Date   

Re: WWI Alien Registration: Russian immigrants #general

Tom Chatt
 

Russia required all male Russian immigrants in USA and Canada to register
at a Russian Consulate during WWI. Not sure if they did the same during
the Russo-Japanese War. These can be located through the American Society
of Germans >from Russia Historical Society.

I tried to find this reference on their website, http://www.ahsgr.org,
but couldn't locate it. Can you give more details?
I too was unable to find this on the ahsgr.org website. However, I did find some
very useful information about Russian consular records here:
http://www.rootsweb.com/~mafsocna/russian.htm

They don't specifically mention this military registration. The site says:
"The content of the files which have greatest value to genealogists include
nationality certificates, passport and visa applications and correspondence,
passports, correspondence on matters of inheritance, Red Cross reports on missing
persons, financial records including money transfers to relatives still in Russia,
correspondence of emigrants seeking family members still in Russia; questions of
military service; and business dealings of emigrants."

If these military registration records existed at the consulate as described, they
would be found in this resource. The website describes how the US National
Archives happened to come by the complete records of the Russian US consulates.

Cheers,
Tom Chatt
Los Angeles, CA


Re: Family Reunion #france

DebWE308@...
 

Dear Genners,
Thank you all for the great advice that you gave me for organizing for my family
reunion! In the beginning some of my closer relatives were skeptical. But since
I've begun to contact the extended family, these relatives are so happy to
contribute information that I am thankful that I have "unlimited" long distance
phone service. It seems that most people would rather talk than write. And I have
learned some new interesting facts about my family. I am planning the reunion for
next summer.

Debbie Wang Etzion
Great Neck, NY
SCHECHTER, NIKIPROVETSKY, GELWARG >from Tyvrov, Trostinets, Vinnitza area.
SALTZMAN >from Pinsk


Re: ytandv digest: September 07, 2004 #yiddish

Gene Warech <operawriter@...>
 

The Album is available at UC Santa Barbara main library,
non-circulating (thus always there).
Gene Warech

Michelle Chernikoff Anderson wrote:
"I found my great grandfather (Morris Nasatir) listed in the online
index of the Album of the Yiddish Theatre. I would love to be able to see
this. Does anyone know where I can view it in Southern California?"


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen RE: WWI Alien Registration: Russian immigrants #general

Tom Chatt
 

Russia required all male Russian immigrants in USA and Canada to register
at a Russian Consulate during WWI. Not sure if they did the same during
the Russo-Japanese War. These can be located through the American Society
of Germans >from Russia Historical Society.

I tried to find this reference on their website, http://www.ahsgr.org,
but couldn't locate it. Can you give more details?
I too was unable to find this on the ahsgr.org website. However, I did find some
very useful information about Russian consular records here:
http://www.rootsweb.com/~mafsocna/russian.htm

They don't specifically mention this military registration. The site says:
"The content of the files which have greatest value to genealogists include
nationality certificates, passport and visa applications and correspondence,
passports, correspondence on matters of inheritance, Red Cross reports on missing
persons, financial records including money transfers to relatives still in Russia,
correspondence of emigrants seeking family members still in Russia; questions of
military service; and business dealings of emigrants."

If these military registration records existed at the consulate as described, they
would be found in this resource. The website describes how the US National
Archives happened to come by the complete records of the Russian US consulates.

Cheers,
Tom Chatt
Los Angeles, CA


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Family Reunion #general

DebWE308@...
 

Dear Genners,
Thank you all for the great advice that you gave me for organizing for my family
reunion! In the beginning some of my closer relatives were skeptical. But since
I've begun to contact the extended family, these relatives are so happy to
contribute information that I am thankful that I have "unlimited" long distance
phone service. It seems that most people would rather talk than write. And I have
learned some new interesting facts about my family. I am planning the reunion for
next summer.

Debbie Wang Etzion
Great Neck, NY
SCHECHTER, NIKIPROVETSKY, GELWARG >from Tyvrov, Trostinets, Vinnitza area.
SALTZMAN >from Pinsk


Yiddish Theatre and Vadeville #YiddishTheatre Re: ytandv digest: September 07, 2004 #yiddish

Gene Warech <operawriter@...>
 

The Album is available at UC Santa Barbara main library,
non-circulating (thus always there).
Gene Warech

Michelle Chernikoff Anderson wrote:
"I found my great grandfather (Morris Nasatir) listed in the online
index of the Album of the Yiddish Theatre. I would love to be able to see
this. Does anyone know where I can view it in Southern California?"


Re: When Can Immigrants Change Name? #general

Judith Romney Wegner
 

Tom Chatt wrote:

In the case of my own great-grandparents, whose surname was BRAUTMAN, they just
simply started using the name BRANTMAN instead over time. I suppose they thought
it was easier to pronounce.
Dear Tom,

The motivation for this particular name change is self-evident -- and typical of
the linguistic process by which such surname changes occurred. I would guess that
it was the line of least resistance and probably occurred as follows:

English-speaking readers of the unfamiliar German name BRAUTMAN -- especially if
encountered in handwriting -- are virtually certain to misread it as BRANTMAN for
two reasons: (l) in the English language the combination "ANT" is far more
frequent than the combination "AUT" (especially in the middle of a word) and (2)
the handwritten letters "n" and "u" are easily confused. (We've all that that
experience when trying to read surnames on handwritten census forms!)

My guess is that officials and other strangers were constantly addressing them as
Brantman, and in the end they just gave up and adopted it as the line of least
resistance.

So now, Tom, I am wondering whether your own surname CHATT was originally CHAIT
(which is far more common among Jews and would illustrate exactly the same
linguistic process).

Judith Romney Wegner
jrw@brown.edu


Re: When Can Immigrants Change Name? #general

Linda Altman <altmanlh@...>
 

I have read many times that immigrants names were not changed at Ellis Island.
However, I would like to see more of a discussion about changing names. I have
a grandparent who, it is said changed his name after he left Russia in 1901.
But when could that have occurred?
Anytime after he left Russia

As I understand it, you need to "register" to leave your town (and that records
exist documenting this), and I would assume to do that you had to use your real
name.
I had a relative Abe Loewenthal, who deserted the Russian army in 1905. He did not
register with anyone, he just left in a hurry.

Once you got to the ship you were taking, did you have to show papers that
proved that the name you provided was your real name or could you give a false
name at this point?
I think it was way easier back then to use a fake name or falsified papers. You
had to be the person on the ticket, but it appears that they were not all that
particular about proving who you were. They were more concerned about infectious
diseases and having you refused entry into the US as the shipping companies were
responsible for the return voyage.

Once you were in the country, could you just start using another name at the
turn of the 20th century?
Sure could. No Social Security Cards etc. One of my families surname was Cybula
and Cybulac in Poland. It became Smith in NY by most of them except for Harry. He
kept it as Cibula. The other side of my family Doherty is spelled as Doherty,
Doughtery, and O'Doherty. The O' Doherty was not allowed in Ireland at the time
(English rule prohibited the use of the O').

Bottom line, for those of us who wish to find our ancestors in the Old Country,
how can we connect to the old name?
Find everything you can about them here in the US. Find them, find their friends,
aquaintences, other relatives, spouses, witnesses to marriages etc. Document them
until there are no more documents to find. You will come across the surname
eventually. For me, it was the connection of being told that the surname was a
loose translation of the Polish word for onion. So I went to a Polish dictionary
to lookup how onion was spelled in Polish. Hit paydirt shortly after that.

Linda Altman


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen RE: When Can Immigrants Change Name? #general

Judith Romney Wegner
 

Tom Chatt wrote:

In the case of my own great-grandparents, whose surname was BRAUTMAN, they just
simply started using the name BRANTMAN instead over time. I suppose they thought
it was easier to pronounce.
Dear Tom,

The motivation for this particular name change is self-evident -- and typical of
the linguistic process by which such surname changes occurred. I would guess that
it was the line of least resistance and probably occurred as follows:

English-speaking readers of the unfamiliar German name BRAUTMAN -- especially if
encountered in handwriting -- are virtually certain to misread it as BRANTMAN for
two reasons: (l) in the English language the combination "ANT" is far more
frequent than the combination "AUT" (especially in the middle of a word) and (2)
the handwritten letters "n" and "u" are easily confused. (We've all that that
experience when trying to read surnames on handwritten census forms!)

My guess is that officials and other strangers were constantly addressing them as
Brantman, and in the end they just gave up and adopted it as the line of least
resistance.

So now, Tom, I am wondering whether your own surname CHATT was originally CHAIT
(which is far more common among Jews and would illustrate exactly the same
linguistic process).

Judith Romney Wegner
jrw@brown.edu


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: When Can Immigrants Change Name? #general

Linda Altman <altmanlh@...>
 

I have read many times that immigrants names were not changed at Ellis Island.
However, I would like to see more of a discussion about changing names. I have
a grandparent who, it is said changed his name after he left Russia in 1901.
But when could that have occurred?
Anytime after he left Russia

As I understand it, you need to "register" to leave your town (and that records
exist documenting this), and I would assume to do that you had to use your real
name.
I had a relative Abe Loewenthal, who deserted the Russian army in 1905. He did not
register with anyone, he just left in a hurry.

Once you got to the ship you were taking, did you have to show papers that
proved that the name you provided was your real name or could you give a false
name at this point?
I think it was way easier back then to use a fake name or falsified papers. You
had to be the person on the ticket, but it appears that they were not all that
particular about proving who you were. They were more concerned about infectious
diseases and having you refused entry into the US as the shipping companies were
responsible for the return voyage.

Once you were in the country, could you just start using another name at the
turn of the 20th century?
Sure could. No Social Security Cards etc. One of my families surname was Cybula
and Cybulac in Poland. It became Smith in NY by most of them except for Harry. He
kept it as Cibula. The other side of my family Doherty is spelled as Doherty,
Doughtery, and O'Doherty. The O' Doherty was not allowed in Ireland at the time
(English rule prohibited the use of the O').

Bottom line, for those of us who wish to find our ancestors in the Old Country,
how can we connect to the old name?
Find everything you can about them here in the US. Find them, find their friends,
aquaintences, other relatives, spouses, witnesses to marriages etc. Document them
until there are no more documents to find. You will come across the surname
eventually. For me, it was the connection of being told that the surname was a
loose translation of the Polish word for onion. So I went to a Polish dictionary
to lookup how onion was spelled in Polish. Hit paydirt shortly after that.

Linda Altman


JGSNY September 12th meeting #general

Gloria Berkenstat <gitl_leah@...>
 

On Sunday, September 12th at 2 pm, the Jewish Genealogical Society of New York
will present Stanley M. Diamond, founder of Jewish Records Indexing-Poland(JRI-
Poland), a project to index all of the Jewish vital records in pre-World War Two
Poland. He will discuss how he has combined genetic, medical and genealogical
research in documenting the Beta-Thalassemia trait in his extended family and the
different methods and special responsibilities involved in this research.

Stanley Diamond began his genealogical research to document the incidence of the
Beta-Thalassemia trait that causes an inherited blood disorder that can cause
anemia. His interest in genealogical research related genetics was instrumental
in the creation of JRI-Poland.

The meetings of the Jewish Genealogical Society of New York take place at the
Center for Jewish History located at 15 West 16th Street between 5th and 6th
Avenues. The Center's Genealogy Institute will be open >from 12:30 to 2:00 on
September 12th for networking with other researchers and access to resource
materials and computers.

There is no entry fee for JGSNY members; the fee for non-members is $3.

For more information contact the Jewish Genealogical Society at info@jgsny.org or
call 212-294-8326.

Gloria Berkenstat Freund
New York, NY
JGSNY Program VP


Re: When Can Immigrants Change Name? #general

Leslie Weinberg <artsoul@...>
 

Very difficult to trace names. As far as I know, my grandparents did not have to
show anything with their names. I know that my grandfather came here as "Markus"
and changed his name to Max. My grandmother was "Adeline" and changed it to
Adele. Neither did this in any legal way, they just started using the names. My
other grandfather and his brothers came here as last name "Danskoy" and when one
of the brothers got married, they decided they didn't like the name, and they all
changed it to Dann. They all "Americanized" their first names - Mordsche became
Max, etc, and this, I know, was never done through legal channels. This was many
years after they arrived, and I do not know whether there was any legal paperwork
involved in the last name change.
Leslie Weinberg

Mara Fein wrote:

Once you were in the country, could you just start using another name at
the turn of the 20th century?

Bottom line, for those of us who wish to find our ancestors in the Old
Country, how can we connect to the old name?


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen JGSNY September 12th meeting #general

Gloria Berkenstat <gitl_leah@...>
 

On Sunday, September 12th at 2 pm, the Jewish Genealogical Society of New York
will present Stanley M. Diamond, founder of Jewish Records Indexing-Poland(JRI-
Poland), a project to index all of the Jewish vital records in pre-World War Two
Poland. He will discuss how he has combined genetic, medical and genealogical
research in documenting the Beta-Thalassemia trait in his extended family and the
different methods and special responsibilities involved in this research.

Stanley Diamond began his genealogical research to document the incidence of the
Beta-Thalassemia trait that causes an inherited blood disorder that can cause
anemia. His interest in genealogical research related genetics was instrumental
in the creation of JRI-Poland.

The meetings of the Jewish Genealogical Society of New York take place at the
Center for Jewish History located at 15 West 16th Street between 5th and 6th
Avenues. The Center's Genealogy Institute will be open >from 12:30 to 2:00 on
September 12th for networking with other researchers and access to resource
materials and computers.

There is no entry fee for JGSNY members; the fee for non-members is $3.

For more information contact the Jewish Genealogical Society at info@jgsny.org or
call 212-294-8326.

Gloria Berkenstat Freund
New York, NY
JGSNY Program VP


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: When Can Immigrants Change Name? #general

Leslie Weinberg <artsoul@...>
 

Very difficult to trace names. As far as I know, my grandparents did not have to
show anything with their names. I know that my grandfather came here as "Markus"
and changed his name to Max. My grandmother was "Adeline" and changed it to
Adele. Neither did this in any legal way, they just started using the names. My
other grandfather and his brothers came here as last name "Danskoy" and when one
of the brothers got married, they decided they didn't like the name, and they all
changed it to Dann. They all "Americanized" their first names - Mordsche became
Max, etc, and this, I know, was never done through legal channels. This was many
years after they arrived, and I do not know whether there was any legal paperwork
involved in the last name change.
Leslie Weinberg

Mara Fein wrote:

Once you were in the country, could you just start using another name at
the turn of the 20th century?

Bottom line, for those of us who wish to find our ancestors in the Old
Country, how can we connect to the old name?


Intro to Jewish Genealogy, Center for Jewish History, NYC #general

Robert Friedman <rfriedman@...>
 

The Center for Jewish History Genealogy Institute
Fall 2004 Workshop Schedule

[Please excuse cross-posting to multiple lists]

Introduction to Jewish Genealogy
11:00 am - 12:30 pm
October 12
November 11
December 8

A one-hour presentation covers general principles and procedures of family history
research, with ample time allowed for questions and answers. Beginning steps
include oral history, "family archives" containing treasured photographs and
documents, and selected Internet sites. Most information, however, must still be
gleaned >from source documents such as the US census, immigration and
naturalization papers, vital records, cemetery and funeral home records,
newspapers, city directories, and telephone books. Special topics to consider
while searching for relatives include the origins of Jewish surnames, language and
spelling variations, the accuracy and completeness of records, and the historical
context in which various records were created and used.

LIMITED ENROLLMENT -- Pre-registration recommended

Center for Jewish History Box Office
15 W. 16th Street
New York, NY 10011
917-606-8200
boxoffice@cjh.org

The Center for Jewish History Genealogy Institute collaborates with the CJH
partners--the American Jewish Historical Society, the American Sephardi
Federation, the Leo Baeck Institute, the Yeshiva University Museum, and the YIVO
Institute for Jewish Research--to provide access to family history reference
materials, answer questions about family history research, orient family history
researchers to the collections at CJH, and offer programs on family history
research.

Robert Friedman, Director
gi@cjh.org
www.cjh.org/family/


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Intro to Jewish Genealogy, Center for Jewish History, NYC #general

Robert Friedman <rfriedman@...>
 

The Center for Jewish History Genealogy Institute
Fall 2004 Workshop Schedule

[Please excuse cross-posting to multiple lists]

Introduction to Jewish Genealogy
11:00 am - 12:30 pm
October 12
November 11
December 8

A one-hour presentation covers general principles and procedures of family history
research, with ample time allowed for questions and answers. Beginning steps
include oral history, "family archives" containing treasured photographs and
documents, and selected Internet sites. Most information, however, must still be
gleaned >from source documents such as the US census, immigration and
naturalization papers, vital records, cemetery and funeral home records,
newspapers, city directories, and telephone books. Special topics to consider
while searching for relatives include the origins of Jewish surnames, language and
spelling variations, the accuracy and completeness of records, and the historical
context in which various records were created and used.

LIMITED ENROLLMENT -- Pre-registration recommended

Center for Jewish History Box Office
15 W. 16th Street
New York, NY 10011
917-606-8200
boxoffice@cjh.org

The Center for Jewish History Genealogy Institute collaborates with the CJH
partners--the American Jewish Historical Society, the American Sephardi
Federation, the Leo Baeck Institute, the Yeshiva University Museum, and the YIVO
Institute for Jewish Research--to provide access to family history reference
materials, answer questions about family history research, orient family history
researchers to the collections at CJH, and offer programs on family history
research.

Robert Friedman, Director
gi@cjh.org
www.cjh.org/family/


Leopold LEVY #france

Pierre Hahn <pierre28@...>
 

Leopold LEVY died 23 Nov 1825 in Mulhouse at the age of 4 year and 11 month
Father Pierre LEVY and Mother Madeleine BERNHEIM

information on the parents is of interest

Pierre M. Hahn, San Francisco


French SIG #France Leopold LEVY #france

Pierre Hahn <pierre28@...>
 

Leopold LEVY died 23 Nov 1825 in Mulhouse at the age of 4 year and 11 month
Father Pierre LEVY and Mother Madeleine BERNHEIM

information on the parents is of interest

Pierre M. Hahn, San Francisco


hungarian naming patterns? #hungary

tom klein <h-sig@...>
 

i am looking for material on naming patterns in "greater hungary" (enough already of poland/russia!). i am particularly interested in the period just before and after emancipation, or roughly most of the 19th century. my hope is that naming would change to reflect the wider social and political changes that were affecting the jewish community. and in order to try to find identify broader patterns, i would like to work with larger batches of data (such as the censuses or compilations of entire cemeteries) rather than individual families, if possible.
specifically, i would like to look at documents showing both the secular and hebrew names of individuals.

does anyone know where to look for this kind of data?

....... tom klein, toronto


Hungary SIG #Hungary hungarian naming patterns? #hungary

tom klein <h-sig@...>
 

i am looking for material on naming patterns in "greater hungary" (enough already of poland/russia!). i am particularly interested in the period just before and after emancipation, or roughly most of the 19th century. my hope is that naming would change to reflect the wider social and political changes that were affecting the jewish community. and in order to try to find identify broader patterns, i would like to work with larger batches of data (such as the censuses or compilations of entire cemeteries) rather than individual families, if possible.
specifically, i would like to look at documents showing both the secular and hebrew names of individuals.

does anyone know where to look for this kind of data?

....... tom klein, toronto