Date   

What Currency is Helers #galicia

Alan Weiser <alanboy@...>
 

I am having an old Kolomea document translated >from Hebrew to English.
A portion talks about a donation to the synagogue and refers to it as
"18 - 36 Hellers."

Can anyone tell me in what currency a Heller would be and some
relation of value in terms dollars of the 1908 era.. The reference
is to a time in Kolomea around 1908 when Austrian rule applied.

Alan Weiser
alanboy@...
Silver Spring


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia What Currency is Helers #galicia

Alan Weiser <alanboy@...>
 

I am having an old Kolomea document translated >from Hebrew to English.
A portion talks about a donation to the synagogue and refers to it as
"18 - 36 Hellers."

Can anyone tell me in what currency a Heller would be and some
relation of value in terms dollars of the 1908 era.. The reference
is to a time in Kolomea around 1908 when Austrian rule applied.

Alan Weiser
alanboy@...
Silver Spring


Re: Family recollections from Bialystok #poland

Tilford Bartman <bartmant@...>
 

Great stuff Susan. Thanks for sharing it. I look forward to seeing the
issues of Bialystoker Vegn and the Stimme.

I'm not sure about the historiography of the 1922 pogrom? Poland gained
independence in 1918 and defeated the Bolsheviks in 1920. Technically I
don't think there would have been Cossacks in Bialystok in 1922. I know
they were in the area early in WW I before the German occupation. I'm
not aware of any pogrom in 1922, but of course that doesn't mean there
wasn't one. Perhaps someone else knows about it. There were well known
pogroms in Bialystok in 1905 and 1906 that I think were organized
primarily by Russian Czarist authorities.

Thanks Again,

Tilford Bartman


Suprlmn@... wrote:


Before WW2, our family, SZEJNMAN, lived on Ulica Suiento-Janske, in
Der Nowe, apparently a 'new' suburb of Bialystok, not far >from the
Central Park, according to the map. It was a two story house.
I recall this distinctly because of my mother's telling about the
big Pogrom in 1922, where the Cossaks entered the house and threw her
brother out of a second-story window. He died soon after of multiple
fractures and internal hemorrhage.

I also recall that every Friday afternoon, I would walk with my
grandmother to the baker's. He had already shut down his ovens for
Shabbes but since the heat remained overnight, all the ladies in the
neighborhood would bring him their big, heavy pots of cholent, which
cooked overnight to perfection. Then on Saturday morning, my mother
and I walked to the Shul to pick up my grandmother. On the way home,
we stopped at the baker's to collect our cholent, which was always
our Shabbes noon meal. And was it ever delicious!

At the corner of our street was the Aptek or pharmacist, who always
had candies for me.

Another of my mother's recollections was of her grandmother, Bluma
JASKOLKA, who was very tiny and wiry and was always knitting something
as she walked. On just such a walk, paying no attention to her
whereabouts, she was knocked over and killed by a horse and wagon.

Mama remembered going to high school fairly close by, where she had
to cross a railroad trestle on the way. One day, she and a friend
played hookey >from school in order to watch the new train (a real
novelty then) pass underneath. When it did, it emitted so much
smoke and soot that their faces turned black -- so much for an alibi.

Among other subjects, she studied Latin, French and German, and quickly
picked up all the neighboring Slavik tongues. She used to sing me
lullabies in Latin and French, as well as Yiddish, Polish and
Russian.

I have a number of issues of 'Bialystoker Vegn,' published in Buenos
Airies, and also 'Der Bialystoker Stimme,' published by the Bialystoker
Home in New York. I plan to upload some of the articles to the web site
soon. The ones >from Argentina are in Yiddish and Spanish, while the NY
ones are in Yiddish and English. Expect some photos as well in the near
future.

B'shalom, Susan Pearlman
nee Szejna-Dwera SZEJNMAN-KOSLOVSKY, in Bialystok
[Also researching JASKOLKA, LEVITAN, KAM, KAMINSKY, MALETSKY, RUDY,
SASLOVSKY, WISHNIATSKY, YELLIN, YOSHPE, ZELIKOWICZ all >from the same
general area.]


BialyGen: Bialystok Region #Bialystok #Poland Re: Family recollections from Bialystok #poland

Tilford Bartman <bartmant@...>
 

Great stuff Susan. Thanks for sharing it. I look forward to seeing the
issues of Bialystoker Vegn and the Stimme.

I'm not sure about the historiography of the 1922 pogrom? Poland gained
independence in 1918 and defeated the Bolsheviks in 1920. Technically I
don't think there would have been Cossacks in Bialystok in 1922. I know
they were in the area early in WW I before the German occupation. I'm
not aware of any pogrom in 1922, but of course that doesn't mean there
wasn't one. Perhaps someone else knows about it. There were well known
pogroms in Bialystok in 1905 and 1906 that I think were organized
primarily by Russian Czarist authorities.

Thanks Again,

Tilford Bartman


Suprlmn@... wrote:


Before WW2, our family, SZEJNMAN, lived on Ulica Suiento-Janske, in
Der Nowe, apparently a 'new' suburb of Bialystok, not far >from the
Central Park, according to the map. It was a two story house.
I recall this distinctly because of my mother's telling about the
big Pogrom in 1922, where the Cossaks entered the house and threw her
brother out of a second-story window. He died soon after of multiple
fractures and internal hemorrhage.

I also recall that every Friday afternoon, I would walk with my
grandmother to the baker's. He had already shut down his ovens for
Shabbes but since the heat remained overnight, all the ladies in the
neighborhood would bring him their big, heavy pots of cholent, which
cooked overnight to perfection. Then on Saturday morning, my mother
and I walked to the Shul to pick up my grandmother. On the way home,
we stopped at the baker's to collect our cholent, which was always
our Shabbes noon meal. And was it ever delicious!

At the corner of our street was the Aptek or pharmacist, who always
had candies for me.

Another of my mother's recollections was of her grandmother, Bluma
JASKOLKA, who was very tiny and wiry and was always knitting something
as she walked. On just such a walk, paying no attention to her
whereabouts, she was knocked over and killed by a horse and wagon.

Mama remembered going to high school fairly close by, where she had
to cross a railroad trestle on the way. One day, she and a friend
played hookey >from school in order to watch the new train (a real
novelty then) pass underneath. When it did, it emitted so much
smoke and soot that their faces turned black -- so much for an alibi.

Among other subjects, she studied Latin, French and German, and quickly
picked up all the neighboring Slavik tongues. She used to sing me
lullabies in Latin and French, as well as Yiddish, Polish and
Russian.

I have a number of issues of 'Bialystoker Vegn,' published in Buenos
Airies, and also 'Der Bialystoker Stimme,' published by the Bialystoker
Home in New York. I plan to upload some of the articles to the web site
soon. The ones >from Argentina are in Yiddish and Spanish, while the NY
ones are in Yiddish and English. Expect some photos as well in the near
future.

B'shalom, Susan Pearlman
nee Szejna-Dwera SZEJNMAN-KOSLOVSKY, in Bialystok
[Also researching JASKOLKA, LEVITAN, KAM, KAMINSKY, MALETSKY, RUDY,
SASLOVSKY, WISHNIATSKY, YELLIN, YOSHPE, ZELIKOWICZ all >from the same
general area.]


LDS film #588,931 Staszow #poland

Nicolas Trokiner <trokiner@...>
 

Hello,

I'll view this microfilm soon (maybe tomorrow evening if it arrives).
If anyone has a specific record to see, please let me know the year
and the number and I'll copy it for you.

Nicolas Trokiner
Paris, France

MODERATOR'S NOTE: Please respond privately.


Anyone planning to visit LDS center #poland

Nicolas Trokiner <trokiner@...>
 

Hello,

Does anyone plan to visit a LDS center where a lot of microfilms are
available? I would need 3 specific records on 3 different films and
it would take 6 months to view all of them >from France.

Please contact me privatly: trokiner@...

If I can help for stuff in Paris, I will.

Nicolas Trokiner
Paris, France


JRI Poland #Poland LDS film #588,931 Staszow #poland

Nicolas Trokiner <trokiner@...>
 

Hello,

I'll view this microfilm soon (maybe tomorrow evening if it arrives).
If anyone has a specific record to see, please let me know the year
and the number and I'll copy it for you.

Nicolas Trokiner
Paris, France

MODERATOR'S NOTE: Please respond privately.


JRI Poland #Poland Anyone planning to visit LDS center #poland

Nicolas Trokiner <trokiner@...>
 

Hello,

Does anyone plan to visit a LDS center where a lot of microfilms are
available? I would need 3 specific records on 3 different films and
it would take 6 months to view all of them >from France.

Please contact me privatly: trokiner@...

If I can help for stuff in Paris, I will.

Nicolas Trokiner
Paris, France


LDS film #716,167 Pinczow #poland

Nicolas Trokiner <trokiner@...>
 

Hello,

I'll view this microfilm tomorrow evening. If anyone has a specific
record to see, please let me know the year and the number and I'll
copy it for you.

Nicolas Trokiner
Paris, France

MODERATOR'S NOTE: Please respond privately.


JRI Poland #Poland LDS film #716,167 Pinczow #poland

Nicolas Trokiner <trokiner@...>
 

Hello,

I'll view this microfilm tomorrow evening. If anyone has a specific
record to see, please let me know the year and the number and I'll
copy it for you.

Nicolas Trokiner
Paris, France

MODERATOR'S NOTE: Please respond privately.


Re: Skull & Cross-Bones on Matzevahs (Gravestones) in Glueckstadt #germany

Mordechai Heymann <Marc@...>
 

MODERATOR NOTE: We appreciate it when listmembers post a summary of off list
responses to a question asked in the list. In most cases the summary should be
shorter than this one.

******* This topic is now closed in the GerSIG Forum. All responses to this
message must be sent to Mr. Heymann by private email. **************

Dear Sigger's
I asked a question about the "skull and crossbones" symbol on
Portuguese Jewish Matzevah's (Grave stones) in Glueckstadt.
Thank you to all those who replied.

Unfortuneatly no one was able to give me a definitive explanation
although there were many opinions and theories. Therefore I had to
undertake further research and analysis. Here below are my comments and
answers to to theories raised and comments made.

The pirate theory: Pirates used the Skull and Crossbones as their
symbol especially on their Flag. This is definitely wrong, the symbol
appears on the Matzevah's of men, women and children. There is no
evidence that any Jews were pirates, and piracy was NOT a Jewish
profession!. This community in Glueckstadt were ex Marrano Jews of the
Portuguese nation.

The Christian symbol of Skull and crossbones: The skull and Crossbones
tomb icons are very common in Christianity back to catacombs in the
fourth and fifth centuries. >from the Middle Ages there were also a
number of 'memento mori'. Such images (the skull and crossed bones, the
hourglass, and even the scythe) are reminders of the end to which we all
come. They also warn sinners of the brevity of earthly life. And there
was also early thinking that evidence of the body was necessary before
entry into heaven. (the skull and crossbones was a reminder of where the
body was). Perhaps inspired by Golgotha, the Place of the Skull, where
Jesus was crucified. The Christian concept of Jesus there dying on the
cross on behalf of his believers so they might enter heaven is the
message of hope in death. This would explain the crossed bones.

The Masonic symbol It is also an important emblem in Freemasonry, where
it symbolizes the transience of the material world, and is used in
initiation rituals as a symbol of rebirth.

As Nazi Symbol: "Death's Head" was the symbol of the Nazi
SS-Totenkopfverbande the Nazi SS Death's Head Division (purpose was hunt
out enemies (Jews) and to guard the concentration camps). The symbol is
often seen as a tattoo, which indicates that its wearer has murdered one
of the movement's enemies (ie Jews). Although Nazi's were not around at
this time, the idea that the person killed one of the their enemies a)
is NOT a Jewish concept b) is just totally improbable given the
circumstances of the Portuguese Jews and Marranos!

As a Symbol of membership of the Chevra Kaddisha:
This is wrong, It is not and never has been a symbol of the Chevra
Kadisha. It does NOT indicate that a person was a membership of the
Chevra Kaddisha (burial society)

As a Jewish Symbol >from Kabbalah:
A possible Jewish connection. I have found is a reference skull and
crossbones in Kabala. There is a suggestion that it may symbolize the
"sephirah daath" on the kabalistic Tree of Life. The gateway to the
higher realms of understanding only achievable through spiritual death
and rebirth. Here a skull did not inspire horror, on the contrary, it
symbolised the promise of a new life. This may be an explanation and may
fit into the worldview of the ex-Marrano Portuguese Jews of Glueckstadt.
Some were influenced by Kabala as evidenced in some comments in the 30
Drosha's (religious sermons) of Alvaro Dinis (aka Semuel Yachia 1565 -
1650 ) published in Hamburg 1629. His family, (forced new Christian
converso's) after torture and humiliation and indignity they escaped
Portugal and the Inquisition returning to torah observant Judaism in
Amsterdam, Hamburg and Glueckstadt.

The Grave art of the Portuguese Jews
Portuguese Jews in this period (16th and 17th Century) were ex
Marrano's (ie forced christian converts, whose families practiced
Catholism for 2 or 3 generations as "New Christians")
Grave art of the Portuguese Jews in Glueckstadt and Hamburg on the
gravestones >from the 17th and 18th century cover an abundance of
subjects. They are not in the most part characteristically "Jewish art"
and show a major resemblance with the contemporary Christian art of the
time. In many cases they have in the corners Rosettes that trim a plain
tombstone. The inscriptions have a predilection to have floral wreaths,
floral jewellery with baroque medallions (with or without text) ,and
frequently have motifs of a half naked woman or angels. The ban on the
use of pictures in religious settings and religious rites practiced
throughout the ages by Jews and as proscribed by halacha (Jewish Law)
was not practiced by these Portuguese, neither in their cemeteries nor
in their synagogues. Amsterdam's Ultra Orthodox Jewish Rabbis as well
as Isaac Aboab, Rabbi Fonseca, Jacob Sasportas, Selomoh de Oliveira or
Salomo de Jacob Aelyon accepted with a heavy heart the artistic taste of
their Jewish brethern and their use of heathen subjects on graves

The images on the Portuguese Jewish graves can be divided in four main groups:
a) decorative and allegorical images: cypress, palms trees; a tree,
that is struck by an axe in a hand, that comes out of the clouds,; wheat
sheaf (on children graves), two little angels with trumpet announce the
death of the deceased etc. A wide range of grave symbols on Portuguese
Tombstones, that shows the transitoriness of life is expressed in grave
art. These are frequently decorated with angel or angel wings, hours
glass, the skull (without or with crossbones and some with or without
hours glass) and a hand with some scales as a sign for the weighing of
the deeds of the deceased.
(b) Base reliefs with the statement of the occupation and the meaning
of the occupation, as well as priestly blessing; tools of a member of
the Chevra Kaddisha (burial Society) ; opened book (for a scholar) etc;

(c) scenes out of the last meeting of the deceased and
(d) biblical scenes, especially alluding to the first name the deceased
like Jacobs dream; Eve with the snake; Moses striking the rock and water
coming out; Rachel with the sheep; King David with the harp, or Daniel
in the lion pit. Through the choice of Jewish names - usually Abraham,
Jacob, David, Joseph and Daniel for the men, Sara, Rachel, Ester, Ribca
(Rebecca) for the women - and the use of pictorial decorations, as a
reference to the name of the deceased, indicates that they want to be
attached to Jewish tradition. Subjects that are on graves are found
also duplicated on Ketubbot (marriage certificates), Haggadot (Passover
books), Rimonim, Talassim (prayer shawls) or in Jewish printing.
Portuguese grave art is impressive through its unusual wealth of
biblical scenes. In contrast to the Portuguese cemetery in Hamburg,
Amsterdam or Curacao with their Tombstone, and stone Sarcophagi which
are blunted, pyramid style graves, where as the Portuguese part of the
Glueckstadt cemetery shows only simple, tombstones lying horizontally ,
covering the entire grave. The gravestones possess Hebrew and/or
Portuguese Spanish texts that run around the Tombstone or are arranged
in lines. The writing on the gravestone usually is framed. In the four
corners of the stone, are often rosettes outside of the framing or
around the outside as a trimming. The Tombstone became in the course of
the time after 1700s skilful trimmed with biblical and allegorical
representations..

The Glueckstadt resident's gravestones are clearly recognizable, and
have much in common with those in Hamburg. Trimmings as borders, with
angels head with wings, skull and crossbones, and hours glass or columns
and almost identical epitaphs of wisdom shows the relations between both
cities were close, although Hamburg considered itself always as a mother
community.

The use of the "skull and crossbones" symbol leads us to the conclusion
that this was Christian symbol, adopted by Jews because they lived in a
Christian environment BUT more particularly because they were
Marrano's had a Christian past

As well as or maybe alternatively the "skull and crossbones" symbol
could be a Kabalalistic symbol, although this is less likely.

I found a reference to Michael Studemund-Halevy "Die
portugiesisch-spanischen Grabinschriften in Norddeutschland: Gluckstadt
und Emden" Unfortuneatly in German so I could not read it.

Thank you and I hope the many of you who asked or responded find my
outline above enlightening. Kol Tov

Mordechai Heymann Melbourne Australia www.heymannfamily.com

For picture of the grave / tombstone / matzevah go to
http://www.heymannfamily.com/Matzevah%20with%20Skull%20and%20Cross%20Bones.htm


German SIG #Germany Re: Skull & Cross-Bones on Matzevahs (Gravestones) in Glueckstadt #germany

Mordechai Heymann <Marc@...>
 

MODERATOR NOTE: We appreciate it when listmembers post a summary of off list
responses to a question asked in the list. In most cases the summary should be
shorter than this one.

******* This topic is now closed in the GerSIG Forum. All responses to this
message must be sent to Mr. Heymann by private email. **************

Dear Sigger's
I asked a question about the "skull and crossbones" symbol on
Portuguese Jewish Matzevah's (Grave stones) in Glueckstadt.
Thank you to all those who replied.

Unfortuneatly no one was able to give me a definitive explanation
although there were many opinions and theories. Therefore I had to
undertake further research and analysis. Here below are my comments and
answers to to theories raised and comments made.

The pirate theory: Pirates used the Skull and Crossbones as their
symbol especially on their Flag. This is definitely wrong, the symbol
appears on the Matzevah's of men, women and children. There is no
evidence that any Jews were pirates, and piracy was NOT a Jewish
profession!. This community in Glueckstadt were ex Marrano Jews of the
Portuguese nation.

The Christian symbol of Skull and crossbones: The skull and Crossbones
tomb icons are very common in Christianity back to catacombs in the
fourth and fifth centuries. >from the Middle Ages there were also a
number of 'memento mori'. Such images (the skull and crossed bones, the
hourglass, and even the scythe) are reminders of the end to which we all
come. They also warn sinners of the brevity of earthly life. And there
was also early thinking that evidence of the body was necessary before
entry into heaven. (the skull and crossbones was a reminder of where the
body was). Perhaps inspired by Golgotha, the Place of the Skull, where
Jesus was crucified. The Christian concept of Jesus there dying on the
cross on behalf of his believers so they might enter heaven is the
message of hope in death. This would explain the crossed bones.

The Masonic symbol It is also an important emblem in Freemasonry, where
it symbolizes the transience of the material world, and is used in
initiation rituals as a symbol of rebirth.

As Nazi Symbol: "Death's Head" was the symbol of the Nazi
SS-Totenkopfverbande the Nazi SS Death's Head Division (purpose was hunt
out enemies (Jews) and to guard the concentration camps). The symbol is
often seen as a tattoo, which indicates that its wearer has murdered one
of the movement's enemies (ie Jews). Although Nazi's were not around at
this time, the idea that the person killed one of the their enemies a)
is NOT a Jewish concept b) is just totally improbable given the
circumstances of the Portuguese Jews and Marranos!

As a Symbol of membership of the Chevra Kaddisha:
This is wrong, It is not and never has been a symbol of the Chevra
Kadisha. It does NOT indicate that a person was a membership of the
Chevra Kaddisha (burial society)

As a Jewish Symbol >from Kabbalah:
A possible Jewish connection. I have found is a reference skull and
crossbones in Kabala. There is a suggestion that it may symbolize the
"sephirah daath" on the kabalistic Tree of Life. The gateway to the
higher realms of understanding only achievable through spiritual death
and rebirth. Here a skull did not inspire horror, on the contrary, it
symbolised the promise of a new life. This may be an explanation and may
fit into the worldview of the ex-Marrano Portuguese Jews of Glueckstadt.
Some were influenced by Kabala as evidenced in some comments in the 30
Drosha's (religious sermons) of Alvaro Dinis (aka Semuel Yachia 1565 -
1650 ) published in Hamburg 1629. His family, (forced new Christian
converso's) after torture and humiliation and indignity they escaped
Portugal and the Inquisition returning to torah observant Judaism in
Amsterdam, Hamburg and Glueckstadt.

The Grave art of the Portuguese Jews
Portuguese Jews in this period (16th and 17th Century) were ex
Marrano's (ie forced christian converts, whose families practiced
Catholism for 2 or 3 generations as "New Christians")
Grave art of the Portuguese Jews in Glueckstadt and Hamburg on the
gravestones >from the 17th and 18th century cover an abundance of
subjects. They are not in the most part characteristically "Jewish art"
and show a major resemblance with the contemporary Christian art of the
time. In many cases they have in the corners Rosettes that trim a plain
tombstone. The inscriptions have a predilection to have floral wreaths,
floral jewellery with baroque medallions (with or without text) ,and
frequently have motifs of a half naked woman or angels. The ban on the
use of pictures in religious settings and religious rites practiced
throughout the ages by Jews and as proscribed by halacha (Jewish Law)
was not practiced by these Portuguese, neither in their cemeteries nor
in their synagogues. Amsterdam's Ultra Orthodox Jewish Rabbis as well
as Isaac Aboab, Rabbi Fonseca, Jacob Sasportas, Selomoh de Oliveira or
Salomo de Jacob Aelyon accepted with a heavy heart the artistic taste of
their Jewish brethern and their use of heathen subjects on graves

The images on the Portuguese Jewish graves can be divided in four main groups:
a) decorative and allegorical images: cypress, palms trees; a tree,
that is struck by an axe in a hand, that comes out of the clouds,; wheat
sheaf (on children graves), two little angels with trumpet announce the
death of the deceased etc. A wide range of grave symbols on Portuguese
Tombstones, that shows the transitoriness of life is expressed in grave
art. These are frequently decorated with angel or angel wings, hours
glass, the skull (without or with crossbones and some with or without
hours glass) and a hand with some scales as a sign for the weighing of
the deeds of the deceased.
(b) Base reliefs with the statement of the occupation and the meaning
of the occupation, as well as priestly blessing; tools of a member of
the Chevra Kaddisha (burial Society) ; opened book (for a scholar) etc;

(c) scenes out of the last meeting of the deceased and
(d) biblical scenes, especially alluding to the first name the deceased
like Jacobs dream; Eve with the snake; Moses striking the rock and water
coming out; Rachel with the sheep; King David with the harp, or Daniel
in the lion pit. Through the choice of Jewish names - usually Abraham,
Jacob, David, Joseph and Daniel for the men, Sara, Rachel, Ester, Ribca
(Rebecca) for the women - and the use of pictorial decorations, as a
reference to the name of the deceased, indicates that they want to be
attached to Jewish tradition. Subjects that are on graves are found
also duplicated on Ketubbot (marriage certificates), Haggadot (Passover
books), Rimonim, Talassim (prayer shawls) or in Jewish printing.
Portuguese grave art is impressive through its unusual wealth of
biblical scenes. In contrast to the Portuguese cemetery in Hamburg,
Amsterdam or Curacao with their Tombstone, and stone Sarcophagi which
are blunted, pyramid style graves, where as the Portuguese part of the
Glueckstadt cemetery shows only simple, tombstones lying horizontally ,
covering the entire grave. The gravestones possess Hebrew and/or
Portuguese Spanish texts that run around the Tombstone or are arranged
in lines. The writing on the gravestone usually is framed. In the four
corners of the stone, are often rosettes outside of the framing or
around the outside as a trimming. The Tombstone became in the course of
the time after 1700s skilful trimmed with biblical and allegorical
representations..

The Glueckstadt resident's gravestones are clearly recognizable, and
have much in common with those in Hamburg. Trimmings as borders, with
angels head with wings, skull and crossbones, and hours glass or columns
and almost identical epitaphs of wisdom shows the relations between both
cities were close, although Hamburg considered itself always as a mother
community.

The use of the "skull and crossbones" symbol leads us to the conclusion
that this was Christian symbol, adopted by Jews because they lived in a
Christian environment BUT more particularly because they were
Marrano's had a Christian past

As well as or maybe alternatively the "skull and crossbones" symbol
could be a Kabalalistic symbol, although this is less likely.

I found a reference to Michael Studemund-Halevy "Die
portugiesisch-spanischen Grabinschriften in Norddeutschland: Gluckstadt
und Emden" Unfortuneatly in German so I could not read it.

Thank you and I hope the many of you who asked or responded find my
outline above enlightening. Kol Tov

Mordechai Heymann Melbourne Australia www.heymannfamily.com

For picture of the grave / tombstone / matzevah go to
http://www.heymannfamily.com/Matzevah%20with%20Skull%20and%20Cross%20Bones.htm


Re: "Chower Rabbi" #germany

MBernet@...
 

Eva Lewin Radding wrote:

< Has anyone ever seen a name like "Chower Rabbi Jehudah"... >

That's the Hebrew word, Chaver, meaning "companion." Like "Companion of the
Order of the British Empire," it's a title of distinction. You may find it
used as a salutation in a letter, a title on a ketubah, or lehavdil, on a
tombstone.

I am familiar only with its being used for older members of the congregation
who were more knowledgeable about Judaism or Jewish texts than their
fellows. My maternal gf was granted the honor on his 70th birthday., He had been a
trader and was neither a rabbi nor a teacher.

"Chower Rabbi Jehudah"... would not have been a rabbi; that part of the
title should be red as "rebbe," or "reb," an honorary title, like Mr., that was
likely to be attached to any adult male,

Another custom was to refer to someone as "heChoshuver" >from the Hebrew "the
important person"--something like "the hon." I think many people may have
confused "heChover" and the much rarer "heChoshuver"

I am not familiar with heChover being bestowed on a Yeshiva "bocher." That
may have been a custom in East European communities.

Michael Bernet http://www.mem-Ber.net NY


German SIG #Germany Re: "Chower Rabbi" #germany

MBernet@...
 

Eva Lewin Radding wrote:

< Has anyone ever seen a name like "Chower Rabbi Jehudah"... >

That's the Hebrew word, Chaver, meaning "companion." Like "Companion of the
Order of the British Empire," it's a title of distinction. You may find it
used as a salutation in a letter, a title on a ketubah, or lehavdil, on a
tombstone.

I am familiar only with its being used for older members of the congregation
who were more knowledgeable about Judaism or Jewish texts than their
fellows. My maternal gf was granted the honor on his 70th birthday., He had been a
trader and was neither a rabbi nor a teacher.

"Chower Rabbi Jehudah"... would not have been a rabbi; that part of the
title should be red as "rebbe," or "reb," an honorary title, like Mr., that was
likely to be attached to any adult male,

Another custom was to refer to someone as "heChoshuver" >from the Hebrew "the
important person"--something like "the hon." I think many people may have
confused "heChover" and the much rarer "heChoshuver"

I am not familiar with heChover being bestowed on a Yeshiva "bocher." That
may have been a custom in East European communities.

Michael Bernet http://www.mem-Ber.net NY


Re: Family registers as a genealogy resource #germany

Roger Lustig <trovato@...>
 

Cheryl Johnson wrote:
LDS states "Family registers are more common in southern Germany, especially in
W├╝rttemberg and Baden after 1808. Children are usually listed in
chronological order. Names, birth dates, confirmation dates, marriage dates,
and death dates may be listed. In some registers, when a child married & remained
in the same parish, the register gives a "see" reference and a page number where
that particular child appears as the head of a household. Some family registers
indicate whether the family moved to another village or emigrated to another
country."
"I wondered if Gersiggers were aware of this vital source of information. I
wondered too if anyone knows if there is a list of the towns/cities that
kept a Family Register." [end] =====>

Yes, indeed: family registers are wonderful, and they can fill in gaps.
After all, if you have vital records for the years X to Y, you won't
necessarily find much about anyone who wasn't born, or died, or got
married or divorced in those years. (Parents and spouses of such will
be mentioned, but not necessarily in detail.) Family registers can fill
in the gaps.

The ones I've seen are >from Kreis (county) Rybnik (Upper Silesia, in Prussia),
and cover parts of the period 1818-1847. In one case (Sohrau), there are no vital
records for 1836-47, but the family register has about 20 births >from that time.

In many entries, all the birthdates are there--back to the 1740's!!--plus the date
of marriage and/or arrival in the jurisdiction. Citizenship-register numbers
and/or local census numbers are frequently there too. If a family member died
or moved away, or set up a new household, they'd be lined out (still
legible), usually with an explanation and perhaps a cross-reference.

These registers are intimately related to, and generally based on,
censuses and arrival registers. Sometimes the types of register are
hard to tell apart. Sometimes the arrival register itself was used
instead of an actual family register: in Gleiwitz (one county over from
Rybnik), the BMD registers identify families by 1812 census number where
available; and for late(r)comers, by arrival-register entry number.

It's clear that other cities and counties kept them (because there are
BMD registers with numbered entries for people who moved there since the
previous census), but I haven't seen them. (Well--one of them, in a
20thC transcription: Cosel, also in Upper Silesia, for 1812-23.)

Where *are* all the family and arrival registers and censuses? All info
welcome!

Roger Lustig Princeton, NJ <trovato@...>
Researching Upper Silesia (and the ways of Prussian vital records)


German SIG #Germany Re: Family registers as a genealogy resource #germany

Roger Lustig <trovato@...>
 

Cheryl Johnson wrote:
LDS states "Family registers are more common in southern Germany, especially in
W├╝rttemberg and Baden after 1808. Children are usually listed in
chronological order. Names, birth dates, confirmation dates, marriage dates,
and death dates may be listed. In some registers, when a child married & remained
in the same parish, the register gives a "see" reference and a page number where
that particular child appears as the head of a household. Some family registers
indicate whether the family moved to another village or emigrated to another
country."
"I wondered if Gersiggers were aware of this vital source of information. I
wondered too if anyone knows if there is a list of the towns/cities that
kept a Family Register." [end] =====>

Yes, indeed: family registers are wonderful, and they can fill in gaps.
After all, if you have vital records for the years X to Y, you won't
necessarily find much about anyone who wasn't born, or died, or got
married or divorced in those years. (Parents and spouses of such will
be mentioned, but not necessarily in detail.) Family registers can fill
in the gaps.

The ones I've seen are >from Kreis (county) Rybnik (Upper Silesia, in Prussia),
and cover parts of the period 1818-1847. In one case (Sohrau), there are no vital
records for 1836-47, but the family register has about 20 births >from that time.

In many entries, all the birthdates are there--back to the 1740's!!--plus the date
of marriage and/or arrival in the jurisdiction. Citizenship-register numbers
and/or local census numbers are frequently there too. If a family member died
or moved away, or set up a new household, they'd be lined out (still
legible), usually with an explanation and perhaps a cross-reference.

These registers are intimately related to, and generally based on,
censuses and arrival registers. Sometimes the types of register are
hard to tell apart. Sometimes the arrival register itself was used
instead of an actual family register: in Gleiwitz (one county over from
Rybnik), the BMD registers identify families by 1812 census number where
available; and for late(r)comers, by arrival-register entry number.

It's clear that other cities and counties kept them (because there are
BMD registers with numbered entries for people who moved there since the
previous census), but I haven't seen them. (Well--one of them, in a
20thC transcription: Cosel, also in Upper Silesia, for 1812-23.)

Where *are* all the family and arrival registers and censuses? All info
welcome!

Roger Lustig Princeton, NJ <trovato@...>
Researching Upper Silesia (and the ways of Prussian vital records)


Re: : Camp des Milles... #germany

Rosanne Leeson <rdleeson@...>
 

Dear Fellow SIGgers,
I have become aware that in my haste to inform you of the now
functional website for the Camps des Milles I may have accidentally
mistyped the URL. The correct URL is:

www.campdesmilles.org

My apologies , Rosanne Leeson Southern California USA


German SIG #Germany RE:: Camp des Milles... #germany

Rosanne Leeson <rdleeson@...>
 

Dear Fellow SIGgers,
I have become aware that in my haste to inform you of the now
functional website for the Camps des Milles I may have accidentally
mistyped the URL. The correct URL is:

www.campdesmilles.org

My apologies , Rosanne Leeson Southern California USA


Re: INTRO: KLAPHOLZ / KLAPPHOLZ in Francfurt am Main #germany

Fritz Neubauer
 

Claire Sztern schrieb:
The family names and towns in Germany that I am researching are:
Mainly KLAPHOLZ / KLAPPHOLZ of Francfurt am Main (but other cities are >good too).
Dear Claire,
there is a listing in the Theresienstadt Memorial Book for
Berta KLAPHOLZ, born 10 May 1876
who was deported >from Muenchen/Nuernberg to Theresienstadt on 11 Sept 1942.

Let me know if you think there is a connection. with kind regards

Fritz Neubauer North Germany <fritz.neubauer@...>


German SIG #Germany Re: INTRO: KLAPHOLZ / KLAPPHOLZ in Francfurt am Main #germany

Fritz Neubauer
 

Claire Sztern schrieb:
The family names and towns in Germany that I am researching are:
Mainly KLAPHOLZ / KLAPPHOLZ of Francfurt am Main (but other cities are >good too).
Dear Claire,
there is a listing in the Theresienstadt Memorial Book for
Berta KLAPHOLZ, born 10 May 1876
who was deported >from Muenchen/Nuernberg to Theresienstadt on 11 Sept 1942.

Let me know if you think there is a connection. with kind regards

Fritz Neubauer North Germany <fritz.neubauer@...>