Date   

6 Photos Taken in Wyszkow during the 1920s and 1930s #general

Howard Orenstein
 

The website, "Explore Your Jewish Heritage in Wyszkow, Poland"
has been updated.

http://wwwfac.mcdaniel.edu/Psychology/HBO/JHWyszkow3.html

Scroll down the page. Click on the link: "Photos taken in 1920s and
1930s in Wyszkow," and you will see 6 thumbnail photos. After each
thumbnail there is a link to a larger version of and bibliographic
notes about the photo.

Howard Orenstein
Westminster, MD
horenstein@mcdaniel.edu


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen 6 Photos Taken in Wyszkow during the 1920s and 1930s #general

Howard Orenstein
 

The website, "Explore Your Jewish Heritage in Wyszkow, Poland"
has been updated.

http://wwwfac.mcdaniel.edu/Psychology/HBO/JHWyszkow3.html

Scroll down the page. Click on the link: "Photos taken in 1920s and
1930s in Wyszkow," and you will see 6 thumbnail photos. After each
thumbnail there is a link to a larger version of and bibliographic
notes about the photo.

Howard Orenstein
Westminster, MD
horenstein@mcdaniel.edu


Re: Naming a son after a brother? #general

Peter Zavon <pzavon@...>
 

Perhaps the son was NOT named after the mother's living brother. The son
may have been named after a deceased relative of the husband. I understand
that many Ashkenazi families followed a pattern of naming the first son
after the husband's deceased father or grandfather.

The custom of not naming a child after a living relative did not mean the
child could not be given a name used by any other relative. If that were
the case, there would have to have been a great many more Jewish personal
names available.

My grandmother named her first daughter Esther, after _her_ deceased mother.
Each of my grandmother' siblings also named a child Esther. So there were
several first cousins all named Esther. That is not much different >from the
situation Leslie describes.

--
Peter Zavon
Penfield, NY

"Leslie Weinberg" <artsoul@optonline.net> wrote in message
news:2_Yce.22553$RP1.2162@fe10.lga...

X-No-archive: yes
Thanks once again to the tireless efforts of JRI-Poland, I have the name
of my grandfather's nephew, but there is something very strange here.
The son, born four months after the civil marriage (I guess I have to
assume there was a religious marriage earlier?) has the name Mozes,
which also happens to be the name of her own brother. My grandfather
had two siblings by my great-grandfather's second marriage, Hene and
Mozes. I know Mozes lived through the War (he was in a camp in Italy, I
was told, and came to the U.S. after the War on the ship which docked in
upstate NY). and I remember meeting him as a child. Why would a Jew
from Galicia name a son after a brother?


Re: Naming a son after a brother? #general

Stan Goodman <SPAM_FOILER@...>
 

On Sun, 1 May 2005 08:47:11 UTC, artsoul@optonline.net (Leslie Weinberg)
opined:

Thanks once again to the tireless efforts of JRI-Poland, I have the name
of my grandfather's nephew, but there is something very strange here.
The son, born four months after the civil marriage (I guess I have to
assume there was a religious marriage earlier?) has the name Mozes,
which also happens to be the name of her own brother. My grandfather
had two siblings by my great-grandfather's second marriage, Hene and
Mozes. I know Mozes lived through the War (he was in a camp in Italy, I
was told, and came to the U.S. after the War on the ship which docked in
upstate NY). and I remember meeting him as a child. Why would a Jew
from Galicia name a son after a brother?
from as much as I have been able to understand in your description, I don't
know that you can say that he was named abter the brother. Brother Moses was
almost certainly named for a forebear; if not, then for some prestigious
personage or someone else. The son that occupies your thoughts may have been
named for that same forebear, or for another, on either side of the family.

You don't mention whether Brother Moses was alive or dead when the son was
born (or possibly that has gone over my head). If he was dead, expecially if
he had died without issue, there would be nothing surprising about wishing
to carry his name forward as a memorial. If he was alive, that would seem to
confirm the possibilities I have tried to describe in the paragraph above.
If two people have the same forename, they are not necessarily named for
each other, even in Galicia.

As a relevant anecdote, I can tell you that my pmggm bore two sons of the
same forename. The first had died in infancy, and she "recycled" the name,
which was that of her grandfather, for the second. Things in the real world
are not programmed as neatly as one might imagine.

Stan Goodman, Qiryat Tiv'on, Israel

Searching:
NEACHOWICZ/NOACHOWICZ, NEJMAN/NAJMAN, SURALSKI: >from Lomza Gubernia
ISMACH: >from Lomza Gubernia, Galicia, and Ukraina
HERTANU, ABRAMOVICI, LAUER: >from Dorohoi District, Romania
GRISARU, VATARU: >from Iasi, Dorohoi, and Mileanca, Romania

See my interactive family tree (requires Java 1.1.6 or better). the URL is:
http://www.hashkedim.com

For reasons connected with anti-spam/junk security, the return address is
not valid. To communicate with me, please visit my website (see the URL
above -- no Java required for this purpose) and fill in the email form
there.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Naming a son after a brother? #general

Peter Zavon <pzavon@...>
 

Perhaps the son was NOT named after the mother's living brother. The son
may have been named after a deceased relative of the husband. I understand
that many Ashkenazi families followed a pattern of naming the first son
after the husband's deceased father or grandfather.

The custom of not naming a child after a living relative did not mean the
child could not be given a name used by any other relative. If that were
the case, there would have to have been a great many more Jewish personal
names available.

My grandmother named her first daughter Esther, after _her_ deceased mother.
Each of my grandmother' siblings also named a child Esther. So there were
several first cousins all named Esther. That is not much different >from the
situation Leslie describes.

--
Peter Zavon
Penfield, NY

"Leslie Weinberg" <artsoul@optonline.net> wrote in message
news:2_Yce.22553$RP1.2162@fe10.lga...

X-No-archive: yes
Thanks once again to the tireless efforts of JRI-Poland, I have the name
of my grandfather's nephew, but there is something very strange here.
The son, born four months after the civil marriage (I guess I have to
assume there was a religious marriage earlier?) has the name Mozes,
which also happens to be the name of her own brother. My grandfather
had two siblings by my great-grandfather's second marriage, Hene and
Mozes. I know Mozes lived through the War (he was in a camp in Italy, I
was told, and came to the U.S. after the War on the ship which docked in
upstate NY). and I remember meeting him as a child. Why would a Jew
from Galicia name a son after a brother?


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Naming a son after a brother? #general

Stan Goodman <SPAM_FOILER@...>
 

On Sun, 1 May 2005 08:47:11 UTC, artsoul@optonline.net (Leslie Weinberg)
opined:

Thanks once again to the tireless efforts of JRI-Poland, I have the name
of my grandfather's nephew, but there is something very strange here.
The son, born four months after the civil marriage (I guess I have to
assume there was a religious marriage earlier?) has the name Mozes,
which also happens to be the name of her own brother. My grandfather
had two siblings by my great-grandfather's second marriage, Hene and
Mozes. I know Mozes lived through the War (he was in a camp in Italy, I
was told, and came to the U.S. after the War on the ship which docked in
upstate NY). and I remember meeting him as a child. Why would a Jew
from Galicia name a son after a brother?
from as much as I have been able to understand in your description, I don't
know that you can say that he was named abter the brother. Brother Moses was
almost certainly named for a forebear; if not, then for some prestigious
personage or someone else. The son that occupies your thoughts may have been
named for that same forebear, or for another, on either side of the family.

You don't mention whether Brother Moses was alive or dead when the son was
born (or possibly that has gone over my head). If he was dead, expecially if
he had died without issue, there would be nothing surprising about wishing
to carry his name forward as a memorial. If he was alive, that would seem to
confirm the possibilities I have tried to describe in the paragraph above.
If two people have the same forename, they are not necessarily named for
each other, even in Galicia.

As a relevant anecdote, I can tell you that my pmggm bore two sons of the
same forename. The first had died in infancy, and she "recycled" the name,
which was that of her grandfather, for the second. Things in the real world
are not programmed as neatly as one might imagine.

Stan Goodman, Qiryat Tiv'on, Israel

Searching:
NEACHOWICZ/NOACHOWICZ, NEJMAN/NAJMAN, SURALSKI: >from Lomza Gubernia
ISMACH: >from Lomza Gubernia, Galicia, and Ukraina
HERTANU, ABRAMOVICI, LAUER: >from Dorohoi District, Romania
GRISARU, VATARU: >from Iasi, Dorohoi, and Mileanca, Romania

See my interactive family tree (requires Java 1.1.6 or better). the URL is:
http://www.hashkedim.com

For reasons connected with anti-spam/junk security, the return address is
not valid. To communicate with me, please visit my website (see the URL
above -- no Java required for this purpose) and fill in the email form
there.


Re: The DEUTSCH family from TAB - ADAND-SIOFOK - 2015 #hungary

Eloedfamily@...
 

One is the GGF and the other is the GF, both have the same first name Lipot,
but not the same wife. (By the way, during 1944/46 I visited Tab and Siofok
several times. Tab, the main-city (jaras-szekhely) for the area had the mill,
and we would walk 3 / 4 hoursin the early morning to get flower >from there.)
Leslie
Calif


Re: Almanac and directory of the Hungarian railways #hungary

bikerick
 

I know someone who works at the railroad. If all else fails, let me know,
and I could see if he could be of some help, Rick

-----Original Message-----
From: Dennis Baer [mailto:dennis.baer@verizon.net]
Sent: Wednesday, April 27, 2005 5:50 AM
To: H-SIG
Subject: [h-sig] Almanac and directory of the Hungarian railways

Hello

Does anyone have accesss to

The Almanac and directory of the Hungarian railways for the years 1885 to
1905?.

My great grandfather Samuel ( SHMUEL ) ZANVIL SCHANCZ (Schanz)

worked as the railroad station master in Munkacs, Hungary >from about 1885
until 1905.

I want to see if someone can find any records for him.

Thank you.

Dennis Baer

Seeking SCHANCZ, SCHANTZ in Munkacs


Re: The DEUTSCH family from TAB - ADAND-SIOFOK #hungary

גירון
 

Hello,
I believe my original message confused some as Dr. Yehuda Klausner wrote in
reponse "I have detected a discrepancy in it.
At the beginning of your letter you write that Lipot DEUTSCHs wife was Kati,
at the end Lipot's wife was Sari CZEISZLER. Which one is it?"

let me clarify:
DEUTSCH LIPOT and KATI's son was:
LAJOS DEUTSCH who married BETTI GOLDHAMMER his son was
LIPOT who married SARI CZEISZLER his son is my
father.
this Lipot had 2 sisters and a brother all mentined in
my original message

This is intersting as not only the Jewish name repeats itself but the
general name as well.

I hope everything is clearer now.

Nava Giron
Israel


Hungary SIG #Hungary Re: The DEUTSCH family from TAB - ADAND-SIOFOK - 2015 #hungary

Eloedfamily@...
 

One is the GGF and the other is the GF, both have the same first name Lipot,
but not the same wife. (By the way, during 1944/46 I visited Tab and Siofok
several times. Tab, the main-city (jaras-szekhely) for the area had the mill,
and we would walk 3 / 4 hoursin the early morning to get flower >from there.)
Leslie
Calif


Hungary SIG #Hungary RE: Almanac and directory of the Hungarian railways #hungary

bikerick
 

I know someone who works at the railroad. If all else fails, let me know,
and I could see if he could be of some help, Rick

-----Original Message-----
From: Dennis Baer [mailto:dennis.baer@verizon.net]
Sent: Wednesday, April 27, 2005 5:50 AM
To: H-SIG
Subject: [h-sig] Almanac and directory of the Hungarian railways

Hello

Does anyone have accesss to

The Almanac and directory of the Hungarian railways for the years 1885 to
1905?.

My great grandfather Samuel ( SHMUEL ) ZANVIL SCHANCZ (Schanz)

worked as the railroad station master in Munkacs, Hungary >from about 1885
until 1905.

I want to see if someone can find any records for him.

Thank you.

Dennis Baer

Seeking SCHANCZ, SCHANTZ in Munkacs


Hungary SIG #Hungary Re: The DEUTSCH family from TAB - ADAND-SIOFOK #hungary

גירון
 

Hello,
I believe my original message confused some as Dr. Yehuda Klausner wrote in
reponse "I have detected a discrepancy in it.
At the beginning of your letter you write that Lipot DEUTSCHs wife was Kati,
at the end Lipot's wife was Sari CZEISZLER. Which one is it?"

let me clarify:
DEUTSCH LIPOT and KATI's son was:
LAJOS DEUTSCH who married BETTI GOLDHAMMER his son was
LIPOT who married SARI CZEISZLER his son is my
father.
this Lipot had 2 sisters and a brother all mentined in
my original message

This is intersting as not only the Jewish name repeats itself but the
general name as well.

I hope everything is clearer now.

Nava Giron
Israel


GOTTLIEB Family in California #hungary

fbandjd@...
 

Dear Fellow Researchers,

I am looking for Hungarian GOTTLIEBs who lived in Southern California
around 1944 and were associated with the entertainment industry. They
also owned part interest in a bar/restaurant in San Francisco. My
cousin Morty HERTZ recently remembered having a Seder with my GOTTLIEB
cousins in La Brea, CA while he was in the Army.

Thanks for your help in the past.
Fran Meng
W.C., CA
fbandjd@aol.com


Hungary SIG #Hungary GOTTLIEB Family in California #hungary

fbandjd@...
 

Dear Fellow Researchers,

I am looking for Hungarian GOTTLIEBs who lived in Southern California
around 1944 and were associated with the entertainment industry. They
also owned part interest in a bar/restaurant in San Francisco. My
cousin Morty HERTZ recently remembered having a Seder with my GOTTLIEB
cousins in La Brea, CA while he was in the Army.

Thanks for your help in the past.
Fran Meng
W.C., CA
fbandjd@aol.com


Cemetery records - double deck graves? #general

Gloria Bailey <GAB123@...>
 

Response to a question >from Judith Lipmanson on the accuracy of cemetery
records and the possibility that one grave was on top of another...

In my family (Catholic side) at a Catholic cemetery - Calvary on LI -- I
have been told that my grandfather's grave is on top of my grandmother's
grave. My grandfather died 18 years after my grandmother. The listing from
the cemetery office lists 3 people buried in this - section 55 Range 10 Plot
D Grave #6. In addition, in another section, range, plot graves 1 and 2 are
buried 6 adults. And another has 5 adults and 1 child. I don't know how big
each of these graves are, but that appears to be a lot of people.

I will also note that some of the people buried in my family plots are not
directly related to me, but were members of extended family of the spouse of
my grandfather's brother. So, it is totally possible to have someone in the
plot that you do not recognize.

Also, I found people I never knew about >from the cemetery listing as well.
One was an "adopted" daughter of my grandfather's sister with the surname of
that sister's second husband (which I did not know before I received that
listing).

These plots were purchased between 1907 and 1918 and were used through the
1960's.

Another thing the listing said was that some graves were moved >from one
section to another and at least one was moved to another cemetery. Our
family was poor and I believe they shared the plots they had when the death
occurred and maybe made other plans later.

All in all, you can learn a lot >from the cemetery listing. Since the
records were kept on file cards by hand, it is entirely possible for all
kinds of errors to get in as well. For instance, they could make a notation
on the wrong card and thus it would not match the physical gravesite.
Alternatively, they could forget to record something or record it in the
wrong place, so the gravesite could have more than the card.

Gloria A. Bailey, Ph.D.
Searching Osherowitz and Ginsberg/Ginsburg in Romanovo & Slutzk, Minsk,
Belarus and Schildkraut in Pagost, Minsk Belarus


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Cemetery records - double deck graves? #general

Gloria Bailey <GAB123@...>
 

Response to a question >from Judith Lipmanson on the accuracy of cemetery
records and the possibility that one grave was on top of another...

In my family (Catholic side) at a Catholic cemetery - Calvary on LI -- I
have been told that my grandfather's grave is on top of my grandmother's
grave. My grandfather died 18 years after my grandmother. The listing from
the cemetery office lists 3 people buried in this - section 55 Range 10 Plot
D Grave #6. In addition, in another section, range, plot graves 1 and 2 are
buried 6 adults. And another has 5 adults and 1 child. I don't know how big
each of these graves are, but that appears to be a lot of people.

I will also note that some of the people buried in my family plots are not
directly related to me, but were members of extended family of the spouse of
my grandfather's brother. So, it is totally possible to have someone in the
plot that you do not recognize.

Also, I found people I never knew about >from the cemetery listing as well.
One was an "adopted" daughter of my grandfather's sister with the surname of
that sister's second husband (which I did not know before I received that
listing).

These plots were purchased between 1907 and 1918 and were used through the
1960's.

Another thing the listing said was that some graves were moved >from one
section to another and at least one was moved to another cemetery. Our
family was poor and I believe they shared the plots they had when the death
occurred and maybe made other plans later.

All in all, you can learn a lot >from the cemetery listing. Since the
records were kept on file cards by hand, it is entirely possible for all
kinds of errors to get in as well. For instance, they could make a notation
on the wrong card and thus it would not match the physical gravesite.
Alternatively, they could forget to record something or record it in the
wrong place, so the gravesite could have more than the card.

Gloria A. Bailey, Ph.D.
Searching Osherowitz and Ginsberg/Ginsburg in Romanovo & Slutzk, Minsk,
Belarus and Schildkraut in Pagost, Minsk Belarus


Kamsii Birth Record - #general

Burt Hecht <burt1933@...>
 

Dear Genners,

Some weeks ago I submitted to ViewMate the image of a birth record I mistook
for a family member. It was graciously and exactly translated >from the
Russian by a great volunteer. In going over names, places, etc. I
discovered this was not within my family. It is >from 1837 for Ratsa
Kamskii, daughter to Mordke. I would be happy to post the image again, but it is
lost to me. The VM image was designated 5842:


Burt Hecht

VM 5842


Upper right: 13

1. [It] occurred in city Platsko eighth % twentieth % [of] February
2. thousand eight-hundred seventy seventh year at ten o'cl-
3. ock [of] morning appeared Mordka Yusef Kamskii trader
4. thirty six years living in Platsko
5. and in presence [of] witnesses Zakel Bauman six-
6. ty nine years and Mosek Buki fifty
7. eight years >from birth elders liv-
8. ing in Platsko presented [to] us infant [of] fe-
9. male sex announcing that such was-born in this
10. city first% thirteenth [of] February [of] current year,
11. at seven o'clock [of] morning >from lawful his wife Ryfka
12. born Grubman, twenty six years from
13. birth, [to] infant this after birth was-given name Ratsa
14. Act this [to] announcer and [to] witnesses was-read
15. [by] us and [by] those-present was-signed_ ___
16. Maintaining Acts [of] Civil Status
17. Politsmeistr [of] city Platsko Squiggle
18. M. Buki (latin) Z. Bauman (latin) M Y Kamski (latin)


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Kamsii Birth Record - #general

Burt Hecht <burt1933@...>
 

Dear Genners,

Some weeks ago I submitted to ViewMate the image of a birth record I mistook
for a family member. It was graciously and exactly translated >from the
Russian by a great volunteer. In going over names, places, etc. I
discovered this was not within my family. It is >from 1837 for Ratsa
Kamskii, daughter to Mordke. I would be happy to post the image again, but it is
lost to me. The VM image was designated 5842:


Burt Hecht

VM 5842


Upper right: 13

1. [It] occurred in city Platsko eighth % twentieth % [of] February
2. thousand eight-hundred seventy seventh year at ten o'cl-
3. ock [of] morning appeared Mordka Yusef Kamskii trader
4. thirty six years living in Platsko
5. and in presence [of] witnesses Zakel Bauman six-
6. ty nine years and Mosek Buki fifty
7. eight years >from birth elders liv-
8. ing in Platsko presented [to] us infant [of] fe-
9. male sex announcing that such was-born in this
10. city first% thirteenth [of] February [of] current year,
11. at seven o'clock [of] morning >from lawful his wife Ryfka
12. born Grubman, twenty six years from
13. birth, [to] infant this after birth was-given name Ratsa
14. Act this [to] announcer and [to] witnesses was-read
15. [by] us and [by] those-present was-signed_ ___
16. Maintaining Acts [of] Civil Status
17. Politsmeistr [of] city Platsko Squiggle
18. M. Buki (latin) Z. Bauman (latin) M Y Kamski (latin)


Re: Melovitz, Austria - where? #general

Peter Zavon <pzavon@...>
 

The ShtetlSeeker indicates that Maliyevtsy is at coordinates 49 degrees
North and 27 degrees East. This location was in the Russian Empire during
the 19th century, not in Austria. (It may be worth noting that it would have
been only a short distance east of the Russian border with the Austrian
province of Galicia.)

If Melovitz was in Austria before WWI, then Melovitz is not Maliyevtsy.

Peter Zavon
Penfield, NY (Rochester Area)

"Bob Wexler" <rwexler@buffnet.net> wrote in message
news:5.1.0.14.2.20050430101123.0334e040@mail.buffnet.net...
A paternal great-grandmother's death certificate (Rochester, NY 1935)
lists > her place of birth as Melovitz, Austria. She was born in either 1860 (55
yo> on 1915 NY State Census) or 1869 (>from death certificate). The informant
was a son-in-law.
As her son, my gf lists his place of birth as Lenitz (Ilintsy?), Kiev,
Russia on his 1922 Petition for Naturalization, and I have a birth record
from Odessa listing him as a citizen of Shpola, I used the JewishGen
ShteltSeeker and selected Maliyevtsy as the most likely candidate for the
current town name.

Is "Melovitz" actually Maliyevtsy, or would another town be more likely?
Bob Wexler
South Wales, NY (Buffalo area)


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Melovitz, Austria - where? #general

Peter Zavon <pzavon@...>
 

The ShtetlSeeker indicates that Maliyevtsy is at coordinates 49 degrees
North and 27 degrees East. This location was in the Russian Empire during
the 19th century, not in Austria. (It may be worth noting that it would have
been only a short distance east of the Russian border with the Austrian
province of Galicia.)

If Melovitz was in Austria before WWI, then Melovitz is not Maliyevtsy.

Peter Zavon
Penfield, NY (Rochester Area)

"Bob Wexler" <rwexler@buffnet.net> wrote in message
news:5.1.0.14.2.20050430101123.0334e040@mail.buffnet.net...
A paternal great-grandmother's death certificate (Rochester, NY 1935)
lists > her place of birth as Melovitz, Austria. She was born in either 1860 (55
yo> on 1915 NY State Census) or 1869 (>from death certificate). The informant
was a son-in-law.
As her son, my gf lists his place of birth as Lenitz (Ilintsy?), Kiev,
Russia on his 1922 Petition for Naturalization, and I have a birth record
from Odessa listing him as a citizen of Shpola, I used the JewishGen
ShteltSeeker and selected Maliyevtsy as the most likely candidate for the
current town name.

Is "Melovitz" actually Maliyevtsy, or would another town be more likely?
Bob Wexler
South Wales, NY (Buffalo area)