Date   

Will Photograph Gravestones in Warsaw #general

morilo@...
 

Dear Jewishgenners,

I will be in Warsaw for a few weeks in February and March.
I am offering to take digital photos of gravestones at the Jewish cemetery in
Warsaw and email them to you. (Of course I do not charge anything for taking the
photographs and emailing them to you).
Please respond to me privately.
Best,
Ilona Moradof
Maintal, Germany
morilo@...

Researching BROMBERG, Warsaw and Ostrow Mazowiecka; WISLICKI, Lublin and Warsaw;
SCHNECK/ SCHNEK, Lviv.


Email Archive #general

ben.forman <ben.forman@...>
 

Hey Genners

Just stumbled across this

http://soc.genealogy.jewish.newsgrouptopics.com/

seems all our emails appear her too if you ever need another way to search them.

Ben Forman


Argentine Immigration Help #general

Abuwasta Abuwasta
 

I would suggest searching Buenos Aires Jewish cemeteries which are online
http://www.amia.org.ar/difuntos.asp
Just type the name Golman and press buscar(search)and then you'll find Leon
(Leib???) Golman and a lady whose maiden name was Golman and a first name which
starts with B.
Jacob Rosen
Jerusalem


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Will Photograph Gravestones in Warsaw #general

morilo@...
 

Dear Jewishgenners,

I will be in Warsaw for a few weeks in February and March.
I am offering to take digital photos of gravestones at the Jewish cemetery in
Warsaw and email them to you. (Of course I do not charge anything for taking the
photographs and emailing them to you).
Please respond to me privately.
Best,
Ilona Moradof
Maintal, Germany
morilo@...

Researching BROMBERG, Warsaw and Ostrow Mazowiecka; WISLICKI, Lublin and Warsaw;
SCHNECK/ SCHNEK, Lviv.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Email Archive #general

ben.forman <ben.forman@...>
 

Hey Genners

Just stumbled across this

http://soc.genealogy.jewish.newsgrouptopics.com/

seems all our emails appear her too if you ever need another way to search them.

Ben Forman


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Argentine Immigration Help #general

Abuwasta Abuwasta
 

I would suggest searching Buenos Aires Jewish cemeteries which are online
http://www.amia.org.ar/difuntos.asp
Just type the name Golman and press buscar(search)and then you'll find Leon
(Leib???) Golman and a lady whose maiden name was Golman and a first name which
starts with B.
Jacob Rosen
Jerusalem


Re: Fertilitiy of Anglo-Dutch Jews, etc.--and origins of British Jews #general

Nick <tulse04-news@...>
 

"Sally Bruckheimer" <sallybru@...> wrote
There were plenty of Ashkenazi in the Netherlands >from the late 17th century on.
This is confirmed by
http://www.jewishvirtuallibrary.org/jsource/vjw/netherlands.html#jews. It says
that Ashkenazi Jews arrived in Amsterdam in 1620. They first came >from Germany and
later >from Eastern Europe.

According to the website they soon became numerically superior to the Sephardim.

Nick Landau
London, UK
COHNREICH (Anklam, Germany Krajenka, Poland) ATLAS (Wielkie Oczy (near
Lvov/Lemberg), Poland)
WECHSLER(Schwabach, Germany) KOHN (Wallerstein and Kleinerdlingen,Germany)
LANDAU/FREDKIN(Gomel, Mogilev, Belarus)


100 Shtetls of Ukraine #general

Marilyn F <mrl516@...>
 

Does anyone know if the book "One Hundred Shtetls of the Ukraine" has ever
been translated into English and if so where I can obtain a translated copy?. Many
of the Shtetl I am researching are listedi n their S. Podolia volume. Thanks for
your suggestions.
Marilyn Feingold, USA

MILGROM,KORMAN-Tulchin
SCHLAFFER, SZAFIR-Kamenka ( Moldova)
PEKARSKY/SOKOLOFSKY-Tashkent/Israel
STEINBERG/LERNER/ELKUS/MILGROM/Odessa
TESLER/MALAMUD/LUBER-Kamenka (Moldova)
ROSENTHAL-Worone/Pittsburgh


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Re: Fertilitiy of Anglo-Dutch Jews, etc.--and origins of British Jews #general

Nick <tulse04-news@...>
 

"Sally Bruckheimer" <sallybru@...> wrote
There were plenty of Ashkenazi in the Netherlands >from the late 17th century on.
This is confirmed by
http://www.jewishvirtuallibrary.org/jsource/vjw/netherlands.html#jews. It says
that Ashkenazi Jews arrived in Amsterdam in 1620. They first came >from Germany and
later >from Eastern Europe.

According to the website they soon became numerically superior to the Sephardim.

Nick Landau
London, UK
COHNREICH (Anklam, Germany Krajenka, Poland) ATLAS (Wielkie Oczy (near
Lvov/Lemberg), Poland)
WECHSLER(Schwabach, Germany) KOHN (Wallerstein and Kleinerdlingen,Germany)
LANDAU/FREDKIN(Gomel, Mogilev, Belarus)


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen 100 Shtetls of Ukraine #general

Marilyn F <mrl516@...>
 

Does anyone know if the book "One Hundred Shtetls of the Ukraine" has ever
been translated into English and if so where I can obtain a translated copy?. Many
of the Shtetl I am researching are listedi n their S. Podolia volume. Thanks for
your suggestions.
Marilyn Feingold, USA

MILGROM,KORMAN-Tulchin
SCHLAFFER, SZAFIR-Kamenka ( Moldova)
PEKARSKY/SOKOLOFSKY-Tashkent/Israel
STEINBERG/LERNER/ELKUS/MILGROM/Odessa
TESLER/MALAMUD/LUBER-Kamenka (Moldova)
ROSENTHAL-Worone/Pittsburgh


Re: "Vlach" or BLOCH #general

CharlesPottins
 

In the Balkans, people called Vlachs, or related names -Mavrovlachos, Black
Vlachs, in Greece, >from which also Morlacks, - have been dark-complexioned,
speaking a Latin language akin to Romanian, and traditionally semi-nomad, herding
sheep and goats in the mountain areas, or raising and selling horses.
Also recruited as soldiers by various regimes.
They lived in several countries, and various explanations were given for their
origins, such as the Roman legions who settled there >from varios countries.
Noel Malcolm in his history of Bosnia points to linguistic links with the ancient
Illyrians, and says "Vlach" was a term the incoming Slavs would have used for
people who spoke Latinate languages. The ones who had a mountain shepherding
lifestyle probably survived longer as a distinct people. Others intermarried and
became part of the nations among whom they lived.
But if any Jews acquired the name Wallach it is probably >from the region,
Wallachia, or perhaps by extension as a nickname for anyone who was dark,
"foreign" and travelled.

Charles Pottins


"Long Life" at Shivas: Post-script #general

Judith Romney Wegner
 

Dear JGenners:

Someone on this list who grew up in London asked me about the origina of the
Anglo-Jewish custom of wishing mourners "Long Life" at shivas. Alas, I haven't
the faintest idea; but now I am wondering if it could somehow be a sephardic
influence on Anglo-Jewish custom.
Here's why:

The Sephardic synagogue ritual has a charming practice whereby the congregation
wishes long life to each person who is called to the Torah. Not in English, of
course! What they actually do is chant a biblical verse (in a catchy little tune
I wish I could sing on e-mail) to each and every honoree right after he recites
the blessing following the Torah portion.

The verse is Proverbs 9:11 -- Ki vi yirbu yamekha, v'yosifu l'kha sh'not hayyim.
"For through Me your days shall increase and and years be added to your life."

So here's my question: Does anybody know whether Sephardim recite this same verse
to mourners at funerals or shivas? Because if so, I can easily imagine this
custom rubbing off on the first Dutch Ashkenazi immigrants to London, who followed
hard on the heels of the sephardim in the late 17th century, and I can see it
eventually becoming institutionalized as: "I wish you long life.".

Incidentally, the person who raised the question told me that her sister now
living in the Bronx has actually persuaded her rabbi to introduce this
Anglo-Jewish custom at funerals and shivas in that congregation! I guess that's a
pretty good start.....

Judith Romney Wegner


"I wish you long life" #general

Judith Romney Wegner
 

Dear JGenners,

I have just been struck by a completely different possibility for the source of
the English greeting to mourners: "I wish you long life. " (And this one does not
postulate sephardic influence).

The English expression could be a rough translation of the expression "le-orekh
yamim tovim" which is sometimes placed as an abbreviation: lamed aleph yod tet)
directly after the name of a person in the salutation at the beginning of the
letter. (The expression le-orekh yamim is found in some biblical books, mainly
Psalms and Proverbs as one might expect.

I used to do this routinely but haven't done it for years, so I had forgotten all
about until just now! The Hebrew expression means literally "[I wish you]
length of good days." So maybe that's where "I wish you long life" comes from?

Of course the use of L-'-Y-T in the salutation of letters is not something one
associates primarily with the Anglo-Jewish community as such. When I and others
began to use it, it was definitely an influence imported >from abroad when the
B'nei Akiva youth movement took root in England during WW2.

Judith Romney Wegner


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: "Vlach" or BLOCH #general

CharlesPottins
 

In the Balkans, people called Vlachs, or related names -Mavrovlachos, Black
Vlachs, in Greece, >from which also Morlacks, - have been dark-complexioned,
speaking a Latin language akin to Romanian, and traditionally semi-nomad, herding
sheep and goats in the mountain areas, or raising and selling horses.
Also recruited as soldiers by various regimes.
They lived in several countries, and various explanations were given for their
origins, such as the Roman legions who settled there >from varios countries.
Noel Malcolm in his history of Bosnia points to linguistic links with the ancient
Illyrians, and says "Vlach" was a term the incoming Slavs would have used for
people who spoke Latinate languages. The ones who had a mountain shepherding
lifestyle probably survived longer as a distinct people. Others intermarried and
became part of the nations among whom they lived.
But if any Jews acquired the name Wallach it is probably >from the region,
Wallachia, or perhaps by extension as a nickname for anyone who was dark,
"foreign" and travelled.

Charles Pottins


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen "Long Life" at Shivas: Post-script #general

Judith Romney Wegner
 

Dear JGenners:

Someone on this list who grew up in London asked me about the origina of the
Anglo-Jewish custom of wishing mourners "Long Life" at shivas. Alas, I haven't
the faintest idea; but now I am wondering if it could somehow be a sephardic
influence on Anglo-Jewish custom.
Here's why:

The Sephardic synagogue ritual has a charming practice whereby the congregation
wishes long life to each person who is called to the Torah. Not in English, of
course! What they actually do is chant a biblical verse (in a catchy little tune
I wish I could sing on e-mail) to each and every honoree right after he recites
the blessing following the Torah portion.

The verse is Proverbs 9:11 -- Ki vi yirbu yamekha, v'yosifu l'kha sh'not hayyim.
"For through Me your days shall increase and and years be added to your life."

So here's my question: Does anybody know whether Sephardim recite this same verse
to mourners at funerals or shivas? Because if so, I can easily imagine this
custom rubbing off on the first Dutch Ashkenazi immigrants to London, who followed
hard on the heels of the sephardim in the late 17th century, and I can see it
eventually becoming institutionalized as: "I wish you long life.".

Incidentally, the person who raised the question told me that her sister now
living in the Bronx has actually persuaded her rabbi to introduce this
Anglo-Jewish custom at funerals and shivas in that congregation! I guess that's a
pretty good start.....

Judith Romney Wegner


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen "I wish you long life" #general

Judith Romney Wegner
 

Dear JGenners,

I have just been struck by a completely different possibility for the source of
the English greeting to mourners: "I wish you long life. " (And this one does not
postulate sephardic influence).

The English expression could be a rough translation of the expression "le-orekh
yamim tovim" which is sometimes placed as an abbreviation: lamed aleph yod tet)
directly after the name of a person in the salutation at the beginning of the
letter. (The expression le-orekh yamim is found in some biblical books, mainly
Psalms and Proverbs as one might expect.

I used to do this routinely but haven't done it for years, so I had forgotten all
about until just now! The Hebrew expression means literally "[I wish you]
length of good days." So maybe that's where "I wish you long life" comes from?

Of course the use of L-'-Y-T in the salutation of letters is not something one
associates primarily with the Anglo-Jewish community as such. When I and others
began to use it, it was definitely an influence imported >from abroad when the
B'nei Akiva youth movement took root in England during WW2.

Judith Romney Wegner


Masons - One More Time #general

Sam Schleman <Samara99@...>
 

Since my last posting about the Masons about a week or so ago, I have learned
something that might be useful to anyone considering this as a potential research
source.

To my surprise, I discovered that an obit was run in the NY Times in 1925 for my
GGF, even though he was neither a captain of industry nor society - he was a
plumber. Evidently, back then the NY Times was a lot less selective as to whose
obit they ran than they are in more modern times. More to the point, it was
evidently a common practice that if the deceased was the member of the Masons, the
secretary of his particular lodge would place an obit in the Times, inviting the
brothers of his lodge to pay final respects. The key is that the obit mentions the
name and number of the lodge.

Since Masonic records are maintained by the lodge, this information is necessary
to obtain whatever records the Masons may have, which >from other posts, can
evidently vary >from not much to a great deal.

Suggest that anyone with a Masonic connection use Proquest, at least for NYC, and
see if you can find an obit with the lodge mentioned.

Happy hunting.

Sam Schleman
Malvern, PA
Samara99@...


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Masons - One More Time #general

Sam Schleman <Samara99@...>
 

Since my last posting about the Masons about a week or so ago, I have learned
something that might be useful to anyone considering this as a potential research
source.

To my surprise, I discovered that an obit was run in the NY Times in 1925 for my
GGF, even though he was neither a captain of industry nor society - he was a
plumber. Evidently, back then the NY Times was a lot less selective as to whose
obit they ran than they are in more modern times. More to the point, it was
evidently a common practice that if the deceased was the member of the Masons, the
secretary of his particular lodge would place an obit in the Times, inviting the
brothers of his lodge to pay final respects. The key is that the obit mentions the
name and number of the lodge.

Since Masonic records are maintained by the lodge, this information is necessary
to obtain whatever records the Masons may have, which >from other posts, can
evidently vary >from not much to a great deal.

Suggest that anyone with a Masonic connection use Proquest, at least for NYC, and
see if you can find an obit with the lodge mentioned.

Happy hunting.

Sam Schleman
Malvern, PA
Samara99@...


Passenger Lists, Veracruz, 1936 #general

Viviana Grosz-Gluckman <grosz_chai@...>
 

I am a member of H-Sig. I posted the question below to that group but since it is
a geeral question the moderator advised me to seek info here. I hope you can help
me:

I am trying to find out the passenger lists of the ship in which my father arrived
to the port of Veracruz in Mexico in 1936. I was able to obtain the name of 3
vessels that sailed >from the Port of Antwerp in that year (1936), but I have not
been successful in finding any other information regarding names of passengers.
Below I paste the info that was given to me to see if someone on the list can help
me.

(1936)14 September S.S. Saarland - destination Mexico
Hamburg - America Line

(1936)25 September S.S. Edam - destination Vera Cruz (Mexico)
Nederlandse - Amerikaanse Stoomvaartmaatschappij (Holland Amerka Line)

(1936)29 September "Orinoco" (Hapag Line) destination Vera Cruz - Tampico
(Mexico

Thanks,

Viviana Grosz-Gluckman
grosz_chai@...
New Jersey


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Passenger Lists, Veracruz, 1936 #general

Viviana Grosz-Gluckman <grosz_chai@...>
 

I am a member of H-Sig. I posted the question below to that group but since it is
a geeral question the moderator advised me to seek info here. I hope you can help
me:

I am trying to find out the passenger lists of the ship in which my father arrived
to the port of Veracruz in Mexico in 1936. I was able to obtain the name of 3
vessels that sailed >from the Port of Antwerp in that year (1936), but I have not
been successful in finding any other information regarding names of passengers.
Below I paste the info that was given to me to see if someone on the list can help
me.

(1936)14 September S.S. Saarland - destination Mexico
Hamburg - America Line

(1936)25 September S.S. Edam - destination Vera Cruz (Mexico)
Nederlandse - Amerikaanse Stoomvaartmaatschappij (Holland Amerka Line)

(1936)29 September "Orinoco" (Hapag Line) destination Vera Cruz - Tampico
(Mexico

Thanks,

Viviana Grosz-Gluckman
grosz_chai@...
New Jersey