Date   

FEINSTEIN/FINESTONE; Ukraine>Chelsea MA 1840>1970 #ukraine

alanpeg <alanpeg@...>
 

It's been a while, so:

I hope that someone has information on my paternal grandmother's family. We
are searching for ancestors and descendants of Israel FEINSTEIN (sometimes
listed as FINESTONE). The son of Samuel FEINSTEIN, he was born in Zhitomir,
Ukraine in 1839/40 and was married to Bella (Blume) ALEXANDER or BERNSTEIN.
He had a sister-in-law named Leah.

Israel and Blume emigrated to Chelsea MA in 1901. All nine of their
children had preceded them to Chelsea:
Abraham changed his name to GORDON and married Dora (Dvera) ROSENFIELD.
Nathan changed his name to FINESTONE and married Bessie FINKEL.
Simon (Shimon) changed his name to STARR and married Bessie GINSBERG.
Sophie (Shiva) married John ALBERT.
Clara married Alexander ROSENFIELD. These were my grandparents.
Sonya (Shininda) married Jacob FINGOLD.
Harry changed his name to FINESTONE and married Fannie SCHULTZ.
Elizabeth (Leah) never married.
Samuel changed his name to FINESTONE. His wife was Anna SMITH or
SANDERS.

We will be happy to share information if there is a match.

Al & Peg Rosenfield
Columbus OH

MODERATOR'S NOTE: Be sure to put ALL your names and places in the JewishGen
Family Finder (JGFF).


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine FEINSTEIN/FINESTONE; Ukraine>Chelsea MA 1840>1970 #ukraine

alanpeg <alanpeg@...>
 

It's been a while, so:

I hope that someone has information on my paternal grandmother's family. We
are searching for ancestors and descendants of Israel FEINSTEIN (sometimes
listed as FINESTONE). The son of Samuel FEINSTEIN, he was born in Zhitomir,
Ukraine in 1839/40 and was married to Bella (Blume) ALEXANDER or BERNSTEIN.
He had a sister-in-law named Leah.

Israel and Blume emigrated to Chelsea MA in 1901. All nine of their
children had preceded them to Chelsea:
Abraham changed his name to GORDON and married Dora (Dvera) ROSENFIELD.
Nathan changed his name to FINESTONE and married Bessie FINKEL.
Simon (Shimon) changed his name to STARR and married Bessie GINSBERG.
Sophie (Shiva) married John ALBERT.
Clara married Alexander ROSENFIELD. These were my grandparents.
Sonya (Shininda) married Jacob FINGOLD.
Harry changed his name to FINESTONE and married Fannie SCHULTZ.
Elizabeth (Leah) never married.
Samuel changed his name to FINESTONE. His wife was Anna SMITH or
SANDERS.

We will be happy to share information if there is a match.

Al & Peg Rosenfield
Columbus OH

MODERATOR'S NOTE: Be sure to put ALL your names and places in the JewishGen
Family Finder (JGFF).


Summary: Query on 19th-c Russ. Emp. hats, yarmulkes #ukraine

Marc L. Greenberg <marek4@...>
 

My query about style of hats and yarmulkes on Jewish
men in the late nineteenth-century Russian Empire
generated dozens of responses and requests that I post
to the group what I learn.* The question echoes a
current ethnographic concern, although my intention
was only to find out about the nineteenth century
practice. Michael Restatcher [Israel] wrote: “…the
kind of hat in the Jewish traditional life is a very,
very large subject [among] the ‘Chasidim’ even today
in the streets of NY or London, etc. People can
identify >from which ‘stream’ the person is >from his
hat. So, I believe that you touched a very important
and interesting subject.” To save bandwidth I have
edited the responses down to the pertinent information
and divided them into three groups: A. Those who
believe the hats were common, everyday headgear; B.
Those who believe there was special significance
attached to one hat or the other; C. Those who
suggested ways to follow up on the question.

A. Common:

1. My grandfather, Reven Roiter, wore this type of
yarmulke often. He immigrated >from Lipkany, Bessarabia
in 1913 to the US. I have seen similar yarmulkes on
middle aged and older men in the US dating back to the
1950s and 1960s. [Anna Reuter, Palo Alto, CA]

2. The high yarmulke was not uncommon - even in the
states it was worn as I remember them in the 1950s.
The cap is a common Russian one. It also appears in
some of our family's old photographs. [Shalom
Bronstein, Jerusalem]

3. I have a photo of my great grandfather in a similar
hat. He emigrated >from Belarus to Chicago, in 1907.
I don't know when or where the photo was taken. [Marla
Deutsch, Campbell, CA]

4. I believe this type of yarmulke was Litvak. It's
the type my Suwalker great-grandfather is wearing in a
photo. I have ancestors (Moskowitz) who went from
Vilkija, Kovno Gub., Lithuania to Soroki, Bessarabia,
in the 1870's. [Gayle Sweetwine Saini, Ann Arbor, MI]

5. I have a similar photo of an unknown relative which
is posted on Viewmate, no. VM 3332. The place where
these were taken was in Dobrzyn. [Ellen Mandel]

[This establishes a wide geography for the ‘stovepipe’
type of yarmulke: Dobrzyñ is today in NW Poland. Note
MLG.]

6. I have pictures of two great-grandfathers, both of
whom are wearing the first type of square yarmulke in
Russia. I also have pictures of a great-grandfather
and a great-great-grandfather wearing derbies. So it
wasn't unusual to be photographed wearing street hats.
The hat in the second photo looks like a fairly
standard Russian hat of the period. I have a photo of
a gentleman wearing a similar street hat in Baltimore
in the 1920s[; it is] of a Jewish farming community
and the hat resembles nothing more than the hat Stalin
is pictured wearing. [Steve also notes a statement
from another discussion group on this topic:] “The
high yarmulke was a Lithuanian/Russian singularity.
Not *all* of the gedolim of the previous generation
wore them; some, depending on their land of origin,
wore the type we wear; some wore turbans for that
matter.”
http://www.ottmall.com/mj_ht_arch/v33/mj_v33i20.html
[Steve comments:] I don't know how authoritative this
is, but I don't think I've seen the more common
version in a photograph >from Russia. They also seem to
be rather common in photos on tombstones. [Steve
Franklin, Baltimore]

7. I've seen plenty of pictures of Jews >from Russia
and Bessarabia, and my conclusion is that the top of
the head “stovepipe” is the religious headpiece or
yarmulke. It has no special significance, in my
opinion, other than being a religious symbol. As for
the other headpiece, the one with the bill, that […]
is simply the style of men of that era. It almost has
a military look to it, so my guess is that it is just
what the Jewish (or non-Jewish) man would be wearing.
The fact that he is indoors taking his picture may
only mean that he is proud of his headpiece and wants
to show it off. [Irv Schoenberg]

B. Uncommon:

1. It is called a BUCHARI, and I believe it was [...]
popular among Sephardic Jews. [Dayna Chalif, San
Francisco]

[In response to Dayna’s query I replied that she
reminded of a fascinating on-line photographic
exhibit, which includes 19th-century color (!) photos
of Samarkand Jews:
http://www.loc.gov/exhibits/empire/ethnic.html
http://www.loc.gov/exhibits/empire/images/p87_8066__01861_.jpg
MLG]

2. The hats seem rabbinic. Especially the first one:
kipah in dress-up version. The second hat is
fascinating and may reflect a specific yeshiva. [A.]

3. The tall hat is worn by a chazan (cantor) even in
modern times. [Elaine Siegel, Monroe Township, NJ]

C. Helpful suggestions for follow-up:

In Tel Aviv there is a museum which has a whole
building dedicated to dress.
http://www.eretzmuseum.org.il [English link]
http://www.eretzmuseum.org.il/main/site/index.php3?mod=firstPage&langId=1
Ethnography and Folklore Pavilion
http://www.eretzmuseum.org.il/main/site/index.php3?page=71
[Hinda Solomon, Rishon LeZion, Israel] The same
suggestion was made by another SIG member [“A.”]

The prevailing view is that these types of hats,
especially the “stovepipe” yarmulke, were found
throughout the Pale of Settlement and were thus not
uncommon. The style of yarmulke does not seem to have
any special significance except to mark a pious Jewish
male.
I thank the friendly people on the Romania-SIG and
Ukraine-SIG who shared their interest and collective
expertise. If I learn anything more after following up
with the Jerusalem museum ethnographers, or others, I
shall post the answer(s) to the groups.

Marc L. Greenberg, Lawrence, KS, USA

*My original query referred to photos >from Kishinev,
Bessarabia, ca. 1900, archived on Viewmate:
http://data.jewishgen.org/viewmate/ALL/viewmateview.asp?key=5639
http://data.jewishgen.org/viewmate/ALL/viewmateview.asp?key=5640


Mukachevo #ukraine

Dennis Baer <dennis.baer@...>
 

Hello



I would like to see the group include Mukachevo in any birth, mariage and
death documents that get researched. I want to see such documents >from 1700
- 1910 catalogued eventually especially the Hungarian Jewish records.



I research the surnames SCHANZ, SCHANTZ, SCHANCZ, GRUNSTEIN, GREENSTEIN and
GOLD.



Dennis Baer



Bethpage, New York


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine Summary: Query on 19th-c Russ. Emp. hats, yarmulkes #ukraine

Marc L. Greenberg <marek4@...>
 

My query about style of hats and yarmulkes on Jewish
men in the late nineteenth-century Russian Empire
generated dozens of responses and requests that I post
to the group what I learn.* The question echoes a
current ethnographic concern, although my intention
was only to find out about the nineteenth century
practice. Michael Restatcher [Israel] wrote: “…the
kind of hat in the Jewish traditional life is a very,
very large subject [among] the ‘Chasidim’ even today
in the streets of NY or London, etc. People can
identify >from which ‘stream’ the person is >from his
hat. So, I believe that you touched a very important
and interesting subject.” To save bandwidth I have
edited the responses down to the pertinent information
and divided them into three groups: A. Those who
believe the hats were common, everyday headgear; B.
Those who believe there was special significance
attached to one hat or the other; C. Those who
suggested ways to follow up on the question.

A. Common:

1. My grandfather, Reven Roiter, wore this type of
yarmulke often. He immigrated >from Lipkany, Bessarabia
in 1913 to the US. I have seen similar yarmulkes on
middle aged and older men in the US dating back to the
1950s and 1960s. [Anna Reuter, Palo Alto, CA]

2. The high yarmulke was not uncommon - even in the
states it was worn as I remember them in the 1950s.
The cap is a common Russian one. It also appears in
some of our family's old photographs. [Shalom
Bronstein, Jerusalem]

3. I have a photo of my great grandfather in a similar
hat. He emigrated >from Belarus to Chicago, in 1907.
I don't know when or where the photo was taken. [Marla
Deutsch, Campbell, CA]

4. I believe this type of yarmulke was Litvak. It's
the type my Suwalker great-grandfather is wearing in a
photo. I have ancestors (Moskowitz) who went from
Vilkija, Kovno Gub., Lithuania to Soroki, Bessarabia,
in the 1870's. [Gayle Sweetwine Saini, Ann Arbor, MI]

5. I have a similar photo of an unknown relative which
is posted on Viewmate, no. VM 3332. The place where
these were taken was in Dobrzyn. [Ellen Mandel]

[This establishes a wide geography for the ‘stovepipe’
type of yarmulke: Dobrzyñ is today in NW Poland. Note
MLG.]

6. I have pictures of two great-grandfathers, both of
whom are wearing the first type of square yarmulke in
Russia. I also have pictures of a great-grandfather
and a great-great-grandfather wearing derbies. So it
wasn't unusual to be photographed wearing street hats.
The hat in the second photo looks like a fairly
standard Russian hat of the period. I have a photo of
a gentleman wearing a similar street hat in Baltimore
in the 1920s[; it is] of a Jewish farming community
and the hat resembles nothing more than the hat Stalin
is pictured wearing. [Steve also notes a statement
from another discussion group on this topic:] “The
high yarmulke was a Lithuanian/Russian singularity.
Not *all* of the gedolim of the previous generation
wore them; some, depending on their land of origin,
wore the type we wear; some wore turbans for that
matter.”
http://www.ottmall.com/mj_ht_arch/v33/mj_v33i20.html
[Steve comments:] I don't know how authoritative this
is, but I don't think I've seen the more common
version in a photograph >from Russia. They also seem to
be rather common in photos on tombstones. [Steve
Franklin, Baltimore]

7. I've seen plenty of pictures of Jews >from Russia
and Bessarabia, and my conclusion is that the top of
the head “stovepipe” is the religious headpiece or
yarmulke. It has no special significance, in my
opinion, other than being a religious symbol. As for
the other headpiece, the one with the bill, that […]
is simply the style of men of that era. It almost has
a military look to it, so my guess is that it is just
what the Jewish (or non-Jewish) man would be wearing.
The fact that he is indoors taking his picture may
only mean that he is proud of his headpiece and wants
to show it off. [Irv Schoenberg]

B. Uncommon:

1. It is called a BUCHARI, and I believe it was [...]
popular among Sephardic Jews. [Dayna Chalif, San
Francisco]

[In response to Dayna’s query I replied that she
reminded of a fascinating on-line photographic
exhibit, which includes 19th-century color (!) photos
of Samarkand Jews:
http://www.loc.gov/exhibits/empire/ethnic.html
http://www.loc.gov/exhibits/empire/images/p87_8066__01861_.jpg
MLG]

2. The hats seem rabbinic. Especially the first one:
kipah in dress-up version. The second hat is
fascinating and may reflect a specific yeshiva. [A.]

3. The tall hat is worn by a chazan (cantor) even in
modern times. [Elaine Siegel, Monroe Township, NJ]

C. Helpful suggestions for follow-up:

In Tel Aviv there is a museum which has a whole
building dedicated to dress.
http://www.eretzmuseum.org.il [English link]
http://www.eretzmuseum.org.il/main/site/index.php3?mod=firstPage&langId=1
Ethnography and Folklore Pavilion
http://www.eretzmuseum.org.il/main/site/index.php3?page=71
[Hinda Solomon, Rishon LeZion, Israel] The same
suggestion was made by another SIG member [“A.”]

The prevailing view is that these types of hats,
especially the “stovepipe” yarmulke, were found
throughout the Pale of Settlement and were thus not
uncommon. The style of yarmulke does not seem to have
any special significance except to mark a pious Jewish
male.
I thank the friendly people on the Romania-SIG and
Ukraine-SIG who shared their interest and collective
expertise. If I learn anything more after following up
with the Jerusalem museum ethnographers, or others, I
shall post the answer(s) to the groups.

Marc L. Greenberg, Lawrence, KS, USA

*My original query referred to photos >from Kishinev,
Bessarabia, ca. 1900, archived on Viewmate:
http://data.jewishgen.org/viewmate/ALL/viewmateview.asp?key=5639
http://data.jewishgen.org/viewmate/ALL/viewmateview.asp?key=5640


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine Mukachevo #ukraine

Dennis Baer <dennis.baer@...>
 

Hello



I would like to see the group include Mukachevo in any birth, mariage and
death documents that get researched. I want to see such documents >from 1700
- 1910 catalogued eventually especially the Hungarian Jewish records.



I research the surnames SCHANZ, SCHANTZ, SCHANCZ, GRUNSTEIN, GREENSTEIN and
GOLD.



Dennis Baer



Bethpage, New York


Birds of a Feather - Kiev Gubernia #ukraine

Kenneth Packer
 

Moshe,
If you want to start a Birds of a Feather Group for Kiev gubernia
(including Korostyshev, Zhitomer, Koristan, etc. area) I would be glad
to join. As you know I have WINARSKY's on my PACKER (PEKER) Family
Tree. I don't have the slightest idea of how to start a group myself.
Regards,
Ken Packer

Researching: PEKER, PACKER, BECKER, >from anywhere in the Ukraine, especially towns within a 200 mile radius >from Kiev (Korostyshev, Zhitomer, Koristan, Brusilov, Khordorkev, Rudni).


Moshe Davis wrote:

Subject: pooling information to maximize research
From: "Moshe & Esther Davis" <davis@...>
Date: Thu, 10 Mar 2005 09:42:21

Dear All,

I'd also be interested in the possibility of forming "birds of a feather"
groups. My interests in the Ukraine are:

(1) The area of Tecs, Chust, and Sziget in Zarkapatska Oblast,
Ukraine and Maramures, Romania (former Austro-Hungarian
Marmaros in SubCarpathia), family surnames DAVIDOVITS,
CHAIMOVITS, KATZ, ZELMANOVITS.

(2) The Kiev gubernia (possibly Korostychev area), family surnames
WINARKSY, SHURMAN.

(3) The area of Novograd Wolinsky (Zvhil), Rovne, Korets, and
Kniace in Volhynia gubernia, family surnames ABRAMSON, KATZ,
METKOP, KRASNOSTAWSKY.

Moshe Davis
Jerusalem


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine Birds of a Feather - Kiev Gubernia #ukraine

Kenneth Packer
 

Moshe,
If you want to start a Birds of a Feather Group for Kiev gubernia
(including Korostyshev, Zhitomer, Koristan, etc. area) I would be glad
to join. As you know I have WINARSKY's on my PACKER (PEKER) Family
Tree. I don't have the slightest idea of how to start a group myself.
Regards,
Ken Packer

Researching: PEKER, PACKER, BECKER, >from anywhere in the Ukraine, especially towns within a 200 mile radius >from Kiev (Korostyshev, Zhitomer, Koristan, Brusilov, Khordorkev, Rudni).


Moshe Davis wrote:

Subject: pooling information to maximize research
From: "Moshe & Esther Davis" <davis@...>
Date: Thu, 10 Mar 2005 09:42:21

Dear All,

I'd also be interested in the possibility of forming "birds of a feather"
groups. My interests in the Ukraine are:

(1) The area of Tecs, Chust, and Sziget in Zarkapatska Oblast,
Ukraine and Maramures, Romania (former Austro-Hungarian
Marmaros in SubCarpathia), family surnames DAVIDOVITS,
CHAIMOVITS, KATZ, ZELMANOVITS.

(2) The Kiev gubernia (possibly Korostychev area), family surnames
WINARKSY, SHURMAN.

(3) The area of Novograd Wolinsky (Zvhil), Rovne, Korets, and
Kniace in Volhynia gubernia, family surnames ABRAMSON, KATZ,
METKOP, KRASNOSTAWSKY.

Moshe Davis
Jerusalem


Davidsohn #ukraine

orin
 

Hello
I am researching my cousins ROZA (ROZI) and NUTZI >from KISHINEV.
Their parents MORITZ and BETTY DAVIDSOHN.
They was born in BUCHARES, Romania, after their father died they moved with
their mother to KISHINEV.
They should be 60 - 70 years old, and maybe their surname is different now.

Thank you

Frida Oringer
Hertzeliya, Israel
orin@...


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine Davidsohn #ukraine

orin
 

Hello
I am researching my cousins ROZA (ROZI) and NUTZI >from KISHINEV.
Their parents MORITZ and BETTY DAVIDSOHN.
They was born in BUCHARES, Romania, after their father died they moved with
their mother to KISHINEV.
They should be 60 - 70 years old, and maybe their surname is different now.

Thank you

Frida Oringer
Hertzeliya, Israel
orin@...


R' DAVIDSOHN, Dorohoi, Romania, ca. 1870 #rabbinic

orin
 

Hello,

I seek information about Rabbi Yoel DAVIDSOHN >from Herta - Dorohoi -
Romania and his family.

The details that I have - He was born on 1840, married Serel, and I
know the names of two sons - David and Strul. I believe there were
more children.

His father was Rabbi David, who was More Tzedek in Galati - Romania.

I will be happy to receive more information.

Frida Oringer
Hertzeliya, Israel
mailto:orin@...


Rabbinic Genealogy SIG #Rabbinic R' DAVIDSOHN, Dorohoi, Romania, ca. 1870 #rabbinic

orin
 

Hello,

I seek information about Rabbi Yoel DAVIDSOHN >from Herta - Dorohoi -
Romania and his family.

The details that I have - He was born on 1840, married Serel, and I
know the names of two sons - David and Strul. I believe there were
more children.

His father was Rabbi David, who was More Tzedek in Galati - Romania.

I will be happy to receive more information.

Frida Oringer
Hertzeliya, Israel
mailto:orin@...


David Hirsch to speak in San Diego #general

Roberta Berman <rbrta@...>
 

David Hirsch, the Jewish and Middle Eastern Studies bibliographer at the
UCLA Research Library will be speaking at the next meeting of the San Diego
Jewish Genealogical Society.

He will discuss the different resources available in academic libraries
such as encyclopedias, directories, gazetteers, Yizkor books, indexes, etc.
that might be useful for a Jewish genealogist. He will also discuss the
resources in many different languages: Hebrew, Yiddish, Spanish, Russian,
German, etc. that are available at UCLA.

Sunday, March 13th, 1:00 P.M.

Lawrence Family Jewish Community Center, Senior Activity Room
4126 Executive Drive, La Jolla, CA

Non-members $3.00

Roberta Berman
SDJGS

Researching: CHAMEIDES, ROTTENSTREICH.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen David Hirsch to speak in San Diego #general

Roberta Berman <rbrta@...>
 

David Hirsch, the Jewish and Middle Eastern Studies bibliographer at the
UCLA Research Library will be speaking at the next meeting of the San Diego
Jewish Genealogical Society.

He will discuss the different resources available in academic libraries
such as encyclopedias, directories, gazetteers, Yizkor books, indexes, etc.
that might be useful for a Jewish genealogist. He will also discuss the
resources in many different languages: Hebrew, Yiddish, Spanish, Russian,
German, etc. that are available at UCLA.

Sunday, March 13th, 1:00 P.M.

Lawrence Family Jewish Community Center, Senior Activity Room
4126 Executive Drive, La Jolla, CA

Non-members $3.00

Roberta Berman
SDJGS

Researching: CHAMEIDES, ROTTENSTREICH.


Full Day Genealogy Seminar, Basics and Beyond, Sunday April 3, 2005 in NYC #general

Jewish Genealogical Society <jgs@...>
 

The Jewish Genealogical Society (New York) is pleased to announce its
Basics & Beyond full-day seminar on Sunday April 3, 2005 at the Center
for Jewish History, 15 West 16th Street, NYC. Early registration ends
March 18, 2005. Space is limited -- advance registration is
recommended.

The following is an outline of the program:

Naturalizations & Draft Records (Lucille Gudis, co-chair 2006
Interantional Conference on Jewish Genealogy, co-chair 1999 Conference
and NARA volunteer)

Beginner's Workshop (Jordan Auslander, compiler of the recently
published, A Genealogical Gazetteer of the Kingdon of Hungary)

Vital Records (Debra Braverman, professional genealogist and member of
the APG)

Genealogical Treasures at YIVO (Estelle Guzik, editor, Genealogical
Resources in New York and former JGS President)

Court Records (Bruce Abrams, Archivist, NY County Clerk's Office, Old
Records Division)

Eastern European Research (Linda Cantor, former President, JGS of Long
Island, former IAJGS Board member, and JGS (NY) Secretary)

Research in New York City (Claus Hirsch, JGS Executive Council and
Advisory Board member for Stammbaum, the Journal of German-Jewish
Genealogy)

Computors & Genealogy (David Kleiman, co-founder and chair of the New
York Computers and Genealogy Special Interest Group)

Polish Research (Alex Friedlander, JGS President, former editor of
Dorot, the journal of the JGS (NY) and author of the 2 volume >from
Suwalki to St Iganace)

Holocaust Research (Gloria Berkenstat Freund, JGS Vice President for
Programs and Program Chair of the 2006 Conference)

Ask the Experts (Steven Siegel, former JGS President and Alex
Friedlander, Lucille Gudis, Estelle Guzik)

Searching for Survivors of the SS St. Louis (Scott Miller, Director,
Registry of Holocaust Survivors, US Holocaust Memorial Museum)
* * *

For information on the seminar location and early registration fees
check www.jgsny.org. Discount rates are available to members of the JGS
and co-sponsors, the American Jewish Historical Society, the American
Separdi Federation, the Center for Jewish History Genealogy Institute,
the Leo Baeck Institute, the Yeshiva University Museum and the YIVO
Institute for Jewish Research.

Estelle Guzik
JGS (NY)


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Full Day Genealogy Seminar, Basics and Beyond, Sunday April 3, 2005 in NYC #general

Jewish Genealogical Society <jgs@...>
 

The Jewish Genealogical Society (New York) is pleased to announce its
Basics & Beyond full-day seminar on Sunday April 3, 2005 at the Center
for Jewish History, 15 West 16th Street, NYC. Early registration ends
March 18, 2005. Space is limited -- advance registration is
recommended.

The following is an outline of the program:

Naturalizations & Draft Records (Lucille Gudis, co-chair 2006
Interantional Conference on Jewish Genealogy, co-chair 1999 Conference
and NARA volunteer)

Beginner's Workshop (Jordan Auslander, compiler of the recently
published, A Genealogical Gazetteer of the Kingdon of Hungary)

Vital Records (Debra Braverman, professional genealogist and member of
the APG)

Genealogical Treasures at YIVO (Estelle Guzik, editor, Genealogical
Resources in New York and former JGS President)

Court Records (Bruce Abrams, Archivist, NY County Clerk's Office, Old
Records Division)

Eastern European Research (Linda Cantor, former President, JGS of Long
Island, former IAJGS Board member, and JGS (NY) Secretary)

Research in New York City (Claus Hirsch, JGS Executive Council and
Advisory Board member for Stammbaum, the Journal of German-Jewish
Genealogy)

Computors & Genealogy (David Kleiman, co-founder and chair of the New
York Computers and Genealogy Special Interest Group)

Polish Research (Alex Friedlander, JGS President, former editor of
Dorot, the journal of the JGS (NY) and author of the 2 volume >from
Suwalki to St Iganace)

Holocaust Research (Gloria Berkenstat Freund, JGS Vice President for
Programs and Program Chair of the 2006 Conference)

Ask the Experts (Steven Siegel, former JGS President and Alex
Friedlander, Lucille Gudis, Estelle Guzik)

Searching for Survivors of the SS St. Louis (Scott Miller, Director,
Registry of Holocaust Survivors, US Holocaust Memorial Museum)
* * *

For information on the seminar location and early registration fees
check www.jgsny.org. Discount rates are available to members of the JGS
and co-sponsors, the American Jewish Historical Society, the American
Separdi Federation, the Center for Jewish History Genealogy Institute,
the Leo Baeck Institute, the Yeshiva University Museum and the YIVO
Institute for Jewish Research.

Estelle Guzik
JGS (NY)


JGSNY March 20th Meeting - HIAS #general

Gloria Berkenstat <gitl_leah@...>
 

On Sunday, March 20th at 2 pm, JGSNY will present our
board member, Valery Bazarov, head of the Location and
Family History Service at the Hebrew Immigrant Aid
Society (HIAS). He will explain how the HIAS case
files have enabled him to solve “mysteries.”.

The meeting takes place at the Center for Jewish
History located in Manhattan at 15 West 16th Street,
between 5th and 6th Avenues.

Come at 12:30 and join us for an informal get-together
before the meeting. Lunch can be purchased at the
Center café and enjoyed with conversation at tables
set up in the Great Hall outside the auditorium. Food
CANNOT be brought >from outside due to the dietary laws
observed by the Center.

The Center Genealogy Institute will be open >from 12:30
to 2:00 on March 20th for networking
with other researchers and access to resource
materials and computers.

Please note that early registration rates for the
April 3rd Basics and Beyond Workshop expire on March
18th.

For more information about the meeting and/or the
workshop, call 212-294-8326 or send a message to
info@....

Gloria Berkenstat Freund
JGSNY Vice President for Programs
New York, NY


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen JGSNY March 20th Meeting - HIAS #general

Gloria Berkenstat <gitl_leah@...>
 

On Sunday, March 20th at 2 pm, JGSNY will present our
board member, Valery Bazarov, head of the Location and
Family History Service at the Hebrew Immigrant Aid
Society (HIAS). He will explain how the HIAS case
files have enabled him to solve “mysteries.”.

The meeting takes place at the Center for Jewish
History located in Manhattan at 15 West 16th Street,
between 5th and 6th Avenues.

Come at 12:30 and join us for an informal get-together
before the meeting. Lunch can be purchased at the
Center café and enjoyed with conversation at tables
set up in the Great Hall outside the auditorium. Food
CANNOT be brought >from outside due to the dietary laws
observed by the Center.

The Center Genealogy Institute will be open >from 12:30
to 2:00 on March 20th for networking
with other researchers and access to resource
materials and computers.

Please note that early registration rates for the
April 3rd Basics and Beyond Workshop expire on March
18th.

For more information about the meeting and/or the
workshop, call 212-294-8326 or send a message to
info@....

Gloria Berkenstat Freund
JGSNY Vice President for Programs
New York, NY


Re: Numbering of residences in Prague in the late 19th century #general

Stan Goodman <SPAM_FOILER@...>
 

On Fri, 11 Mar 2005 15:39:59 UTC, glecompte@... (Dr. Gare LeCompte)
opined:

My grandfather, Wilhelm GROSCHL, was born at "Prague No. 39/V" on
September 14, 1882, according to HBMa 2523 in the Praha State
Archive. He was the son of Jocachim GROSCHL("bookbinder of
Dolltchen, region of Pilsen, son of Wolf and Lea nee BLEYER who
married in Dolitchen on September 20, 1829) and Emilie Groschl
(daughter of Joseph Anspach and Marie Anspach nee Eckstein).
(Groschl can also be transliterated as Groeschl)

Apparently they moved, as older brother Joseph Groschl was
born on December 16, 1879 at "Prague No. 54/V"

I know that Prague V is the "Smichov" district. While the Josefov
"ghetto" underwent "urban renewal" in 1897 with streets and
buildings "condensed," I am working under the assumption that
the Smichov district was less disrupted.

My question is how do you convert old record geographic locations
(e.g., Prague No. 39/V) to a current street location?
You are right about Smichov/Prague 5, of course. The fact that both these
addresses are only two-digit numbers suggests that there weren't many
buldings in the quarter at the time. I think it was a new neighborhood in
the mid-19th century, and that the first street to be built up was the one
where the streetcar tracks are laid >from Mala Strana to Andel -- that is all
shops now. Right behind that street is the only synagogue in Smichov, now a
warehouse, which makes sense. I would think that the Jewish Community might
be able to steer you to a place that might be able to give you information
you are looking for. The address I have for the Community's office is:
walterova AT kehilaprag.cz (You know how to make that a real email address.)


--
Stan Goodman, Qiryat Tiv'on, Israel

Searching:
NEACHOWICZ/NOACHOWICZ, NEJMAN/NAJMAN, SURALSKI: >from Lomza Gubernia
ISMACH: >from Lomza Gubernia, Galicia, and Ukraina
HERTANU, ABRAMOVICI, LAUER: >from Dorohoi District, Romania
GRISARU, VATARU: >from Iasi, Dorohoi, and Mileanca, Romania

See my interactive family tree (requires Java 1.1.6 or better). the URL is:
http://www.hashkedim.com

For reasons connected with anti-spam/junk security, the return address is
not valid. To communicate with me, please visit my website (see the URL
above -- no Java required for this purpose) and fill in the email form
there.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Numbering of residences in Prague in the late 19th century #general

Stan Goodman <SPAM_FOILER@...>
 

On Fri, 11 Mar 2005 15:39:59 UTC, glecompte@... (Dr. Gare LeCompte)
opined:

My grandfather, Wilhelm GROSCHL, was born at "Prague No. 39/V" on
September 14, 1882, according to HBMa 2523 in the Praha State
Archive. He was the son of Jocachim GROSCHL("bookbinder of
Dolltchen, region of Pilsen, son of Wolf and Lea nee BLEYER who
married in Dolitchen on September 20, 1829) and Emilie Groschl
(daughter of Joseph Anspach and Marie Anspach nee Eckstein).
(Groschl can also be transliterated as Groeschl)

Apparently they moved, as older brother Joseph Groschl was
born on December 16, 1879 at "Prague No. 54/V"

I know that Prague V is the "Smichov" district. While the Josefov
"ghetto" underwent "urban renewal" in 1897 with streets and
buildings "condensed," I am working under the assumption that
the Smichov district was less disrupted.

My question is how do you convert old record geographic locations
(e.g., Prague No. 39/V) to a current street location?
You are right about Smichov/Prague 5, of course. The fact that both these
addresses are only two-digit numbers suggests that there weren't many
buldings in the quarter at the time. I think it was a new neighborhood in
the mid-19th century, and that the first street to be built up was the one
where the streetcar tracks are laid >from Mala Strana to Andel -- that is all
shops now. Right behind that street is the only synagogue in Smichov, now a
warehouse, which makes sense. I would think that the Jewish Community might
be able to steer you to a place that might be able to give you information
you are looking for. The address I have for the Community's office is:
walterova AT kehilaprag.cz (You know how to make that a real email address.)


--
Stan Goodman, Qiryat Tiv'on, Israel

Searching:
NEACHOWICZ/NOACHOWICZ, NEJMAN/NAJMAN, SURALSKI: >from Lomza Gubernia
ISMACH: >from Lomza Gubernia, Galicia, and Ukraina
HERTANU, ABRAMOVICI, LAUER: >from Dorohoi District, Romania
GRISARU, VATARU: >from Iasi, Dorohoi, and Mileanca, Romania

See my interactive family tree (requires Java 1.1.6 or better). the URL is:
http://www.hashkedim.com

For reasons connected with anti-spam/junk security, the return address is
not valid. To communicate with me, please visit my website (see the URL
above -- no Java required for this purpose) and fill in the email form
there.