Date   

Re: litvaksig digest: April 10, 2005 #lithuania

mhlcswc2@...
 

My Mother's English name was Ray and her Yiddish name was Roshka. I don't
think they used Hebrew names. Hebrew, to the best of my knowledge, was only a
praying language. None of my family on either side had Hebrew names. I
believe that the "Ka" was diminutive since her sisters and brothers' names all
ended in "Ka." Her name was probably Rosha. Her parents were >from Vilna.
She died in 1958. When our USAF rabbi was told that our new baby's given name
for the naming ceremony was Roshka he said it wasn't an appropriate name and
called her Rachel. We had planned on our daughter carrying her grandmother's
English and Yiddish names but "A rose by any other name smells as sweet."
She just has the English name.

Marcia Hoffman
Researching ODINS, ORDINETZ, GOODMAN in Vilnius area

In a message dated 4/11/2005 2:37:38 AM Eastern Standard Time,
litvaksig@lyris.jewishgen.org writes:

Dear Litvaksiggers,
I have a great -grandmother, born in Vilnius in 1870, whose "secular name"
(the only one I know) was Rozalia. I thought it was an equivalent of Rachel
(via "Raizel") but I found an unknown equivalent in the Lithuania Given
Names Database : Rosha or Rusha. I had never come across this Hebrew name
before. I'd like to know more about its origins and meaning. Thanks for your
help,

Nathalie Ried (Paris, France)


Trip to Lithuania - FINAL CALL #lithuania

Howard Margol
 

My group trip to Lithuania, June 28 - July 7, 2005 is almost filled but I do
have room for four more. All arrangements have been made and the top hotels
and restaurants have been reserved. If you are interested please contact me
as I am sure the remaining spots will be reserved very quickly. In all
probability, this will be my last group trip to Lithuania. I plan to go in the
future but not organize a group trip.

PLEASE CONTACT ME PERSONALLY AND NOT WITH A MESSAGE ON THE DIGEST.

Howard Margol
homargol@aol.com


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania Re: litvaksig digest: April 10, 2005 #lithuania

mhlcswc2@...
 

My Mother's English name was Ray and her Yiddish name was Roshka. I don't
think they used Hebrew names. Hebrew, to the best of my knowledge, was only a
praying language. None of my family on either side had Hebrew names. I
believe that the "Ka" was diminutive since her sisters and brothers' names all
ended in "Ka." Her name was probably Rosha. Her parents were >from Vilna.
She died in 1958. When our USAF rabbi was told that our new baby's given name
for the naming ceremony was Roshka he said it wasn't an appropriate name and
called her Rachel. We had planned on our daughter carrying her grandmother's
English and Yiddish names but "A rose by any other name smells as sweet."
She just has the English name.

Marcia Hoffman
Researching ODINS, ORDINETZ, GOODMAN in Vilnius area

In a message dated 4/11/2005 2:37:38 AM Eastern Standard Time,
litvaksig@lyris.jewishgen.org writes:

Dear Litvaksiggers,
I have a great -grandmother, born in Vilnius in 1870, whose "secular name"
(the only one I know) was Rozalia. I thought it was an equivalent of Rachel
(via "Raizel") but I found an unknown equivalent in the Lithuania Given
Names Database : Rosha or Rusha. I had never come across this Hebrew name
before. I'd like to know more about its origins and meaning. Thanks for your
help,

Nathalie Ried (Paris, France)


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania Trip to Lithuania - FINAL CALL #lithuania

Howard Margol
 

My group trip to Lithuania, June 28 - July 7, 2005 is almost filled but I do
have room for four more. All arrangements have been made and the top hotels
and restaurants have been reserved. If you are interested please contact me
as I am sure the remaining spots will be reserved very quickly. In all
probability, this will be my last group trip to Lithuania. I plan to go in the
future but not organize a group trip.

PLEASE CONTACT ME PERSONALLY AND NOT WITH A MESSAGE ON THE DIGEST.

Howard Margol
homargol@aol.com


JAFFE family from Subacius or Siubaiciai #lithuania

joniffer3@...
 

Hello Everybody!

I've reached a dead-end in my efforts to learn more about the family of
my cousin Rivka/Rebecca JAFFE and am hoping one of you can help. This
is what I know:

Rivka/Rebecca JAFFE was born in 1889 in "Shubetz" (according to
naturalization papers), which I believe is either Subacius or
Siubaiciai. Her father was Jacob JAFFE.
Rivka/Rebecca married Eli LOHN and immigrated to Minnesota, then Chicago
via Liverpool and/or Leeds, England.
Rivka/Rebecca had two brothers (also JAFFE). One immigrated to South
Africa. The other immigrated to New Zealand.

I've exhausted all available internet resources, including the
All-Lithuanian Database, the JGFF and the FTJP. Any help would be
greatly appreciated! Private responses please, to:
joniffer3@earthlink.net

Thank you!
Jonathan Levine
New York, NY

Researching: YUTER, WALDMAN, SHKUDOVICH >from Troskunai & elsewhere
Researching: KANTOR, FERKIN, LOHN >from Zagare & elsewhere


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania JAFFE family from Subacius or Siubaiciai #lithuania

joniffer3@...
 

Hello Everybody!

I've reached a dead-end in my efforts to learn more about the family of
my cousin Rivka/Rebecca JAFFE and am hoping one of you can help. This
is what I know:

Rivka/Rebecca JAFFE was born in 1889 in "Shubetz" (according to
naturalization papers), which I believe is either Subacius or
Siubaiciai. Her father was Jacob JAFFE.
Rivka/Rebecca married Eli LOHN and immigrated to Minnesota, then Chicago
via Liverpool and/or Leeds, England.
Rivka/Rebecca had two brothers (also JAFFE). One immigrated to South
Africa. The other immigrated to New Zealand.

I've exhausted all available internet resources, including the
All-Lithuanian Database, the JGFF and the FTJP. Any help would be
greatly appreciated! Private responses please, to:
joniffer3@earthlink.net

Thank you!
Jonathan Levine
New York, NY

Researching: YUTER, WALDMAN, SHKUDOVICH >from Troskunai & elsewhere
Researching: KANTOR, FERKIN, LOHN >from Zagare & elsewhere


Re: my family names in an unexpected place #general

Martin Fischer
 

Renee Steinig <rsteinig@suffolk.lib.ny.us> recently wrote:

I recently did some exploring for family names on a major commercial
genealogy website and made a strange discovery: names of some of my close
family members were grouped as a family within a file submitted by a
stranger. They are not linked to her family nor is it likely that they
could be.
I had a somewhat similar experience, but I found there was no mischief
involved. The stranger who had posted the information was not related to me
in any way, but he was related by marriage to some people on my family tree
who happened to also be related to me by other marriages.

So, it was just a "Six Degrees of Separation" kind of relationship.

That said, your statement that the stranger was not linked to and could not
be linked to your family members does call for further investigation.

Martin Fischer
Oak Park, Illinois
---
The Fischer and Levin family history Web site is at:
http://mefischer1.home.comcast.net/


Initials on 1901 UK census #general

laurence <laurence@...>
 

On 11 April 2005, Maureen Mathie indicated that, in the 1901 census, only
the initials of the first names for her grandparents and their families were
given; and she asks whether this was a common occurrence.

In my experience, for the 1901 Census (England and Wales), the first name is
given in full more than 99% of the time. Of course it may not be the name
you expect!

Maureen also mentioned:
"On the same document my Grandmother's occupation is stated as Topo Maker.
Can anyone tell me what a Topo is? I presume the entry is a typing
mistake."

I have never heard of a "Topo maker". Whilst the transcriptions are useful
finding aids, it is always important to check an image of the census for the
accuracy and completeness of the transcription. The correct occupation may
become obvious when you view the census page image.

Laurence Harris
Pinner, Middlesex, England
Researching Jewish bakers of England


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: my family names in an unexpected place #general

Martin Fischer
 

Renee Steinig <rsteinig@suffolk.lib.ny.us> recently wrote:

I recently did some exploring for family names on a major commercial
genealogy website and made a strange discovery: names of some of my close
family members were grouped as a family within a file submitted by a
stranger. They are not linked to her family nor is it likely that they
could be.
I had a somewhat similar experience, but I found there was no mischief
involved. The stranger who had posted the information was not related to me
in any way, but he was related by marriage to some people on my family tree
who happened to also be related to me by other marriages.

So, it was just a "Six Degrees of Separation" kind of relationship.

That said, your statement that the stranger was not linked to and could not
be linked to your family members does call for further investigation.

Martin Fischer
Oak Park, Illinois
---
The Fischer and Levin family history Web site is at:
http://mefischer1.home.comcast.net/


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Initials on 1901 UK census #general

laurence <laurence@...>
 

On 11 April 2005, Maureen Mathie indicated that, in the 1901 census, only
the initials of the first names for her grandparents and their families were
given; and she asks whether this was a common occurrence.

In my experience, for the 1901 Census (England and Wales), the first name is
given in full more than 99% of the time. Of course it may not be the name
you expect!

Maureen also mentioned:
"On the same document my Grandmother's occupation is stated as Topo Maker.
Can anyone tell me what a Topo is? I presume the entry is a typing
mistake."

I have never heard of a "Topo maker". Whilst the transcriptions are useful
finding aids, it is always important to check an image of the census for the
accuracy and completeness of the transcription. The correct occupation may
become obvious when you view the census page image.

Laurence Harris
Pinner, Middlesex, England
Researching Jewish bakers of England


The JewishGen Given Names Data Bases #austria-czech

Prof. G. L. Esterson <jerry@...>
 

It has recently been pointed out on this mailing list that neither Austria
nor Czechoslovakia Given Names Data Bases are now included among the
fifteen GNDBs currently on the JewishGen GNDBs web site. This is correct.

The last update to this web site was made just two years ago and the next
update and expansion of the site is due in the near future. Among large
increases in the number of given names included in the various existing
data bases, will also be new data bases for the above two regions of
Europe. The latter new GNDBs have been in continuous development for
several years now, and are now nearly ready for posting. I do regret that
this has not been available to those who are researching their ancestry in
these two countries.

One of the major items in the upgraded and new data bases will be the large
number of secular names used by Jews in European countries (particularly
well-represented are the German secular names which were so popular among
European Jews), along with the Hebrew and/or Yiddish names to which they
were sometimes linked, as determined by statistical studies of archival
documents.

An announcement will be made when the two new data bases and other upgrades
have been added to the JewishGen web site.

Prof. G. L. Esterson, Ra'anana, Israel


Austria-Czech SIG #Austria-Czech The JewishGen Given Names Data Bases #austria-czech

Prof. G. L. Esterson <jerry@...>
 

It has recently been pointed out on this mailing list that neither Austria
nor Czechoslovakia Given Names Data Bases are now included among the
fifteen GNDBs currently on the JewishGen GNDBs web site. This is correct.

The last update to this web site was made just two years ago and the next
update and expansion of the site is due in the near future. Among large
increases in the number of given names included in the various existing
data bases, will also be new data bases for the above two regions of
Europe. The latter new GNDBs have been in continuous development for
several years now, and are now nearly ready for posting. I do regret that
this has not been available to those who are researching their ancestry in
these two countries.

One of the major items in the upgraded and new data bases will be the large
number of secular names used by Jews in European countries (particularly
well-represented are the German secular names which were so popular among
European Jews), along with the Hebrew and/or Yiddish names to which they
were sometimes linked, as determined by statistical studies of archival
documents.

An announcement will be made when the two new data bases and other upgrades
have been added to the JewishGen web site.

Prof. G. L. Esterson, Ra'anana, Israel


KOHN and LEDERER, Teresov?, Bohemia>Chicago, IL #austria-czech

Rebecca Fenning <macguffin317@...>
 

Hi all,

My gggg-grandparents, Aaron KOHN (1826-1906) and Josephine LEDERER
(1826-1900) immigrated to Chicago, Illinois >from Bohemia in 1878 with one of
their sons, Isidor (1859-1925), joining two of their children, Harry
(1851-1919) and Rose (1854-1905), who were already settled there.

Harry married Jennie KLAUSNER in Chicago in 1879, and had 3 children
(Tillie, Rose and Charles), who left no descendants.

Rose, my ggg-grandmother, married David BROWN in Chicago in 1876 and had 7
children living to adulthood: Julius L. (1877-1929), Samuel E. (1882-1936),
Jessye KOLLENBERG (1884-1924), Isabella LOEWY (1886-1954), Charles G.
(1888-1981), Edith BESSINGER (1890-1974) and Roy L. (1894-1943).

Isidor married Jennie WINKLER in 1883 and had two daughters, Amanda and
Gertrude.

Harry, Aaron, Isidor and David BROWN were all in the liquor business -
either owning liquor stores or saloons at various points in time. All of
the KOHNs are buried in the Free Sons of Israel Cemetery; The BROWNs are
buried at Jewish Graceland. They have had me at a bit of a dead end for a
while, since I had absolutely no idea where in Bohemia they were from.
However, I think I may have made a bit of a breakthrough.

I believe that they were related to another family of KOHNs, who originated
in Teresov, Bohemia and settled in Chicago in the 1880s. Brothers Joseph
(1868-1946; m. Rose BERLIN) and David KOHN (1869-1925, m. Theresa SEESLAND)
worked and lived with my above-mentioned KOHNs in the 1890s, following their
1884 arrival in the States. They were later joined in Chicago by their
mother, Julia (b. 1849) and their 8 siblings: Fred H. (1877-1950, m.
Elizabeth PICK), Regina (1878-?, m. Max SIMON), Malvina (1880-1943, m.
Samuel LEVY), Louise (1884-1937, Henry FLEISHMAN), Maurice (1886-1949, m.
Tillie), Adolph (1887-1949, m. Ruth MIELKE), Frances (1890-1906) and Otto
(1891-?).

Anyone with links to the above mentioned KOHN or LEDERER clans, or with
links to Teresov and the surrounding area -- I'd love to hear >from you.

Thanks,
Rebecca Fenning
Allston, Mass.


Austria-Czech SIG #Austria-Czech KOHN and LEDERER, Teresov?, Bohemia>Chicago, IL #austria-czech

Rebecca Fenning <macguffin317@...>
 

Hi all,

My gggg-grandparents, Aaron KOHN (1826-1906) and Josephine LEDERER
(1826-1900) immigrated to Chicago, Illinois >from Bohemia in 1878 with one of
their sons, Isidor (1859-1925), joining two of their children, Harry
(1851-1919) and Rose (1854-1905), who were already settled there.

Harry married Jennie KLAUSNER in Chicago in 1879, and had 3 children
(Tillie, Rose and Charles), who left no descendants.

Rose, my ggg-grandmother, married David BROWN in Chicago in 1876 and had 7
children living to adulthood: Julius L. (1877-1929), Samuel E. (1882-1936),
Jessye KOLLENBERG (1884-1924), Isabella LOEWY (1886-1954), Charles G.
(1888-1981), Edith BESSINGER (1890-1974) and Roy L. (1894-1943).

Isidor married Jennie WINKLER in 1883 and had two daughters, Amanda and
Gertrude.

Harry, Aaron, Isidor and David BROWN were all in the liquor business -
either owning liquor stores or saloons at various points in time. All of
the KOHNs are buried in the Free Sons of Israel Cemetery; The BROWNs are
buried at Jewish Graceland. They have had me at a bit of a dead end for a
while, since I had absolutely no idea where in Bohemia they were from.
However, I think I may have made a bit of a breakthrough.

I believe that they were related to another family of KOHNs, who originated
in Teresov, Bohemia and settled in Chicago in the 1880s. Brothers Joseph
(1868-1946; m. Rose BERLIN) and David KOHN (1869-1925, m. Theresa SEESLAND)
worked and lived with my above-mentioned KOHNs in the 1890s, following their
1884 arrival in the States. They were later joined in Chicago by their
mother, Julia (b. 1849) and their 8 siblings: Fred H. (1877-1950, m.
Elizabeth PICK), Regina (1878-?, m. Max SIMON), Malvina (1880-1943, m.
Samuel LEVY), Louise (1884-1937, Henry FLEISHMAN), Maurice (1886-1949, m.
Tillie), Adolph (1887-1949, m. Ruth MIELKE), Frances (1890-1906) and Otto
(1891-?).

Anyone with links to the above mentioned KOHN or LEDERER clans, or with
links to Teresov and the surrounding area -- I'd love to hear >from you.

Thanks,
Rebecca Fenning
Allston, Mass.


Re: Understanding Familianten Records #austria-czech

Julius Muller <library@...>
 

Dear Genners,
Celia is absolutely right. Censuses 1724 very clearly show the strategy and that
the preparation for strict restriction are very on.
It can be called primitive only in terms of technology used but no in terms of
the consistency. Familiant Books are just a kind of top of the iceberg. You can
surely find incomplete records like missing one or two sons but it only refers
to the person who actually wrote the records - for example looking few pages
further you can find the names of parents that are missing as unbekannt in the
same volume (?!).

Very large agenda on the Jewish familiants was led by Jewish Committee
(Commissio in rebus Judeorum). There si quite large collection on applicitions,
complaints, decrees, re-application, inquiries and other documents related to
restriction policy of the Committee. Just part of it is stored in 85 dusty boxes
in Central archive.

To my knowledge Moravia Familiant books are mostly scattered in Prague Jewish
Museum, Prague Central archive and in Brno regional archive (separately in
different so called Manor repertories).

Julius Muller
Jewish Family History Centre, Prague


Austria-Czech SIG #Austria-Czech Re: Understanding Familianten Records #austria-czech

Julius Muller <library@...>
 

Dear Genners,
Celia is absolutely right. Censuses 1724 very clearly show the strategy and that
the preparation for strict restriction are very on.
It can be called primitive only in terms of technology used but no in terms of
the consistency. Familiant Books are just a kind of top of the iceberg. You can
surely find incomplete records like missing one or two sons but it only refers
to the person who actually wrote the records - for example looking few pages
further you can find the names of parents that are missing as unbekannt in the
same volume (?!).

Very large agenda on the Jewish familiants was led by Jewish Committee
(Commissio in rebus Judeorum). There si quite large collection on applicitions,
complaints, decrees, re-application, inquiries and other documents related to
restriction policy of the Committee. Just part of it is stored in 85 dusty boxes
in Central archive.

To my knowledge Moravia Familiant books are mostly scattered in Prague Jewish
Museum, Prague Central archive and in Brno regional archive (separately in
different so called Manor repertories).

Julius Muller
Jewish Family History Centre, Prague


1908 Tirol and Vorarlberg business directory #austria-czech

Logan J. Kleinwaks
 

According to the University of Innsbruck's website
http://webapp.uibk.ac.at/alo/cat/startpage.jsp, the University has a copy of
the 1908 Tirol and Vorarlberg business directory, "Adressbuch fuer Industrie,
Handel und Gewerbe von Tirol und Vorarlberg." The library catalog entry can be
found by searching for "tirol adressbuch" at the above website. Very
interestingly, it appears that this book can be ordered as a searchable ebook,
digitized and OCR'd. I have no experience using this service, nor am I in any
way affiliated with it. I discovered this site while searching for additional
online business and telephone directories to add to my search engine at
www.kalter.org/search.php (which has no Austria-Czech coverage, currently).

Best regards,

Logan Kleinwaks
kleinwaks@alumni.princeton.edu
near Washington, D.C.


Austria-Czech SIG #Austria-Czech 1908 Tirol and Vorarlberg business directory #austria-czech

Logan J. Kleinwaks
 

According to the University of Innsbruck's website
http://webapp.uibk.ac.at/alo/cat/startpage.jsp, the University has a copy of
the 1908 Tirol and Vorarlberg business directory, "Adressbuch fuer Industrie,
Handel und Gewerbe von Tirol und Vorarlberg." The library catalog entry can be
found by searching for "tirol adressbuch" at the above website. Very
interestingly, it appears that this book can be ordered as a searchable ebook,
digitized and OCR'd. I have no experience using this service, nor am I in any
way affiliated with it. I discovered this site while searching for additional
online business and telephone directories to add to my search engine at
www.kalter.org/search.php (which has no Austria-Czech coverage, currently).

Best regards,

Logan Kleinwaks
kleinwaks@alumni.princeton.edu
near Washington, D.C.


April Meeting-Jewish Genealogical Society of Los Angeles #general

Pamela Weisberger <pweisberger@...>
 

The Jewish Genealogical Society of Los Angeles announces its next meeting:
Monday, April 18th at 7:00PM at Valley Beth Shalom, Lopaty Chapel, 15739
Ventura Boulevard, Encino, CA.

Nancy Carlberg, author and professional genealogist, will be talking about
"Overcoming Dead Ends and Organizing Materials in Genealogical Research."

Have you encountered brick walls in your genealogical research that are
impeding your progress? Nancy Carlberg will offer techniques and strategies
for scaling these walls so you can identify the missing buds and branches on
your family tree. Offering common sense and novel approaches, she’ll
explain how to “ask the right questions” and use a multitude of resources to
expand your searches. Techniques for analyzing family group sheets to
reveal hidden connections and the importance of using original documents--as
opposed to relying solely on internet-obtained information--will also be
covered. Because an important component to success is developing a workable
organizational system, she will demonstrate how to file and chart the data
you’ve accumulated to make your future searches more productive.

Speaker: Nancy Carlberg is a noted genealogist, former researcher for Alex
Haley on Roots II, and author of over thirty books, on topics such as “The
Pleasures and Perils of Climbing Your Family Tree” and “How to Survive the
Genealogy Bug Without Going Broke.” She lectures and teaches genealogy
throughout Los Angeles and Orange counties and has traveled extensively
doing research for herself and others throughout the United States, Great
Britain and Europe. She is currently a cataloguer at the Los Angeles Family
History Center in West Los Angeles, and in 2002 was President of the British
Isles Family History Society. Ms. Carlsberg’s books and publications will
be available for purchase at the meeting.

Directions: Exit the San Diego Fwy at Ventura Blvd and go west ½ mile. VBS
will be on your right between Haskell & Densmore. Or, exit the Ventura Fwy
at Haskell and go south ½ mile to Ventura Blvd and turn right. Valley Beth
Shalom will be on your right.

Pamela Weisberger
Vice-President, Programs JGSLA
pweisberger@hotmail.com


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen April Meeting-Jewish Genealogical Society of Los Angeles #general

Pamela Weisberger <pweisberger@...>
 

The Jewish Genealogical Society of Los Angeles announces its next meeting:
Monday, April 18th at 7:00PM at Valley Beth Shalom, Lopaty Chapel, 15739
Ventura Boulevard, Encino, CA.

Nancy Carlberg, author and professional genealogist, will be talking about
"Overcoming Dead Ends and Organizing Materials in Genealogical Research."

Have you encountered brick walls in your genealogical research that are
impeding your progress? Nancy Carlberg will offer techniques and strategies
for scaling these walls so you can identify the missing buds and branches on
your family tree. Offering common sense and novel approaches, she’ll
explain how to “ask the right questions” and use a multitude of resources to
expand your searches. Techniques for analyzing family group sheets to
reveal hidden connections and the importance of using original documents--as
opposed to relying solely on internet-obtained information--will also be
covered. Because an important component to success is developing a workable
organizational system, she will demonstrate how to file and chart the data
you’ve accumulated to make your future searches more productive.

Speaker: Nancy Carlberg is a noted genealogist, former researcher for Alex
Haley on Roots II, and author of over thirty books, on topics such as “The
Pleasures and Perils of Climbing Your Family Tree” and “How to Survive the
Genealogy Bug Without Going Broke.” She lectures and teaches genealogy
throughout Los Angeles and Orange counties and has traveled extensively
doing research for herself and others throughout the United States, Great
Britain and Europe. She is currently a cataloguer at the Los Angeles Family
History Center in West Los Angeles, and in 2002 was President of the British
Isles Family History Society. Ms. Carlsberg’s books and publications will
be available for purchase at the meeting.

Directions: Exit the San Diego Fwy at Ventura Blvd and go west ½ mile. VBS
will be on your right between Haskell & Densmore. Or, exit the Ventura Fwy
at Haskell and go south ½ mile to Ventura Blvd and turn right. Valley Beth
Shalom will be on your right.

Pamela Weisberger
Vice-President, Programs JGSLA
pweisberger@hotmail.com