provide the simple "facts" of the vital
record--as they were originally written--which is why one should always
send for the actual copy so that one may discover other hidden gems
lurking in the margins of the record book.

In my case, there was information about how the family who worked on the
estate of a landowner was moved >from one town to another, and on what dates
(in Roman numerals).

In another, an infants' death record for my surname, listed under "NN" (for
no name/not named) and "stillbirth" actually showed in the comments section
that the child had lived for seven days, but had not lived long enough to
have a bris and receive a given name.

Other "comments" may provide a wealth of unexpected information for
researchers, including the name of the midwife and witnesses...and the only
way to know what exists is to see the actual record. Even if there is a
slight mispelling in how the archivist entered the information, seeing it
with your own eyes will enable you to correct the record for your own files.

Indexing >from difficult-to-read handwriting is an imprecise art--subject to
interpretation--and these indices should be used as a guide--but not
considered the final or absolute word.

Pamela Weisberger
Santa Monica, CA
pweisberger@hotmail.com


Askin again #usa

Terri Burns <mooneymouse58@...>
 

Thank you so much for your replies. It made my day.
I think I messed up and said that the HITT line was Jewish and it was not.
Thanks for the references and for the insights you shared with me.
I've never had this type of welcome at any other genealogy site.
I can't wait to share them with my friend Holly Strum who referred me to
this site.
I plan to share this info with the Bracken County (KY) Historical Society.
A woman who had researched the Askin line for 20 years and found out she was
dying saw my posting for Askin and I proved to be descended >from an uncle
who left VA with an older brother when KY became a going concern and was
never heard >from again. She was thrilled to fill in what happened to that
last sibling and sent me all her research. I gleaned what I needed, put it
in a huge binder, and then donated it to the above named historical society.
Thank you again.

Terri Miller Duff, Batavia, Ohio USA <mooneymouse58@hotmail.com>


Early American SIG #USA Askin again #usa

Terri Burns <mooneymouse58@...>
 

Thank you so much for your replies. It made my day.
I think I messed up and said that the HITT line was Jewish and it was not.
Thanks for the references and for the insights you shared with me.
I've never had this type of welcome at any other genealogy site.
I can't wait to share them with my friend Holly Strum who referred me to
this site.
I plan to share this info with the Bracken County (KY) Historical Society.
A woman who had researched the Askin line for 20 years and found out she was
dying saw my posting for Askin and I proved to be descended >from an uncle
who left VA with an older brother when KY became a going concern and was
never heard >from again. She was thrilled to fill in what happened to that
last sibling and sent me all her research. I gleaned what I needed, put it
in a huge binder, and then donated it to the above named historical society.
Thank you again.

Terri Miller Duff, Batavia, Ohio USA <mooneymouse58@hotmail.com>