Date   

Re: Los Angeles marriage query #general

Ted Gostin <tgostin@...>
 

Diana da Costa asked about Rabbi R. Farber and Congregation Sinai, now
Sinai Temple, in Los Angeles in 1913.

Sinai Temple, originally Congregation Sinai, was the first Conservative
congregation formed in Los Angeles, founded in 1906. There is a Wikipedia article
with a brief history. Diana asked about a 1913 marriage for her grandparents
performed by Rabbi Farber. The Los Angeles Public Library has digitized Los Angeles
County directories and made them available for free on their website; the list of
available years is at http://rescarta.lapl.org/ResCarta-Web/jsp/RcWebBrowse.jsp. 
The 1913 directory shows Rabbi Farber as the rabbi of Congregation
Sinai, then located at 1148 South Alvarado, a location confirmed in the
Wikipedia article on Sinai Temple. The congregation still exists today
and is, I believe, the largest Conservative congregation in Los Angeles.

Ted Gostin
Sherman Oaks, CA 91413-1321
tedgostin@generationspress.com

From: "Diana da Costa" <dianadacosta@btinternet.com>
My husband's maternal grandparents, both born in London UK, were married in
Los Angeles on 17 August 1913 by Rabbi Dr. R. FARBER. We have a copy of
their marriage certificate which states Rabbi Farber's synagogue to be _Sinai -
the word written before is unclear.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Los Angeles marriage query #general

Ted Gostin <tgostin@...>
 

Diana da Costa asked about Rabbi R. Farber and Congregation Sinai, now
Sinai Temple, in Los Angeles in 1913.

Sinai Temple, originally Congregation Sinai, was the first Conservative
congregation formed in Los Angeles, founded in 1906. There is a Wikipedia article
with a brief history. Diana asked about a 1913 marriage for her grandparents
performed by Rabbi Farber. The Los Angeles Public Library has digitized Los Angeles
County directories and made them available for free on their website; the list of
available years is at http://rescarta.lapl.org/ResCarta-Web/jsp/RcWebBrowse.jsp. 
The 1913 directory shows Rabbi Farber as the rabbi of Congregation
Sinai, then located at 1148 South Alvarado, a location confirmed in the
Wikipedia article on Sinai Temple. The congregation still exists today
and is, I believe, the largest Conservative congregation in Los Angeles.

Ted Gostin
Sherman Oaks, CA 91413-1321
tedgostin@generationspress.com

From: "Diana da Costa" <dianadacosta@btinternet.com>
My husband's maternal grandparents, both born in London UK, were married in
Los Angeles on 17 August 1913 by Rabbi Dr. R. FARBER. We have a copy of
their marriage certificate which states Rabbi Farber's synagogue to be _Sinai -
the word written before is unclear.


Svencionys District BOF at Conference #lithuania

Rhoda Miller
 

For Warsaw Conference Attendees!
Just a reminder to let you know that there will be a Svencionys BOF at
the conference on Monday, August 6 at 9:15am in the
Katowice-Boardroom. Towns in the Svencionys District Research Group
are:
Adutiskis
Daugeliskis
Ignalina
Kaltanenai Kamelishki(Belarus)
Kobyiniki
Linkmenys
Lyntupy (Belarus) Mielagenai
Narach (Belarus) Naujasis
Pabrade
Stajetiske
Svencionys Svencionelial
Svir (Belarus) Zhodzishki (Belarus) and nearby villages

Looking forward to seeing you in Warsaw!
Safe travel,
Rhoda Miller
Coordinator
Svencionys District Research Group of Litvak SIG

Researching: KOWALSKY (Utena, Svencionys, Kaltanenai, Vilna),
KOTLOWITZ (Orlya, Belarus)


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania Svencionys District BOF at Conference #lithuania

Rhoda Miller
 

For Warsaw Conference Attendees!
Just a reminder to let you know that there will be a Svencionys BOF at
the conference on Monday, August 6 at 9:15am in the
Katowice-Boardroom. Towns in the Svencionys District Research Group
are:
Adutiskis
Daugeliskis
Ignalina
Kaltanenai Kamelishki(Belarus)
Kobyiniki
Linkmenys
Lyntupy (Belarus) Mielagenai
Narach (Belarus) Naujasis
Pabrade
Stajetiske
Svencionys Svencionelial
Svir (Belarus) Zhodzishki (Belarus) and nearby villages

Looking forward to seeing you in Warsaw!
Safe travel,
Rhoda Miller
Coordinator
Svencionys District Research Group of Litvak SIG

Researching: KOWALSKY (Utena, Svencionys, Kaltanenai, Vilna),
KOTLOWITZ (Orlya, Belarus)


Re: ELKONES #lithuania

Matthew Klionsky <klionsky@...>
 

Just a speculation about the ELCHONES name. I haven't done any
specific research and I have no specific knowledge about this name,
but it is at least phonetically very similar to the name Elkins/Elkin
or Elkind. These exist in my family with earliest known origin near
Minsk (Borisov and Zembin). My understanding is that names that end
with the suffix -kind or -kin (meaning 'children of') usually are
appended to the first name of a woman/mother. Examples: Sorkin = child
of Sorah; Rivkin = child of Rivkah. If this holds for your name
(i.e., that Elchones is just a variant of Elkins), it could mean child
of Elisheva (or of Elka, or of Elli, or of any other EL... name.

Matthew Klionsky


1. ELCHONES

2. Re: ELCHONES - surname source and translation, please


----------------------------------------------------------------------


Subject: ELCHONES

From: Herbert Lazerow <lazer@sandiego.edu>

Date: Wed, 25 Jul 2018 12:44:10 -0700

X-Message-Number: 1


Would be grateful to know the source and meaning of the
surname ELCHONES, sometimes written as ELCHANES.>

According to Alexander Beider's A Dictionary of Jewish Surnames

from the Russian Empire (Avotaynu 1993), the surname Elkhanan is
adopted >from various forms of a similar given name first found in 2

Samuel 23:24. He specifically lists ELKHONES as one of those derived

forms. Usually, Beider states an area where the name is particularly

prominent, but he does not do that with this name.


Bert

--

Herbert Lazerow

Professor of Law, University of San Diego



----------------------------------------------------------------------


Subject: Re: ELCHONES - surname source and translation, please

From: G Sles <gsles@yahoo.com>

Date: Wed, 25 Jul 2018 21:23:57 +0000 (UTC)

X-Message-Number: 2


Greetings all,


Thank you for Shimon for pointing out that the names ELCHONES and

ELCHANES are based on the name Elkanah, husband of Biblical Hannah.


Here's info about him:

https://www.chabad.org/search/keyword_cdo/kid/11970/oq/Elkanah/jewish/Elkanah-Father-of-Samuel.htm


https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Elkanah


If anyone has additional insights, please respond to me privately.

Thank you.


Best,

Gay Slesinger

USA


from original post
Subject: ELCHONES - surname source and translation, please

Would be grateful to know the source and meaning of the surname

ELCHONES, sometimes written as ELCHANES. My relatives, with ancestors

by that name. say they lived in Lithuania,and possibly Hungary and

Romania. Descendants are known to be in France, Canada and the US.

People with that surname are in the Lithuania database.


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania Re: ELKONES #lithuania

Matthew Klionsky <klionsky@...>
 

Just a speculation about the ELCHONES name. I haven't done any
specific research and I have no specific knowledge about this name,
but it is at least phonetically very similar to the name Elkins/Elkin
or Elkind. These exist in my family with earliest known origin near
Minsk (Borisov and Zembin). My understanding is that names that end
with the suffix -kind or -kin (meaning 'children of') usually are
appended to the first name of a woman/mother. Examples: Sorkin = child
of Sorah; Rivkin = child of Rivkah. If this holds for your name
(i.e., that Elchones is just a variant of Elkins), it could mean child
of Elisheva (or of Elka, or of Elli, or of any other EL... name.

Matthew Klionsky


1. ELCHONES

2. Re: ELCHONES - surname source and translation, please


----------------------------------------------------------------------


Subject: ELCHONES

From: Herbert Lazerow <lazer@sandiego.edu>

Date: Wed, 25 Jul 2018 12:44:10 -0700

X-Message-Number: 1


Would be grateful to know the source and meaning of the
surname ELCHONES, sometimes written as ELCHANES.>

According to Alexander Beider's A Dictionary of Jewish Surnames

from the Russian Empire (Avotaynu 1993), the surname Elkhanan is
adopted >from various forms of a similar given name first found in 2

Samuel 23:24. He specifically lists ELKHONES as one of those derived

forms. Usually, Beider states an area where the name is particularly

prominent, but he does not do that with this name.


Bert

--

Herbert Lazerow

Professor of Law, University of San Diego



----------------------------------------------------------------------


Subject: Re: ELCHONES - surname source and translation, please

From: G Sles <gsles@yahoo.com>

Date: Wed, 25 Jul 2018 21:23:57 +0000 (UTC)

X-Message-Number: 2


Greetings all,


Thank you for Shimon for pointing out that the names ELCHONES and

ELCHANES are based on the name Elkanah, husband of Biblical Hannah.


Here's info about him:

https://www.chabad.org/search/keyword_cdo/kid/11970/oq/Elkanah/jewish/Elkanah-Father-of-Samuel.htm


https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Elkanah


If anyone has additional insights, please respond to me privately.

Thank you.


Best,

Gay Slesinger

USA


from original post
Subject: ELCHONES - surname source and translation, please

Would be grateful to know the source and meaning of the surname

ELCHONES, sometimes written as ELCHANES. My relatives, with ancestors

by that name. say they lived in Lithuania,and possibly Hungary and

Romania. Descendants are known to be in France, Canada and the US.

People with that surname are in the Lithuania database.


JRI-Poland at the Conference - Part 2 #poland

Mark Halpern
 

Dear Fellow Conference Goers:

This year the Conference is in our "court" in the ancestral homes for
our many volunteers and supporters. This year, JRI-Poland is a Platinum
Sponsor of the 38th IAJGS International Conference on Jewish Genealogy.

On Monday August 6th, JRI-Poland, the Polish State Archives, and the
Warsaw Conference Chairs have cooperated to bring you a day of
information to help researchers and to share plans for the future.

Here is the full lineup:

08:00 - 09:00 - National Digitization Project of Poland (National
Digital Archive of the Polish State Archive)
09:15 - 10:15 - Jewish Records Indexing - Poland: The Impact of Reaching
Critical Mass
10:30 - 11:00 - Collections of Jewish Interest at the Polish State
Archives - General Director Wojciech Wozniak
11:00 - 11:30 - Special Collections of the Lodz Branch of the Polish
State Archives
12:00 - 13:15 - JRI-Poland Luncheon – Speaker will be Mayor of
Ciechanowiec, Poland Miroslaw Reczko. We are sorry, but the luncheon is
Sold Out
13:30 - 14:00 - Galicianer Records at the Central Archives of Historical
Records in Warsaw (AGAD Archive)
14:00 - 14:30 - The Collections of the Rzeszow Branch of the Polish
State Archives
14:45 - 15:45 - Galicia Basics: What Every Galitzianer Needs to Know -
sponsored by Gesher Galicia
16:00 - 17:00 - Researching your Galitzianer Family: Working with Vital
Records - sponsored by JRI-Poland
17:00 - 17:45 - Meet & Greet Reception (Schmooze & Nosh) - JRI-Poland is
sponsoring a selection of all-Kosher pierogi and noshes for everyone
18:00 - 19:30 - Meet the Family: A Journey of a Thousand Years at POLIN
Museum: Pamela Weisberger Memorial Lecture sponsored by Jewish
Genealogical Society of Los Angeles - speaker is Barbara
Kirshenblatt-Gimblett, Chief Curator of the Core Exhibition at POLIN
Museum

I think you will all agree that this is a great lineup of programs.
JRI-Poland thanks the Polish State Archives, Gesher Galicia, and the
Jewish Genealogical Society of Los Angeles for their great programming.

And a really big thank you to the Warsaw Conference Lead Chair, the
Program Committee, and the other volunteers for organizing this day.

See you all soon.

Mark Halpern
JRI-Poland Conference Coordinator


JRI Poland #Poland JRI-Poland at the Conference - Part 2 #poland

Mark Halpern
 

Dear Fellow Conference Goers:

This year the Conference is in our "court" in the ancestral homes for
our many volunteers and supporters. This year, JRI-Poland is a Platinum
Sponsor of the 38th IAJGS International Conference on Jewish Genealogy.

On Monday August 6th, JRI-Poland, the Polish State Archives, and the
Warsaw Conference Chairs have cooperated to bring you a day of
information to help researchers and to share plans for the future.

Here is the full lineup:

08:00 - 09:00 - National Digitization Project of Poland (National
Digital Archive of the Polish State Archive)
09:15 - 10:15 - Jewish Records Indexing - Poland: The Impact of Reaching
Critical Mass
10:30 - 11:00 - Collections of Jewish Interest at the Polish State
Archives - General Director Wojciech Wozniak
11:00 - 11:30 - Special Collections of the Lodz Branch of the Polish
State Archives
12:00 - 13:15 - JRI-Poland Luncheon – Speaker will be Mayor of
Ciechanowiec, Poland Miroslaw Reczko. We are sorry, but the luncheon is
Sold Out
13:30 - 14:00 - Galicianer Records at the Central Archives of Historical
Records in Warsaw (AGAD Archive)
14:00 - 14:30 - The Collections of the Rzeszow Branch of the Polish
State Archives
14:45 - 15:45 - Galicia Basics: What Every Galitzianer Needs to Know -
sponsored by Gesher Galicia
16:00 - 17:00 - Researching your Galitzianer Family: Working with Vital
Records - sponsored by JRI-Poland
17:00 - 17:45 - Meet & Greet Reception (Schmooze & Nosh) - JRI-Poland is
sponsoring a selection of all-Kosher pierogi and noshes for everyone
18:00 - 19:30 - Meet the Family: A Journey of a Thousand Years at POLIN
Museum: Pamela Weisberger Memorial Lecture sponsored by Jewish
Genealogical Society of Los Angeles - speaker is Barbara
Kirshenblatt-Gimblett, Chief Curator of the Core Exhibition at POLIN
Museum

I think you will all agree that this is a great lineup of programs.
JRI-Poland thanks the Polish State Archives, Gesher Galicia, and the
Jewish Genealogical Society of Los Angeles for their great programming.

And a really big thank you to the Warsaw Conference Lead Chair, the
Program Committee, and the other volunteers for organizing this day.

See you all soon.

Mark Halpern
JRI-Poland Conference Coordinator


INTRO - researching GOLDBERG and WEINBERG family from Warsaw, Poland #germany

Liat Shira Goldberg <liatgold@...>
 

Hello GerSig,
I just joined the group. I have just started doing genealogy research &
I consider myself to be a beginner in doing German Jewish Genealogy research.
I live in Jerusalem. My native language is Hebrow and I also know English.
I consider myself an intermediate in
using a computer. My experience in using the Internet is limited.

I have identified the names of my
my great grandparents and of my great great
grandparents and of some aunts, uncles and nephews, as far as we know they
all got Killed at the Warsaw Geto, but we are hoping that maybe we are wrong.
After the war they were in Bnhehausen Jew camp and >from they were
transf erd to camp rochelle both in Germany.

My primary research goals now are to find out: Evrything that is possiable
about them and if any of the GOLDBERG's or WEINBERG's made it out of there
alive besides for my grandparents

My JGFF= Esearcher ID number is 799128.

The family names and ancestral towns that I have entered in the
JewishGen Family Finder are:GOLDBERG >from Warsaw ; WEINBERG >from Warsaw
but unfortunatly didn't find anything.
I'd appreciate any help and information you can provide me with.

Thank you very much.

Liat Shira Goldberg >from Jerusalem Israel liatgold@yahoo.com


German SIG #Germany INTRO - researching GOLDBERG and WEINBERG family from Warsaw, Poland #germany

Liat Shira Goldberg <liatgold@...>
 

Hello GerSig,
I just joined the group. I have just started doing genealogy research &
I consider myself to be a beginner in doing German Jewish Genealogy research.
I live in Jerusalem. My native language is Hebrow and I also know English.
I consider myself an intermediate in
using a computer. My experience in using the Internet is limited.

I have identified the names of my
my great grandparents and of my great great
grandparents and of some aunts, uncles and nephews, as far as we know they
all got Killed at the Warsaw Geto, but we are hoping that maybe we are wrong.
After the war they were in Bnhehausen Jew camp and >from they were
transf erd to camp rochelle both in Germany.

My primary research goals now are to find out: Evrything that is possiable
about them and if any of the GOLDBERG's or WEINBERG's made it out of there
alive besides for my grandparents

My JGFF= Esearcher ID number is 799128.

The family names and ancestral towns that I have entered in the
JewishGen Family Finder are:GOLDBERG >from Warsaw ; WEINBERG >from Warsaw
but unfortunatly didn't find anything.
I'd appreciate any help and information you can provide me with.

Thank you very much.

Liat Shira Goldberg >from Jerusalem Israel liatgold@yahoo.com


Re: rom-sig digest: July 25, 2018 #romania

Merle Kastner <merlebk18@...>
 

Dear Barbara, Michael and Emily,

Huge thanks for all the wonderful work you have
done and are doing and for continuing Rosanne's
and Bob Wascou's dedicated work!

Your plans for the Warsaw conference are excellent
and RomaniaSIG is very lucky to have you and we
are all very appreciative.

Merle (Romania SIG member since 1994)

Merle Kastner
Jewish Genealogical Society of Montreal
VP & Programming
merlebk18@gmail.com
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

-----Original Message-----
From: Romania SIG [mailto:rom-sig@lyris.jewishgen.org]
Sent: July-26-18 2:04 AM
To: rom-sig digest recipients
Subject: rom-sig digest: July 25, 2018

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Support the work of YOUR Romania-SIG with a contribution
to the JewishGen Romania SIG Funds
HELP US TO HELP YOU
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
ROM-SIG Digest for Wednesday, July 25, 2018.

1. New Iasi Marriage records now online (message 1 of 3)
2. Rom Sig Leadership announcements (message 2 of 3)
3. RomSig IAJGS Conference activities (message 3 of 3)
4. Jewishgen events at the Conference
5. Re: New Iasi Marriage records now online (message 1 of 3)

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: New Iasi Marriage records now online (message 1 of 3)
From: Barbara Hershey <barbara.hershey@comcast.net>
Date: Tue, 24 Jul 2018 22:47:02 -0700
X-Message-Number: 1

Very exciting news! Over 1000 additional marriage records >from Iasi (Jassy=
)

Romania have been uploaded and are available now in the Romanian database o=
n

Jewishgen. The new records are for these years:
1869
1871
1872
1878
1881
1882
1900

My great appreciation goes to Michael Moritz. Michael took some work I
found in
records that the former Sig coordinator, Bob Wascou, had received from
volunteers.
He pieced together the miscellaneous records found and compiled these for
submission to Jewishgen's database. Thanks to the transcribers who worked o=
n

these before the passing of Bob Wascou several years ago.

If you were one of the volunteers who worked on these records during the
time of
Bob Wascou's tenure with the Sig, please identify yourself to me. We do no=
t

have a clear list of the volunteers and would like to publicly acknowledge
you.

Search tips >from Michael Moritz:

A reminder when searching these Romanian records (among others in our
collection):
spelling on the Romanian records often differed >from that eventually used i=
n
the
US. For instance, most Romanian surnames that are Germanic in origin used
the
Germanic form in the US, but on Romanian records may appear very different.=

A
good example is Schwartz. In Romania, this name was transcribed in
countless
different ways, ranging >from Schwarz to Svarz to Sfart (with a diacritical
on the
s making a sh sound, and one on the t that made it a ts sound and thus
pronounced
like Schwartz). Another example is the name Rosenzweig, which could be on =

Romanian records as Rozintfaig (again with a diacritical on the t).

One final note on searching: in the old Romanian alphabet of the 19th
century,
there was a letter D with a diacritical under it that made the DZ sound.
This
was since replaced in the Romanian alphabet with a Z. Therefore, searching=

for
**any** names that have a Z sound in it, you should also search with the
letter D instead (for example, Leizer or Reiza could have been transcribed
as
Leider or Reida, or Feinsilber could have been transcribed as Faindilber;
and to
use the above Rosenzweig example, it could be written as Rodintfaig). So b=
e

creative in your searching and do not search only for exact matches.

Happy and successful searching!

Barbara Hershey
JewishGen Romanian SIG Coordinator

Portland, Oregon, USA


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Rom Sig Leadership announcements (message 2 of 3)
From: Barbara Hershey <barbara.hershey@comcast.net>
Date: Tue, 24 Jul 2018 22:50:16 -0700
X-Message-Number: 2

When I took over leadership of the Sig, my goal was to be sure we located
and
saved as many records as might have been on Bob=E2??s computer at the time =
of
his
sudden death. I did not want your efforts to be lost. His son, Danny
Wascou,
provided me what he was able to locate. I am thankful to those who came
before me
leading the Sig, Bob Wascou and Rosanne Leeson. If you still have any
records,
images or spreadsheets in your records, please let me know what you have if=

it is
not already in the database. My original goal with the Sig has been
accomplished.
While I am absolutely not an expert on Romania, I do have an interest in
moving
this group ahead.

***To that end, I am especially pleased that Michael Moritz and Emily Garbe=
r
have
agreed to join me as co-leaders of this Jewishgen Romanian Sig. We have ye=
t
to
determine our individual responsibilities and will inform you of that when =

agreements have been reached.***

We have a variety of other record sets waiting to be processed for inclusio=
n
in
the Romanian database. To accomplish this, we will likely name someone as
the
primary volunteer coordinator to determine where your interests and skills
match
with work we need to do. Let me know if you would like to work on more
records.
If you are familiar with Romanian language, please also identify that. I d=
o
have
the names of some of you who have contacted me in the last couple of years.=


We have many additional records >from Iasi and Bucharest. Bruce Reich is
continuing working on Bukovina records. We also have records waiting to be=

input
from several smaller communities. We are continuing to get donations of
some
records sets. With more volunteers, we can make these records freely
available to
everyone on Jewishgen. Even without knowing the language, with persistence
and
some tools we have created, anyone might be able to help with this project.=

Work
would progress more effectively with the assistance of others of you who
might
help with communications, website design, coordinating volunteers and more =

activities. Let us know how you would like to help.

Stay in touch and best wishes,

Barbara Hershey
Jewishgen RomSig Coordinator

Portland, Oregon, USA



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RomSig IAJGS Conference activities (message 3 of 3)
From: Barbara Hershey <barbara.hershey@comcast.net>
Date: Tue, 24 Jul 2018 22:51:34 -0700
X-Message-Number: 3

Jewishgen RomSig has several activities scheduled at the upcoming IAJGS
conference
in Warsaw. If you are interested in Romanian research, please join us for
all or
some.

Share Fair
Sig meeting
Marius Chelcu program
RomSig grab and go lunch

1. As announced in the previous message, thankfully, Emily Garber and
Michael
Moritz accepted my request that they join me as co-coordinators of the
Jewishgen
Rom-Sig. Emily and I will be at the conference. I will be at the Share
Fair on
Sunday afternoon and hope that Emily and our speaker, Marius Chelcu, will
join me
for at least part of that time. Please stop by and say hello.

2. The RomSig meeting will be Monday at 9:15 in Chelm-HM 8. It will be an=

opportunity to learn about our status and activities and to ask all of your=

questions. Answers will follow.

3. 1:30 on Monday, our invited guest, Marius Chelcu will be presenting
"Archives
from Romanian Moldavia: Sources for Jewish Genealogical and Demographic
Studies."
This is our first invited speaker in several years. Marius has a Ph.D. in
history
from the Al. I Cuza University in Iasi and works as a senior researcher at
the
A.D. Xenopol Institute of History in Iasi. In addition to his primary work=
,

Marius has been instrumental for many years in photographing the civil/vita=
l

records for the Iasi area on our behalf. These are the images that our
volunteers
have indexed and made available in the Jewishgen database. It is his first=

time
attending the conference and I invite you to join me in welcoming him. I
look
forward to some descriptions of the historic Moldavia region of Romania.
This
presentation is Monday afternoon in the Lublin-HM1 room.

4. We have scheduled an informal lunch on Tuesday at 12:00 in the Lublin-H=
M
1
room. Thanks to Diane Bark for organizing this event. Those of you who
ordered a
lunch through Diane will be able to pick them up in the room. I'm sure
Diane
would be happy to have some extra hands picking up the lunch boxes around
11:45.
Please contact her either through email or through the conference app to
make that
connection. If you did not pre-reserve the lunch with Diane, you are still=

very
welcome. Please bring your own lunch or just join us for conversation and
getting
to know each other.

I am looking for someone who will be able to take notes and write some
reflections
of our events at the conference. I've been reminded that people would
actually
like to read about it on this discussion list. Please let me know of your =

willingness to do so for the lunch or any of the other events. I'll even
help by
taking your notes and writing if you do not want to do so.

Best regards and looking forward to seeing those of you at the conference,

Barbara Hershey
RomSig Coordinator

Portland, Oregon, USA



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Jewishgen events at the Conference
From: barbara.hershey@comcast.net
Date: Tue, 24 Jul 2018 23:03:41 -0700
X-Message-Number: 4

Jewishgen is sponsoring the Meet and Greet reception (with treats) on
Wednesday
August 8 at 5 prior to the Annual Meeting at 6. All of you are invited to
attend
the meeting to hear the exciting announcements >from Jewishgen about their
latest
improvements.



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: New Iasi Marriage records now online (message 1 of 3)
From: LucR <luc.radu@verizon.net>
Date: Wed, 25 Jul 2018 13:03:14 -0400
X-Message-Number: 5

This is indeed good news for many people with ancestry >from Iasi, the
largest "Jewish" city in the Old Kingdom of Romania during the 19th
century.

I do have a comment on the transcriptions where it appears the "D" was
maintained instead of the normal "Z" (i.e. Leider instead of Leizer, etc.
)This belongs to a very different category than, for example, the multiple
spellings for Schwartz. In the latter case, many Jews actually had
official civil records listeing Sfart, Sfartz, etc. While the the "D" is
an archaic ( slavonic) construct which disappeared in later 1800s records.
Therefore would have been advisable to have it replaced by "Z" due to the
high frequency it shows up both in given names and surnames.


Luc Radu
Great Neck, NY

On 7/25/18, 1:47 AM, "Romania SIG on behalf of Barbara Hershey
barbara.hershey@comcast.net" <rom-sig@lyris.jewishgen.org> wrote:

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Very exciting news! Over 1000 additional marriage records >from Iasi
(Jassy)
Romania have been uploaded and are available now in the Romanian database
on
Jewishgen. The new records are for these years:
1869
1871
1872
1878
1881
1882
1900

My great appreciation goes to Michael Moritz. Michael took some work I
found in
records that the former Sig coordinator, Bob Wascou, had received from
volunteers.
He pieced together the miscellaneous records found and compiled these for
submission to Jewishgen's database. Thanks to the transcribers who worked
on
these before the passing of Bob Wascou several years ago.

If you were one of the volunteers who worked on these records during the
time of
Bob Wascou's tenure with the Sig, please identify yourself to me. We do
not
have a clear list of the volunteers and would like to publicly
acknowledge you.

Search tips >from Michael Moritz:

A reminder when searching these Romanian records (among others in our
collection):
spelling on the Romanian records often differed >from that eventually used
in the
US. For instance, most Romanian surnames that are Germanic in origin
used the
Germanic form in the US, but on Romanian records may appear very
different. A
good example is Schwartz. In Romania, this name was transcribed in
countless
different ways, ranging >from Schwarz to Svarz to Sfart (with a
diacritical on the
s making a sh sound, and one on the t that made it a ts sound and thus
pronounced
like Schwartz). Another example is the name Rosenzweig, which could be
on
Romanian records as Rozintfaig (again with a diacritical on the t).

One final note on searching: in the old Romanian alphabet of the 19th
century,
there was a letter D with a diacritical under it that made the DZ sound.
This
was since replaced in the Romanian alphabet with a Z. Therefore,
searching for
**any** names that have a Z sound in it, you should also search with the
letter D instead (for example, Leizer or Reiza could have been
transcribed as
Leider or Reida, or Feinsilber could have been transcribed as Faindilber;
and to
use the above Rosenzweig example, it could be written as Rodintfaig). So
be
creative in your searching and do not search only for exact matches.

Happy and successful searching!

Barbara Hershey
JewishGen Romanian SIG Coordinator

Portland, Oregon, USA



---

END OF DIGEST

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
IAJGS Conference in Warsaw registration:

Workshop, SIG Luncheons, and Banquet reservations are all open for
registration now on the conference website.

Don't miss the first IAJGS International Conference on Jewish Genealogy
to be held in Eastern Europe and our 38th overall! The Warsaw, Poland
Hilton Hotel & Conference Center will be the base for lectures, panels,
networking, and historic excursions and a unique Resource Village!

Mark your calendar for 5-10 August 2018 and visit iajgs2018.org for details=
=2E
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Watch JewishGen's video =96 click here:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3DnASSn4rDXh4
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
To send messages to ROM-SIG List: <rom-sig@lyris.jewishgen.org>.
ROM-SIG is a part of JewishGen: The Home of Jewish Genealogy.
Visit the ROM-SIG home page at < http://www.jewishgen.org/romsig >.
Search for previous archived messages at:
http://www.jewishgen.org/wconnect/wc.isa?jg~jgsys~sigspop

This list is supported by JewishGen. Become a contributor:
< http://www.jewishgen.org/jewishgen-erosity/contribute.html >.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
*** Sign up now for value-added services! ***
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen/ValueAdded.asp
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

For help in using JewishGen services visit the JewishGen Support Center at
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen/Support.htm
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~=
~
"Has JewishGen helped you connect with your family? We want to hear
your story! Please email us at info@JewishGen.org today."

This mailing may contain pointers to outside resources. No endorsement
is implied by their inclusion here.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Planning to use Ancestry.com? Start by using the "Ancestry Search Box"
on the JewishGen homepage.
By doing this, any eventual subscription to Ancestry.com will result in
Jewishgen receiving a commission.
It's an easy way to help JewishGen!
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
You are currently subscribed to rom-sig as: [merlebk18@gmail.com]
To change the format of our mailings, to stop/resume delivery (vacation),
or to unsubscribe, please go to http://lyris.jewishgen.org/ListManager


Romania SIG #Romania RE: rom-sig digest: July 25, 2018 #romania

Merle Kastner <merlebk18@...>
 

Dear Barbara, Michael and Emily,

Huge thanks for all the wonderful work you have
done and are doing and for continuing Rosanne's
and Bob Wascou's dedicated work!

Your plans for the Warsaw conference are excellent
and RomaniaSIG is very lucky to have you and we
are all very appreciative.

Merle (Romania SIG member since 1994)

Merle Kastner
Jewish Genealogical Society of Montreal
VP & Programming
merlebk18@gmail.com
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

-----Original Message-----
From: Romania SIG [mailto:rom-sig@lyris.jewishgen.org]
Sent: July-26-18 2:04 AM
To: rom-sig digest recipients
Subject: rom-sig digest: July 25, 2018

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Support the work of YOUR Romania-SIG with a contribution
to the JewishGen Romania SIG Funds
HELP US TO HELP YOU
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
ROM-SIG Digest for Wednesday, July 25, 2018.

1. New Iasi Marriage records now online (message 1 of 3)
2. Rom Sig Leadership announcements (message 2 of 3)
3. RomSig IAJGS Conference activities (message 3 of 3)
4. Jewishgen events at the Conference
5. Re: New Iasi Marriage records now online (message 1 of 3)

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: New Iasi Marriage records now online (message 1 of 3)
From: Barbara Hershey <barbara.hershey@comcast.net>
Date: Tue, 24 Jul 2018 22:47:02 -0700
X-Message-Number: 1

Very exciting news! Over 1000 additional marriage records >from Iasi (Jassy=
)

Romania have been uploaded and are available now in the Romanian database o=
n

Jewishgen. The new records are for these years:
1869
1871
1872
1878
1881
1882
1900

My great appreciation goes to Michael Moritz. Michael took some work I
found in
records that the former Sig coordinator, Bob Wascou, had received from
volunteers.
He pieced together the miscellaneous records found and compiled these for
submission to Jewishgen's database. Thanks to the transcribers who worked o=
n

these before the passing of Bob Wascou several years ago.

If you were one of the volunteers who worked on these records during the
time of
Bob Wascou's tenure with the Sig, please identify yourself to me. We do no=
t

have a clear list of the volunteers and would like to publicly acknowledge
you.

Search tips >from Michael Moritz:

A reminder when searching these Romanian records (among others in our
collection):
spelling on the Romanian records often differed >from that eventually used i=
n
the
US. For instance, most Romanian surnames that are Germanic in origin used
the
Germanic form in the US, but on Romanian records may appear very different.=

A
good example is Schwartz. In Romania, this name was transcribed in
countless
different ways, ranging >from Schwarz to Svarz to Sfart (with a diacritical
on the
s making a sh sound, and one on the t that made it a ts sound and thus
pronounced
like Schwartz). Another example is the name Rosenzweig, which could be on =

Romanian records as Rozintfaig (again with a diacritical on the t).

One final note on searching: in the old Romanian alphabet of the 19th
century,
there was a letter D with a diacritical under it that made the DZ sound.
This
was since replaced in the Romanian alphabet with a Z. Therefore, searching=

for
**any** names that have a Z sound in it, you should also search with the
letter D instead (for example, Leizer or Reiza could have been transcribed
as
Leider or Reida, or Feinsilber could have been transcribed as Faindilber;
and to
use the above Rosenzweig example, it could be written as Rodintfaig). So b=
e

creative in your searching and do not search only for exact matches.

Happy and successful searching!

Barbara Hershey
JewishGen Romanian SIG Coordinator

Portland, Oregon, USA


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Rom Sig Leadership announcements (message 2 of 3)
From: Barbara Hershey <barbara.hershey@comcast.net>
Date: Tue, 24 Jul 2018 22:50:16 -0700
X-Message-Number: 2

When I took over leadership of the Sig, my goal was to be sure we located
and
saved as many records as might have been on Bob=E2??s computer at the time =
of
his
sudden death. I did not want your efforts to be lost. His son, Danny
Wascou,
provided me what he was able to locate. I am thankful to those who came
before me
leading the Sig, Bob Wascou and Rosanne Leeson. If you still have any
records,
images or spreadsheets in your records, please let me know what you have if=

it is
not already in the database. My original goal with the Sig has been
accomplished.
While I am absolutely not an expert on Romania, I do have an interest in
moving
this group ahead.

***To that end, I am especially pleased that Michael Moritz and Emily Garbe=
r
have
agreed to join me as co-leaders of this Jewishgen Romanian Sig. We have ye=
t
to
determine our individual responsibilities and will inform you of that when =

agreements have been reached.***

We have a variety of other record sets waiting to be processed for inclusio=
n
in
the Romanian database. To accomplish this, we will likely name someone as
the
primary volunteer coordinator to determine where your interests and skills
match
with work we need to do. Let me know if you would like to work on more
records.
If you are familiar with Romanian language, please also identify that. I d=
o
have
the names of some of you who have contacted me in the last couple of years.=


We have many additional records >from Iasi and Bucharest. Bruce Reich is
continuing working on Bukovina records. We also have records waiting to be=

input
from several smaller communities. We are continuing to get donations of
some
records sets. With more volunteers, we can make these records freely
available to
everyone on Jewishgen. Even without knowing the language, with persistence
and
some tools we have created, anyone might be able to help with this project.=

Work
would progress more effectively with the assistance of others of you who
might
help with communications, website design, coordinating volunteers and more =

activities. Let us know how you would like to help.

Stay in touch and best wishes,

Barbara Hershey
Jewishgen RomSig Coordinator

Portland, Oregon, USA



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RomSig IAJGS Conference activities (message 3 of 3)
From: Barbara Hershey <barbara.hershey@comcast.net>
Date: Tue, 24 Jul 2018 22:51:34 -0700
X-Message-Number: 3

Jewishgen RomSig has several activities scheduled at the upcoming IAJGS
conference
in Warsaw. If you are interested in Romanian research, please join us for
all or
some.

Share Fair
Sig meeting
Marius Chelcu program
RomSig grab and go lunch

1. As announced in the previous message, thankfully, Emily Garber and
Michael
Moritz accepted my request that they join me as co-coordinators of the
Jewishgen
Rom-Sig. Emily and I will be at the conference. I will be at the Share
Fair on
Sunday afternoon and hope that Emily and our speaker, Marius Chelcu, will
join me
for at least part of that time. Please stop by and say hello.

2. The RomSig meeting will be Monday at 9:15 in Chelm-HM 8. It will be an=

opportunity to learn about our status and activities and to ask all of your=

questions. Answers will follow.

3. 1:30 on Monday, our invited guest, Marius Chelcu will be presenting
"Archives
from Romanian Moldavia: Sources for Jewish Genealogical and Demographic
Studies."
This is our first invited speaker in several years. Marius has a Ph.D. in
history
from the Al. I Cuza University in Iasi and works as a senior researcher at
the
A.D. Xenopol Institute of History in Iasi. In addition to his primary work=
,

Marius has been instrumental for many years in photographing the civil/vita=
l

records for the Iasi area on our behalf. These are the images that our
volunteers
have indexed and made available in the Jewishgen database. It is his first=

time
attending the conference and I invite you to join me in welcoming him. I
look
forward to some descriptions of the historic Moldavia region of Romania.
This
presentation is Monday afternoon in the Lublin-HM1 room.

4. We have scheduled an informal lunch on Tuesday at 12:00 in the Lublin-H=
M
1
room. Thanks to Diane Bark for organizing this event. Those of you who
ordered a
lunch through Diane will be able to pick them up in the room. I'm sure
Diane
would be happy to have some extra hands picking up the lunch boxes around
11:45.
Please contact her either through email or through the conference app to
make that
connection. If you did not pre-reserve the lunch with Diane, you are still=

very
welcome. Please bring your own lunch or just join us for conversation and
getting
to know each other.

I am looking for someone who will be able to take notes and write some
reflections
of our events at the conference. I've been reminded that people would
actually
like to read about it on this discussion list. Please let me know of your =

willingness to do so for the lunch or any of the other events. I'll even
help by
taking your notes and writing if you do not want to do so.

Best regards and looking forward to seeing those of you at the conference,

Barbara Hershey
RomSig Coordinator

Portland, Oregon, USA



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Jewishgen events at the Conference
From: barbara.hershey@comcast.net
Date: Tue, 24 Jul 2018 23:03:41 -0700
X-Message-Number: 4

Jewishgen is sponsoring the Meet and Greet reception (with treats) on
Wednesday
August 8 at 5 prior to the Annual Meeting at 6. All of you are invited to
attend
the meeting to hear the exciting announcements >from Jewishgen about their
latest
improvements.



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: New Iasi Marriage records now online (message 1 of 3)
From: LucR <luc.radu@verizon.net>
Date: Wed, 25 Jul 2018 13:03:14 -0400
X-Message-Number: 5

This is indeed good news for many people with ancestry >from Iasi, the
largest "Jewish" city in the Old Kingdom of Romania during the 19th
century.

I do have a comment on the transcriptions where it appears the "D" was
maintained instead of the normal "Z" (i.e. Leider instead of Leizer, etc.
)This belongs to a very different category than, for example, the multiple
spellings for Schwartz. In the latter case, many Jews actually had
official civil records listeing Sfart, Sfartz, etc. While the the "D" is
an archaic ( slavonic) construct which disappeared in later 1800s records.
Therefore would have been advisable to have it replaced by "Z" due to the
high frequency it shows up both in given names and surnames.


Luc Radu
Great Neck, NY

On 7/25/18, 1:47 AM, "Romania SIG on behalf of Barbara Hershey
barbara.hershey@comcast.net" <rom-sig@lyris.jewishgen.org> wrote:

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Very exciting news! Over 1000 additional marriage records >from Iasi
(Jassy)
Romania have been uploaded and are available now in the Romanian database
on
Jewishgen. The new records are for these years:
1869
1871
1872
1878
1881
1882
1900

My great appreciation goes to Michael Moritz. Michael took some work I
found in
records that the former Sig coordinator, Bob Wascou, had received from
volunteers.
He pieced together the miscellaneous records found and compiled these for
submission to Jewishgen's database. Thanks to the transcribers who worked
on
these before the passing of Bob Wascou several years ago.

If you were one of the volunteers who worked on these records during the
time of
Bob Wascou's tenure with the Sig, please identify yourself to me. We do
not
have a clear list of the volunteers and would like to publicly
acknowledge you.

Search tips >from Michael Moritz:

A reminder when searching these Romanian records (among others in our
collection):
spelling on the Romanian records often differed >from that eventually used
in the
US. For instance, most Romanian surnames that are Germanic in origin
used the
Germanic form in the US, but on Romanian records may appear very
different. A
good example is Schwartz. In Romania, this name was transcribed in
countless
different ways, ranging >from Schwarz to Svarz to Sfart (with a
diacritical on the
s making a sh sound, and one on the t that made it a ts sound and thus
pronounced
like Schwartz). Another example is the name Rosenzweig, which could be
on
Romanian records as Rozintfaig (again with a diacritical on the t).

One final note on searching: in the old Romanian alphabet of the 19th
century,
there was a letter D with a diacritical under it that made the DZ sound.
This
was since replaced in the Romanian alphabet with a Z. Therefore,
searching for
**any** names that have a Z sound in it, you should also search with the
letter D instead (for example, Leizer or Reiza could have been
transcribed as
Leider or Reida, or Feinsilber could have been transcribed as Faindilber;
and to
use the above Rosenzweig example, it could be written as Rodintfaig). So
be
creative in your searching and do not search only for exact matches.

Happy and successful searching!

Barbara Hershey
JewishGen Romanian SIG Coordinator

Portland, Oregon, USA



---

END OF DIGEST

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
IAJGS Conference in Warsaw registration:

Workshop, SIG Luncheons, and Banquet reservations are all open for
registration now on the conference website.

Don't miss the first IAJGS International Conference on Jewish Genealogy
to be held in Eastern Europe and our 38th overall! The Warsaw, Poland
Hilton Hotel & Conference Center will be the base for lectures, panels,
networking, and historic excursions and a unique Resource Village!

Mark your calendar for 5-10 August 2018 and visit iajgs2018.org for details=
=2E
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Watch JewishGen's video =96 click here:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3DnASSn4rDXh4
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
To send messages to ROM-SIG List: <rom-sig@lyris.jewishgen.org>.
ROM-SIG is a part of JewishGen: The Home of Jewish Genealogy.
Visit the ROM-SIG home page at < http://www.jewishgen.org/romsig >.
Search for previous archived messages at:
http://www.jewishgen.org/wconnect/wc.isa?jg~jgsys~sigspop

This list is supported by JewishGen. Become a contributor:
< http://www.jewishgen.org/jewishgen-erosity/contribute.html >.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
*** Sign up now for value-added services! ***
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen/ValueAdded.asp
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

For help in using JewishGen services visit the JewishGen Support Center at
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen/Support.htm
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~=
~
"Has JewishGen helped you connect with your family? We want to hear
your story! Please email us at info@JewishGen.org today."

This mailing may contain pointers to outside resources. No endorsement
is implied by their inclusion here.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Planning to use Ancestry.com? Start by using the "Ancestry Search Box"
on the JewishGen homepage.
By doing this, any eventual subscription to Ancestry.com will result in
Jewishgen receiving a commission.
It's an easy way to help JewishGen!
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
You are currently subscribed to rom-sig as: [merlebk18@gmail.com]
To change the format of our mailings, to stop/resume delivery (vacation),
or to unsubscribe, please go to http://lyris.jewishgen.org/ListManager


Re: New Iasi Marriage records now online (message 1 of 3) #romania

Monica Friedlander <monifriedlander@...>
 

I agree with Luc on this issue (D v. Z spelling). Unlike all other spelling
concerns, this one has nothing to do with transcription of Romanian sounds/letters
and only with political circumstances that influenced the spelling at the time.
(Romanian is not a Slavic language!)

The "d" spelling appears to be random, no different than if you replaced z with d
in English. (In fact, it's much worse in Romanian, which is a phonetic language.
A misspelling like this seems very much out of place.) So I concur it should all
be reverted to the correct (and current) spelling of the language to prevent
endless confusions.

I'd love to do a search of the records myself, since my paternal
great-grand-parents were married in Iasi around 1870 (give or take). I've never
done a search of these databases, so please advise how I may go about it.

Thanks,
Monica Friedlander

On Jul 25, 2018, at 10:03 AM, Luc Radu luc.radu@verizon.net <rom-sig@lyris.jewishgen.org> wrote:

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
This is indeed good news for many people with ancestry >from Iasi, the
largest "Jewish" city in the Old Kingdom of Romania during the 19th
century.

I do have a comment on the transcriptions where it appears the "D" was
maintained instead of the normal "Z" (i.e. Leider instead of Leizer, etc.
)This belongs to a very different category than, for example, the multiple
spellings for Schwartz. In the latter case, many Jews actually had
official civil records listeing Sfart, Sfartz, etc. While the the "D" is
an archaic ( slavonic) construct which disappeared in later 1800s records.
Therefore would have been advisable to have it replaced by "Z" due to the
high frequency it shows up both in given names and surnames.


Luc Radu
Great Neck, NY

On 7/25/18, 1:47 AM, "Romania SIG on behalf of Barbara Hershey
barbara.hershey@comcast.net" <rom-sig@lyris.jewishgen.org> wrote:

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Very exciting news! Over 1000 additional marriage records >from Iasi
(Jassy)
Romania have been uploaded and are available now in the Romanian database
on
Jewishgen. The new records are for these years:
1869
1871
1872
1878
1881
1882
1900

My great appreciation goes to Michael Moritz. Michael took some work I
found in
records that the former Sig coordinator, Bob Wascou, had received from
volunteers.
He pieced together the miscellaneous records found and compiled these for
submission to Jewishgen's database. Thanks to the transcribers who worked
on
these before the passing of Bob Wascou several years ago.

If you were one of the volunteers who worked on these records during the
time of
Bob Wascou's tenure with the Sig, please identify yourself to me. We do
not
have a clear list of the volunteers and would like to publicly
acknowledge you.

Search tips >from Michael Moritz:

A reminder when searching these Romanian records (among others in our
collection):
spelling on the Romanian records often differed >from that eventually used
in the
US. For instance, most Romanian surnames that are Germanic in origin
used the
Germanic form in the US, but on Romanian records may appear very
different. A
good example is Schwartz. In Romania, this name was transcribed in
countless
different ways, ranging >from Schwarz to Svarz to Sfart (with a
diacritical on the
s making a sh sound, and one on the t that made it a ts sound and thus
pronounced
like Schwartz). Another example is the name Rosenzweig, which could be
on
Romanian records as Rozintfaig (again with a diacritical on the t).

One final note on searching: in the old Romanian alphabet of the 19th
century,
there was a letter D with a diacritical under it that made the DZ sound.
This
was since replaced in the Romanian alphabet with a Z. Therefore,
searching for
**any** names that have a Z sound in it, you should also search with the
letter D instead (for example, Leizer or Reiza could have been
transcribed as
Leider or Reida, or Feinsilber could have been transcribed as Faindilber;
and to
use the above Rosenzweig example, it could be written as Rodintfaig). So
be
creative in your searching and do not search only


Romania SIG #Romania Re: New Iasi Marriage records now online (message 1 of 3) #romania

Monica Friedlander <monifriedlander@...>
 

I agree with Luc on this issue (D v. Z spelling). Unlike all other spelling
concerns, this one has nothing to do with transcription of Romanian sounds/letters
and only with political circumstances that influenced the spelling at the time.
(Romanian is not a Slavic language!)

The "d" spelling appears to be random, no different than if you replaced z with d
in English. (In fact, it's much worse in Romanian, which is a phonetic language.
A misspelling like this seems very much out of place.) So I concur it should all
be reverted to the correct (and current) spelling of the language to prevent
endless confusions.

I'd love to do a search of the records myself, since my paternal
great-grand-parents were married in Iasi around 1870 (give or take). I've never
done a search of these databases, so please advise how I may go about it.

Thanks,
Monica Friedlander

On Jul 25, 2018, at 10:03 AM, Luc Radu luc.radu@verizon.net <rom-sig@lyris.jewishgen.org> wrote:

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
This is indeed good news for many people with ancestry >from Iasi, the
largest "Jewish" city in the Old Kingdom of Romania during the 19th
century.

I do have a comment on the transcriptions where it appears the "D" was
maintained instead of the normal "Z" (i.e. Leider instead of Leizer, etc.
)This belongs to a very different category than, for example, the multiple
spellings for Schwartz. In the latter case, many Jews actually had
official civil records listeing Sfart, Sfartz, etc. While the the "D" is
an archaic ( slavonic) construct which disappeared in later 1800s records.
Therefore would have been advisable to have it replaced by "Z" due to the
high frequency it shows up both in given names and surnames.


Luc Radu
Great Neck, NY

On 7/25/18, 1:47 AM, "Romania SIG on behalf of Barbara Hershey
barbara.hershey@comcast.net" <rom-sig@lyris.jewishgen.org> wrote:

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Very exciting news! Over 1000 additional marriage records >from Iasi
(Jassy)
Romania have been uploaded and are available now in the Romanian database
on
Jewishgen. The new records are for these years:
1869
1871
1872
1878
1881
1882
1900

My great appreciation goes to Michael Moritz. Michael took some work I
found in
records that the former Sig coordinator, Bob Wascou, had received from
volunteers.
He pieced together the miscellaneous records found and compiled these for
submission to Jewishgen's database. Thanks to the transcribers who worked
on
these before the passing of Bob Wascou several years ago.

If you were one of the volunteers who worked on these records during the
time of
Bob Wascou's tenure with the Sig, please identify yourself to me. We do
not
have a clear list of the volunteers and would like to publicly
acknowledge you.

Search tips >from Michael Moritz:

A reminder when searching these Romanian records (among others in our
collection):
spelling on the Romanian records often differed >from that eventually used
in the
US. For instance, most Romanian surnames that are Germanic in origin
used the
Germanic form in the US, but on Romanian records may appear very
different. A
good example is Schwartz. In Romania, this name was transcribed in
countless
different ways, ranging >from Schwarz to Svarz to Sfart (with a
diacritical on the
s making a sh sound, and one on the t that made it a ts sound and thus
pronounced
like Schwartz). Another example is the name Rosenzweig, which could be
on
Romanian records as Rozintfaig (again with a diacritical on the t).

One final note on searching: in the old Romanian alphabet of the 19th
century,
there was a letter D with a diacritical under it that made the DZ sound.
This
was since replaced in the Romanian alphabet with a Z. Therefore,
searching for
**any** names that have a Z sound in it, you should also search with the
letter D instead (for example, Leizer or Reiza could have been
transcribed as
Leider or Reida, or Feinsilber could have been transcribed as Faindilber;
and to
use the above Rosenzweig example, it could be written as Rodintfaig). So
be
creative in your searching and do not search only


Re: New Iasi Marriage records now online (message 1 of 3) #romania

LucR <luc.radu@...>
 

This is indeed good news for many people with ancestry >from Iasi, the
largest "Jewish" city in the Old Kingdom of Romania during the 19th
century.

I do have a comment on the transcriptions where it appears the "D" was
maintained instead of the normal "Z" (i.e. Leider instead of Leizer, etc.
)This belongs to a very different category than, for example, the multiple
spellings for Schwartz. In the latter case, many Jews actually had
official civil records listeing Sfart, Sfartz, etc. While the the "D" is
an archaic ( slavonic) construct which disappeared in later 1800s records.
Therefore would have been advisable to have it replaced by "Z" due to the
high frequency it shows up both in given names and surnames.


Luc Radu
Great Neck, NY

On 7/25/18, 1:47 AM, "Romania SIG on behalf of Barbara Hershey
barbara.hershey@comcast.net" <rom-sig@lyris.jewishgen.org> wrote:

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Very exciting news! Over 1000 additional marriage records >from Iasi
(Jassy)
Romania have been uploaded and are available now in the Romanian database
on
Jewishgen. The new records are for these years:
1869
1871
1872
1878
1881
1882
1900

My great appreciation goes to Michael Moritz. Michael took some work I
found in
records that the former Sig coordinator, Bob Wascou, had received from
volunteers.
He pieced together the miscellaneous records found and compiled these for
submission to Jewishgen's database. Thanks to the transcribers who worked
on
these before the passing of Bob Wascou several years ago.

If you were one of the volunteers who worked on these records during the
time of
Bob Wascou's tenure with the Sig, please identify yourself to me. We do
not
have a clear list of the volunteers and would like to publicly
acknowledge you.

Search tips >from Michael Moritz:

A reminder when searching these Romanian records (among others in our
collection):
spelling on the Romanian records often differed >from that eventually used
in the
US. For instance, most Romanian surnames that are Germanic in origin
used the
Germanic form in the US, but on Romanian records may appear very
different. A
good example is Schwartz. In Romania, this name was transcribed in
countless
different ways, ranging >from Schwarz to Svarz to Sfart (with a
diacritical on the
s making a sh sound, and one on the t that made it a ts sound and thus
pronounced
like Schwartz). Another example is the name Rosenzweig, which could be
on
Romanian records as Rozintfaig (again with a diacritical on the t).

One final note on searching: in the old Romanian alphabet of the 19th
century,
there was a letter D with a diacritical under it that made the DZ sound.
This
was since replaced in the Romanian alphabet with a Z. Therefore,
searching for
**any** names that have a Z sound in it, you should also search with the
letter D instead (for example, Leizer or Reiza could have been
transcribed as
Leider or Reida, or Feinsilber could have been transcribed as Faindilber;
and to
use the above Rosenzweig example, it could be written as Rodintfaig). So
be
creative in your searching and do not search only for exact matches.

Happy and successful searching!

Barbara Hershey
JewishGen Romanian SIG Coordinator

Portland, Oregon, USA


Romania SIG #Romania Re: New Iasi Marriage records now online (message 1 of 3) #romania

LucR <luc.radu@...>
 

This is indeed good news for many people with ancestry >from Iasi, the
largest "Jewish" city in the Old Kingdom of Romania during the 19th
century.

I do have a comment on the transcriptions where it appears the "D" was
maintained instead of the normal "Z" (i.e. Leider instead of Leizer, etc.
)This belongs to a very different category than, for example, the multiple
spellings for Schwartz. In the latter case, many Jews actually had
official civil records listeing Sfart, Sfartz, etc. While the the "D" is
an archaic ( slavonic) construct which disappeared in later 1800s records.
Therefore would have been advisable to have it replaced by "Z" due to the
high frequency it shows up both in given names and surnames.


Luc Radu
Great Neck, NY

On 7/25/18, 1:47 AM, "Romania SIG on behalf of Barbara Hershey
barbara.hershey@comcast.net" <rom-sig@lyris.jewishgen.org> wrote:

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Very exciting news! Over 1000 additional marriage records >from Iasi
(Jassy)
Romania have been uploaded and are available now in the Romanian database
on
Jewishgen. The new records are for these years:
1869
1871
1872
1878
1881
1882
1900

My great appreciation goes to Michael Moritz. Michael took some work I
found in
records that the former Sig coordinator, Bob Wascou, had received from
volunteers.
He pieced together the miscellaneous records found and compiled these for
submission to Jewishgen's database. Thanks to the transcribers who worked
on
these before the passing of Bob Wascou several years ago.

If you were one of the volunteers who worked on these records during the
time of
Bob Wascou's tenure with the Sig, please identify yourself to me. We do
not
have a clear list of the volunteers and would like to publicly
acknowledge you.

Search tips >from Michael Moritz:

A reminder when searching these Romanian records (among others in our
collection):
spelling on the Romanian records often differed >from that eventually used
in the
US. For instance, most Romanian surnames that are Germanic in origin
used the
Germanic form in the US, but on Romanian records may appear very
different. A
good example is Schwartz. In Romania, this name was transcribed in
countless
different ways, ranging >from Schwarz to Svarz to Sfart (with a
diacritical on the
s making a sh sound, and one on the t that made it a ts sound and thus
pronounced
like Schwartz). Another example is the name Rosenzweig, which could be
on
Romanian records as Rozintfaig (again with a diacritical on the t).

One final note on searching: in the old Romanian alphabet of the 19th
century,
there was a letter D with a diacritical under it that made the DZ sound.
This
was since replaced in the Romanian alphabet with a Z. Therefore,
searching for
**any** names that have a Z sound in it, you should also search with the
letter D instead (for example, Leizer or Reiza could have been
transcribed as
Leider or Reida, or Feinsilber could have been transcribed as Faindilber;
and to
use the above Rosenzweig example, it could be written as Rodintfaig). So
be
creative in your searching and do not search only for exact matches.

Happy and successful searching!

Barbara Hershey
JewishGen Romanian SIG Coordinator

Portland, Oregon, USA


Jewish records of Garamszentkereszt - Ziar nad Hronom #hungary

vdw_jonathan@...
 

Hello,

I would like to locate the record of a marriage which supposedly took place in
Garamszentkereszt (now Ziar nad Hronom in Slovakia, if I am not mistaken) around
1890. However, I couldn't find the Jewish records of this town on Familysearch.
Does anyone know if these records are available online? Or are these records part
of records of another town nearby?

Thank you!

Jonathan Vandewiele

Moderator: Have you checked the JewishGen Hungary database? What are the names of
the couple? were they both born in Garamszentkereszt? I the couple were >from different
towns the marriage may have been recorded in more than one town.


Hungary SIG #Hungary Jewish records of Garamszentkereszt - Ziar nad Hronom #hungary

vdw_jonathan@...
 

Hello,

I would like to locate the record of a marriage which supposedly took place in
Garamszentkereszt (now Ziar nad Hronom in Slovakia, if I am not mistaken) around
1890. However, I couldn't find the Jewish records of this town on Familysearch.
Does anyone know if these records are available online? Or are these records part
of records of another town nearby?

Thank you!

Jonathan Vandewiele

Moderator: Have you checked the JewishGen Hungary database? What are the names of
the couple? were they both born in Garamszentkereszt? I the couple were >from different
towns the marriage may have been recorded in more than one town.


Pavel Kral death #hungary

lilotmoorman@...
 

Dear Siggers,
I have sad news for the many Siggers whose lives were touched by Pavel Kral/Kalmar.
Pavel survived the Holocaust of Slovakian Jews in Bytca as a teen age resistance fighter, and then made it his lifeâ??s work to insure that the Jews of Bytca would not be forgotten. He self-published a comprehensive illustrated record of the cityâ??s Jewish community which was translated into four languages. Copies have become part of the Yad Vashem and U.S. Holocaust Museum archives, and are available there for researchers.
Pavel also created a mind-boggling documented genealogy of his two ancestral lines, the Kalmar/Kohn and Leimdorfer families, going back to the sixteenth century. It has become an invaluable resource for researchers of Slovakian/Hungarian origin.
Pavel died in Prague on June 25 at the age of 92.

Lilot Moorman
Atlanta, GA


Hungary SIG #Hungary Pavel Kral death #hungary

lilotmoorman@...
 

Dear Siggers,
I have sad news for the many Siggers whose lives were touched by Pavel Kral/Kalmar.
Pavel survived the Holocaust of Slovakian Jews in Bytca as a teen age resistance fighter, and then made it his lifeâ??s work to insure that the Jews of Bytca would not be forgotten. He self-published a comprehensive illustrated record of the cityâ??s Jewish community which was translated into four languages. Copies have become part of the Yad Vashem and U.S. Holocaust Museum archives, and are available there for researchers.
Pavel also created a mind-boggling documented genealogy of his two ancestral lines, the Kalmar/Kohn and Leimdorfer families, going back to the sixteenth century. It has become an invaluable resource for researchers of Slovakian/Hungarian origin.
Pavel died in Prague on June 25 at the age of 92.

Lilot Moorman
Atlanta, GA

38981 - 39000 of 659860