Date   

Location of Birth Records for Plunge/Plungyan c. 1893? #lithuania

Jmfine2000@...
 

I am trying to locate the birth record or a birth certificate for my
Grandfather who was born in Plunge/Plungyan in January 1893.

1. Where would theses records be housed?

2. What sort of documentation could I expect to find?

3. Who should I contact in order to get a copy of these records?

Your advice would be greatly appreciated. Thanks,

Jonathan Fine
Tustin, CA


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania Location of Birth Records for Plunge/Plungyan c. 1893? #lithuania

Jmfine2000@...
 

I am trying to locate the birth record or a birth certificate for my
Grandfather who was born in Plunge/Plungyan in January 1893.

1. Where would theses records be housed?

2. What sort of documentation could I expect to find?

3. Who should I contact in order to get a copy of these records?

Your advice would be greatly appreciated. Thanks,

Jonathan Fine
Tustin, CA


Re: litvaksig digest: March 07, 2005 #lithuania

KelAbraz@...
 

The mystery town of Leton may not be a town at all, only birthplace is
specified not necessarily town, e.g. Maine, USA. Could the 'Leton' be
miswritten or misread? It could be Letow or more correctly Litau, in
other words Lithuania.

Just a thought.
Kelvyn Abramowitz

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

It identifies the birthplace of Yane and his parents as Leton,
Russia. Using


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania Re: litvaksig digest: March 07, 2005 #lithuania

KelAbraz@...
 

The mystery town of Leton may not be a town at all, only birthplace is
specified not necessarily town, e.g. Maine, USA. Could the 'Leton' be
miswritten or misread? It could be Letow or more correctly Litau, in
other words Lithuania.

Just a thought.
Kelvyn Abramowitz

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

It identifies the birthplace of Yane and his parents as Leton,
Russia. Using


FAQ's explanation typo error #lithuania

Howard Margol
 

In yesterdays Digest I posted a question and answer pertaining to the
Litvak SIG FAQ's. I made a typo error which I apologize for and want
to correct.

<< 3. What are the ALD '/' (delimiters) used for in the ALD? The
number of '/' are not the same for all records. >>

Rather than spell out the entire source, i.e., LVIA/Fond 1228/Apras
1/Byla125/Lapas 62, it is a space saving way of using LVIA/1228/1/125/62.
The Fond/Apras/Byla numbers will almost always be shown but not
necessarily the Byla number. The numbers are based on the official
filing system used by the Lithuanian archives. With these numbers,
an archivist can go directly to the particular record in question.

I should have stated that the Lapas (page number) is not always shown.

Howard Margol


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania FAQ's explanation typo error #lithuania

Howard Margol
 

In yesterdays Digest I posted a question and answer pertaining to the
Litvak SIG FAQ's. I made a typo error which I apologize for and want
to correct.

<< 3. What are the ALD '/' (delimiters) used for in the ALD? The
number of '/' are not the same for all records. >>

Rather than spell out the entire source, i.e., LVIA/Fond 1228/Apras
1/Byla125/Lapas 62, it is a space saving way of using LVIA/1228/1/125/62.
The Fond/Apras/Byla numbers will almost always be shown but not
necessarily the Byla number. The numbers are based on the official
filing system used by the Lithuanian archives. With these numbers,
an archivist can go directly to the particular record in question.

I should have stated that the Lapas (page number) is not always shown.

Howard Margol


Next Meeting in Jerusalem Branch of the Israel Genealogical Society #general

Mathilde Tagger <tagger@...>
 

Hello everyone,
Here are the details of the March meeting of the Jerusalem Branch of the Israel
Genealogical Society (Hebrew Section) in cooperation with the IGS Sephardim SIG.

Date: Wednesday March 16, 2005
Time: 6:00 P.M. Library open
7:15 " Announcements and a very short presentation a new book
7:30 " Hebrew Section Main Program

Place: Beit Frankfurter, 80 Derekh Beit Lehem, Bak'a, Jerusalem

Topic: The Jews of Fez (Morocco) and the Role of the HA-SARFATY Rabbinical
Dynasty

Lecturer: Dr. Vidal Serfaty, Lecturer at the Tel Aviv University

Dr. Serfaty will trace the history of the very old Jewish community of Fez that
for long decades was the capital of Morocco.

The community of Fez absorbed numerous exiles >from Spain after the Expulsion in
1492. The first members of the HaTzarfati family members who settled in Fez were
among the rabbinical dynasties like the Danan or Ibn Danan, the Monsonego, the
Serrero, the Mansano and others, who chose Fez may be because the city got the
reputation of being a rabbinical center since the stay of HaRambam there.

Dr. Serfaty, a direct descendent of one of last Chief Rabbis in Fez, made a
tremendous family research, especially using rabbinical works. He will take us
back to Morocco but also to Spain and France.

For more details, please contact me at: tagger@actcom.co.il
Shalom,
Mathilde Tagger
Jerusalem Branch
Israel Genealogical Society
Visit: www.isragen.org.il


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Next Meeting in Jerusalem Branch of the Israel Genealogical Society #general

Mathilde Tagger <tagger@...>
 

Hello everyone,
Here are the details of the March meeting of the Jerusalem Branch of the Israel
Genealogical Society (Hebrew Section) in cooperation with the IGS Sephardim SIG.

Date: Wednesday March 16, 2005
Time: 6:00 P.M. Library open
7:15 " Announcements and a very short presentation a new book
7:30 " Hebrew Section Main Program

Place: Beit Frankfurter, 80 Derekh Beit Lehem, Bak'a, Jerusalem

Topic: The Jews of Fez (Morocco) and the Role of the HA-SARFATY Rabbinical
Dynasty

Lecturer: Dr. Vidal Serfaty, Lecturer at the Tel Aviv University

Dr. Serfaty will trace the history of the very old Jewish community of Fez that
for long decades was the capital of Morocco.

The community of Fez absorbed numerous exiles >from Spain after the Expulsion in
1492. The first members of the HaTzarfati family members who settled in Fez were
among the rabbinical dynasties like the Danan or Ibn Danan, the Monsonego, the
Serrero, the Mansano and others, who chose Fez may be because the city got the
reputation of being a rabbinical center since the stay of HaRambam there.

Dr. Serfaty, a direct descendent of one of last Chief Rabbis in Fez, made a
tremendous family research, especially using rabbinical works. He will take us
back to Morocco but also to Spain and France.

For more details, please contact me at: tagger@actcom.co.il
Shalom,
Mathilde Tagger
Jerusalem Branch
Israel Genealogical Society
Visit: www.isragen.org.il


Emigration from Poland in 1891 #poland

Jjlaca@...
 

As my family left Poland, they had lived in Kolo, just 100 mile west of
Warszaw, in 1891, the posting below leads me to ask the question as to whether
anyone knows if there was a defining event or events that would have encouraged
emigration during that time?

Jonny Joseph
Los Angeles, CA, USA

Researching KUCZYNSKI, RAUF, BRUCHSTAJN (Kolo)

In a message dated 3/4/2005 10:13:51 P.M. Pacific Standard Time,
bialystok@lyris.jewishgen.org writes:

I've read descriptions of the 1905 and 1906 pogroms and they were indeed
very gruesome

No wonder they sparked a wave of immigration.


March Meeting of Jewish Genealogical Society of Greater Philadelphia #general

JGLois@...
 

March Meeting of Jewish Genealogical Society of Greater Philadelphia

Date: March 14, 2005
Time: 7:45 PM
Place: The Newman Building at Gratz College
Old York Road (Route 611) and Melrose Avenue
Melrose Park, PA


Speaker: Marion Smith (INS) & Valery Bazarov (HIAS)

Topic: Genealogy Through Cooperation:
HIAS and the US Immigration Service Working Together

During this presentation, Valery Bazarov, Director Location and Family History
Services, HIAS, and US Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) Historian
Marian L. Smith will demonstrate the importance of locating all surviving
documents in immigrant research. They will do so by presenting case studies of
various immigrants who arrived in the U.S. during the early 20th century and came
to the attention of both HIAS and INS. The case studies will illustrate research
problem solving, the workings of immigration law, the role of immigrant aid
societies in the process, and the additional genealogical information to be found
in such records.

Importantly, the cases show how all parties negotiated immigration rules to grant
or deny immigrant admissions. The foundation of the lecture will be original
records found in the HIAS Archives in New York, the National Archives (NARA) in
Washington, D.C., at NARA Regional facilities, and through the Freedom of
Information Act. Based on their lecture given at the 2003 IAJGS Conference in
Washington, DC, Bazarov and Smith will introduce new cases and update old cases
with new documentary information.

Marian L. Smith is the Senior Historian at US Citizenship and Immigration
Services, Department of Homeland Security (formerly the Immigration and
Naturalization Service). She regularly lectures at national and international
genealogy conferences on the history and uses of immigration and naturalization
records. Her articles appear in the National Archives journal Prologue, the FGS
Forum, and other publications. Her research focus primarily involves official
immigration agency records held in the National Archives in downtown Washington,
D.C.

Valery Bazarov was born in Russia in 1942. He immigrated to the United States in
1988. He holds two graduate degrees >from Odessa State University (1969) and Hunter
College of the City University of New York (1994). Valery Bazarov joined the
Hebrew Immigrant Aid Society in 1988 and over the next decade assisted the arrival
of more than 200,000 Jewish refugees who came to the United States under HIAS
auspices. He is currently responsible for the HIAS Location and Family History
Service, helping immigrants of different generations to find family members and
friends - often in other countries - whom they lost contact with over the years,
sometimes, decades. Valery is especially committed to finding and honoring the
heroes who rescued European Jews during the Holocaust. He also researches HIAS
history and presents his findings in lectures and publications. He is a frequent
lecturer at the international seminars on Jewish genealogy, speaking about HIAS
activities and projects. Valery also travels to Eastern Europe (Poland and
Ukraine) where he works in various archives and locates documents related directly
to HIAS activities, spanning the last 100 years.

Come to the meeting 30 minutes early for a Question and Answer session preceding
the general meeting.

For all who are researching Philadelphia roots and need information on local
resources; cemeteries, funeral directors, repositories (and much more) please
visit the JGSGP website:
http://www.jewishgen.org/jgsp

Interested friends are always welcome!
Refreshments will be served following the meeting

German Special Interest Group:

Time: Sunday, March 20, 3:00PM
Place: at the home of Phyllis Sichel in Elkins Park, PA.
Topic: Joan Pollak will discuss researching her ancestors in 17th - 19th century
southern Germany, and in 19th ,southern United States.For more information and
location contact Monica Leonards at
m_leonards@hotmail.com

Delaware County Main Line Affiliate

Time: Tuesday, April 5, 7:30PM
Place: Martins Run Life Care Community, 11 Martin's Run, Meda, PA
Topic: Dr. Wolf Karo will speak on his return visit to Germany

One on one help is offered in the Computer room starting at 6:45PM For more
information contact Shelda Sandler at
stanshel@msn.com

Lois Sernoff [JGS GreaterPhiladelphia]
<JGLois@aol.com>


BialyGen: Bialystok Region #Bialystok #Poland Emigration from Poland in 1891 #poland

Jjlaca@...
 

As my family left Poland, they had lived in Kolo, just 100 mile west of
Warszaw, in 1891, the posting below leads me to ask the question as to whether
anyone knows if there was a defining event or events that would have encouraged
emigration during that time?

Jonny Joseph
Los Angeles, CA, USA

Researching KUCZYNSKI, RAUF, BRUCHSTAJN (Kolo)

In a message dated 3/4/2005 10:13:51 P.M. Pacific Standard Time,
bialystok@lyris.jewishgen.org writes:

I've read descriptions of the 1905 and 1906 pogroms and they were indeed
very gruesome

No wonder they sparked a wave of immigration.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen March Meeting of Jewish Genealogical Society of Greater Philadelphia #general

JGLois@...
 

March Meeting of Jewish Genealogical Society of Greater Philadelphia

Date: March 14, 2005
Time: 7:45 PM
Place: The Newman Building at Gratz College
Old York Road (Route 611) and Melrose Avenue
Melrose Park, PA


Speaker: Marion Smith (INS) & Valery Bazarov (HIAS)

Topic: Genealogy Through Cooperation:
HIAS and the US Immigration Service Working Together

During this presentation, Valery Bazarov, Director Location and Family History
Services, HIAS, and US Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) Historian
Marian L. Smith will demonstrate the importance of locating all surviving
documents in immigrant research. They will do so by presenting case studies of
various immigrants who arrived in the U.S. during the early 20th century and came
to the attention of both HIAS and INS. The case studies will illustrate research
problem solving, the workings of immigration law, the role of immigrant aid
societies in the process, and the additional genealogical information to be found
in such records.

Importantly, the cases show how all parties negotiated immigration rules to grant
or deny immigrant admissions. The foundation of the lecture will be original
records found in the HIAS Archives in New York, the National Archives (NARA) in
Washington, D.C., at NARA Regional facilities, and through the Freedom of
Information Act. Based on their lecture given at the 2003 IAJGS Conference in
Washington, DC, Bazarov and Smith will introduce new cases and update old cases
with new documentary information.

Marian L. Smith is the Senior Historian at US Citizenship and Immigration
Services, Department of Homeland Security (formerly the Immigration and
Naturalization Service). She regularly lectures at national and international
genealogy conferences on the history and uses of immigration and naturalization
records. Her articles appear in the National Archives journal Prologue, the FGS
Forum, and other publications. Her research focus primarily involves official
immigration agency records held in the National Archives in downtown Washington,
D.C.

Valery Bazarov was born in Russia in 1942. He immigrated to the United States in
1988. He holds two graduate degrees >from Odessa State University (1969) and Hunter
College of the City University of New York (1994). Valery Bazarov joined the
Hebrew Immigrant Aid Society in 1988 and over the next decade assisted the arrival
of more than 200,000 Jewish refugees who came to the United States under HIAS
auspices. He is currently responsible for the HIAS Location and Family History
Service, helping immigrants of different generations to find family members and
friends - often in other countries - whom they lost contact with over the years,
sometimes, decades. Valery is especially committed to finding and honoring the
heroes who rescued European Jews during the Holocaust. He also researches HIAS
history and presents his findings in lectures and publications. He is a frequent
lecturer at the international seminars on Jewish genealogy, speaking about HIAS
activities and projects. Valery also travels to Eastern Europe (Poland and
Ukraine) where he works in various archives and locates documents related directly
to HIAS activities, spanning the last 100 years.

Come to the meeting 30 minutes early for a Question and Answer session preceding
the general meeting.

For all who are researching Philadelphia roots and need information on local
resources; cemeteries, funeral directors, repositories (and much more) please
visit the JGSGP website:
http://www.jewishgen.org/jgsp

Interested friends are always welcome!
Refreshments will be served following the meeting

German Special Interest Group:

Time: Sunday, March 20, 3:00PM
Place: at the home of Phyllis Sichel in Elkins Park, PA.
Topic: Joan Pollak will discuss researching her ancestors in 17th - 19th century
southern Germany, and in 19th ,southern United States.For more information and
location contact Monica Leonards at
m_leonards@hotmail.com

Delaware County Main Line Affiliate

Time: Tuesday, April 5, 7:30PM
Place: Martins Run Life Care Community, 11 Martin's Run, Meda, PA
Topic: Dr. Wolf Karo will speak on his return visit to Germany

One on one help is offered in the Computer room starting at 6:45PM For more
information contact Shelda Sandler at
stanshel@msn.com

Lois Sernoff [JGS GreaterPhiladelphia]
<JGLois@aol.com>


Belarus SIG Coordinator Stepping Down #poland

Bialystoker
 

Many of you who research in the BIALYGen area also are researching in
the area of Grodno Gubernia now in Belarus. You have probably seen that
the originator of the Belarus SIG and its leader since its inception in
1998, Dave Fox, has decided to retire >from his leadership role.

If you just surf through the Belarus SIG website
< http://www.jewishgen.org/Belarus/ >, you will see the results of Dave's
leadership. In the short history of BIALYGen (about 19 months), the
Belarus SIG and Dave Fox has been great friends to BIALYGen. Dave
invited us to cooperate on a few Grodno Gubernia projects for which we
are grateful.

On behalf of BIALYGen, we wish Dave much success and happiness in his
future personal and genealogical pursuits. Hopefully a new leader of the
Belarus SIG will step forward and BIALYGen can continue our cooperative
work together.

Mark Halpern
BIALYGen Coordinator


BialyGen: Bialystok Region #Bialystok #Poland Belarus SIG Coordinator Stepping Down #poland

Bialystoker
 

Many of you who research in the BIALYGen area also are researching in
the area of Grodno Gubernia now in Belarus. You have probably seen that
the originator of the Belarus SIG and its leader since its inception in
1998, Dave Fox, has decided to retire >from his leadership role.

If you just surf through the Belarus SIG website
< http://www.jewishgen.org/Belarus/ >, you will see the results of Dave's
leadership. In the short history of BIALYGen (about 19 months), the
Belarus SIG and Dave Fox has been great friends to BIALYGen. Dave
invited us to cooperate on a few Grodno Gubernia projects for which we
are grateful.

On behalf of BIALYGen, we wish Dave much success and happiness in his
future personal and genealogical pursuits. Hopefully a new leader of the
Belarus SIG will step forward and BIALYGen can continue our cooperative
work together.

Mark Halpern
BIALYGen Coordinator


'Jewels and Ashes' #poland

suprlmn@...
 

The mention of Bransk in recent postings reminded me of the book "Jewels
and Ashes" by Arnold Zable, who lives in Australia. It reads like a good
detective story, mentions both people and shtetlach in the Bialystoker
gegnvart (vicinity).

Once you start reading, you'll find it very hard to put down, because
in addition to the drama of before and during WW2, there is much local
color and history. Best of all, he names names. The only drawback,
in my opinion, is the lack of an index. Publisher is Harcourt, Brace
& Co., 1991; ISBN 0-15-146348-4. Enjoy, reminisce, and above all,
never forget.

B'shalom, Susan Pearlman
Nee Szejna-Dwera SZEJNMAN-KOSLOWSKY, in Bialystok, Poland
[also researching JASKOLKA, WISHNIATSKY]


BialyGen: Bialystok Region #Bialystok #Poland 'Jewels and Ashes' #poland

suprlmn@...
 

The mention of Bransk in recent postings reminded me of the book "Jewels
and Ashes" by Arnold Zable, who lives in Australia. It reads like a good
detective story, mentions both people and shtetlach in the Bialystoker
gegnvart (vicinity).

Once you start reading, you'll find it very hard to put down, because
in addition to the drama of before and during WW2, there is much local
color and history. Best of all, he names names. The only drawback,
in my opinion, is the lack of an index. Publisher is Harcourt, Brace
& Co., 1991; ISBN 0-15-146348-4. Enjoy, reminisce, and above all,
never forget.

B'shalom, Susan Pearlman
Nee Szejna-Dwera SZEJNMAN-KOSLOWSKY, in Bialystok, Poland
[also researching JASKOLKA, WISHNIATSKY]


Jewish Genealogical Society of Oregon, March 21st Monthly Meeting #general

Ronald D. Doctor <rondoctor@...>
 

The Jewish Genealogical Society of Oregon (JGSO) invites you, your family, and
friends to our March meeting.

Raising Atlantis: Restoring Jewish Heritage in Poland
A videotape of a presentation by
Yale Reisner

Date: Monday, March 21, 2005
Time: 7:30 pm to 9:30 pm
Place: Neveh Shalom Congregation
2900 Peaceful Lane
Portland, Oregon
(Beaverton-Hillsdale Highway/North on Dosch Rd/Right on Peaceful Lane)

This is a videotape of Yale Reisner's presentation to the Jewish Genealogy Society
of Long Island in May 2004. Yale is Founder and Director of the Ronald S. Lauder
Foundation's Genealogy Project at the Jewish Historical Institute in Warsaw,
Poland. Since 1994, he has assisted individuals and families in finding
information on their family roots. The Lauder Foundation, a non-profit Jewish
educational foundation, is active in 16 central and eastern European countries.
Yale has a degree in Eastern European Jewish Studies. Before moving to Poland, he
was involved with the YIVO Institute in New York and worked with the US National
Archives. He has lectured and published numerous articles on the future of
European Jewry in the US, Canada, France, and Poland. His presentation at the Long
Island JGS was one of several on his recent tour of the US. In these
presentations, Yale recounts tales of current Jewish life in Poland, and the
struggle of Poles and Jews alike to come to grips with their shared history.

This event is Free to JGSO members. Contributions at the door of $2 door are
requested >from non-members to help us defray the meeting cost. Contribution can be
deducted >from new membership if you join that evening.

It is time to renew your annual membership in JGSO. If you have not already done
so, please send your membership dues renewal check to JGSO, PO Box 19736,
Portland, Oregon 97280. Annual dues are $30 for Family Membership, $23 for
Individual Membership, and $10 for Student Membership. If you are not yet a member
of JGSO, won't you consider joining us?

The 170 page third edition of "Getting Started in Jewish Genealogy: A Handbook for
Beginners with Supplementary Information for Advanced Research" will be for sale
at the meeting. It is free to new members with paid membership, $12 to members in
good standing, and $18 to non-members. Also available for sale are copies of "The
JGSO CD-Rom". It is packed with useful information to help you develop your family
history. Cost is $15 for JGSO members and $25 for non-members.

To be placed on JGS of Oregon's e-mail distribution list, send an e-mail message
to rondoctor@earthlink.net. Once you are on the list, you will receive periodic
messages concerning Jewish genealogy. Your name and e-mail address will not be
distributed outside of JGS of Oregon.

For more information about JGSO and its activities, visit the JGSO web site at:
http://www.rootsweb.com/~orjgs <http://www.rootsweb.com/%7Eorjgs>;, or call Sandra
Shapiro at 503-694-5646.

The JGSO is affiliated with the International Association of Jewish Genealogical
Societies.
Ronald D. Doctor


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Jewish Genealogical Society of Oregon, March 21st Monthly Meeting #general

Ronald D. Doctor <rondoctor@...>
 

The Jewish Genealogical Society of Oregon (JGSO) invites you, your family, and
friends to our March meeting.

Raising Atlantis: Restoring Jewish Heritage in Poland
A videotape of a presentation by
Yale Reisner

Date: Monday, March 21, 2005
Time: 7:30 pm to 9:30 pm
Place: Neveh Shalom Congregation
2900 Peaceful Lane
Portland, Oregon
(Beaverton-Hillsdale Highway/North on Dosch Rd/Right on Peaceful Lane)

This is a videotape of Yale Reisner's presentation to the Jewish Genealogy Society
of Long Island in May 2004. Yale is Founder and Director of the Ronald S. Lauder
Foundation's Genealogy Project at the Jewish Historical Institute in Warsaw,
Poland. Since 1994, he has assisted individuals and families in finding
information on their family roots. The Lauder Foundation, a non-profit Jewish
educational foundation, is active in 16 central and eastern European countries.
Yale has a degree in Eastern European Jewish Studies. Before moving to Poland, he
was involved with the YIVO Institute in New York and worked with the US National
Archives. He has lectured and published numerous articles on the future of
European Jewry in the US, Canada, France, and Poland. His presentation at the Long
Island JGS was one of several on his recent tour of the US. In these
presentations, Yale recounts tales of current Jewish life in Poland, and the
struggle of Poles and Jews alike to come to grips with their shared history.

This event is Free to JGSO members. Contributions at the door of $2 door are
requested >from non-members to help us defray the meeting cost. Contribution can be
deducted >from new membership if you join that evening.

It is time to renew your annual membership in JGSO. If you have not already done
so, please send your membership dues renewal check to JGSO, PO Box 19736,
Portland, Oregon 97280. Annual dues are $30 for Family Membership, $23 for
Individual Membership, and $10 for Student Membership. If you are not yet a member
of JGSO, won't you consider joining us?

The 170 page third edition of "Getting Started in Jewish Genealogy: A Handbook for
Beginners with Supplementary Information for Advanced Research" will be for sale
at the meeting. It is free to new members with paid membership, $12 to members in
good standing, and $18 to non-members. Also available for sale are copies of "The
JGSO CD-Rom". It is packed with useful information to help you develop your family
history. Cost is $15 for JGSO members and $25 for non-members.

To be placed on JGS of Oregon's e-mail distribution list, send an e-mail message
to rondoctor@earthlink.net. Once you are on the list, you will receive periodic
messages concerning Jewish genealogy. Your name and e-mail address will not be
distributed outside of JGS of Oregon.

For more information about JGSO and its activities, visit the JGSO web site at:
http://www.rootsweb.com/~orjgs <http://www.rootsweb.com/%7Eorjgs>;, or call Sandra
Shapiro at 503-694-5646.

The JGSO is affiliated with the International Association of Jewish Genealogical
Societies.
Ronald D. Doctor


MENDELEWICZ-Sephardic but living in Belarus? #belarus

Alan Tapper <sabaalan@...>
 

Genners,

When I started researching the MENDELEWICZ family, some one told me
that they were related to the CARDOZA's >from Spain. I thought that
they were kidding me. But what I have found out surprised me. The
family had come >from a small shtetl near Slonim, Belarus called Byten
where they had lived for many years.

No one knows for sure why or where they came >from before that, but
thanks to a family scribe, Shmuel Meyer MENDELEWICZ, who related the
story of the family to a nephew just before he left to come to the
United States in 1901, the story lives on. Shmuel Meyer was 93 at that
time. It seems that Shmuel Meyer's grandfather was Rabbi Shmuel Meyer
MENDOZA. In 1777, he took the position of rabbi in Byten which was in
the Russian Empire, and he changed the name to MENDELOVICH which in
Polish is spelled MENDELEWICZ. Rabbi Shmuel Meyer MENDOZA's family had
lived in Kobryn since 1650 when Israel MENDOZA, a merchant, settled
there.

Why or how they got there I do not know. I can surmise, but that leads
to trouble unless one is lucky. You see that in Tuscany ( Italy) around
1600 Jews were welcomed and encouraged to be merchants. >from 1600 t0
1800 under the rule of the Medici Jewish family life was very good.
Trading was known to take place with Russia around 1650. One could
draw the conclusion that the MENDOZA family were merchants and in
expanding their business, a son, Israel MENDOZA, moved to Kobryn .

Oh yes, I did also find out that a marriage took place in 1802 between
Esther MENDOZA and a member of the CARDOZA family but I don't know if
Esther is in our family tree.

Alan Tapper
Fairfax, VA.

Researching:

MENDELOVICH, MENDELEWICZ, MENDELOWITZ >from Slonim, Baraonvichi and Byten
MENDOZA >from Kobryn, GORMAN >from Baranovichi
HOCHBERG and KATZ >from Iasi
TAPPER >from Snitkov
BURDMAN and FAHRER >from Tulchin
NEMIROVSKY >from Lipovets


Belarus SIG #Belarus MENDELEWICZ-Sephardic but living in Belarus? #belarus

Alan Tapper <sabaalan@...>
 

Genners,

When I started researching the MENDELEWICZ family, some one told me
that they were related to the CARDOZA's >from Spain. I thought that
they were kidding me. But what I have found out surprised me. The
family had come >from a small shtetl near Slonim, Belarus called Byten
where they had lived for many years.

No one knows for sure why or where they came >from before that, but
thanks to a family scribe, Shmuel Meyer MENDELEWICZ, who related the
story of the family to a nephew just before he left to come to the
United States in 1901, the story lives on. Shmuel Meyer was 93 at that
time. It seems that Shmuel Meyer's grandfather was Rabbi Shmuel Meyer
MENDOZA. In 1777, he took the position of rabbi in Byten which was in
the Russian Empire, and he changed the name to MENDELOVICH which in
Polish is spelled MENDELEWICZ. Rabbi Shmuel Meyer MENDOZA's family had
lived in Kobryn since 1650 when Israel MENDOZA, a merchant, settled
there.

Why or how they got there I do not know. I can surmise, but that leads
to trouble unless one is lucky. You see that in Tuscany ( Italy) around
1600 Jews were welcomed and encouraged to be merchants. >from 1600 t0
1800 under the rule of the Medici Jewish family life was very good.
Trading was known to take place with Russia around 1650. One could
draw the conclusion that the MENDOZA family were merchants and in
expanding their business, a son, Israel MENDOZA, moved to Kobryn .

Oh yes, I did also find out that a marriage took place in 1802 between
Esther MENDOZA and a member of the CARDOZA family but I don't know if
Esther is in our family tree.

Alan Tapper
Fairfax, VA.

Researching:

MENDELOVICH, MENDELEWICZ, MENDELOWITZ >from Slonim, Baraonvichi and Byten
MENDOZA >from Kobryn, GORMAN >from Baranovichi
HOCHBERG and KATZ >from Iasi
TAPPER >from Snitkov
BURDMAN and FAHRER >from Tulchin
NEMIROVSKY >from Lipovets