Date   

Nun-ayin-kof-dalet #general

Israel P
 

On a grave of a 2002 terror victim, which I am doing for JOWBR, is "nun-ayin-kof-
dalet" but clearly written as initials rather than as a word. As a word it is
"bound" as in the binding of Isaac. The initials seem to mean "neherag al kidush
hashem." (At least that's the way I am translating it.)

That set of initials does not appear in the standard reference that I use and I
am wondering if this is an original composition for this grave, using an
excellent play on words.

Israel Pickholtz


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Nun-ayin-kof-dalet #general

Israel P
 

On a grave of a 2002 terror victim, which I am doing for JOWBR, is "nun-ayin-kof-
dalet" but clearly written as initials rather than as a word. As a word it is
"bound" as in the binding of Isaac. The initials seem to mean "neherag al kidush
hashem." (At least that's the way I am translating it.)

That set of initials does not appear in the standard reference that I use and I
am wondering if this is an original composition for this grave, using an
excellent play on words.

Israel Pickholtz


Surname FEUERBERG (& Lancy Spalter) #general

idac818@...
 

I received a response to my posting >from Lancy Spalter. I have tried to
contact him and my e-mail bounced.
Does anyone know his e-mail address.
Lancy if you read this please send me your address. I have some questions
that you can help me with.
Ida Cherney
No. Lauderdale, Florida

Searching: FEUERBERG,DRESCHER,BERLAD


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Surname FEUERBERG (& Lancy Spalter) #general

idac818@...
 

I received a response to my posting >from Lancy Spalter. I have tried to
contact him and my e-mail bounced.
Does anyone know his e-mail address.
Lancy if you read this please send me your address. I have some questions
that you can help me with.
Ida Cherney
No. Lauderdale, Florida

Searching: FEUERBERG,DRESCHER,BERLAD


Re: Fabrications in Family Trees #general

Roger Lustig <trovato@...>
 

Dear Tamar:

Thanks for the thoughtful exposition. Let me add one more reason to
your list--perhaps the most important:

People make mistakes.

They remember things wrong. They add 2 and 2, and get 5. They conflate
several people, or two towns with similar names, in their memory. They
forget that something was just a rumor. They get excited about a find,
and assume too much.

We'll never know how the story got loose that Irving Berlin was born in
some hamlet in Siberia. He never corrected it. On his marriage license
and citizenship application he correctly gave his birthplace as Mogliv,
near Minsk; but hundreds of publications have the (impossible) story of
his Siberian origins.

Closer to home, my father concerned himself with genealogy and the
Jewish history of Gleiwitz, his town in Upper Silesia, >from the time he
was 15 or so and still living there. His father, equally interested,
helped him. When we moved to Germany in the 1970's, he got back into
it, and visited Poland many times. He made many discoveries, and began
doing what JRI-PL is doing now, but over 20 years ago, with much more
primitive tools. (No spreadsheets! No Internet! No proofreaders...)
He found sources that cataloguers and researchers had missed (and in at
least one case, still haven't found!!!), and knew more about his subject
than anyone else. His papers (including many microfilms and printouts)
are now available at the Central Archive for the History of German Jewry
in Heidelberg; see the catalogue at
http://www.uni-heidelberg.de/institute/sonst/aj/VERSCHIE/LUSTIG/index.htm.

And yet...

He seems never to have noticed that the story of his grandfather's
origins was fishy. His mother's father, they said, was born 2 days
after the death of *his* father. Problem: why didn't the son get his
father's given name, then? Even stranger, on one of his visits to
Polish archives, he found a set of vital records that contained a wealth
of information about his ancestors (not only that line!). He was short
of time, but along with zeroing in on lots of good stuff, he managed to
a) misread some of the information about his grandfather's mother, and
b) miss the death of his grandfather's alleged father (4 years too
early!) entirely. Only last fall did I find the birth records for his
grandfather--who (along with an older brother who *did* have the
"expected" given name, but who was also born too late) was quite simply
born out of wedlock.

Did he not want this known? Heck, no. He'd encountered far, far worse
things about our family, and not only wrote about them in painstaking
detail but saw to it that his writings made it to the proper places
(e.g., the Leo Baeck Institute). After the aforementioned day in the
archives, he sent out quite a few notes to members of that side of the
family, asking for any further information (and sharing his partially
correct finds). Of course, he was also careful not to tell people
things that could only hurt, as you, Tamar, discussed.

Now, it didn't help that he'd also misread some information in a
published source that led him to believe that his grandfather's mother's
family came >from Strehlen, near Brieg, which is quite impossible. The
dates clearly don't work--but even a cautious lab chemist like my father
could evidently get overwhelmed by enthusiasm. After all, Strehlen was
the home of Dr. Paul EHRLICH, and if you had *him* in your family tree,
not only would that be wonderful in and of itself, but it would give a
link to Fritz HABER, Carl WEIGERT, and more.

All of which is to say: there doesn't have to be a *need* for conscious
or unconscious rewriting or retelling. We're all of us capable of
putting the facts down wrong without having any reason. Someday, for
instance, I'll find out how it came to pass that some undoubtedly
good-hearted Mormon baptized my g-g-g-grandmother posthumously, but not
before changing her given name and her sex! (I identified her >from
surname, initial, dates, and places.)

Best regards,

Roger Lustig Princeton, NJ
researching Upper Silesia

TamarDC wrote:

I have found some cases of information provided to me by relatives which was
either false or misleadingly incomplete. While frustrating, I have come to
understand that it's a fact of life in family research. Often, people don't
consciously lie, they are telling a story that is easier for them to accept and
explain. Understanding the reasons behind the untruth, I have found, is very
helpful in not getting angry or frustrated. Here are a few examples:

- I have many cases of lies about real age, most often >from women. In our culture,
the reasons for this are both sad and understandable.
- I had one case where a physical deformity (which was crucially important in the
decision of my great grandmother to marry my great grandfather) was hidden >from
me. I wondered for quite a while we she, of a rich and successful family, married
him, a poor Polish Jew. The reason was, she had a humpback. It took quite a
while to unearth that one!
- A relation collaborated with the Nazis. This was not exactly hidden, but a
positive spin was put on it.
- There is a case in my family, where I nearly certain that the death of a person
did not occur as it was told to me. The truth is probably somewhat uglier and
messier. However, the story has allowed the children (all in their sixties now)
to survive emotionally in difficult circumstances and I see no reason to dig
further.

Although I was trained as a historian, I do not think it's my job to tell all in
my family research. Some may disagree, but I think our purpose is to bring
families together, to allow us to see the wonder of our ancestors. I won't tell
an outright lie, but I have certainly hidden things that do not materially affect
the story, but that are shameful or hurtful to family members. I know some people
feel that the truth is the rock that has the right to crush everything, but I
believe in the quality of "rakhmanut" - compassion. These issues are close to
people's heart and affect the way they see themselves.
Just my point of view of course.


Re: Fabrications in Family Trees #general

TamarDC <t.duke.cohan@...>
 

Hi Roger,

Thanks for your interesting note and the thoughtful addition.
I agree 100% with what you are saying. I also have found that
some incorrect information is simply a case of people
forgetting or misunderstanding information.

I don't know if the members of this list remember the trial of
Ivan Demjanjuk, who was accused of being a Nazi guard at
Treblinka? This was some fifteen years or so ago. I was
living in Israel at the time and attended some of the sessions
of the trial. I was much struck by how inconsistent and plain
wrong the memories of the witnesses were. And the events
discribed were very traumatic and still they did not remember!
How much more true of the details that we, family
researchers, try to get people to remember.

Thanks again for the helpful comment,

Tamar Duke-Cohan (Newton, MA)


Re: Tokyo cemeteries #general

Nick <tulse04-news@...>
 

"Jerome Seligsohn" < jselig1315@... > wrote:

If this has been answered already I apologize for
troubling you. For the message writer who wanted
information on Tokyo cemeteries and Jewish life in
Japan might I suggest that you go to
http://www.jccjapan.or.jp/

Jerome Seligsohn
NYC
The above website gives the cemetery as:

Yokohama Foreigners' Cemetery - Jewish Section
Yokohama Gaijin Bochi 96, Yamate-cho
Naka-ku, Yokohama-shi, Kanagawa-ken, Japan

It gives a listing of all the Jewish graves.

Nick Landau
London, UK
--
COHNREICH (Anklam, Germany Krajenka, Poland) ATLAS (Wielkie Oczy (near
Lvov/Lemberg), Poland)
WECHSLER(Schwabach, Germany) KOHN (Wallerstein and Kleinerdlingen,Germany)
LANDAU/FREDKIN(Gomel, Mogilev, Belarus)


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Fabrications in Family Trees #general

Roger Lustig <trovato@...>
 

Dear Tamar:

Thanks for the thoughtful exposition. Let me add one more reason to
your list--perhaps the most important:

People make mistakes.

They remember things wrong. They add 2 and 2, and get 5. They conflate
several people, or two towns with similar names, in their memory. They
forget that something was just a rumor. They get excited about a find,
and assume too much.

We'll never know how the story got loose that Irving Berlin was born in
some hamlet in Siberia. He never corrected it. On his marriage license
and citizenship application he correctly gave his birthplace as Mogliv,
near Minsk; but hundreds of publications have the (impossible) story of
his Siberian origins.

Closer to home, my father concerned himself with genealogy and the
Jewish history of Gleiwitz, his town in Upper Silesia, >from the time he
was 15 or so and still living there. His father, equally interested,
helped him. When we moved to Germany in the 1970's, he got back into
it, and visited Poland many times. He made many discoveries, and began
doing what JRI-PL is doing now, but over 20 years ago, with much more
primitive tools. (No spreadsheets! No Internet! No proofreaders...)
He found sources that cataloguers and researchers had missed (and in at
least one case, still haven't found!!!), and knew more about his subject
than anyone else. His papers (including many microfilms and printouts)
are now available at the Central Archive for the History of German Jewry
in Heidelberg; see the catalogue at
http://www.uni-heidelberg.de/institute/sonst/aj/VERSCHIE/LUSTIG/index.htm.

And yet...

He seems never to have noticed that the story of his grandfather's
origins was fishy. His mother's father, they said, was born 2 days
after the death of *his* father. Problem: why didn't the son get his
father's given name, then? Even stranger, on one of his visits to
Polish archives, he found a set of vital records that contained a wealth
of information about his ancestors (not only that line!). He was short
of time, but along with zeroing in on lots of good stuff, he managed to
a) misread some of the information about his grandfather's mother, and
b) miss the death of his grandfather's alleged father (4 years too
early!) entirely. Only last fall did I find the birth records for his
grandfather--who (along with an older brother who *did* have the
"expected" given name, but who was also born too late) was quite simply
born out of wedlock.

Did he not want this known? Heck, no. He'd encountered far, far worse
things about our family, and not only wrote about them in painstaking
detail but saw to it that his writings made it to the proper places
(e.g., the Leo Baeck Institute). After the aforementioned day in the
archives, he sent out quite a few notes to members of that side of the
family, asking for any further information (and sharing his partially
correct finds). Of course, he was also careful not to tell people
things that could only hurt, as you, Tamar, discussed.

Now, it didn't help that he'd also misread some information in a
published source that led him to believe that his grandfather's mother's
family came >from Strehlen, near Brieg, which is quite impossible. The
dates clearly don't work--but even a cautious lab chemist like my father
could evidently get overwhelmed by enthusiasm. After all, Strehlen was
the home of Dr. Paul EHRLICH, and if you had *him* in your family tree,
not only would that be wonderful in and of itself, but it would give a
link to Fritz HABER, Carl WEIGERT, and more.

All of which is to say: there doesn't have to be a *need* for conscious
or unconscious rewriting or retelling. We're all of us capable of
putting the facts down wrong without having any reason. Someday, for
instance, I'll find out how it came to pass that some undoubtedly
good-hearted Mormon baptized my g-g-g-grandmother posthumously, but not
before changing her given name and her sex! (I identified her >from
surname, initial, dates, and places.)

Best regards,

Roger Lustig Princeton, NJ
researching Upper Silesia

TamarDC wrote:

I have found some cases of information provided to me by relatives which was
either false or misleadingly incomplete. While frustrating, I have come to
understand that it's a fact of life in family research. Often, people don't
consciously lie, they are telling a story that is easier for them to accept and
explain. Understanding the reasons behind the untruth, I have found, is very
helpful in not getting angry or frustrated. Here are a few examples:

- I have many cases of lies about real age, most often >from women. In our culture,
the reasons for this are both sad and understandable.
- I had one case where a physical deformity (which was crucially important in the
decision of my great grandmother to marry my great grandfather) was hidden >from
me. I wondered for quite a while we she, of a rich and successful family, married
him, a poor Polish Jew. The reason was, she had a humpback. It took quite a
while to unearth that one!
- A relation collaborated with the Nazis. This was not exactly hidden, but a
positive spin was put on it.
- There is a case in my family, where I nearly certain that the death of a person
did not occur as it was told to me. The truth is probably somewhat uglier and
messier. However, the story has allowed the children (all in their sixties now)
to survive emotionally in difficult circumstances and I see no reason to dig
further.

Although I was trained as a historian, I do not think it's my job to tell all in
my family research. Some may disagree, but I think our purpose is to bring
families together, to allow us to see the wonder of our ancestors. I won't tell
an outright lie, but I have certainly hidden things that do not materially affect
the story, but that are shameful or hurtful to family members. I know some people
feel that the truth is the rock that has the right to crush everything, but I
believe in the quality of "rakhmanut" - compassion. These issues are close to
people's heart and affect the way they see themselves.
Just my point of view of course.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Fabrications in Family Trees #general

TamarDC <t.duke.cohan@...>
 

Hi Roger,

Thanks for your interesting note and the thoughtful addition.
I agree 100% with what you are saying. I also have found that
some incorrect information is simply a case of people
forgetting or misunderstanding information.

I don't know if the members of this list remember the trial of
Ivan Demjanjuk, who was accused of being a Nazi guard at
Treblinka? This was some fifteen years or so ago. I was
living in Israel at the time and attended some of the sessions
of the trial. I was much struck by how inconsistent and plain
wrong the memories of the witnesses were. And the events
discribed were very traumatic and still they did not remember!
How much more true of the details that we, family
researchers, try to get people to remember.

Thanks again for the helpful comment,

Tamar Duke-Cohan (Newton, MA)


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Tokyo cemeteries #general

Nick <tulse04-news@...>
 

"Jerome Seligsohn" < jselig1315@... > wrote:

If this has been answered already I apologize for
troubling you. For the message writer who wanted
information on Tokyo cemeteries and Jewish life in
Japan might I suggest that you go to
http://www.jccjapan.or.jp/

Jerome Seligsohn
NYC
The above website gives the cemetery as:

Yokohama Foreigners' Cemetery - Jewish Section
Yokohama Gaijin Bochi 96, Yamate-cho
Naka-ku, Yokohama-shi, Kanagawa-ken, Japan

It gives a listing of all the Jewish graves.

Nick Landau
London, UK
--
COHNREICH (Anklam, Germany Krajenka, Poland) ATLAS (Wielkie Oczy (near
Lvov/Lemberg), Poland)
WECHSLER(Schwabach, Germany) KOHN (Wallerstein and Kleinerdlingen,Germany)
LANDAU/FREDKIN(Gomel, Mogilev, Belarus)


Information Resources for Israelis in Israel and those who have family in Israel #warsaw #poland

Rose Feldman <rosef@...>
 

With the opening of the online database of Yad Vashem, there has been an
increase in the number of people inquiring as to the possibility of
tracking down relatives and acquaintances in Israel.
In addition to helping those of you >from abroad who can not read the pages
of testimony in hebrew, we are preparing a short guide for doing research in
Israel. Doing research in Israel often requires that the research be done in
hebrew and that the person requesting the information identify himself as an
Israeli citizen, and a relative. This one page guide is for those Israelis
or anyone who has family in Israel that can do this research for them.
The first version of the guide is in hebrew. We hope to have the english
version up in a few days and will notify you when it is posted.
http://www.isragen.org.il/NROS/Research/Search-Israel-Hebrew-1.pdf

Rose Feldman
Secretary Tel-Aviv Branch of the Israel Genealogical Society
rosef@...
home phone 03-6413856 (in the evenings)
Join the Israel Genealogical Society (IGS)
and receive our Journal "Sharsheret Hadorot"
Society branches are in Jerusalem, Tel Aviv, Haifa, Negev (Beer Sheva),
Netanya.
Visit our forum in hebrew at the ynet SITE - www.ynet.co.il/shorashim
"To help and be helped"


bouncing e-mails ??? #warsaw #poland

Carol W. Skydell <cskydell@...>
 

Folks,
When a message you send to another researcher listed in the JGFF or FTJP,
fails to be delivered, please report the bounce to
<lostNfound@...>. In your message, provide your own full
name and JGID, and the name and JGID of the person with the bounced e-mail.

Under the leadership of Saul Goldstone we have a considerable group of
volunteers who contact people in their local area who have changed their
e-mail addresses but have neglected to notify JewishGen. The ability to
connect with another researcher who may have a connection to your own
research is vital and the reason we established the lostNfound help desk.

If you are willing to devote some time to helping in this effort, please
contact Saul at
<sgoldstone@...> and provide him with your home address and
specify the towns to which you are willing to make phone calls. These can
be as wide an area as you like. Please consider joining in the effort to
find all researchers who are lost.

Many thanks for helping with this.
Carol

Carol W. Skydell, Vice President
JewishGen Special Projects


Warszawa Research Group #Warsaw #Poland Information Resources for Israelis in Israel and those who have family in Israel #warsaw #poland

Rose Feldman <rosef@...>
 

With the opening of the online database of Yad Vashem, there has been an
increase in the number of people inquiring as to the possibility of
tracking down relatives and acquaintances in Israel.
In addition to helping those of you >from abroad who can not read the pages
of testimony in hebrew, we are preparing a short guide for doing research in
Israel. Doing research in Israel often requires that the research be done in
hebrew and that the person requesting the information identify himself as an
Israeli citizen, and a relative. This one page guide is for those Israelis
or anyone who has family in Israel that can do this research for them.
The first version of the guide is in hebrew. We hope to have the english
version up in a few days and will notify you when it is posted.
http://www.isragen.org.il/NROS/Research/Search-Israel-Hebrew-1.pdf

Rose Feldman
Secretary Tel-Aviv Branch of the Israel Genealogical Society
rosef@...
home phone 03-6413856 (in the evenings)
Join the Israel Genealogical Society (IGS)
and receive our Journal "Sharsheret Hadorot"
Society branches are in Jerusalem, Tel Aviv, Haifa, Negev (Beer Sheva),
Netanya.
Visit our forum in hebrew at the ynet SITE - www.ynet.co.il/shorashim
"To help and be helped"


Warszawa Research Group #Warsaw #Poland bouncing e-mails ??? #warsaw #poland

Carol W. Skydell <cskydell@...>
 

Folks,
When a message you send to another researcher listed in the JGFF or FTJP,
fails to be delivered, please report the bounce to
<lostNfound@...>. In your message, provide your own full
name and JGID, and the name and JGID of the person with the bounced e-mail.

Under the leadership of Saul Goldstone we have a considerable group of
volunteers who contact people in their local area who have changed their
e-mail addresses but have neglected to notify JewishGen. The ability to
connect with another researcher who may have a connection to your own
research is vital and the reason we established the lostNfound help desk.

If you are willing to devote some time to helping in this effort, please
contact Saul at
<sgoldstone@...> and provide him with your home address and
specify the towns to which you are willing to make phone calls. These can
be as wide an area as you like. Please consider joining in the effort to
find all researchers who are lost.

Many thanks for helping with this.
Carol

Carol W. Skydell, Vice President
JewishGen Special Projects


Warsaw 1930s Photos #warsaw #poland

David Ferleger
 

Warsaw (and some >from shtetl Chmielnick).

Some of the photos are -- as photos -- quite stunning (even if it
wasn't my family!). Some are of street scenes. Many are wonderful
portraits.

http://homepage.mac.com/davidferleger/polandpictures/PhotoAlbum7.html
My mother came >from Warsaw (later, was in Maidanek, Auschwitz and
others). My father >from shtetl Chmielnick.
A cousin >from USA took pictures (the only ones pre-War we have) on
mid-1930s visit to Poland. They're now
on my website below.

Pictures of shtetl life, and also of busy Warsaw might be of interest
to others.
Some parks/landmarks may be identifiable by someone - let me know!


David Ferleger is pleased to announce:
http://homepage.mac.com/davidferleger/polandpictures/PhotoAlbum7.html
========================================
David Ferleger
10 Presidential Blvd, Suite 115
Bala Cynwyd, PA 19004
610-668-2221 610-668-3889 fax


Warszawa Research Group #Warsaw #Poland Warsaw 1930s Photos #warsaw #poland

David Ferleger
 

Warsaw (and some >from shtetl Chmielnick).

Some of the photos are -- as photos -- quite stunning (even if it
wasn't my family!). Some are of street scenes. Many are wonderful
portraits.

http://homepage.mac.com/davidferleger/polandpictures/PhotoAlbum7.html
My mother came >from Warsaw (later, was in Maidanek, Auschwitz and
others). My father >from shtetl Chmielnick.
A cousin >from USA took pictures (the only ones pre-War we have) on
mid-1930s visit to Poland. They're now
on my website below.

Pictures of shtetl life, and also of busy Warsaw might be of interest
to others.
Some parks/landmarks may be identifiable by someone - let me know!


David Ferleger is pleased to announce:
http://homepage.mac.com/davidferleger/polandpictures/PhotoAlbum7.html
========================================
David Ferleger
10 Presidential Blvd, Suite 115
Bala Cynwyd, PA 19004
610-668-2221 610-668-3889 fax


Re: Visit to Vienna #austria-czech

Celia Male <celiamale@...>
 

Bob Rubin wrote to us a follows: I will be travelling
to Vienna the last week in March to explore the city
where my great-grandfather was born. I was wondering
if people would recommend what is worth seeing?

Our moderator did say "please respond privately"
but I assume that this was directed at general
sightseeing, not the sites of genealogical interest.

For the benefit of newcomers to this SIG - I would
like to stress that this topic has been dealt with in
Summer 2004 [specifically August 2004] and there are a
number of very relevant postings which can be accessed
on the message archives.

I always access these via the "home page" of
Austria-Czech: [right at the end]. Select SIG
archives; then after your registration, choose
Austria-Czech and enter either the dates or key words,
which can include author's names and any other
possibilities you can think of.

Places to visit include
BMD records: the IKG, Seitenstettengasse [make an
appointment];
Museums: Jewish Museum, Dorotheergasse;
Cemeteries: including Zentralfriedhof Gates 1 & IV,
Crematorium, Doblinger Friedhof;
Archives: including the Staatsarchiv,
Nottendorfergasse, the Wiener Stadt und Landesarchiv
at the Gasometer and the Adler Society;
Holocaust memorials - the Judenplatz.

See particularly: 2004 postings of 8, 10th, 13th &
25th August and 16 and 30th September. Planning trip
to Vienna & Czech Republic etc ...

Celia Male [UK]


Austria-Czech SIG #Austria-Czech Re: Visit to Vienna #austria-czech

Celia Male <celiamale@...>
 

Bob Rubin wrote to us a follows: I will be travelling
to Vienna the last week in March to explore the city
where my great-grandfather was born. I was wondering
if people would recommend what is worth seeing?

Our moderator did say "please respond privately"
but I assume that this was directed at general
sightseeing, not the sites of genealogical interest.

For the benefit of newcomers to this SIG - I would
like to stress that this topic has been dealt with in
Summer 2004 [specifically August 2004] and there are a
number of very relevant postings which can be accessed
on the message archives.

I always access these via the "home page" of
Austria-Czech: [right at the end]. Select SIG
archives; then after your registration, choose
Austria-Czech and enter either the dates or key words,
which can include author's names and any other
possibilities you can think of.

Places to visit include
BMD records: the IKG, Seitenstettengasse [make an
appointment];
Museums: Jewish Museum, Dorotheergasse;
Cemeteries: including Zentralfriedhof Gates 1 & IV,
Crematorium, Doblinger Friedhof;
Archives: including the Staatsarchiv,
Nottendorfergasse, the Wiener Stadt und Landesarchiv
at the Gasometer and the Adler Society;
Holocaust memorials - the Judenplatz.

See particularly: 2004 postings of 8, 10th, 13th &
25th August and 16 and 30th September. Planning trip
to Vienna & Czech Republic etc ...

Celia Male [UK]


Re: Family Tree is online (Sarah Krein) #austria-czech

michal <mbeer@...>
 

There was a big family Winkler in Moravia- in the small town
Miroslav - Mislitz. Most of them were interned in Theresienstadt and survived!
Some of the children live in Israel, some in England.

Maud Michal Beer

****
Subject: RE: Family Tree is online (Sarah Krein)
From: Sarah Krein <sarah@...>
Date: Sat, 26 Feb 2005 15:15:30 +0200

Celia
You hit post luck as it is only Winkler and Wilder who
are >from Austria
Sarah


-----Original Message-----
From: Celia Male [mailto:celiamale@...]
Sent: Sunday, February 20, 2005 2:39 PM
To: austriaczech@...
Cc: Sarah Krein
Subject: Re: [austriaczech] Family Tree is online (Sarah Krein)

Sarah Krein of Tel Aviv has kindly sent us the url of
her online family tree {79 different family names}:

http://familytreemaker.genealogy.com/users/k/r/e/Sarah-D-Krein/index.html


Could I make a plea? As this is the Austria-Czech
group of Jewishgen - it would be useful to highlight
the families that came >from this region.

I looked at the list of names and by pure chance hit
upon two Viennese connections: WILDER & WINKLER.
I used my "lucky dip genealogy method". I thought of a
recent celebrity death and then of his glamorous,
iconic wife [both will be nameless!] and then of my
favourite film "Some Like it Hot" and its Viennese
director, Billy WILDER.

However, I have yet to come across another Viennese/
Bohemia/Moravia family. Perhaps I do not know how to
search this on-line tree as rapidly as my "karfiol"
search? Help please....

Celia Male [UK]


Austria-Czech SIG #Austria-Czech Re: Family Tree is online (Sarah Krein) #austria-czech

michal <mbeer@...>
 

There was a big family Winkler in Moravia- in the small town
Miroslav - Mislitz. Most of them were interned in Theresienstadt and survived!
Some of the children live in Israel, some in England.

Maud Michal Beer

****
Subject: RE: Family Tree is online (Sarah Krein)
From: Sarah Krein <sarah@...>
Date: Sat, 26 Feb 2005 15:15:30 +0200

Celia
You hit post luck as it is only Winkler and Wilder who
are >from Austria
Sarah


-----Original Message-----
From: Celia Male [mailto:celiamale@...]
Sent: Sunday, February 20, 2005 2:39 PM
To: austriaczech@...
Cc: Sarah Krein
Subject: Re: [austriaczech] Family Tree is online (Sarah Krein)

Sarah Krein of Tel Aviv has kindly sent us the url of
her online family tree {79 different family names}:

http://familytreemaker.genealogy.com/users/k/r/e/Sarah-D-Krein/index.html


Could I make a plea? As this is the Austria-Czech
group of Jewishgen - it would be useful to highlight
the families that came >from this region.

I looked at the list of names and by pure chance hit
upon two Viennese connections: WILDER & WINKLER.
I used my "lucky dip genealogy method". I thought of a
recent celebrity death and then of his glamorous,
iconic wife [both will be nameless!] and then of my
favourite film "Some Like it Hot" and its Viennese
director, Billy WILDER.

However, I have yet to come across another Viennese/
Bohemia/Moravia family. Perhaps I do not know how to
search this on-line tree as rapidly as my "karfiol"
search? Help please....

Celia Male [UK]