Date   

transliteration string #general

ac <anitac47@...>
 

As there has been a discussion of late on how to transliterate names, I
have a question:

When my relatives came over >from Odessa would their travel papers been
written in Cryillic? Or:
-would it have been transliterated by the Russian government (seems
unlikely) with documents written in a Western and Cyrillic alphabets?
-would it have been transliterated by the port authorities >from wherever
they left?
-or might it have been that the shipping line agents who issued tickets or
whatever were fluent in the local language and could transliterate the names?

I assume one of these (or perhaps at another point) would be true since all
the transliterations on manifests I have found are consistent (among Jews
and Christians having this name) aside >from the occasional vowel change.
Was there a standard or a set of international travel rules in the 1890s
for doing this?

Thanks,
Anita Citron
Hicksville, NY
Searching NADWORNY everywhere, anywhere


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen transliteration string #general

ac <anitac47@...>
 

As there has been a discussion of late on how to transliterate names, I
have a question:

When my relatives came over >from Odessa would their travel papers been
written in Cryillic? Or:
-would it have been transliterated by the Russian government (seems
unlikely) with documents written in a Western and Cyrillic alphabets?
-would it have been transliterated by the port authorities >from wherever
they left?
-or might it have been that the shipping line agents who issued tickets or
whatever were fluent in the local language and could transliterate the names?

I assume one of these (or perhaps at another point) would be true since all
the transliterations on manifests I have found are consistent (among Jews
and Christians having this name) aside >from the occasional vowel change.
Was there a standard or a set of international travel rules in the 1890s
for doing this?

Thanks,
Anita Citron
Hicksville, NY
Searching NADWORNY everywhere, anywhere


JGS of Georgia March Meeting #general

Sandi Goldsmith
 

Using Internet Resources in Genealogical Research

When Sunday, March 6, 2005

Time: 1:30 - 4:30 PM

Where: Cuba Genealogy Center
(at the William Bremen Jewish Heritage Museum)
1440 Spring St. NW, Atlanta, GA

There are so many sources of information on the Internet to help with
genealogical resources, how can you possibly know when and why to use them ?
What is the correct methodology in using the Internet to help grow your family
tree ?
Walk through real-life examples of using the Internet to track down information
about your ancestors and relatives.

A few examples include: tracking down living descendants >from an individual
in the 1850's, finding individuals in the census that are not listed in
online census indexes, using obituaries to trace family members, determining
relationships >from people buried in family plots, using property databases to
acquire family information, and more. Finding online resources that are relevant
to your specific situation takes work and we'll show you how.

Taught by Gary Palgon, chairman of the Jewish Genealogical Society of Georgia,
and Family Tree Expert. The following Sunday, a hands-on workshop will be held
to allow experts to help individuals use the sites themselves visit.
http://www.thebreman.org/jgsg.htm for details on the workshop.

The meeting is free for Breman members and $5 for non-members, payable at the
door.

Please check our web sites for details and additional information.
http://www.jewishgen.org/jgsg

Sandi Goldsmith
Alpharetta, GA


Re: EIDB occupations #general

Ida & Joseph Schwarcz
 

On the ship manifect my mother was listed as housewife, although she was a
professional seamstress, and my father was listed as a tailor, although his
eyesight was so bad he was legally blind in his old age. People just said
what they thought would be best for them. In America my father bought and
sold as he had done in Ukraine.
Ida Selavan Schwarcz
Arad, Israel

-----Original Message-----
From: marlene finkelstein [mailto:m51marlene@...]
Sent: Sunday, February 27, 2005 3:15 PM
To: JewishGen Discussion Group
Subject: EIDB occupations

I think that I have located the person that I am looking for on a 1911 ship
manifest on the EIDB but am puzzled as to why his occupation was listed as a
joiner (previously explained by the Jewishgen group to be a tinsmith or a
carpenter). Most of the other info on the manifest seems to be correct. I
know that the person that I am seeking was >from a family that raised cattle
& farmed in Volhynia Gubernia and that he became a produce dealer here in
the United States. Have others found a lack of correlation between the
manifest information and " reality"? Perhaps a joiner was more desirable
immigrant than a farmer arriving in NYC??

Much thanks for your advice.

Marlene Finkelstein
New Jersey, USA


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen JGS of Georgia March Meeting #general

Sandi Goldsmith
 

Using Internet Resources in Genealogical Research

When Sunday, March 6, 2005

Time: 1:30 - 4:30 PM

Where: Cuba Genealogy Center
(at the William Bremen Jewish Heritage Museum)
1440 Spring St. NW, Atlanta, GA

There are so many sources of information on the Internet to help with
genealogical resources, how can you possibly know when and why to use them ?
What is the correct methodology in using the Internet to help grow your family
tree ?
Walk through real-life examples of using the Internet to track down information
about your ancestors and relatives.

A few examples include: tracking down living descendants >from an individual
in the 1850's, finding individuals in the census that are not listed in
online census indexes, using obituaries to trace family members, determining
relationships >from people buried in family plots, using property databases to
acquire family information, and more. Finding online resources that are relevant
to your specific situation takes work and we'll show you how.

Taught by Gary Palgon, chairman of the Jewish Genealogical Society of Georgia,
and Family Tree Expert. The following Sunday, a hands-on workshop will be held
to allow experts to help individuals use the sites themselves visit.
http://www.thebreman.org/jgsg.htm for details on the workshop.

The meeting is free for Breman members and $5 for non-members, payable at the
door.

Please check our web sites for details and additional information.
http://www.jewishgen.org/jgsg

Sandi Goldsmith
Alpharetta, GA


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen RE: EIDB occupations #general

Ida & Joseph Schwarcz
 

On the ship manifect my mother was listed as housewife, although she was a
professional seamstress, and my father was listed as a tailor, although his
eyesight was so bad he was legally blind in his old age. People just said
what they thought would be best for them. In America my father bought and
sold as he had done in Ukraine.
Ida Selavan Schwarcz
Arad, Israel

-----Original Message-----
From: marlene finkelstein [mailto:m51marlene@...]
Sent: Sunday, February 27, 2005 3:15 PM
To: JewishGen Discussion Group
Subject: EIDB occupations

I think that I have located the person that I am looking for on a 1911 ship
manifest on the EIDB but am puzzled as to why his occupation was listed as a
joiner (previously explained by the Jewishgen group to be a tinsmith or a
carpenter). Most of the other info on the manifest seems to be correct. I
know that the person that I am seeking was >from a family that raised cattle
& farmed in Volhynia Gubernia and that he became a produce dealer here in
the United States. Have others found a lack of correlation between the
manifest information and " reality"? Perhaps a joiner was more desirable
immigrant than a farmer arriving in NYC??

Much thanks for your advice.

Marlene Finkelstein
New Jersey, USA


family GRANAAT #general

Max & Bertha van Dam <berthavd@...>
 

For a friend we are looking for Deborah GRANAAT born june 1923 in Amsterdam
Holland. Her parents were Siegfried GRANAAT and Wilhelmina PTASZNIK.

We think the family went to America just before or at the beginning of WWII.

Hope somebody can help us locate her or her decendants.

Yours

Bertha van Dam
Rechovot
Israel

Researching the following Dutch families: BROMET(Worldwide); CONEN; CRACAU;
DOOF; HAMMELBURG; LOONSTEIN; NABARRO, (Holland and England); SOESTER; SWAAP;
TRIJBETS/TRIJBETZ/TRIJBITZ; VAN CLEEF/VAN KLEEF; VAN DAM; and some other
Dutch families


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen family GRANAAT #general

Max & Bertha van Dam <berthavd@...>
 

For a friend we are looking for Deborah GRANAAT born june 1923 in Amsterdam
Holland. Her parents were Siegfried GRANAAT and Wilhelmina PTASZNIK.

We think the family went to America just before or at the beginning of WWII.

Hope somebody can help us locate her or her decendants.

Yours

Bertha van Dam
Rechovot
Israel

Researching the following Dutch families: BROMET(Worldwide); CONEN; CRACAU;
DOOF; HAMMELBURG; LOONSTEIN; NABARRO, (Holland and England); SOESTER; SWAAP;
TRIJBETS/TRIJBETZ/TRIJBITZ; VAN CLEEF/VAN KLEEF; VAN DAM; and some other
Dutch families


Re: Yitta and Yetta #general

Sally Bruckheimer <sallybru@...>
 

A further complication of the Yitta/Yetta story is the Russian language. If
your ancestors were in any Slavic speaking country, the locals would have
pronounced Ita (Ida) or Etta, Yitta or Yetta. So there are actually 4 names
which can be confused not 2. I had an aunt Etta (American born) who was
never called Yetta as far as I know, but I believe that a Russian speaker
would have said Yetta.

It can be tricky trying to determine what your ancestor said >from a
census-taker's or a shipping line clerk's transliteration of a spoken name.
Much would depend on familiarity with the foreign language and dialect, as
well as the writer's spelling proficiency.

Sally Bruckheimer
Chatham, NJ


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Yitta and Yetta #general

Sally Bruckheimer <sallybru@...>
 

A further complication of the Yitta/Yetta story is the Russian language. If
your ancestors were in any Slavic speaking country, the locals would have
pronounced Ita (Ida) or Etta, Yitta or Yetta. So there are actually 4 names
which can be confused not 2. I had an aunt Etta (American born) who was
never called Yetta as far as I know, but I believe that a Russian speaker
would have said Yetta.

It can be tricky trying to determine what your ancestor said >from a
census-taker's or a shipping line clerk's transliteration of a spoken name.
Much would depend on familiarity with the foreign language and dialect, as
well as the writer's spelling proficiency.

Sally Bruckheimer
Chatham, NJ


JGSPalm Beach County,Inc. March meeting #general

Sylvia Furshman Nusinov
 

Our newly revised website:
www.jgspalmbeachcounty.org

Attention: New format for monthly meetings (March-April-May)
11:30 AM -12:30 PM Special Interest Groups [SIGS]
12:30 PM -1:00 PM Brick Wall Session
1:00 PM -3:00 PM Program, followed by brief business meeting.

Beginning with the March 9th meeting one SIG will
be meeting in a classroom at the South County Civic Center at 11:30 AM,
prior to the Brick Wall session and our regular Program and meeting at 12:30
PM.

The March SIG meeting will be for members researching Belarus, focusing on
the former Russian Empire provinces of Grodno, Minsk, Mogilev and Vitebsk,
as well as in the Lida and Vileika districts of the Vilna gubernia. Please
plan to attend so we may formulate future meetings of the Belarus SIG.
Leader: Marvin Lopatin

On April 13 the Litvak SIG will meet: Area: Kovno and Vilna Gubernii of the
Russian Empire, including much of the territory which is now Lithuania.
Leader: Sylvia Furshman Nusinov

Galicia, Romanian and Hungary SIGs will meet on May 11. Area: Austrian
Poland, a province of the Austro-Hungarian Empire from
1772 until 1917 - now in southern Poland and Western Ukraine
Leaders: Dr. Marvin Hamburg and Alfred M. Silberfeld

Romania and Hungary SIG Leader: Natalie Hamburg
Area: Moldava, Bessarabia and Bukovina

For additional information or to join a SIG contact Chairman Marvin Lopatin,
maarglo6@...
If you are researching a different area and are interested in forming a SIG
please contact President Dennis Rice:resident at : jgspalmbeach@...
---
Calendar of Coming Events:
Monthly Meeting
Date: March 9, 2005
Place: South County Civic Center,16700 Jog Road, Delray Beach
Time: 11:30 AM -12:30 PM Belarus Special Interest Group
12:30 PM: Registration, Networking and *brick wall* Session
1:00 PM: Program, followed by short business meeting
Program: "Remembering Yiddish Theater and Second Avenue"
Elaine Rudner, Adjunct Instructor at FAU Continuing Education Center, will
offer a retrospective vision of the Immigrant Jewish Life via the Jewish
Theatre.

Guests are always welcome. There is a $5.00 guest fee.

Cemetery Project
Date: Tuesday March 8, 2005
Place: Royal Palm Memorial Gardens
5601 Greenwood Ave.
West Palm Beach, FL 33407
Time: 10:00 AM
To volunteer or for further information contact Don and Sandy Hirschhorn,
Co-Chairs donsandyh@...

Jacqueline Fineblit
jsfine@...


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen JGSPalm Beach County,Inc. March meeting #general

Sylvia Furshman Nusinov
 

Our newly revised website:
www.jgspalmbeachcounty.org

Attention: New format for monthly meetings (March-April-May)
11:30 AM -12:30 PM Special Interest Groups [SIGS]
12:30 PM -1:00 PM Brick Wall Session
1:00 PM -3:00 PM Program, followed by brief business meeting.

Beginning with the March 9th meeting one SIG will
be meeting in a classroom at the South County Civic Center at 11:30 AM,
prior to the Brick Wall session and our regular Program and meeting at 12:30
PM.

The March SIG meeting will be for members researching Belarus, focusing on
the former Russian Empire provinces of Grodno, Minsk, Mogilev and Vitebsk,
as well as in the Lida and Vileika districts of the Vilna gubernia. Please
plan to attend so we may formulate future meetings of the Belarus SIG.
Leader: Marvin Lopatin

On April 13 the Litvak SIG will meet: Area: Kovno and Vilna Gubernii of the
Russian Empire, including much of the territory which is now Lithuania.
Leader: Sylvia Furshman Nusinov

Galicia, Romanian and Hungary SIGs will meet on May 11. Area: Austrian
Poland, a province of the Austro-Hungarian Empire from
1772 until 1917 - now in southern Poland and Western Ukraine
Leaders: Dr. Marvin Hamburg and Alfred M. Silberfeld

Romania and Hungary SIG Leader: Natalie Hamburg
Area: Moldava, Bessarabia and Bukovina

For additional information or to join a SIG contact Chairman Marvin Lopatin,
maarglo6@...
If you are researching a different area and are interested in forming a SIG
please contact President Dennis Rice:resident at : jgspalmbeach@...
---
Calendar of Coming Events:
Monthly Meeting
Date: March 9, 2005
Place: South County Civic Center,16700 Jog Road, Delray Beach
Time: 11:30 AM -12:30 PM Belarus Special Interest Group
12:30 PM: Registration, Networking and *brick wall* Session
1:00 PM: Program, followed by short business meeting
Program: "Remembering Yiddish Theater and Second Avenue"
Elaine Rudner, Adjunct Instructor at FAU Continuing Education Center, will
offer a retrospective vision of the Immigrant Jewish Life via the Jewish
Theatre.

Guests are always welcome. There is a $5.00 guest fee.

Cemetery Project
Date: Tuesday March 8, 2005
Place: Royal Palm Memorial Gardens
5601 Greenwood Ave.
West Palm Beach, FL 33407
Time: 10:00 AM
To volunteer or for further information contact Don and Sandy Hirschhorn,
Co-Chairs donsandyh@...

Jacqueline Fineblit
jsfine@...


Re: Przemysl: east or west #galicia

Alexander Sharon
 

From: "Suzan & Ron Wynne" <srwynne@...>


I neglected to comment on Avrohom's designation of Przemysl as "eastern"
based on Wrobel. Wrobel is probably correct that Przemysl was politically
part of eastern Galicia but the boundary of the San River is tricky. The
San runs right through the city, cutting it in half by a series of
bridges, which, by the way, played an enormous role during World War II.
The city was split between Germany and Russia. Those who were on the
Russian side at the time of the invasion or who were able to cross the San
afterward, were more likely to have survived the war.

As Avrohom notes, the city of Przemysl has traditionally been inhabited by
Poles, not Ukrainians. I can't speak to Sambor or Zolkiew with respect to
this issue. So, I'd have to say that Wrobel's designations are correct,
but with the caveat that perhaps the San wasn't such a strict boundary
line. The outskirts of Przemysl was the site of heavy fighting between
Ukrainians and Poles after both WWI and WWII, as they struggled to gain
territory.

Suzan Wynne
Kensington, MD
I am strongly in support of Suzan's response.

San River constitutes only 50 km of the 600+ km border between Poland and
Ukraine and this portion is located some 60+ km south of Przemysl in the
high mountains of the Carpathians. San in Przemysl actually flows >from the
west to the east.

Alex Sharon
Calgary


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia Re: Przemysl: east or west #galicia

Alexander Sharon
 

From: "Suzan & Ron Wynne" <srwynne@...>


I neglected to comment on Avrohom's designation of Przemysl as "eastern"
based on Wrobel. Wrobel is probably correct that Przemysl was politically
part of eastern Galicia but the boundary of the San River is tricky. The
San runs right through the city, cutting it in half by a series of
bridges, which, by the way, played an enormous role during World War II.
The city was split between Germany and Russia. Those who were on the
Russian side at the time of the invasion or who were able to cross the San
afterward, were more likely to have survived the war.

As Avrohom notes, the city of Przemysl has traditionally been inhabited by
Poles, not Ukrainians. I can't speak to Sambor or Zolkiew with respect to
this issue. So, I'd have to say that Wrobel's designations are correct,
but with the caveat that perhaps the San wasn't such a strict boundary
line. The outskirts of Przemysl was the site of heavy fighting between
Ukrainians and Poles after both WWI and WWII, as they struggled to gain
territory.

Suzan Wynne
Kensington, MD
I am strongly in support of Suzan's response.

San River constitutes only 50 km of the 600+ km border between Poland and
Ukraine and this portion is located some 60+ km south of Przemysl in the
high mountains of the Carpathians. San in Przemysl actually flows >from the
west to the east.

Alex Sharon
Calgary


bouncing e-mails ??? #latvia

Carol W. Skydell <cskydell@...>
 

Folks,
When a message you send to another researcher listed in the JGFF or FTJP,
fails to be delivered, please report the bounce to
<lostNfound@...>. In your message, provide your own full
name and JGID, and the name and JGID of the person with the bounced e-mail.

Under the leadership of Saul Goldstone we have a considerable group of
volunteers who contact people in their local area who have changed their
e-mail addresses but have neglected to notify JewishGen. The ability to
connect with another researcher who may have a connection to your own
research is vital and the reason we established the lostNfound help desk.

If you are willing to devote some time to helping in this effort, please
contact Saul at
<sgoldstone@...> and provide him with your home address and
specify the towns to which you are willing to make phone calls. These can
be as wide an area as you like. Please consider joining in the effort to
find all researchers who are lost.

Many thanks for helping with this.
Carol

Carol W. Skydell, Vice President
JewishGen Special Projects


bouncing e-mails ??? #scandinavia

Carol W. Skydell <cskydell@...>
 

Folks,
When a message you send to another researcher listed in the JGFF or FTJP,
fails to be delivered, please report the bounce to
<lostNfound@...>. In your message, provide your own full
name and JGID, and the name and JGID of the person with the bounced e-mail.

Under the leadership of Saul Goldstone we have a considerable group of
volunteers who contact people in their local area who have changed their
e-mail addresses but have neglected to notify JewishGen. The ability to
connect with another researcher who may have a connection to your own
research is vital and the reason we established the lostNfound help desk.

If you are willing to devote some time to helping in this effort, please
contact Saul at
<sgoldstone@...> and provide him with your home address and
specify the towns to which you are willing to make phone calls. These can
be as wide an area as you like. Please consider joining in the effort to
find all researchers who are lost.

Many thanks for helping with this.
Carol

Carol W. Skydell, Vice President
JewishGen Special Projects


Latvia SIG #Latvia bouncing e-mails ??? #latvia

Carol W. Skydell <cskydell@...>
 

Folks,
When a message you send to another researcher listed in the JGFF or FTJP,
fails to be delivered, please report the bounce to
<lostNfound@...>. In your message, provide your own full
name and JGID, and the name and JGID of the person with the bounced e-mail.

Under the leadership of Saul Goldstone we have a considerable group of
volunteers who contact people in their local area who have changed their
e-mail addresses but have neglected to notify JewishGen. The ability to
connect with another researcher who may have a connection to your own
research is vital and the reason we established the lostNfound help desk.

If you are willing to devote some time to helping in this effort, please
contact Saul at
<sgoldstone@...> and provide him with your home address and
specify the towns to which you are willing to make phone calls. These can
be as wide an area as you like. Please consider joining in the effort to
find all researchers who are lost.

Many thanks for helping with this.
Carol

Carol W. Skydell, Vice President
JewishGen Special Projects


Scandinavia SIG #Scandinavia bouncing e-mails ??? #scandinavia

Carol W. Skydell <cskydell@...>
 

Folks,
When a message you send to another researcher listed in the JGFF or FTJP,
fails to be delivered, please report the bounce to
<lostNfound@...>. In your message, provide your own full
name and JGID, and the name and JGID of the person with the bounced e-mail.

Under the leadership of Saul Goldstone we have a considerable group of
volunteers who contact people in their local area who have changed their
e-mail addresses but have neglected to notify JewishGen. The ability to
connect with another researcher who may have a connection to your own
research is vital and the reason we established the lostNfound help desk.

If you are willing to devote some time to helping in this effort, please
contact Saul at
<sgoldstone@...> and provide him with your home address and
specify the towns to which you are willing to make phone calls. These can
be as wide an area as you like. Please consider joining in the effort to
find all researchers who are lost.

Many thanks for helping with this.
Carol

Carol W. Skydell, Vice President
JewishGen Special Projects


Re: Problems with names: Cryllic versus Latin letters #general

Dinberg Donna <donna.dinberg@...>
 

Hi Stanley,

I think your solution resolves to one of consistency. A Martha pointed out,
there are several transliteration schemes in existence. Several of these
schemes have been used by agencies such as the Library of Congress at
various times ... so even the most authoritative of sources may have changed
spellings with changes in use of schema. The index to the tables that the
Library of Congress uses today for Romanization and transliteration of
languages may be found at: http://www.loc.gov/catdir/cpso/roman.html
Others may be found elsewhere. You should pick one to use when you are
doing your own transliteration >from any single original script and use it
consistently.

That said, for your own family history you might pick the variant of name
for each historical person that makes the most sense to you. It may be the
name that occurs most frequently, or that which has been used closest to the
present time. You may also have variants that reflect different branches of
your family that you will want to keep. I use three variants of my
ancestral paternal name consistently to represent particular branches of
family, since all three names are in use today. All three names, by the
way, stem >from the same original form of name in Hebrew. I have annotated
where and when, or with whom, and in which records the change occurred for
each variant. I do not try to change any family's name into what would be,
for them, a variant of "their" name.

What you *must* do, however, is enter any variant names (with dates) you
find for a single person, cite your sources carefully, and annotate your
transliteration process if you have a muddle of names for the same
individual or close family group. Most of us have this naming problem. You
are not alone!

I hope this helps a bit.

(I am obliged to mention that the opinions above are my own and not those of
my employer, whose e-mail system I am using.)

Regards,

Donna Dinberg
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
donna.dinberg@...

-----Original Message-----
From: Stanley H. Judd [mailto:stanleyjudd@...]
Sent: Friday, February 25, 2005 1:55 PM
Subject: [latvia] Problems with names: Cryllic versus Latin letters

I need to select the most accurate spelling for the name used in my
genealogy database and for family history reports. I can then link
all of the name variations I find to this best name. ...


Latvia SIG #Latvia RE: Problems with names: Cryllic versus Latin letters #latvia

Dinberg Donna <donna.dinberg@...>
 

Hi Stanley,

I think your solution resolves to one of consistency. A Martha pointed out,
there are several transliteration schemes in existence. Several of these
schemes have been used by agencies such as the Library of Congress at
various times ... so even the most authoritative of sources may have changed
spellings with changes in use of schema. The index to the tables that the
Library of Congress uses today for Romanization and transliteration of
languages may be found at: http://www.loc.gov/catdir/cpso/roman.html
Others may be found elsewhere. You should pick one to use when you are
doing your own transliteration >from any single original script and use it
consistently.

That said, for your own family history you might pick the variant of name
for each historical person that makes the most sense to you. It may be the
name that occurs most frequently, or that which has been used closest to the
present time. You may also have variants that reflect different branches of
your family that you will want to keep. I use three variants of my
ancestral paternal name consistently to represent particular branches of
family, since all three names are in use today. All three names, by the
way, stem >from the same original form of name in Hebrew. I have annotated
where and when, or with whom, and in which records the change occurred for
each variant. I do not try to change any family's name into what would be,
for them, a variant of "their" name.

What you *must* do, however, is enter any variant names (with dates) you
find for a single person, cite your sources carefully, and annotate your
transliteration process if you have a muddle of names for the same
individual or close family group. Most of us have this naming problem. You
are not alone!

I hope this helps a bit.

(I am obliged to mention that the opinions above are my own and not those of
my employer, whose e-mail system I am using.)

Regards,

Donna Dinberg
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
donna.dinberg@...

-----Original Message-----
From: Stanley H. Judd [mailto:stanleyjudd@...]
Sent: Friday, February 25, 2005 1:55 PM
Subject: [latvia] Problems with names: Cryllic versus Latin letters

I need to select the most accurate spelling for the name used in my
genealogy database and for family history reports. I can then link
all of the name variations I find to this best name. ...